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DARWIN

PORT
CORPORATION
OIL
SPILL
CONTINGENCY
PLAN
Plan No Name: ________________________

Position: _______________________

Contact No: ____________________

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN
DOCUMENT CONTROL

IMPORTANT NOTE
This Oil Spill Contingency Plan outlines the steps required for the management of marine oil pollution
responses that are the responsibility of the Darwin Port Corporation.

This includes oil spills, from vessels or land-based activities that enter Port waters.

For incident responses outside of the Port, the NT (DLP Marine) OSCP should also be consulted.

This document should be read in conjunction with the Northern Territory Marine Oil Pollution Manual
(NT MOP Manual).

DOCUMENT IDENTIFICATION
Issuing Agency: Darwin Port Corporation Authorised By: Terry OConnor
Version No: 00 Document ID No: PoD OSCP
Issued to (Position): Name:

Sections of this document may have been amended. Please check the Revision Record in Appendix
F and Section footers against the Master Copy.

CONTROLLED COPY DISTRIBUTION LIST


OSCP & Name or Organisation Issue
Action Plan Location Date
0A (Master Copy/CD) DPC Harbourmaster
1 CEO Darwin Port Corporation
2 DPC Harbourmaster Darwin Port Corporation
3 Fort Hill Wharf Office Darwin Port Corporation
4 Nominated NT MPC DIPE Marine Safety Branch
5 Emergency Services Peter McAuley Centre
6 Duty Officer/Manager FRS, Illife St
7 Manager AMOSC, Geelong
8 Manager AMSA, EPG.
9 Manager (Plus Master CD Backup) Wardrop Consulting
10 Not Allocated Not Allocated
Action Plan Name or Organisation Issue
Only Location Date
11 TDZ Darwin Port Corporation September, 2002
12 Fort Hill Wharf Gatehouse Darwin Port Corporation September, 2002
13 East Arm Wharf Gatehouse Darwin Port Corporation September, 2002
14 Oil Spill Shed Darwin Port Corporation September, 2002
15 Not Allocated Not Allocated
16 Not Allocated Not Allocated
17 Not Allocated Not Allocated
18 Not Allocated Not Allocated
19 Not Allocated Not Allocated
20 Not Allocated Not Allocated

Prepared for the Darwin Port Corporation by Wardrop Consulting Pty. Ltd.
35 Benjamin Drive, Lara. Victoria. Australia 3212.
Tel: (03) 5282 3075/ 5282 4074, Mobile: 0417 536 162, E-mail: wardropcons@primus.com.au

This document has been prepared by Wardrop Consulting for the unrestricted use by the Port of
Darwin Corporation. Nominated NT, Commonwealth or other spill response agencies or personnel
may be supplied with the document for use in the event of a response in the Port of Darwin or under
the direction or control of the Port of Darwin. For most responses, agencies and personnel should be
directed to the Port of Darwin Oil Spill Contingency Plan. Copyright rests with Wardrop Consulting
and unauthorised use or copying by third parties is prohibited.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
DOCUMENT CONTROL
DISTRIBUTION LIST
TABLE OF CONTENTS i
HEALTH AND SAFETY NOTICE vi
ACTION FLOWCHART vii
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS ix

1.0 INTRODUCTION 1-1


1.1 AIM AND OBJECTIVES 1-1
1.1.1 Aim 1-1
1.1.2 Objectives 1-1
1.2 PRIORITIES 1-1
1.3 AUTHORITY 1-1
1.4 DARWIN PORT CORPORATION RESPONSIBILITIES 1-3
1.5 RESPONSIBILITY OF OTHER AGENCIES 1-3
1.6 SCOPE OF THE PLAN 1-3
1.6.1 Area Covered 1-3
1.6.2 Spill Source 1-3
1.6.3 Oil Types 1-3
1.7 INTEGRATION WITH OTHER PLANS 1-3
1.8 SPILL RISKS IN NT WATERS 1-5

2.0 RESPONSE ORGANISATION 2-1


2.1 NATIONAL PLAN ARRANGEMENTS 2-1
2.2 NT ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS 2-1
2.2.1 NT Plan 2-1
2.2.2 Nominated NT Officers 2-1
2.3 PORT OF DARWIN RESPONSE PREPAREDNESS ARRANGEMENTS 2-1
2.4 DIVISION OF RESPONSIBILITY 2-2
2.4.1 Statutory Agencies 2-2
2.4.2 Combat Agencies 2-2
2.4.3 Support Agencies 2-2
2.5 LEVELS OF RESPONSE: RESPONSE TIERS 2-2
2.6 SPILL RESPONSE ORGANISATION: THE INCIDENT
MANAGEMENT TEAM 2-3
2.6.1 IMT Functions and Roles 2-3
2.6.2 Size and Structure 2-3
2.6.3 Tier 1 Responses 2-3
2.6.4 Tier 2 and Tier 3 Responses 2-3
2.6.5 Nominated IMT 2-3
2.7 RESPONSE SUPPORT 2-5
2.7.1 The Port of Darwin Crisis Management Team 2-5
2.7.2 NT Plan Resources 2-5
2.7.3 National Plan Resources 2-5
2.7.4 Industry Support 2-5

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3.0 REPORTING AND ACTIVATION 3-1


3.1 INITIATING THE RESPONSE 3-1
3.2 REPORTING PROCEDURES 3-1
3.2.1 Receiving External Reports 3-1
3.2.2 Staff and Contractors 3-1
3.2.3 DPC Harbourmaster 3-2
3.2.4 Hazardous Substances 3.2
3.3 INITIAL ASSESSMENT: DETERMINING THE RESPONSE TIER 3-2
3.3.1 Responsibility 3-2
3.3.2 Procedure 3-2
3.4 ACTIVATION OF THE INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 3-3
3.4.1 Responsibility 3-3
3.4.2 Scale of Call-out 3-3
3.4.3 Muster Point 3-3
3.5 ESTABLISHING THE INCIDENT CONTROL CENTRE (ICC) 3-5
3.5.1 Location 3-5
3.5.2 First Person On Site 3-5
3.6 MOBILISATION OF EQUIPMENT 3-6

4.0 INCIDENT CONTROL 4-1


4.1 THE ROLE OF THE INCIDENT CONTROLLER 4-1
4.2 ESTABLISHING THE INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM 4-1
4.2.1 Responsibility 4-1
4.2.2 Registration and Induction 4-1
4.3 DEPLOYMENT 4-1
4.3.1 Advanced Operations Centres 4-1
4.3.2 Staging Areas 4-2
4.4 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT 4-2
4.4.1 Briefings 4-2
4.4.2 Ongoing Reporting 4-2
4.5 MEDIA LIAISON 4-3
4.5.1 Tier 1 Responsibility 4-3
4.5.2 Tier 2/3 Responsibility 4-3
4.5.3 Media Liaison Officer 4-3
4.6 ENVIRONMENTAL AND SCIENTIFIC SUPPORT 4-3
4.6.1 NT Environmental and Scientific Coordinator 4-3
4.7 COMMUNITY LIAISON 4-3
4.7.1 Community Liaison Officer 4-3

5.0 PLANNING 5-1


5.1 PLANNING PROCESS 5-1
5.1.1 Planning Officer 5-1
5.1.2 Information Inputs to the Planning Process 5-1
5.1.3 The Incident Planning Cycle 5-2
5.1.4 Incident Action Plan 5-2
5.1.5 Initial Planning Meeting 5-2
5.1.6 Ongoing Revision of the Incident Action Plan 5-2
5.2 PLANNING PROCEDURES 5-3
5.2.1 Briefing 5-3
5.2.2 Planning Meeting Phase I 5-3
5.2.3 Planning Meeting Phase II 5-3
5.2.4 Planning Meeting Phase III 5-4
5.2.5 Other Actions 5-4

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6.0 OPERATIONS 6-1


6.1 THE OPERATIONS FUNCTION 6-1
6.2 OPERATIONS OFFICER 6-1
6.3 PRIORITIES 6-3
6.3.1 Strategies 6-3
6.3.2 Sensitivities 6.3
6.4 AERIAL RESPONSE 6-3
6.4.1 Aerial Response Strategies 6-3
6.4.2 Constraints 6-3
6.4.3 Aerial Surveillance 6-4
6.4.4 Aerial Spraying of Dispersants 6-5
6.5 OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY 6-5
6.5.1 Responsibility 6-5
6.5.2 Health and Safety Inductions 6-6
6.5.3 Material Safety Data Sheets 6.6
6.6 WILDLIFE RESPONSE 6-6
6.6.1 Responsibility 6-5
6.6.2 Wildlife Response Unit 6-6

7.0 MARINE RESPONSE PROCEDURES 7-1


7.1 RESPONSIBILITY 7-1
7.2 RESPONSE METHODS 7-1
7.3 IMMEDIATE RESPONSE 7-1
7.4 PRIORITIES 7-1
7.5 HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES 7-3
7.5.1 Volatile Oils 7-3
7.6 CONTAINMENT AND RECOVERY 7-4
7.6.1 Component Methods 7-4
7.6.2 Constraints 7-6
7.6.3 Temporary Waste Storage 7-6
7.7 USE OF DISPERSANTS FROM VESSELS 7-6
7.7.1 Approval for Use 7-6
7.7.2 Requirements 7-6
7.7.3 Constraints 7-8
7.7.4 Health and Safety Issues 7-8
7.8 PHYSICAL BREAKUP OF SLICKS 7-8
7.8.1 Constraints 7-8
7.9 OTHER METHODS 7-9
7.9.1 In Situ Burning 7-9
7.10 SHORELINE PROTECTION 7-9

8.0 SHORELINE RESPONSE 8-1


8.1 SHORELINE RESPONSE ORGANISATION 8-1
8.2 SHORELINE RESPONSE STRATEGIES 8-1
8.3 NATURAL RECOVERY 8-3
8.4 MANUAL REMOVAL OF OIL AND OILY DEBRIS 8-3
8.5 USE OF SORBENTS TO COLLECT LIQUID OIL 8-4
8.6 MECHANICAL REMOVAL OF OIL AND OILY DEBRIS 8-4
8.7 VACUUM RECOVERY 8-5
8.8 SEDIMENT REWORKING 8-5
8.9 LOW PRESSURE WASHING/FLUSHING 8-6
8.10 HIGH PRESSURE WASHING 8-7

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8.11 USE OF CHEMICAL CLEANING AGENTS 8-7


8.12 SAND BLASTING AND STEAM CLEANING 8-8
8.13 OTHER METHODS 8-8
8.13.1 Bioremediation 8-8
8.13.2 Cutting of Oiled Vegetation 8-8
8.13.3 Burning of Oiled Vegetation and Debris 8-9
8.13.4 Trenching 8-9
8.14 On Site Waste Handling 8-9
8.14.1 On-Site Transport 8-9
8.14.2 Temporary Storage Sites 8-10
8.14.3 Containers 8-10

9.0 WASTE MANAGEMENT 9-1


9.1 RESPONSIBILITY 9-1
9.2 ON SITE (FIELD) TEMPORARY STORAGE 9-1
9.3 WASTE MANAGEMENT SITES 9-1
9.4 SEGREGATION OF WASTE 9-2
9.5 TRANSPORT 9-3
9.6 WASTE SEPARATION 9-3
9.7 DISPOSAL 9-3

10.0 LOGISTICS 10-1


10.1 RESPONSIBILITY 10-1
10.2 LOGISTICS PROCEDURES 10-1
10.2.1 Equipment 10-1
10.2.2 Personnel 10-1
10.2.3 Transport 10-2
10.2.4 Medical 10-2
10.2.5 Communications 10-2

11.0 FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 11-1


11.1 RESPONSIBILITY 11-1
11.2 FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION ORGANISATION 11-1
11.3 FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURES 11-1
11.4 INFORMATION CONTROL 11-2
11.4.1 Forms 11-2
11.4.2 Status Boards 11-2
11.4.3 Wall Maps 11-2
11.4 4 Briefings 11-2

12.2 TERMINATING THE RESPONSE 12-1


12.1 RESPONSIBILITY FOR TERMINATING THE RESPONSE 12-1
12.2 CONDITIONS FOR TERMINATION 12-1
12.2.1 Planning and Operations 12-1
12.2.2 Marine and Aviation Response 12-1
12.2.3 Shoreline Response 12-1
12.2.4 Wildlife 12-1
12.2.5 Health and Safety 12-2
12.2.6 Waste Management 12-2
12.2.7 Logistics 12-2
12.2.8 Finance and Administration 12-2

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12.3 STAND-DOWN PROCEDURES 12-2


12.3.1 Return of Equipment 12-2
12.3.2 Debrief 12-3
12.3.3 Incident Reports 12-3
12.4 COST RECOVERY 12-3

APPENDICES

APPENDIX A RESPONSE CHECKLISTS A-1


APPENDIX B RESPONSE SUPPORT DIRECTORY B-1
APPENDIX C ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION C-1
APPENDIX D DOCUMENTATION D-1
APPENDIX E OIL CHARACTER E-1
APPENDIX F MAINTAINING PREPAREDNESS F-1
APPENDIX G CONTACT DIRECTORY G-1
APPENDIX H OIL SPILL EQUIPMENT H-1

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HEALTH AND SAFETY


Think What am I doing next?
1 through the
Task
Do I know exactly what I should be doing?
Do I have the correct equipment?
Is there anyone else around?
Has someone else moved into my area of work?
Could this affect my job?
Has anything changed?
Have I deviated from the plan? If so, what do I need to consider?
Tell others, revise procedure(s).

Spot the Look close, look wide, look above, look hidden.
2 Hazard Look for hazards, Check before you touch, Falls.
Know your limits - Fatigue, thirst, strength, experience.
Check your environment; dark/light, calm/windy, humid/hot/cold.
Understand your skills - have you done the task before, do you
fully understand the sequence of events and your role in them?

Assess Probability: What is the chance of injury to yourself or others, or


3 the Risk

what is the chance of damaging property?
Consequences: What would the consequences be if:
-Injury to yourself/others
-Damage to property - vehicles, machinery

Make Once the hazards are identified do something about it.


4 the -Get the right tool, equipment or personal protective equipment.
-Tell other people what you are doing.
Changes
- -Get help.

Do the Do the Job remembering the hazards you have identified.


5 Job Be Safe.
Safely

For additional information refer to the


Darwin Port Corporation Occupational Health and Safety System document.

IMPORTANT NOTE
The Port of Darwin Emergency Management Plan should be referred to for any
spills of hazardous materials or for spills accompanied by emergencies.

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BLANK REVERSE

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LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS AND ACRONYMS


(See Module N of the NT MOP Manual for a complete glossary)
AAPMA Association of Australian Ports and Marine Authorities.
AC Aviation Coordinator.
ADIOS Automated Data Inquiry for Oil Spills. NOAA oil weathering and behaviour model.
AFAC Australian Fire Authorities Council.
AFANT Amateur Fishing Association of the Northern territory
AFMA Australian Fisheries Management Authority
AGAL Australian Government Analytical Laboratory.
AIMS Australian Institute of Marine Science
AIIMS Australian Interagency Incident Management System.
AIP Australian Institute of Petroleum.
ALOHA Areal Locations of Hazardous Atmospheres (Software Program, refer to Chemplan).
AMOSC Australian Marine Oil Spill Centre.
AMR Australian Maritime Resources
AMSA Australian Maritime Safety Authority.
AOC Advanced Operations Centre.
ATC Australian Transport Council.
AusSAR Australian Search and Rescue.
AusSAR CC Australian Search and Rescue Coordination Centre.
BC Code Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes.
CC Communications Coordinator.
CEO Chief Executive Officer
CHEMPLAN The National Marine Chemical Spill Contingency Plan.
ChemTox Chemical Toxicity Database (refer to CHEMPLAN).
CHRIS Chemical Hazard Response Information System (refer to CHEMPLAN).
CLO Community Liaison Officer
COWG Chemical Operations Working Group.
CRA Coastal Resource Atlas, see OSRA.
DBIRD (NT) Dept. Business, Industry and Resource Development.
DIPE (NT) Dept of Infrastructure, Planning and Environment.
DIPE OEH Dept of Infrastructure, Planning and Environment, Office of Environment and Heritage
DIPE Marine Dept of Infrastructure, Planning and Environment, Marine Safety Branch
DIPE PW Dept of Infrastructure, Planning and Environment, Parks and Wildlife.
DPC Darwin Port Corporation.
DPP Director of Public Prosecutions.
EA Environment Australia
E&P Exploration and Production.
EARL East Asia Response (Private) Limited (Singapore).
EEZ Exclusive Economic Zone.
EMA Emergency Management Australia. Commonwealth agency based at Mt Macedon, Victoria.
EmS Group Emergency Schedules (IMO Emergency Procedures for Ships Carrying Dangerous Goods).
EPBC Act (Comm.) Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999.
EPG Environment Protection Group (AMSA)
EPS Environment Protection Standards, (AMSA).
ERC Emergency Response Coordinator.
ESC Environmental and Scientific Coordinator.
ESLA Emergency Scale Level Assessment (Software Program, refer to CHEMPLAN).)
EWG Environment Working Group.
FPF Floating Production Facility.
FRS Fire and Rescue Services
FPSO Floating Production Storage and Offtake (facility)
FWADC Fixed Wing Aerial Dispersant Capability.
GEMCO Groote Eylandt Mining Company
HCC Hazardous Chemicals Coordinator
HFO Heavy fuel oil
H&S Health and Safety.
HSC Health and Safety Coordinator.
IAP Incident Action Plan.
IBC Intermediate Bulk Containers.
IBC Code International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk.
IC Incident Controller.
ICC Incident Control Centre.
ICS Incident Control System.
IGA Inter-Governmental Agreement (on the National Plan to Combat the Pollution of the Sea by Oil and Other
Noxious and Hazardous Substances).

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IGC Code International Gas Carrier Code.


IMDG Code International Maritime Dangerous Goods Code.
IMO International Maritime Organization.
IMT Incident Management Team.
INMARSAT International Maritime Satellite.
IPIECA International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association
ITOPF International Tanker Owners Pollution Federation
IUPAC International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry.
LGA Local Government Authority.
LO Logistics Officer.
MAC Mutual Aid Contact (AMOSPlan term).
MARPOL International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, 1973/78
MC Marine Coordinator.
MCIS Milbros Chemical Information System.
MFAG IMO Medical First Aid Guide for Use in Accidents Involving Dangerous Goods.
MLO Media Liaison Officer.
MLU Media Liaison Unit
MO Maritime Operations (AMSA).
MOSES Marine Oil Spill Equipment System.
MODU Mobile Offshore Drilling Unit.
MPC Marine Pollution Coordinator.
MSDS Material Safety Data Sheet.
MSES Maritime Safety and Environmental Strategy (AMSA).
NATPLAN National Plan.
NOAA National Oceanographic & Atmospheric Administration (USA).
NPMC National Plan Management Committee.
NPOG National Plan Operations Group.
NRT National Response Team.
NTES Northern Territory Emergency Services
NT FRS Northern Territory Fire and Rescue Services
NT SC Northern Territory Spill Commander
NT MPC Northern Territory Marine Pollution Coordinator
NT Plan The Northern Territory Marine Oil Pollution Plan.
NTSC Northern Territory Spill Commander
OCS Offshore Constitutional Settlement
OIM Offshore Installation (Rig) Manager.
OO Operations Officer.
OPRC The International Convention on Oil Pollution Preparedness, Response and Cooperation 1990.
OPRC-HNS Protocol on Preparedness, Response and Cooperation to Pollution Incidents by Hazardous and Noxious
Substances 2000.
OSC On Scene Coordinator (now Incident Controller).
OSCP Oil Spill Contingency Plan.
OSD Oil Spill Dispersant.
OSRA Oil Spill Response Atlas.
OSRC Oil Spill Response Centre (Southampton, UK).
OSRICS Oil Spill Response Incident Control System.
OSRL Oil Spill Response Limited (Southampton, UK).
OSSC Oil Spill Service Centre (= OSRC Southampton, UK).
OSTM Oil Spill Trajectory Model.
OWC Oiled Wildlife Coordinator
PACIA Plastics and Chemical Industries Association.
P & I Club Protection and Indemnity Club.
PIC Person In Charge.
PO Planning Officer
POD or PoD Port of Darwin
POLREP Pollution Report. A report, reporting a pollution incident.
PWC Parks and Wildlife Commission (NT).
RCC Rescue Coordination Centre (Canberra, Australia).
RSPCA Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals
SARO Senior Search and Rescue Officer.
SC Shoreline Coordinator.
SITREP Situation Report.
SOLAS International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea.
SSO Site Safety Officer.
UHF Ultra High Frequency.
UNCLOS United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea.
VHF Very High Frequency.
WC Wildlife Coordinator. See also Oiled Wildlife Coordinator/OWC.
WMC Waste Management Coordinator.

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1
INTRODUCTION

1.1 AIM AND OBJECTIVES

1.1.1 Aim

To minimise the effect of any marine oil pollution incident in Port of Darwin
waters, through rapid, effective and appropriate response procedures.

1.1.2 Objectives

1. To ensure that the Port of Darwin and other NT agencies respond


according to the priorities set out in Section 1.2, or according to the
response aims and priorities set by the NT SC or Incident Controller during
a response .
2. To ensure a full and effective integration and utilisation of NT and National
response efforts and resources.
3. To ensure that procedures are consistent with those set out in the NT
Marine Oil Pollution Manual (NT MOP Manual).
4. To identify protection and cleanup priorities.
5. To protect the interests of Port of Darwin, employees and local community,
through objectives 1-4.

This OSCP details the Port of Darwin response to marine oil pollution. NT
administrative procedures and preparedness guidelines are provided in the
NT MOP Manual.

1.2 PRIORITIES

The priorities of any marine oil pollution response are, in decreasing order of
importance, the protection of:

1. Human health and safety.


2. Habitat and cultural resources.
3. Rare and/or endangered flora and fauna.
4. Commercial resources.
5. Recreational and amenity areas.

1.3 AUTHORITY

This OSCP has been prepared and issued in accordance with the NT response
arrangements detailed in NT Plan (ref. NT MOP Manual).

The Darwin Port Corporation (DPC) has Statutory Agency responsibility for the
combat of spills within the Port of Darwin under the NT Darwin Port
Corporation Act, 1999.

Statutory Agency and Combat Agency responsibilities are shown in Figure 1.1.
Shoreline responsibilities are summarised in Table 1.1

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Commonwealth Waters:
SA = AMSA
CA = RP/AMSA

Offshore E&P:
SA = DOR
CA = RP

NT Waters:
SA = DLP Marine
Within Ports: M =
CA i RP/DLP Marine
SA = Port Authority
CA = Terminal Operator/RP
or Port Authority

(Note RP = Responsible Party, CA = Combat Agency, SA = Statutory Agency)

Figure 1.1 Statutory and Combat Agency Responsibilities in NT


and Adjacent Commonwealth Waters

Table 1.1 Statutory and Combat Agencies for Shorelines

Jurisdiction Source Statutory Combat Agency (1)


of Spill Agency Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3
Within Mining Any NT DOR Company or Company or offshore Combat
Leases RP (Spiller) Agency (DLP Marine) if
associated with a spill at sea.
Commonwealth Any Comm Dept. Responsible NT DLP Marine, Port or other
land administering the Party, or as in Agency at the request of the
land Tier 2/3 if Commonwealth or landowner.
Aboriginal title Any Relevant Land source is
Council unknown
Crown land Any NRETAS /other NRETAS or offshore Combat
designated Agency (DLP Marine) if
Authority associated with a spill at sea.
Leasehold land Any Leaseholder
Freehold land Any Local authority Local authority
(1) Response Tiers, or levels of response, are defined in Section 2.
(2) Land spills of noxious and hazardous substances are dealt with under the NT Fire and Rescue
Service Standard Operating Procedure No 001: HAZMAT. AMSA is the Statutory and Combat
Agency for spills of hazardous and noxious substances from vessels in Commonwealth waters.
DIPE Marine is the Statutory Agency for these spills in NT waters . The DLP Marine would call

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upon the assistance of the NTPFRS in order to fulfil the Combat


Agency role.
1.4 DARWIN PORT CORPORATION RESPONSIBILITIES

As Statutory Agency for marine oil pollution in the Port of Darwin, the DPC will:

Maintain and update this OSCP.


Maintain an adequate level of response preparedness in Port of Darwin.
Participate on the NT Marine Pollution Management Committee.
Act as Combat Agency for oil spills in Port of Darwin.
Support other Combat Agencies for spills outside of Port of Darwin.
Undertake investigations and prosecutions.
In consultation with the nominated NT MPC (DLP Marine), facilitate
activation of suitable cost recovery procedures.

1.5 RESPONSIBILITY OF OTHER AGENCIES

The roles and responsibilities of Government and Port agencies are detailed in
the NT MOP Manual (Module B) and summarised in Table 1.2.

1.6 SCOPE OF THE PLAN

1.6.1 Area Covered

The Port of Darwin OSCP applies to all oil spills that occur within the Port of
Darwin.

1.6.2 Spill Source

This OSCP covers spills that may occur from vessels operating within the Port,
shore facilities within the Port or from unknown sources. Identified potential,
spill sources, locations, sizes and oil types are noted in Table 1.3.

1.6.3 Oil Types

Strategies in this OSCP relate to the oils likely to be spilt in Port of Darwin:

Intermediate Fuel oil (IFO) Diesel. Jet fuel-A.


Heavy fuel oil (HFO). Aviation gasoline Lubricating oils.
Motor spirit. (Avgas).

The character and behaviour of these oils are included in Appendix D.

1.7 INTEGRATION WITH OTHER PLANS

The NT OSCP is consistent with:

NT Marine Oil Pollution Manual.


NT Oil Spill Contingency Plan.
NT Fire and Rescue Service Standard Operational Procedures.
Port of Milner Bay (GEMCO) OSCP.
Nhulunbuy (Alcan) Oil Spill Contingency Plan.
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Offshore exploration and production facility plans.


Bing Bong Oil Spill Contingency Plan.

National Plan to Combat Pollution of the Sea by Oil and Other Noxious and
Hazardous Substances (the National Plan or NATPLAN).
AMOSC (AMOSPlan).

Table 1.2 Summary of Spill Response Responsibilities of Other Agencies

Agency Key Responsibilities


Port Maintain and document a satisfactory level of (Tier 1) response preparedness by;
Authorities Providing and maintaining suitable spill response equipment.
and Training and equipping a suitable team of personnel to manage a Tier 1 level
Corporations response and to assist NT agencies in Tier 2/3 responses.
Undertaking regular exercises and participation in NT and National Plan
exercises.
Maintaining National Plan or other equipment on loan to the Port.
NRETAS Provision of advice for cleanup of shorelines under NTG jurisdiction.
Through the ESC, provide advice to the IC and NT MPC on natural and
socioeconomic resources.
Operate the Oil Spill Response Atlas (OSRA).
Provide advice on waste management.
Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able. Coordination and supply
personnel and other resources for the capture, cleanup and management of
oiled wildlife.
Through the ESC, provide advice to the IC and NT MPC on natural resources.
Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able.
DOR DOR, through its Petroleum Operations Section, is the Statutory Authority for
non-vessel spills resulting from offshore exploration and production activities in
NT waters and contiguous Commonwealth waters.
In the event of a Tier 2 or Tier 3 response, NT DBIRD will request the
assistance of either AMSA or DIPE Marine in fulfilling the role of Combat
Agency.
NT Assist the Incident Controller, as required.
Emergency Provide communications for remote marine oil pollution incident responses.
Services and Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able.
NT Police
Fire and Support the Combat Agency in responding to chemical spills.
Rescue During an oil spill response assist the Incident Controller by providing NT FRS
Services equipment as appropriate.
Local Cleanup oil on shorelines if impact is minor. Otherwise,
Government Provide local advice on areas threatened by pollution.
Assistance with liaison between the Incident Controller and local communities.
Provision of personnel and equipment for shoreline cleanup operations.
NT Work Safe Assist the Incident Controller in maintaining safe working conditions during the
response (ref. NTMOP Manual Module C).
Australian Provide skilled individuals from the National Response Team.
Maritime Provide advice to the Incident Controller, NT MPC and/or NT SC.
Safety Run oil spill trajectory analyses.
Authority Mobilise fixed-wing aerial dispersant spraying aircraft.
(AMSA) Mobilise equipment from interstate or overseas.
Assist in the tracking of suspect vessels.
Assist in the sampling of oils from suspect vessels.
Assist in salvage operation.
Undertake search and rescue (via AusSAR, a division of AMSA).
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AMOSC Supply equipment and operators upon request from a member company or
AMSA.

1.8 SPILL RISKS IN PORT OF DARWIN WATERS

Locations at which oil spills can be expected to occur, and oil types that could be
released at each location, are shown in Table 1.2. Table 1.2 also provides
potential spill volumes that could arise from a variety of incidents.

Table 1.3 Indicative Oil Spill Volumes for Various Spill Scenarios in Port of Darwin

Source Incident Location(s) Oil Potential


Type Volume(1)
Offshore Grounding or Darwin Diesel Fuel
Supply collision(Total loss) Harbour Cargo Diesel 500 t
Vessel Lube oil
Loading accident Diesel Small <1 t
Tug/Pilot Grounding (Total Within Port Diesel 100t (Est. total
Vessel loss) fuel held).
Collision Channel or 25 t (1 tank)
Berth
Fishing Fuel bunkering Frances Bay Diesel Small < t
Vessels accident Mooring Basin
Fishermans
Wharf
Grounding or Channel/wharf Diesel 12t (Est. total
collision(Total loss) fuel held).
Fuel Tanker Grounding Any Cargo Diesel. Up to 3,000t
Note: Tanker (Total loss) Motor spirit. (1 centre tank
size usually Avgas. +2 wing
36,000 dwt Kerosene. tanks).
Heavy fuel oil 1,000t (Total
fuel loss).
Collision Wharf Cargo Diesel. 700t
Channel Motor spirit. (1 wing tank).
Other Avgas.
Kerosene.
Heavy fuel oil 500t (1 tank).
Unloading accident Wharf Cargo Diesel. 160t Based on
Wharf pipeline Wharf Motor spirit. 15min
break Possible spill Avgas. discharge &
into storm- Kerosene. pumping rate
water drains of 650 tph.
leading to
Sandgroves
Creek and
Frances Bay.
Onshore Tank rupture Stuart Park Diesel, Motor spirit, Negligible.
Storage Avgas or Kerosene. tanks are
Tanks bunded
(1) Indicative maximum credible scenario. Actual volumes will vary according to vessel
configuration and incident character.

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(2) HFO is unlikely to be spilt in this scenario as most vessels have bottom tanks.

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RESPONSE ORGANISATION 2
2.1 NATIONAL PLAN ARRANGEMENTS

Administrative arrangements under the National Plan are detailed in the NT


Module E of the MOP Manual.

Available incident response support is detailed in Appendix B.

2.2 NT ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS

2.2.1 NT Plan

NT Plan comprises the NT Marine Oil Pollution Manual (NT MOP Manual) and
NT, Port and facility Oil Spill Contingency Plans.

The NT MOP Manual details the administrative arrangements for managing


marine oil pollution preparedness and response in NT together with guidelines
for procedures to be integrated into each OSCP.

2.2.2 Nominated NT Officers

A number of response preparedness and incident response functions have been


assigned to individuals. The people assigned to these, and their day-to day job
titles, varies and so they are referred to in NT Plan and in this OSCP, by their
marine oil pollution management titles:

NT Oil Spill Commander (NT SC).


Deputy NT SC.
Chairman, NT Committee.
NT Marine Pollution Coordinator (NT MPC).
Environmental and Scientific Coordinator (ESC).

The identities and contact details of the current position holders are provided in the front of the
Contact Directory (Appendix G).

Incident response functions are outlined below. Administrative functions are


detailed in Module B of the NT MOP Manual.

2.3 PORT OF DARWIN RESPONSE PREPAREDNESS ARRANGEMENTS

Spill response preparedness in the Port of Darwin is coordinated by the


nominated DPC Incident Controller. This is the DPC Harbourmaster.

Procedures for the maintenance of response preparedness are detailed in


Appendix F.

2.4 DIVISION OF RESPONSIBILITY

The National Plan Administrative Arrangements defines Statutory Agencies and


Combat Agencies. As used in NT Plan, these terms are defined below.

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2.4.1 Statutory Agency

The agency having the legislative responsibility for responding to marine spills in
the area in which the incident has occurred, or else for ensuring that an
appropriate response is mounted by the Responsible Party (i.e. the spiller) or
other nominated agency.

2.4.2 Combat Agency

The Combat Agency is the agency nominated to have operational control over
the spill response. NT Combat Agencies are listed in Table 2.1.

2.4.3 Support Agencies



These include any agency that provides, or may provide, essential services,
personnel or material to support a spill response. This may be through the
Combat Agency or other Support Agency. Support Agencies may be
Government or Non-Government agencies.

2.5 LEVELS OF RESPONSE: RESPONSE TIERS

Spill response is based on a number of levels, or Tiers (Table 2.1). Each Tier is
defined according to the level of resources committed, support agencies and the
agency assuming the role of Combat Agency.

Table 2.1 Description of Response Tiers(1) in Port of Darwin Waters

Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3


Level of Control
Responsible Party Active: IMT(2) Support Roles IMT(2) Support Roles
Incident Control
Port of Darwin Notified/ Standby Active: Active:
(nominated Incident or Active(4): Incident Control(3) Incident Control(3)
Controller) Incident Control
NT DLP NT MPC Notified/Active Active
Marine (Monitoring/Standb Support/ Coordination of Resources
y)
NT SC Notified Notified Active
(Support/Monitoring) (High level control)
Possible Triggers for Determining Response Tier(4)
Indicative Spill Size(4) 0 10 tonnes 10-1,000 >1,000 tonnes
tonnes
Potential for Economic Low Moderate High
or Environmental (Not Significant) (Local or Short-term (Regional or Long-
Damage or Harm Significance) term Significance)
(1) Procedures for the determination of the Tier are detailed in Section 3.3.
(2) IMT = Incident Management Team. In most cases the Responsible Party will be involved in higher
Tiered responses but will not generally be in control of the response.
(3) For spills in NT waters, the Control Agency may be NT DIPE Marine or other agency nominated
by the NT SC.
(4) Indicative only. Highly dependent on a number of considerations.

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2.6 SPILL RESPONSE ORGANISATION: THE INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM

Operational control of all oil spill responses rests with the Incident Management
Team (IMT) under the control of an Incident Controller (IC).

2.6.1 IMT Functions and Roles

IMT functions and roles are outlined in Table 2.2. These functions are allocated
to the IMT members as required.

2.6.2 Size and Structure

Responsibility for determining the size and structure of a Tier 1 IMT rests with
the nominated Incident Controller.

2.6.3 Tier 1 Response

A large response team is not required for a Tier 1 response or small Tier 2
response and some people can be allocated a number of roles.

DPC CEO NT SC

Incident Controller ESC

Media Liaison Marine Shoreline


Officer Coordinator Coordinator

Waste Logistics
Management Officer
Coordinator
Control
Support/Advice

Figure 2.1 Indicative Tier 1 Incident Management Team

Note Responsibility for determining the size and structure of the IMT rests with the
nominated Incident Controller in consultation with the NT SC or NT MPC.

2.6.4 Tier 2 and Tier 3 Responses

A large response will require a large team and each function will be assigned to
an individual or even a response Section, Unit or Team. Figure 2.2 illustrates
the distribution of functions, and the names of IMT members, for a major
response.

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NT Spill NT Counter
Commander Disaster
Committee
Upper Tier 2
& Tier 3 DPC CEO
NT Marine
Pollution Coordinator
Media Liaison
Officer
ESC

Tier 1 &
Lower Tier 2 Incident Controller Advisers

Community Liaison Officer Incident Safety Officer

Planning Operations Logistics Finance & Admin


Officer Officer Officer Officer

Response Marine Procurement Administration


Planning Coordinator Coordinator
Coordinator
Coordinator
Aviation Services Finance
Situation Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator
Coordinator
Shoreline Transport Records
Resource Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator
Coordinator
Wildlife Medical ICC
Environment Coordinator Manager Manager
Coordinator
Staging Area
H&S
Consultation Coordinator Managers
Coordinator
Waste Communications
Management Coordinator
Coordinator
Control
Support
Note (1) The Environmental and Scientific Coordinator (ESC) may be with the NT MPC or

proceed to the ICC to advise the Incident Controller.

Figure 2.2 Incident Management Team Structure for a Major Response


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2.6.5 Nominated IMT Positions

Personnel nominated against key IMT roles (Figure 2.1) are listed in the front of
the Contact Directory (Appendix G).

2.7 RESPONSE SUPPORT

2.7.1 The Port of Darwin Crisis Management Team (CMT)

For incidents that threaten the operation of the Port. The DPC Incident Controller, in consultation
with the DPC CEO, may mobilise a Crisis Management Team. The composition of this team will
reflect the nature of the incident and management strategies required.

2.7.2 NT Plan Resources

The NT MPC will coordinate provision of NT and National Plan (see below)
equipment and human resources for any response in NT waters.

2.7.3 National Plan Resources

National Plan equipment and personnel from the National Response Team
(NRT) are also available from the Australian Maritime Safety Authority. This can
be accessed through the DLP Marine (NT MPC or NT SC).

DLP Marine may request AMSA to coordinate the supply of equipment or


personnel directly with the nominated Incident Controller.

Additional support services are listed in Appendix B.

2.7.4 Industry Support

Industry assistance is available through the Australian Marine Oil Spill Centre
(AMOSC), an industry funded response facility based at North Corio Quay,
Geelong, Victoria. AMOSC resources include:

AMOSC spill response equipment.


Oil company equipment based at various locations.
Trained industry response (Core Group) personnel.

Procedures for accessing oil industry assistance for a spill response, through
AMOSC, are documented in AMOSPlan.

Resources are available directly to member Companies at the request of one of


the affected Oil Companys Authorising Officers, or to Port Authorities through
AMSA.

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Table 2.2 NT and DPC Incident Management Roles (ref. Figure 2.2)

Function Role
NT Command and NT Spill Commander Monitor the progress of all marine oil pollution response in NT w
Support (NT SC) adjacent Commonwealth waters, through the NT MPC.
Appoint the Incident Controller for responses under the jurisdiction of
Marine.
Undertake high level management of a spill response including all liai
the Office if the Chief Minister, the Minister and his/ her advisers
Management of media and public relations, i.e.,
- Overseeing media response through the Media Liaison Unit.
- Authorising press releases/media information bulletins.
- Participating in media interviews/press conferences as require
Liaising with teams managing other aspects of a major incident,
Salvage, fire and other emergency response and search and res
NT Deputy SC The Deputy NT SC will assist the NT SC as required.
NT Marine Pollution The NT MPC will provide support to the Incident Controller during an
Coordinator response. This includes:
(NT MPC) Monitor the response and coordinating the supply of any additional
equipment from within NT or from interstate as required.
Provide technical or scientific support by mobilising the ESC or o
advisers and support personnel.
Liaise with AMSA for the provision of on-site assistance.
Keep the NT SC (or Deputy NT SC) informed.
NT Environmental The ESC will:
and Scientific Provide support to the Incident Controller.
Coordinator (ESC) Coordinate and collate environmental and other scientific advice as
required.
Mobilise and manage OSRA officer for the provision of maps and info
from the OSRA database, and integration with AMSA oil spill trajecto
Media Liaison Manages media relations. Prepares press statements, organises pre
briefings and supports the IC/NT SC in dealing with media.

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Table 2.2 Continued Incident Management Roles (ref. Figure 3.2)


Function Role
Incident Control Incident Control The overall planning and control of the spill response.

Incident Safety For larger responses an Incident Safety Officer (ISO) may be appoin
oversee sites safety management.

Community Liaison The Community Liaison Officer (CLO) is responsible for liaising with
(Indigenous) indigenous communities affected by the incident and for organising a
indigenous lands and for the protection of cultural resources.

The coordination, monitoring and review of Incident Action Plans. Planning personnel will colla
Planning information and consolidate the policy, objectives, strategies and tactics developed by the Incid
Controller/IMT. Specific functions include:
Situation The collection, processing and organisation of information. E.g. oil s
trajectory modelling, weather, sea-state.
Resources Tracking of the deployment of resources.
Environment Responsible for the collection and collation of environment data/ adv
obtaining environmental data from OSRA, the ESC and local source
Consultation Consultation with the non-indigenous community and commercial op
Directs all field operations in the response.
Operations Marine Coordination and direction of all activities undertaken by waterborne
equipment.
Aviation Coordination and direction of all activities undertaken utilising aircraf
aerial dispersant spraying, aerial surveillance and transport.
Shoreline Planning and coordination of shoreline assessment and cleanup act
Wildlife Implementation of the NT Oiled Wildlife Plan, i.e. the collection, trea
rehabilitation of oiled wildlife.
Health and Safety Development and implementation of the Health & Safety Sub-Plan.
Waste Management Coordination of the containment, storage, transport and disposal of
oil and oily waste. Also instruction in on-site handling, storage and/o
separation and treatment.

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Table 2.2 Continued Incident Management Roles (ref. Figure 2.2)


Function Role
Logistics Responsible for ensuring that the IMT is provided with adequate resources to enable an effecti
response. Specific functions include:
Procurement Acquisition of personnel and equipment.
Services Acquisition of services and facilities.
Transport Provision of aviation, land and sea transport services.
Communications Preparation of Communications Sub-Plan and for ensuring the provi
communications services and support.
Medical Provision of medical services where needed.
Finance and Responsible for the provision of administrative services to the IC, Sections and Units of the IMT
Administration the management of financial (costs) information. Functions include:
Administration Administrative services to operate telephones, facsimiles, computers
(if qualified) and messenger services.
Finance Accounting and contracting services.
Records Collation and filing of records and forms including, time sheets, equi
usage records and personnel records.
ICC Management Ensures effective operation of the ICC, including management of inf
transfer of within the ICC, (Status Boards, faxes/ messages delivery
despatch), administering the meeting schedule, ICC security etc.

1.1 AIM AND OBJECTIVES

1.1.1 Aim

To minimise the effect of any marine oil pollution incident in Port of Darwin
waters, through rapid, effective and appropriate response procedures.

1.1.2 Objectives

1. To ensure that the Port of Darwin and other NT agencies respond


according to the priorities set out in Section 1.2, or according to the
response aims and priorities set by the NT SC or Incident Controller during
a response .
2. To ensure a full and effective integration and utilisation of NT and National
response efforts and resources.
3. To ensure that procedures are consistent with those set out in the NT
Marine Oil Pollution Manual (NT MOP Manual).
4. To identify protection and cleanup priorities.
5. To protect the interests of Port of Darwin, employees and local community,
through objectives 1-4.

This OSCP details the Port of Darwin response to marine oil pollution. NT
administrative procedures and preparedness guidelines are provided in the
NT MOP Manual.

1.2 PRIORITIES

The priorities of any marine oil pollution response are, in decreasing order of
importance, the protection of:
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1. Human health and safety.


2. Habitat and cultural resources.
3. Rare and/or endangered flora and fauna.
4. Commercial resources.
5. Recreational and amenity areas.

1.3 AUTHORITY

This OSCP has been prepared and issued in accordance with the NT response
arrangements detailed in NT Plan (ref. NT MOP Manual).

The Darwin Port Corporation (DPC) has Statutory Agency responsibility for the
combat of spills within the Port of Darwin under the NT Darwin Port
Corporation Act, 1999.

Statutory Agency and Combat Agency responsibilities are shown in Figure 1.1.
Shoreline responsibilities are summarised in Table 1.1

Commonwealth Waters:
SA = AMSA
CA = RP/AMSA

Offshore E&P:
SA = DOR
CA = RP

NT Waters:
SA = DLP Marine
Within Ports: M =
CA i RP/DLP Marine
SA = Port Authority
CA = Terminal Operator/RP
or Port Authority

(Note RP = Responsible Party, CA = Combat Agency, SA = Statutory Agency)

Figure 1.1 Statutory and Combat Agency Responsibilities in NT


and Adjacent Commonwealth Waters

Table 1.1 Statutory and Combat Agencies for Shorelines

Jurisdiction Source Statutory Combat Agency (1)


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of Spill Agency Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3


Within Mining Any NT DOR Company or Company or offshore Combat
Leases RP (Spiller) Agency (DLP Marine) if
associated with a spill at sea.
Commonwealth Any Comm Dept. Responsible NT DLP Marine, Port or other
land administering the Party, or as in Agency at the request of the
land Tier 2/3 if Commonwealth or landowner.
Aboriginal title Any Relevant Land source is
Council unknown
Crown land Any NRETAS /other NRETAS or offshore Combat
designated Agency (DLP Marine) if
Authority associated with a spill at sea.
Leasehold land Any Leaseholder
Freehold land Any Local authority Local authority
(1) Response Tiers, or levels of response, are defined in Section 2.
(2) Land spills of noxious and hazardous substances are dealt with under the NT Fire and Rescue
Service Standard Operating Procedure No 001: HAZMAT. AMSA is the Statutory and Combat
Agency for spills of hazardous and noxious substances from vessels in Commonwealth waters.
DIPE Marine is the Statutory Agency for these spills in NT waters . The DLP Marine would call
upon the assistance of the NTPFRS in order to fulfil the Combat
Agency role.
1.4 DARWIN PORT CORPORATION RESPONSIBILITIES

As Statutory Agency for marine oil pollution in the Port of Darwin, the DPC will:

Maintain and update this OSCP.


Maintain an adequate level of response preparedness in Port of Darwin.
Participate on the NT Marine Pollution Management Committee.
Act as Combat Agency for oil spills in Port of Darwin.
Support other Combat Agencies for spills outside of Port of Darwin.
Undertake investigations and prosecutions.
In consultation with the nominated NT MPC (DLP Marine), facilitate
activation of suitable cost recovery procedures.

1.5 RESPONSIBILITY OF OTHER AGENCIES

The roles and responsibilities of Government and Port agencies are detailed in
the NT MOP Manual (Module B) and summarised in Table 1.2.

1.6 SCOPE OF THE PLAN

1.6.1 Area Covered

The Port of Darwin OSCP applies to all oil spills that occur within the Port of
Darwin.

1.6.2 Spill Source

This OSCP covers spills that may occur from vessels operating within the Port,
shore facilities within the Port or from unknown sources. Identified potential,
spill sources, locations, sizes and oil types are noted in Table 1.3.

1.6.3 Oil Types

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Strategies in this OSCP relate to the oils likely to be spilt in Port of Darwin:

Intermediate Fuel oil (IFO) Diesel. Jet fuel-A.


Heavy fuel oil (HFO). Aviation gasoline Lubricating oils.
Motor spirit. (Avgas).

The character and behaviour of these oils are included in Appendix D.

1.7 INTEGRATION WITH OTHER PLANS

The NT OSCP is consistent with:

NT Marine Oil Pollution Manual.


NT Oil Spill Contingency Plan.
NT Fire and Rescue Service Standard Operational Procedures.
Port of Milner Bay (GEMCO) OSCP.
Nhulunbuy (Alcan) Oil Spill Contingency Plan.
Offshore exploration and production facility plans.
Bing Bong Oil Spill Contingency Plan.

National Plan to Combat Pollution of the Sea by Oil and Other Noxious and
Hazardous Substances (the National Plan or NATPLAN).
AMOSC (AMOSPlan).

Table 1.2 Summary of Spill Response Responsibilities of Other Agencies

Agency Key Responsibilities


Port Maintain and document a satisfactory level of (Tier 1) response preparedness by;
Authorities Providing and maintaining suitable spill response equipment.
and Training and equipping a suitable team of personnel to manage a Tier 1 level
Corporations response and to assist NT agencies in Tier 2/3 responses.
Undertaking regular exercises and participation in NT and National Plan
exercises.
Maintaining National Plan or other equipment on loan to the Port.
NRETAS Provision of advice for cleanup of shorelines under NTG jurisdiction.
Through the ESC, provide advice to the IC and NT MPC on natural and
socioeconomic resources.
Operate the Oil Spill Response Atlas (OSRA).
Provide advice on waste management.
Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able. Coordination and supply
personnel and other resources for the capture, cleanup and management of
oiled wildlife.
Through the ESC, provide advice to the IC and NT MPC on natural resources.
Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able.
DOR DOR, through its Petroleum Operations Section, is the Statutory Authority for
non-vessel spills resulting from offshore exploration and production activities in
NT waters and contiguous Commonwealth waters.
In the event of a Tier 2 or Tier 3 response, NT DBIRD will request the
assistance of either AMSA or DIPE Marine in fulfilling the role of Combat
Agency.
NT Assist the Incident Controller, as required.
Emergency Provide communications for remote marine oil pollution incident responses.
Services and Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able.
NT Police
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Fire and Support the Combat Agency in responding to chemical spills.


Rescue During an oil spill response assist the Incident Controller by providing NT FRS
Services equipment as appropriate.
Local Cleanup oil on shorelines if impact is minor. Otherwise,
Government Provide local advice on areas threatened by pollution.
Assistance with liaison between the Incident Controller and local communities.
Provision of personnel and equipment for shoreline cleanup operations.
NT Work Safe Assist the Incident Controller in maintaining safe working conditions during the
response (ref. NTMOP Manual Module C).
Australian Provide skilled individuals from the National Response Team.
Maritime Provide advice to the Incident Controller, NT MPC and/or NT SC.
Safety Run oil spill trajectory analyses.
Authority Mobilise fixed-wing aerial dispersant spraying aircraft.
(AMSA) Mobilise equipment from interstate or overseas.
Assist in the tracking of suspect vessels.
Assist in the sampling of oils from suspect vessels.
Assist in salvage operation.
Undertake search and rescue (via AusSAR, a division of AMSA).
AMOSC Supply equipment and operators upon request from a member company or
AMSA.

1.8 SPILL RISKS IN PORT OF DARWIN WATERS

Locations at which oil spills can be expected to occur, and oil types that could be
released at each location, are shown in Table 1.2. Table 1.2 also provides
potential spill volumes that could arise from a variety of incidents.

Table 1.3 Indicative Oil Spill Volumes for Various Spill Scenarios in Port of Darwin

Source Incident Location(s) Oil Potential


Type Volume(1)
Offshore Grounding or Darwin Diesel Fuel
Supply collision(Total loss) Harbour Cargo Diesel 500 t
Vessel Lube oil
Loading accident Diesel Small <1 t
Tug/Pilot Grounding (Total Within Port Diesel 100t (Est. total
Vessel loss) fuel held).
Collision Channel or 25 t (1 tank)
Berth
Fishing Fuel bunkering Frances Bay Diesel Small < t
Vessels accident Mooring Basin
Fishermans
Wharf
Grounding or Channel/wharf Diesel 12t (Est. total
collision(Total loss) fuel held).
Fuel Tanker Grounding Any Cargo Diesel. Up to 3,000t
Note: Tanker (Total loss) Motor spirit. (1 centre tank
size usually Avgas. +2 wing
36,000 dwt Kerosene. tanks).
Heavy fuel oil 1,000t (Total
fuel loss).

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Collision Wharf Cargo Diesel. 700t


Channel Motor spirit. (1 wing tank).
Other Avgas.
Kerosene.
Heavy fuel oil 500t (1 tank).
Unloading accident Wharf Cargo Diesel. 160t Based on
Wharf pipeline Wharf Motor spirit. 15min
break Possible spill Avgas. discharge &
into storm- Kerosene. pumping rate
water drains of 650 tph.
leading to
Sandgroves
Creek and
Frances Bay.
Onshore Tank rupture Stuart Park Diesel, Motor spirit, Negligible.
Storage Avgas or Kerosene. tanks are
Tanks bunded
(1) Indicative maximum credible scenario. Actual volumes will vary according to vessel
configuration and incident character.
(2) HFO is unlikely to be spilt in this scenario as most vessels have bottom tanks.

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REPORTING AND ACTIVATION 3


3.1 INITIATING THE RESPONSE

Reporting and response activation consists of four procedures:

Reporting of the incident (Figure 3.1 and Section 3.2).


Assessment of the situation and determination of the appropriate level of
response (Section 3.3).
Activation of the Incident Management Team (Section 3.4).
Establishment of an Incident Control Centre (Section 3.5).

3.2 REPORTING PROCEDURES

Reporting procedures are summarised in Figure 3.1.

3.2.1 Receiving External Reports

Reports of oil spills or sightings of oil on the sea may come from a variety of
sources. Personnel receiving an external report of a spill must:

Obtain as many details of the incident as possible from the caller. Use
Procedure A (Appendix A) or a POLREP (Form REP 01, Appendix D) as a
guide.
Immediately pass the report details to the C.

Figure 3.1 Reporting Sequence

3.2.2 Staff and Contractors

All Staff and Contractors must report spills, incidents that may result in a spill, or
observations of oil on the sea, to the nearest Supervisor or Person in Charge
(PIC) who will then report to the DPC Harbourmaster.

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3.2.3 DPC Harbourmaster

Obtain all information available from the observer (Procedure A in Appendix


A) and if necessary;
Inform the CEO (by telephone).
Prepare a POLREP (Appendix D) and send to:
- NT MPC.
- AMSA, EPG.

Note: AMSA should be notified (via POLREP) of any spill of oil or chemicals to
the sea regardless of the potential Tier of the response. This will ensure that
personnel and equipment are on standby should the incident escalate.

Note: Hazardous Substances: If the spilt substance is possibly hazardous, the


Port of Darwin emergency management procedures should be used.

3.2.4 Hazardous Substances

If the spilt substance is possibly hazardous, the DPC Harbourmaster will contact
the Police (if required) and the NT Fire and Rescue Services.

3.3 INITIAL ASSESSMENT: DETERMINING THE RESPONSE TIER

There are no rules for the determination of the response Tier. The fundamental
consideration is whether the Responsible Party (i.e. the spiller) or the Port of
Darwin can manage the response unaided (Tier 1), or whether additional
support and resources are needed (Tier 2 or Tier3).

3.3.1 Responsibility

The DPC Harbourmaster will determine whether Port of Darwin resources can
manage the incident (i.e. response is Tier 1).

For spills that may require a Tier 3 response, the DPC Harbourmaster will notify
the DPC CEO who will notify the NT MPC and NT SC. The NT MPC, in
consultation with the NT SC and DPC Harbourmaster, will determine whether
the spill requires a Tier 3 response.

The NT SC is responsible for initiating a response as per the NT (DIPE) OSCP.

3.3.2 Procedure

This procedure is illustrated in Figure 3.2.

Guidelines for determining the response Tier are provided in Figure 3.3.

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Figure 3.2 Procedure for Confirming the Response Tier

3.4 ACTIVATION OF THE INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM

3.4.1 Responsibility

The DPC Harbourmaster as nominated DPC Incident Controller (DPC IC) is


responsible for calling out the Port of Darwin Incident Management Team (IMT)
and resources.

If the DPC Harbourmaster is unavailable, the deputy DPC Harbourmaster will


assume the role of DPC IC.

3.4.2 Scale of Call-out

The DPC IC/DPC Harbourmaster will mobilize sufficient equipment and


personnel resources required to manage the response (ref. Section 3.3 and
Appendix D).

3.4.3 Muster Point

Port of Darwin personnel nominated to the IMT or coordination roles should


initially muster at the Fort Hill Wharf (Port Operations) Office unless directed
elsewhere by the DPC Harbourmaster or nominated DPC IC.

Personnel may be directed to proceed directly to the nominated Incident Control


Centre or to the Police, Fire and Emergency Services Emergency Centre at
Berrimah.

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Oil Type?

Non Persistent Oils (1) Persistent Oils (1)

Could Shorelines (2) Could Shorelines (2)


Be Impacted? (3) Be Impacted? (3)

No Yes No Yes

Tier 1 Contact Monitor &


Monitor NT FRS (4) Reassess
Only
Volumes
HAZMAT Spilled?
No
Response?

Yes 0-10 10-1,000 >1,000


tonnes tonnes tonnes

HAZMAT Can Combat No


Response Agency Cope?

Yes
Can Combat
Agency Cope?
No
Tier
1 Yes

Notes:
(1) Refer to NT MOP Manual Module M. Tier
Non persistent oils are volatile. 2
(2) Or other sensitive resource.
(3) Based on trajectory analysis and prediction. Tier
(4) NT Fire and Rescue Services = Statutory Agency 3
for hazardous spills.

Figure 3.3 Guidelines for Determining the Level (Tier) of Response

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3.5 ESTABLISHING THE INCIDENT CONTROL CENTRE

3.5.1 Location

For small scale or short duration responses, the DPC IC may control the
response from the DPC Harbourmasters office in the Fort Hill Wharf Office
building.

For any spill response that requires a longer term response, the DPC IC may
also use the East Arm Wharf offices or the DPC Administration Building at the
TDZ.

3.5.2 First Person On Site

The first person to arrive at the DPC ICC will commence preparing the room
(see Appendix A, Procedure B).

Other rooms may need to be set up for use in support of the DPC ICC.

3.6 MOBILISATION OF EQUIPMENT

The location of equipment in the Port of Darwin is listed in Appendix B (see


Equipment: Local).

Equipment mobilisation procedures are detailed in Section 9.3.

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INCIDENT CONTROL 4
4.1 THE ROLE OF THE INCIDENT CONTROLLER

The DPC IC is responsible for the overall management of the incident response
and control of the Incident Management Team (IMT). The functions of the DPC
IC are set out in Checklist IMT-1 (Appendix A).

4.2 ESTABLISHING THE INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM

4.2.1 Responsibility

The DPC IC is responsible for activating the initial IMT (see Section 3) and for
allocating functions to each IMT member.

After the initial assessment of the incident (Section 3.3), each Section Officer or
Coordinator must identify their own staffing needs.

Once approved by the DPC IC, each Officer/Coordinator must appoint staff. For
large-tier responses this may be done through the nominated Logistics Officer.

Staffing requirements should be reassessed by Officers/Coordinators after each


planning cycle (ref. Section 5).

Note: It is important that sufficient staff, including support staff, are allocated to
the IMT.

4.2.2 Registration and Induction

All non IMT members must be registered with the Finance and Administration
Section. All staff must be given OH&S induction (see Section 6.5).

4.3 DEPLOYMENT

Additional facilities may need to be established in the field. These may be


required for on site management (Advanced Operations Centres), the
deployment of equipment or personnel (Staging Areas) or for the provision of
services (e.g. Decontamination Centres, canteens etc.).

Note: It is essential that effective communications between the DPC ICC and
1.1.1 AOC/ Staging Areas are established and maintained (ref. Section 10).

4.3.1 Advanced Operations Centres

The need for Advanced Operations Centres (AOCs) must be identified as soon
as possible, i.e. if:

Field deployment from the DPC ICC is logistically difficult.


Space or facilities are limited at the DPC ICC.
The DPC ICC cannot provide needed security or facilities.

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4.3.2 Staging Areas

Staging Areas may be established for:

Equipment, fuel, supply, and waste depots.


Field crew muster or deployment points.
Field induction centres.
Wildlife assessment and pre-treatment.

Note: The person nominated to manage an AOC or Staging Area should be


appropriate for the function of the facility.

4.4 INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

Documentation and transmission of information relies on the use of:

Effective briefings.
Issue of bulletins and press releases. These are prepared by the Media
Liaison Officer (ref. Section 4.5).
Forms.
Status Boards.
Wall Maps.

The use of Forms, Status boards and Wall Maps is outlined in Section 11.

4.4.1 Briefings

Briefings should precede planning meetings and work periods.

Procedure D (in Appendix A) provides guidelines for briefings.

4.4.2 Ongoing Reporting

Regular Situation Reports or SITREPs (Form REP 02) should be compiled and
issued. The frequency of these will depend on incident needs but should be
issued after each Planning Meeting.

Wall Maps, like Status Boards, can display much information.

A laminated map of the response area should be displayed in the DPC ICC
during all spill responses.

The information on these must also be recorded before being updated. This can
be done using Polaroid or digital cameras to capture the data or by copying
information onto smaller photocopied maps.

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4.5 MEDIA LIAISON

4.5.1 Tier 1 Responsibility

For a Tier 1 response, all media management is the responsibility of the DPC
Incident Controller (DPC IC).

The DPC CEO must authorise all media releases unless the DPC IC has been
delegated this responsibility by the CEO (see DPC Media Policy).

4.5.2 Tier 2/3 Responsibility

For Tier 2 or Tier 3 responses, the DPC CEO must authorise all media releases.
The DPC CEO may delegate this responsibility to the DPC IC.

The NT SC may assume responsibility for NT media management. In these


cases the NT SC may appoint a Media Liaison Officer (MLO, ref NT OSCP).

4.5.3 Media Liaison Officer

The DPC IC (or NT SC) may appoint a Media Liaison Officer (MLO) to advise
the DPC IC and undertake the media liaison function.

MLO functions are provided in IMT Checklist IMT-4 (Appendix A).

The NT Media Sub-Plan is provided in Module H of the NT MOP Manual.

4.6 ENVIRONMENTAL AND SCIENTIFIC SUPPORT

4.6.1 NT Environmental and Scientific Coordinator

The Environmental and Scientific Coordinator (ESC) provides environmental


and scientific advice to the DPC IC and NT SC and will:

Liaise with the NRETAS officers regarding environmental risks, sensitivies


and natural resources (see section 5 also)
Coordinate output from the Oil Spill Response Atlas (OSRA).
Assist the Waste Management Coordinator in identifying temporary waste
storage sites and on site waste management.
Obtain scientific support and data from AMSA and other support agencies
(ref. Appendix B).

A Checklist of ESC functions is provided in Checklist IMT-2 (Appendix A).

4.7 COMMUNITY LIAISON

4.7.1 Community Liaison Officer

A Community Liaison Officer (CLO) should be appointed if a spill has the


potential to impact indigenous title areas or resources, or if these areas need to
be accessed for marine deployment or wildlife response.

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The CLO will contact the relevant Land Council or indigenous/native title holder
if:

A spill has the potential to impact indigenous lands, waters or resources.


Indigenous title lands need to be accessed for marine deployment, shoreline
cleanup or wildlife response.

CLO functions are provided in IMT Checklist IMT-3 in Appendix A.

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PLANNING 5
5.1 PLANNING PROCESS

Planning of the response is the responsibility of the DPC Incident Controller


(DPC IC) but involves all key IMT personnel and advisers.

5.1.1 Planning Officer

In large-tiered responses (upper Tier 2 and Tier 3) a Planning Officer may be


appointed to assist the DPC IC. The Planning Officers role is to:

Monitor the response.


Advise the DPC IC as to when the Incident Action Plan (IAP) requires
revision.
Coordinate and provide information inputs to the planning process, and to
Assist the DPC IC in developing the IAP.

The Planning Officers role is detailed in Checklist IMT-5 in Appendix A.

5.1.2 Information Inputs to the Planning Process

The key to effective planning is the acquisition and the application of information
(see Figure 5.1).

Planning Operations
Weather. Practical input into
Tides, currents . Strategies and Tactics
Topography & shoreline character suggested.
(from OSRA). Operations Sub-Plans.
Environmental sensitivity data Type and quantity of equipment
(OSRA, other sources). and personnel needed.
Spill trajectory modelling. Details of any restrictions or
Oil data (character, behaviour). constraints.
Community issues. H&S Sub-Plan.

Incident
Controller
Planning Meeting

Logistics Finance &


Logistical implications of Administration
Strategies/ Tactics.
Communications Sub-Plan. Cost implications of
Available and future resources. Strategies/ and Tactics.
Personnel/ services contracted Potential damages claims.
or needed. Current financial status.
Information on any legal
Transport available/ needed.
. issues.

Incident Action Plan

Figure 5.1 Inputs to the Planning Process


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5.1.3 The Incident Planning Cycle

The planning process is ongoing and involves a number of procedures:

Initial Planning (Briefing) Meeting.


Development of the Incident Action Plan.
Execution of the Plan.
Feedback to Planning Section (collection and analysis of information).
Ongoing Planning Meetings to revise and update the IAP.

5.1.4 Incident Action Plan

An Incident Action Plan (IAP) should outline the following:

Response This is a broad statement of the over-riding aim of the


Policy or Aim response, i.e. what the response is aiming to achieve. It
should also set priorities. Policy may be set by the DPC IC
or by higher management.

Objectives These are goal statements and indicate desired individual


outcomes of the response (e.g. protection of the shoreline
between points A and B).

Strategies These describe how the IMT plans to reach the stated
objectives (e.g. deployment of booms to protect points A and
B).

Methods These state how the strategies will be undertaken and may
(Tactics) be written as a series of tasks detailing the deployment of
personnel and equipment. The development of Tactics is
undertaken by the relevant Section Officer and Unit
Coordinators.

5.1.5 Initial Planning Meeting

At the Initial Planning Meeting the Incident Controller will brief key IMT Officers
(see Figure 2.1 and Figure 2.2) of the situation, if this has not already been
done (see Section 5.2).

Often, the initial information available is incomplete and some of the initial
Incident Action Plan objectives may be focussed on obtaining data. Strategies
employed may be:

Aerial surveillance (see Section 7).


Trajectory modelling (Appendix B).
Oil fates modelling (Appendix B).

5.1.6 Ongoing Revision of the Incident Action Plan

The response should be monitored and the IAP revised when objectives are met
or when changed circumstances require objectives, strategies or methods to be
revised.

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The frequency of revisions to the Incident Action Plan will be determined by the
DPC IC and will vary according to the nature of the incident and the scale of the
response.

5.2 PLANNING PROCEDURES

The checklist for the procedure for developing an Incident Action plan is
provided in Procedure C (Appendix A).

5.2.1 Briefing

Planning Meetings should be preceded by a briefing, during which the DPC IC,
or other person(s) should detail:

Current situation;
- Spill location and size.
- Combat and Support Agencies.
- Response Tier and resources mobilised.
- Current shorelines and resources impacted.
Predicted situation;
- Trajectory.
- Resources at risk/ potential effects.

5.2.2 Planning Meeting Phase I

During the first phase of a planning meeting the DPC IC will, in consultation with
key IMT personnel:

State Aim (or Policy) of the response (initial Planning Meeting only).
Develop and rank response objectives, based on protection priorities.
Develop Strategies for each Objective.
Identify and obtain permits required for strategies (e.g. dispersant use).

5.2.3 Planning Meeting Phase II

Once Strategies have been determined, Tactics (Methods) must be developed:

The DPC IC will nominate an IMT member to:


- Document Aim, Objectives and Strategies i.e. prepare a Draft
Incident Action Plan (Form IAP 01).
- Distribute Draft Incident Action Plan to Key IMT/Section Officers.
(Note; in a Tier 2/3 response this would be the Planning Officer).
The Logistics Officer will develop a Communications Sub-Plan.
The Media Liaison Officer will revise (or prepare) the Media Sub-Plan.
The H&S Coordinator will prepare an H&S Sub-Plan.
If wildlife is oiled, the nominated Wildlife Coordinator will develop a Wildlife
Sub-Plan.

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5.2.4 Planning Meeting Phase III

Once Tactics and Sub-Plans have been developed they are compiled to form
the Incident Action Plan.

Resource and logistical needs are then finalised and the IAP is implemented.
Issues that should be considered in this final phase include:

The need for Advanced Operations Centre(s).


The need for, and location of, Staging areas.
Compilation of a list of resource needs, i.e. communications, equipment and
personnel.

5.2.5 Other Actions

Following each Planning Meeting a designated IMT member will:

Prepare Resource Requisition Forms.


Prepare a SITREP (Form REP 02) for distribution (Appendix D).

These and other forms are provided in the Module C of the NT MOP Manual.

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OPERATIONS 6
6.1 THE OPERATIONS FUNCTION

The Operations function encompasses all field operations in the response


(see Section 2, Figure 2.3 and Table 2.2).

In most responses an Operations Officer will be appointed (see Figure 2.1).

In larger responses an Operations Section would be formed. A large Tier 2 or


Tier 3 structure of this Section is shown in Figure 2.2 and encompasses:

Marine response (Section 7).


Shoreline response (Section 8).
Aerial response (Section 6.4).
Health and Safety (Section 6.5).
Wildlife (Section 6.6).
Waste Management (Section 9).

As indicated above, marine response, shoreline response and waste


management are dealt with in the following Sections.

In a small response, aerial response and health and safety are likely to be
coordinated by the Operations Officer and are covered in Section 6.4 and 6.5.

Wildlife response is coordinated by NRETAS).

6.2 OPERATIONS OFFICER

The role of the Operations Officer is outlined in Checklist IMT-6 (Appendix A).

Additional procedures which need to be implemented by the Operations


Officer include:

Documentation/Information management
(Appendix D of this OSCP and Module C of the NT MOP Manual).
Determination of operational priorities:
- Development of primary and back-up strategies for IAP objectives
(see Section 6.3 and Figure 6.1).
- Allocation of resources to the various Units.
Implementation of induction procedures and on-site training
(see Section 6.5.2).
Ensuring effective field site control (Procedure-D in Appendix A).
Provision of adequate levels of supervision.
Participation in the planning process (see Section 5).
Monitoring safety, i.e:
- Ensuring that adequate communications are provided.
- Ensuring that personnel are adequately trained and inducted.

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SPILL

Incident Assessment

Oil will not impact Oil will impact


shoreline or important shoreline or
resource important resource

Is Containment and
No Recovery possible?
Monitor
Yes

Can oil be Contain and


No Recover
dispersed?

Yes
Permission Is operation
No given to use successful?
dispersants ? No
Yes Yes
Can shorelines or
No resources be Apply Continue
protected? Dispersants

Yes

Can shorelines Protect Is operation


be cleaned? Shoreline No successful?

Yes

Shoreline Is protection Continue


Cleanup successful?
No
Yes
Is cleanup
successful? Continue
No
Yes
Cleanup
Continue Achieved

Figure 6.1 Generic Guidelines for Determining Response


Strategies

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6.3 PRIORITIES

6.3.1 Strategies

The main response strategies are indicated in Figure 6.1 and are, in order of
preference:

Natural dissipation of the slick at sea.


Marine response:
- Containment and recovery.

- Use of dispersants.
Shoreline protection.
Shoreline Cleanup.
Natural weathering of oil and recovery of impacted shorelines.

6.3.2 Sensitivities

A number of areas have been identified as being of particular importance, and


these are shown in the Maps and Tables provided in Appendix C.

Generally, these areas should receive a high priority for protection. They
should receive a high priority for cleanup provided that:

Cleanup will result in reduced damages.


Cleanup is logistically feasible and
Cleanup efforts are likely to be effective.

6.4 AERIAL RESPONSE

In a Tier 1 response, the Operations officer will be responsible for


coordinating aerial surveillance operations under the direction of the DPC IC.

For larger-scale responses the Incident Controller may appoint an Aviation


Coordinator to coordinate aerial response activities.

6.4.1 Aerial Response Strategies

Aerial response methods encompass:

Aerial surveillance.
Aerial spotting for marine response operations.
Aerial spraying of dispersants.

6.4.2 Constraints

The main constraints for these are listed in Table 6.1.

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Table 6.1 Operational Constraints for Aerial Response Strategies

Constraint
Response Sea Current Wind Oil Viscosity Other
Option State(1) (Knots) (Knots)
(1)
Aerial - - - Visibility
Surveillance
Use of Aerial 5 - 27.0 <2000cSt(2) Range
Dispersants
(1) Dependent on aircraft type.
(2) Oils with hypothetical viscosities higher than this may be amenable to dispersants at higher
application rates, sea temperatures or elevated mixing energies. A test application may be run
to determine amenability.

6.4.3 Aerial Surveillance

For all surveillance tasks:

Aircraft should have good downward visibility (e.g. fixed wing aircraft with
an over-fuselage wing, or helicopters).
Pilots or observers should be provided with information on the likely
location of the slick (e.g. OSTM output).
If acting in support of marine response, aircraft should be equipped with
radios that allow direct communications with vessels (or spray aircraft).

If searching for an oil slick, aircraft should undertake a ladder search of the
area in which the slick is considered to be located (Figure 6.2).

Once located, the oil slick should be described according to (see Figure 6.3):

Length (m or km)
Width (m or km).
Percentage coverage of the sea surface(within the slick area).
Colour (estimate of thickness).

Wind

Aircraft Flight Width


Length
Path

% Cover is
about 60%
Slick
Envelope

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Figure 6.2 Ladder Search


Pattern Figure 6.3 Parameters for Describing Oil at
Sea

Table 6.2 provides guidelines for estimating the thickness of black oils from
colour.

Note: Table 6.2 should not be used for spills of diesel, avgas, motor spirit or
other white oils.

Table 6.2 Guidelines for the Description of Oil Colour and Thickness

Description Thickness Volume


(mm) (m3/sq km)
Barely visible sheen under optimum conditions 0.00005 0.05
Silvery sheen on calm water 0.0001 0.1
Bright bands of rainbow colour 0.0003 0.3
Dull colours seen on calm water 0.001 1.0
Yellowish brown slick barely discernible from aircraft 0.01 10
Light brown or black slick easily seen from aircraft 0.1 100
Thick dark brown or black slick as seen from aircraft 1.0 1,000
Near the source of a large spill 10 10,000

6.4.4 Aerial Spraying of Dispersants

Aerial spraying equipment is available for larger-scale responses. Available resources include:

Fixed Wing Aircraft from the National Plan contractors


(ref. Appendix B, Dispersant: Aerial spraying).
Helicopter spray bucket, available via the NT MPC or NT SC
(Appendix B).

6.5 HEALTH AND SAFETY

6.5.1 Responsibility

The Incident Controller is responsible for ensuring that response activities are
carried out safely.

The DPC IC may appoint an H&S Coordinator to manage Health and Safety.

The H&S Coordinator will generally report to the Operations Officer.

An outline of an H&S Sub-Plan, including inductions, is provided in the NT MOP


Manual, Module I.

In the event of a large spill the DPC IC may appoint an Incident Safety Officer to
oversee the implementation of the H&S Sub-Plan.

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6.5.2 Health and Safety Inductions

All IMT personnel and site visitors must be inducted in on-site safety procedures.
This should be done by the H&S Coordinator.

An outline of an H&S Sub-Plan, including induction procedures, is provided in


the NT MOP Manual, Module I.

6.5.3 Material Safety Data Sheets

All personnel handling chemical products should be issued with the relevant
Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS). The H&S Coordinator, or other delegated
person must ensure that this is done and that personnel understand the correct
materials handling procedures and personnel protective equipment needed.

MSDS for chemical dispersants can be found in Module J of the NT MOP


Manual.

6.6 WILDLIFE RESPONSE

6.6.1 Responsibility

Managing the cleanup, care and rehabilitation of oiled wildlife is the responsibility

of NRETAS.

The DPC IC, or nominated officer, should contact the DIPE PW Oiled Wildlife

Coordinator (OWC) in the event that oiled wildlife is observed or considered

likely.

6.6.2 Wildlife Response Unit

Wildlife response requires a high level of training.

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A Wildlife Unit may be established to undertake this function.

Note: Wildlife response requires a high level of training and must be directed and

supervised by NRETAS officers.

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MARINE RESPONSE 7
7.1 RESPONSIBILITY

In a Tier 1 response, marine response strategies will be coordinated by the DPC


IC or nominated Operations Officer.

In a Tier 2/3 response a Marine Coordinator is appointed to implement the


marine response strategies and methods as directed by the Operations Officer
(OO) and/or DPC Incident Controller (DPC IC).

7.2 RESPONSE METHODS

A number of marine response methods are available:

Containment and recovery (Section 7.6).


Application of dispersants from vessels (Section 7.7).
Physical breakup of the slick (Section 7.8).
Monitoring only, i.e. relying on natural weathering processes (Section 7.9).
Shoreline protection (Section 7.10).

The effectiveness of these marine response methods can be limited by oil type
and weathering (Table 7.1), weather and sea state, or logistics
(Tables 7.3 to Table 7.6).

Note: The Tables provide in this Section are guidelines only. Each spill should
be assessed and the effectiveness of methods and equipment should be
monitored throughout the response.

7.3 IMMEDIATE RESPONSE

A rapid response can restrict the spread of oil and facilitate recovery of oil and
protection of the environment. In the event of an Oil or Noxious Substance spill
the incident should be immediately reported to the DPC Control Tower.

Immediate response actions should be initiated by the Responsible Party and


reported to the NT MPC via a POLREP.

7.4 PRIORITIES

General response priorities for the various oils are provided in Table 7.2.

All incidents should be assessed, and response priorities reassigned, during the
response planning process (ref. Section 6).

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Table 7.1 Marine Response Matrix Showing Predicted Influence of


Weathering on Suitability of Methods

OPTION INSHORE NEARSHORE OPEN SEA


OIL GROUP (1) I II III IV I II III IV I II III IV
DAY ONE
Containment & Recovery R R R R R R C C C
(a) Weir Skimmers F R R R R R R C C C
(b) Oleophilic Skimmers R R R R R R C C C
(c) Vacuum Skimmers R R R R R R
(d) Sorbent Recovery F R R R R R R
Dispersant Application C C C C C C C C C
Physical Break-up R F R F R F
Natural Processes R R R R F R R F
DAYS TWO AND THREE
Containment &Recovery C R R R F R R R C C C
(a) Weir Skimmers F R R R R R R C C C
(b) Oleophilic Skimmers R R R R R R C C C
(c) Vacuum Skimmers F R R R R R R
(d) Sorbent Recovery F R R R R R F
Dispersant Application C C C C C
Physical Break-up R F R F F F
Natural Processes R R R R F R R F
DAY FOUR
Containment & Recovery C R R R F R R R F C C C
(a) Weir Skimmers F R R R R R R C C C
(b) Oleophilic Skimmers R R R R R R C C C
(c) Vacuum Skimmers F R R R R R R
(d) Sorbent Recovery F R R R R F F
Dispersant Application
Physical Break-up
Natural processes R R R R F R R F
Key and footnote:
R Recommended - preferred option
F Feasible, but not preferred option
C Conditional. Possibly useful but may have adverse effects or logistic problems.
Not recommended - either not feasible or has significant adverse effects

(1) Group I (Density, <0.8). Non-persistent oils. Low viscosity and rapidly spreading, with
a high evaporation rate. Do not form emulsions. May pose a fire and explosion
hazard. Examples: Condensates, motor spirit, aviation gasoline (avgas).
Group II (Density, 0.8 - 0.85). Generally rapidly spreading and a moderate to high
evaporation rate. Low-moderate tendency to form emulsions. Generally low,
but variable, viscosity. Examples: Most diesels, light crudes, some kerosenes.
Group III (Density, 0.85 - 0.95). Moderate spreading rate and evaporation rate. Tend to
form emulsions. Viscosity is variable but may be high. Examples: Medium
crude oils, heating oils, most lubricating oils.
Group IV (Density, 0.95 - 1.0). Highly viscous, slow spreading oils with low evaporation.
High tendency to form emulsions. Example Heavy fuel oils, heavy crudes.

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Table 7.2 Response Priorities for Various Oil Types

Product 1) Priority Method Rationale


Group I and 1 Monitor/natural weathering. Oils dissipate rapidly.
Group II 2 Protection of sensitive Oils can cause environmental
Very Light- shorelines/resources at risk. damage.
Light Oils Do Use of dispersants. Potential environmental effects.
Not Containment and recovery. Not safe.
Use Physical break up of slick. Not safe.
Group III 1 Containment and recovery. Has little potential to cause harm.
Medium Oils 2 Use of dispersants. Rapid response and higher
encounter rate than other methods.
Can prevent emulsification.
3 Monitor/natural weathering. Suitable for small or remote spills.
4 Protection of sensitive Oils can cause environmental
shorelines/resources at risk. damage.
5 Physical break up of slick: For small spills close to shore only.
Diesel Monitor closely (see below).
Do Not Physical break up of slick.: Oils tend to emulsify if mixing energy
Use Other oils is applied
Group IV 1 Containment and recovery. See above.
Heavy Oil 2 Shoreline protection See above.
3 Use of dispersants. May be applicable. Monitor closely.
4 Protection of sensitive Oils can cause environmental
shorelines/resources at risk. damage.
5 Monitor/natural weathering. Small isolated spills only.
Do Not Physical break up of slick. Heavy oils may emulsify with high
Use energy agitation.
(1) See Footnote (1) in Table 7.1.

7.5 HEALTH AND SAFETY ISSUES

7.5.1 Volatile Oils

Spills of volatile (Group I) oils, such as motor spirit (petrol), must be handled with
care.

Personnel should not attempt to contain or recover such oils unless the site has
been declared safe by the Supervisor in charge, or by the Marine
Superintendent.

Generally, the strategy to be adopted is to protect sensitive shorelines and other


resources well in advance of the advancing oil, and to allow the oil to evaporate
at sea.

Before deploying personnel or equipment close to these spills, the atmosphere


should be tested by qualified person using a combustible gas-oxygen analyser.
These are available from the NT FRS (Fire Station).

Note: Only trained personnel should operate combustible gas-oxygen


analysers.

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Table 7.3 Beaufort Scale

Beaufort Wind Speed(1) Description Wave Height(2)


Scale Mean Range Wind Sea Mean Max.
0 0 <1 Calm Flat. - -
1 2 1-3 Light air Ripples. 0.1 0.1
2 5 4-6 Light breeze Small wavelets. No breakers. 0.2 0.3
3 9 7-10 Gentle breeze Large wavelets. Some 0.6 1.0
breaking crests & scattered
white horses.
4 13 11-16 Moderate Small waves. Fairly frequent 1.0 1.5
breeze white horses.
5 19 17-21 Fresh breeze Moderate waves. Many white 2.0 2.5
horses. Occasional spray.
6 24 22-27 Strong breeze Large waves. Extensive white 3.0 4.0
foam crests. Some spray.
7 30 28-33 Near gale Sea rises. White foam from 4.0 5.5
breaking waves in streaks.
8 37 34-40 Gale Moderate, long waves. White 5.5 7.5
foam blown in long streaks.
9 44 41-47 Strong gale High waves. Dense streaks 7.0 10.0
of foam. Wave crests begin
to topple.
10 52 48-55 Storm Very high waves. Long 9.0 12.5
hanging crests. Foam in large
patches. Sea surface largely
white.
11 60 56-63 Violent storm Extreme waves (small- - -
medium ships lost to view).
Foam covered sea surface.
Reduced visibility.
12 - >64 Hurricane Air filled with foam and spray. >14 -
Driving spray. Very reduced
visibility.
(1) In knots (~0.5m/second or 1.8 km/hr).
(2) In metres.

7.6 CONTAINMENT AND RECOVERY

7.6.1 Component Methods

In assigning equipment it is essential that a balance is achieved between:

Targeting of the oil (aerial support).


Containment (boom deployment).
Recovery (skimmers).
Temporary waste storage (dracones, barges etc.).
Waste transport and onshore waste receiving capacity.

Procedures for deciding on the most suitable method are illustrated in


Figure 7.1

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN SECTION 7

Information
from Planning
& Surveillance
Yes
Ideal Conditions: Is No
- Wind < 14-22 knots Containment
- Sea State < 3-4 Possible ?
- Currents < 1 knot
Yes
Ideal Conditions*:
- Wind < 7-22 knots Is Recovery No
- Sea State < 1-4 Possible ?
- Currents < 1 knot
*Highly dependent on Yes
skimmer type.
Are Vessels No
and Equipment
Available ?

Yes
External Resources:
- Industry via AMOSPlan
- State via Logistics Mobilise
- National Plan and Resources
interstate via AMSA

Apply Tactics

Deploy Marine Deploy Vessels Deploy Aerial


Waste Storage/ Booms & Support
Transport Units Skimmers

Arrange Arrange Onshore


Onshore Waste Support
Storage

Continue Yes
Are Strategies No Consider Other
Effective ? Strategies

Figure 7.1 Marine Containment and Recovery Strategy Guide

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7.6.2 Constraints

Indicative operational constraints are shown in Table 7.4.

Table 7.4 Operational Constraints for Containment and Recovery

Constraint
Response Option Sea Current Wind Viscosity Other
State(1) (Knots)(2) (Knots) of Oil(3)
Boom Containment 3-4 1.0 16-22 - Vessel
Deflection 3-4 2.0 16-22 - Availability.
Recovery Weir 1 1.0 7 <1000 Availability
(Skimmers) Disc 2-3 1.0 11-16 <1000 of storage
Mop/Belt 3-4 1.0 16-22 >1000 for oil
Vacuum 1 1.0 7 -
Temporary See Appendix - - - - Capacity &
Storage(4) B transport
time
(1) Refer to Table 7.3.
(2) 1 Knot = 0.5m/second or 1.8 km per hour approximately.
(3) cSt = centistokes.

Caution: Fresh, volatile oils should not be contained due to their low flash point.
No attempt should be made to recover these oils until the safety of the area has
been established (see Section 7.5).

7.6.3 Temporary Waste Storage

Marine storage containers are listed in Appendix B. It is important that the time
taken to fill, transport, empty and re-deploy these is calculated throughout the
response.

7.7 USE OF DISPERSANTS FROM VESSELS

7.7.1 Approval for use

Dispersants may only be applied after approval has been given by the Incident
Controller. Permission will be based on the Guidelines for the Use of
Dispersants (Figure 7.2 and Module L of the NT MOP Manual).

Note: Dispersants may be used immediately to reduce a fire/explosion risk posed


by spilt oil.

7.7.2 Requirements

Vessels equipped with appropriate spray booms.


Spotter aircraft, to direct the vessel towards the most concentrated oil and to
report on effectiveness.
Effective communications between vessels and spotter aircraft.

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Consider alternate marine No 1. Have alternatives


response methods: been considered ?
-Containment & Recovery
-Monitor/ Natural dispersion Yes
-Inshore Shoreline
Protection
2. Is oil heading towards
No a sensitive area?

Yes
Monitor & Review

3. Do weather/sea/tide
No conditions allow the
use of dispersants?
Yes

No 4. Is the oil dispersible ?

Yes

5. Is the effect of the


dispersed oil likely to
No be less than the effect
of untreated oil?

Yes

6. Have necessary
No approvals been given ?

Yes

Apply dispersant

No 7. Is dispersant effective ?

Yes

Consider shoreline 8. Has effective dispersion No


response methods: been achieved ?

-Shoreline Protection Yes


-Shoreline Cleanup
-Monitor/Natural Recovery
Job done

Figure 7.2 Guidelines for the Use of Dispersants

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7.7.3 Constraints

Vessels spraying dispersants are generally restricted to:

Sea states of less than 4 (Table 7.1).


Winds of less than 22 knots (Table 7.1).
Non- viscous oils (<2,000 cSt.).
Persistent (non Group I) oils.

Table 7.5 Available Dispersants and Methods of Application at Sea

Type Product Application


Type I BP-AB Neat from vessels only at a Warren-Springs
Hydrocarbon based dose of 1(disp.):5(oil). system
Type III Ardrox 6120 Neat from aircraft or Used neat from
Concentrates Corexit 9527 vessels at 1:30. May be Vikospray or
Corexit 9550 diluted or educted for use similar. Can be
Corexit 9500 from vessels/ fire monitors. diluted for use in
Dasic Slickgone NS If used diluted dose rate is Warren Springs
Slickgone LTSW increased. system.
Shell VDC
Shell VDC Plus
Tergo R-40

7.7.4 Health and Safety Issues

Due consideration should be given to safety at all times when handling dispersants.
Personnel must be familiar with instructions on the safe use of dispersants and be
given the relevant Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS, ref. NT MOP Manual
Module J).

Caution: Vessel Masters must ensure that crews are not exposed to dispersants
sprayed from the vessel or from aircraft.

Caution: Dispersants should not be used to wash skin or clothing.

7.8 PHYSICAL BREAKUP OF SLICKS

Thin films of oil can be physically dispersed by agitating the sea surface using
support vessels' propeller wash.

7.8.1 Constraints

The use of this method is constrained by:

The size of the slick. It is not feasible to treat large spills.


Oil volatility (flash point) and consequent personnel and vessel safety. Light,
volatile (Group I) oils will dissipate quickly and should not need to be treated
in this way. They may also pose an explosion/fire hazard
The potential for some oils to emulsify. Heavy fuel oils and lubricating oils may
emulsify if subject to prop-wash.

This method is seldom required or applicable.

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7.9 OTHER METHODS

7.9.1 In Situ Burning

In situ burning is the process of controlled burning of contained oil at sea. This
method has not been generally accepted as a method in Australia. Burning may
be considered when oil can be contained but recovery, transport or disposal is
not possible.

Constraints to this method are:

Oil needs to be contained (e.g. by booms).


The oil slick must be thick (i.e. at least 2-3mm thick).
Oil should be unweathered. Weathered, emulsified or heavy oils need to be
ignited at higher temperatures and will need accelerants.
Fire-proof booms are not currently held in Australia.
Burnt residues must be recovered and disposed of. These are difficult to
handle and may pose a health risk to personnel.
Smoke produced is undesirable in populated areas.

7.10 SHORELINE PROTECTION

Inshore or onshore protection methods should be initiated if:

Persistent oil is moving towards the shore, and


Marine strategies cannot prevent this.
The shoreline, or associated fauna, flora or heritage resources, will be
harmed by the oil.
Cleanup is not possible, or
Cleanup will not prevent or reduce damage to an acceptable level.

Methods include:

Diversion booming to either deflect oil from a protected shoreline or to


collect oil onto a low sensitivity shore.
Exclusion booming to prevent oil entering areas.
Shoreline barriers such as:
Sand bag, sand or earth dams.
Sand or earth barriers along the shore.
Use of sorbents to protect beach surface or associated fauna.

Other methods such as chemical treatment or pre-application of dispersants are


not recommended.

General guidelines for shoreline protection methods are provided in Table 7.6.

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Table 7.6 Guidelines for Shoreline Protection(1)

Shoreline/Resource Energy(2) Method Constraint/Comment


Cliffs Medium- No inshore High energies make protective
High protection methods methods unlikely to succeed. Wave
Boulder Medium- likely to be action will overcome any barriers/
beaches/reefs High effective. booms.
Cobble beaches Medium-
High
Pebble beaches Medium-
High
Sand beaches High
Medium Deflection booming If oil movement is along the
Low shoreline. Oil can be deflected from
sensitive parts of the beach
Exclusion booming Either inshore (light boom or sorbent
boom) or onshore
(e.g. beach/shore guardian boom).
Sand barriers Push sand down beach to form a
barrier to incoming oil (very low
energy beaches only)
Loose Sorbents May be used to stabilise oil coming
ashore (or on shore) and prevent
oiling of wildlife.
Mud or sandflats (inc. Low Deflection booming Deflect oil from flats. Often limited
intertidal seagrass application due to expanse of area.
flats) Exclusion booming Using either beach/shore guardian
of small areas boom or sorbent boom or snares.
Inlets and tidal creeks Medium Deflection boom Deflect oil to shore.
Low Deploy barrier boom within creek at
point where flow<0.75knots.
Earth barrier/dam Push earth over inlet mouth. Cover
or sandbag dams in plastic and hold in place with
sandbags to avoid dam being
washed away
Mangroves Low Deflection booming If oil movement is along mangrove
fringe.
Exclusion booming Light/sorbent boom or snare booms
across inlets or in front of small
sheltered areas.
Saltmarsh Low Exclusion booming Block inlets
Earth/sandbag Across inlets only if booms are not
dams available. Be careful of potential
damage to vegetation.
(1) Shoreline sensitivities and priorities should be assessed during the planning phase
of the response.
(2) Energies may vary.

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Table 7.7 Protection Priorities and Location Specific Methods

Location Protection Protection Considerations Appendix C


Priority (1) Methods Map Ref(2)
Doctors Gully Aquatic Life 1 Deflection boom. Sea, Road access. C1:11
Reserve
East Point Aquatic Reserve 1 Deflection boom. Sea, Road access. C1: 11, q
Channel Is corals (S and 1 Deflection boom. Sea, Road access. C1: 7
SW)
Channel Is and East Point 1 Deflection boom. Dry weather road access. C1: 7
mangroves 4WD access in wet.
Sandy Creek/ Casuarina 1 Exclusion boom across creek mouth, or Sea, road and beach C1: 14
Beach Construct earth barriers across mouth or upper access.
reaches.
Ludmilla Creek 1 Exclusion boom at mouth or Sea access. Road access C1: 14
Deflection boom to mouth of creek and to
Rapid Creek 1 Exclusion boom across creek mouth, or various points along upper C1: 14
Construct earth barriers across mouth or upper margins of mangroves.
reaches.
Buffalo Creek 1 Exclusion boom across creek mouth, or Road access to creek C1: 14, n
Construct earth barriers across mouth or upper mouth.
reaches. Access to upper reaches
needs Defence Dept
approval.
Sadgoves Creek 1 Exclusion boom across creek mouth, or upper Sea access. C1: 14
reaches. Road access to parts of the
SW shoreline.
4WD access to upper
reaches in dry weather.
South Shell Is, Catalina 1 Deflection boom from rocky shores Sea access. C1: 10
Islands and Old Man Rock Road access to nearby East
Arm boat ramp.

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Table 7.7 Continued Protection Priorities and Location Specific Methods

Location Protection Protection


Priority (1) Methods
Weed Reef 2 Deflection booms if oil will impact at low tide. Sea
Creek C off SW Middle Arm 2 Exclusion boom across mouth or Sea
Collection boom to divert oil to sandy shore at mouth.
Creek H off SW Middle Arm 2 Exclusion boom across mouth. Sea
Mickett Creek 2 Exclusion boom across mouth. Sea
Middle Arm/ East Arm/ 2 Notify owners/operators. Sea
Elizabeth River pearl oyster Avoid use of vessels in vicinity if oil is present.
farms DO NOT USE DISPERSANTS CLOSE TO THESE
AREAS.
Protect above surface structures with sorbent mats.
Frances Bay Mooring Basin 3 Close sea-lock doors. Sea
Protect sea lock with sorbent mats or boom. Road
Water intakes at Ludmilla 3 Contact owner. Request operator to stop intake Sea
Creek (Lake Alexander) pumps if water is drawn at shallow depths (<5m). Road
Water intakes at Vesteys 3 If pumps are active, avoid use of vessels in vicinity if Sea
Beach (Vesteys Lake) oil is present. Road
Water intakes at old Stokes 3 DO NOT USE DISPERSANTS CLOSE TO THESE Sea
Hill Power Station AREAS. Road
(aquaculture).
Water intakes at East Arm 3 Sea
(aquaculture). Road
Water intakes at Middle Arm 3 Sea
(aquaculture). Road
(1) Priorities: 1 = Highest. Note priorities are guidelines and should be used only to allocate
resources if multiple sites are threatened. Some locations can be
adequately protected without deployment of large amounts of equipment. The Incident
Controller may re-rank priorities according incident-specific
considerations.
(2) Map references. See Map C.1 in Appendix C.

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SHORELINE RESPONSE 8
8.1 SHORELINE RESPONSE ORGANISATION

The Shoreline Unit undertakes shoreline assessment and cleanup strategies and
is under the direction of a nominated Shoreline Coordinator.

An indicative Shoreline Unit organisation is shown below (Figure 8.1).

Shoreline
Coordinator

Administrative
Support

Shoreline Assessment Shoreline Cleanup


Supervisor Supervisor

Shoreline Assessment Shoreline Cleanup


A
Team t
Leaders Team Leaders

Figure 8.1 Indicative Shoreline Unit Organisation

8.2 SHORELINE RESPONSE STRATEGIES

A number of shoreline response strategies are shown in Table 8.1, but


shorelines should be assessed to see whether these are suitable. This will
depend on:

Rate and likelihood of natural cleaning.


Access for personnel and machinery.
Nature and distribution of the oil.
Shoreline character.
Availability of personnel and machinery.
Safety issues.
Environmental sensitivity to oil and cleanup methods.

The application of these methods in the Port of Darwin is outlined in Sections 8.3
to 8.12.

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Table 8.1 Application of Shoreline Cleanup Methods to Various Shoreline Types

Cleanup Method
Key:

Natural Recovery

and Debris
Manual Removal of Oil

Use of Sorbents

Mechanical Removal

Vacuum Recovery

Sediment Reworking

Washing/Flushing
Low Pressure

Washing
High Pressure

Use of Chemicals

Cleaning
Sand Blasting/ Steam

Bioremediation
A = Approval may be required
R = Recommended/Preferred option
C = Conditional. May be applicable
=Not recommended

Shoreline Type
Substrate Form/ Exposure
Bedrock Cliff (exposed) R C
Cliff (sheltered) R C C C R R C, A C
Platform (exposed) R C C C C C C, A C
Platform (sheltered/broken) R R C R R R C, A C
Artificial Seawalls/ Jetties C C C C C C, A C
Rip-rap (boulder sea wall) C C C C C C C, A
Boulder Beach (exposed) R R C C C R C, A C
Beach (sheltered) C R C C C R C, A C
Cobble Beach R R C C C R C C C, A C
Pebble Beach R R R C C R C C C, A C
Gravel/grit Beach R R R C C C C C, A C
Course sand Beach C R R R R C C
Fine sand Beach C R R R R C C
Mud/ Silt Intertidal Flats C C C C C C
Mangroves/ Saltmarsh R C C C C C
Coral Reef R C C

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8.3 NATURAL RECOVERY

Oiled shorelines may be left to naturally recover if:

They cannot be cleaned due to lack of access or other factors.


Cleaning will not result in any net environmental benefit.
Weathering or natural removal of the oil is expected to be rapid.
Recovery of natural resources is likely to be rapid.

Table 8.2 Use of Natural Recovery Method

Shoreline Type Can be used on any shoreline subject to the following


constraints.
Constraints Not suitable for public beaches or shorelines used by sensitive
fauna (e.g. birds).
Consent of landowners is required.
Application Monitoring may be required for persistent
(non-Group I) oils.
Safety warnings/sign-posts should be used.
Resource Personnel and transport for erection of signposts.
Requirements

8.4 MANUAL REMOVAL OF OIL AND OILY DEBRIS

Removal of oil and oily debris using manual labour is an efficient but slow
method, applicable to most shoreline types. This method also tends to result in
better selection of oiled substrate and consequently less waste than mechanical
methods.

Table 8.3 Use of Manual Cleanup Methods

Shoreline Type Can be used on any shoreline subject to the following


constraints.
Constraints Bedrock and boulder shorelines should be assessed for safety
before deploying cleanup teams.
This is a slow method and not suitable for use if the extent of
oiling is great.
Application Close supervision of cleanup teams is essential.
Work-site control should be established
(Appendix A, Checklist NT IMT-D)
Resource Approx. 20 persons/km worked/day (2 teams).
Requirements 2 Shoreline Cleanup Team Leaders
22 sets overalls, gloves, hats, boots.
Shovels/wheelbarrows/rakes etc as required.
Suitable waste storage and transport
(e.g. up to 500 plastic bags/km/day).
Transport as required.
Site support equipment.

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8.5 USE OF SORBENTS TO COLLECT LIQUID OIL

Loose sorbents or sorbent mats can be used to facilitate the manual or


mechanical removal of liquid oil from most shoreline types. They may also be
applied to oiled areas to reduce slippery conditions, e.g. on jetties, seawalls or
boat ramps.

Table 8.4 Use of Sorbents on Shorelines

Shoreline Type Can be used on any but care is needed for shorelines adjacent to
shallow corals (see below)
Constraints Oily sorbent materials should not be allowed to wash into coral
areas.
See Table 8.3 if used with manual cleanup.
See Table 8.5 if used with mechanical cleanup.
Application Close supervision of cleanup teams is essential in order to
prevent over-application.
Resource Sorbent material.
Requirements

A number of sorbent materials are available, or can be improvised from available


materials. Table 8.5 lists some of these together with the estimated
effectiveness of each.

Table 8.5 Available Sorbent Materials

Sorbent Oil Capacity(1)


Material
Non-viscous Viscous Comment
Oils(2) Oils(2)
Coconut husk (dry) 2-3 10-20 May sink after prolonged
Wood chips/bark 2-5 5-10 exposure tom water
Sawdust 5-10 10-20
Vermiculite 0.5-3 4-6 Will sink if washed from shore.
Polyethylene Flash spun 6 6 Synthetic. All will float. Difficult to
Foam/sponge 22 30-40 dispose of if used with heavy oils
Polypropylene Pads/rolls 8 15 (e.g. Lubricating oil, Heavy fuel
fibre Stitch-bonded 15 22 oil).
Pom-poms 2 18 Can be re-used if used on diesel
Polyurethane Ground 5 14 or lighter products.
Foam/sponge 22 30-40 (Note: sorbency or reused
materials may be enhanced)
(1) Weight of oil compared to weight of sorbent.
(2) Viscous oil = > 3,000cSt, Non viscous oil = < 3,000cSt.

8.6 MECHANICAL REMOVAL OF OIL AND OILY DEBRIS

Mechanical cleanup is the preferred cleanup for extensively oiled sandy


shorelines.

This method tends to result in the removal of clean substrate also and close
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supervision is required to minimise this. Generally, if > 2cm of sediment needs


to be removed it is best to seek expert advice.

The shoreline should be reworked so that the profile after cleaning approximates
what it was prior to cleanup.

Table 8.6 Use of Mechanical Removal Methods on Shorelines

Shoreline Type Not suitable for use on:


Bedrock or boulders.
Mud or silts.
Shorelines dominated by sensitive fauna (bird nesting) or flora
(seagrass/mangroves/saltmarsh).
Constraints In addition to the above:
Access and sediment load bearing capacity.
Fluid oils may not be amenable to recovery.
Recovery of buried oil may be difficult or result in the removal of
too much sediment (1).
Application Clean parallel to shoreline.
Ensure vehicles do not pass over oily sediments.
Resource Grader, front-end loader and truck (for waste transport).
Requirements Fuel (allow 20-25 litres/hr/vehicle).
Manual cleanup support team; 3-4 people, Team Leader and
personal protective equipment.

8.7 VACUUM RECOVERY

Vacuum recovery is suitable for the recovery of liquid oils and wet debris from
most types of shoreline provided that access is available.

Table 8.7 Use of Vacuum Recovery of Liquid oil from Shorelines

Shoreline Type Any except steep inclines and cliffs.


Not recommended for pebble beaches unless oil is associated
with loose debris (i.e. pebbles will be removed with the oil unless
the method is used with care).
Constraints Not to be used if the oil is volatile e.g. fresh diesel. Not to be
used on Group I oils (e.g. motor spirit at any time).
On some shorelines this method may result in the removal of
large volumes of water along with the oil. This may pose waste
problems.
Application Liquid oil may be scraped into pits for ease of collection. These
must be cleaned before backfilling.
Resource Vacuum truck, or
Requirements Portable vacuum system and
Adequate storage.

8.8 SEDIMENT REWORKING

Reworking coarse substrates (grit, pebbles or cobbles) will facilitate natural


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cleaning by wave action.

Although slow, this method is very efficient in terms of the commitment of labour
and equipment.

Table 8.8 Use of Sediment Reworking Method on Shorelines

Shoreline Type High to moderate energy cobble and pebble beaches only.
Constraints Not to be used if the oil is fresh and liquid, and oiling is heavy (oil
removal should be slow and oil released should be weathered).
Application Method A: Oil stained sediment is pushed into the surf zone foe
cleaning by wave action (Sediment may be reworked a number
of times), or
Method B: Oil is left on the surface so that wave action can clean
off surface oil. When clean, the surface can be tilled to bring
underlying oiled sediments to the surface to be cleaned by wave
action. This process should be repeated until the beach is clean.
Method C: Pebble beaches can be reworked using high-
pressure seawater (see Section 8.10).
Resource Method A: One front-end loader or bulldozer.
Requirements Method B: Tractor and tiller, or grader.
Method C: See Table 8.9.

8.9 LOW PRESSURE WASHING/FLUSHING

Washing methods can be used for all oil types and are best suited to shorelines
with substrates of pebble size or larger, but may be applied to sand beaches
with care. Low pressure washing can also be applied to mangrove, saltmarsh
and shallow corals provided that:

Run-off can be prevented from entering clean areas.


Cleanup teams do not damage the area.

Table 8.9 Use of Low Pressure Washing Methods on Shorelines

Shoreline Type Pebble or rocky shoreline (cobble to bedrock).


Stable sands and muds, -with care.
Constraints Oily run-off must be collected using inshore booms and
skimmers.
Care must be taken not to wash surface oils into clean underlying
sediments.
Oily runoff must not pass over clean shoreline unless enough
water is applied to prevent adhesion of oil to clean sediments (i.e.
deluge/flushing).
Application Wash oil from top of beach to lower levels using moderate
pressure. If lower intertidal zones are unoiled, this may need to
be done on elevated tides only.
Irrigate beach with large volumes of low-pressure seawater.
Deploy booms and skimmers to collect oily run-off.
Resource Pump: 30-50psi @ 200-500 litres/min (12-30 cubic m/hr).
Requirements Hoses: Flexible hose (e.g. fire hose) for spot-washing
Hose or pipe for irrigation.
Inshore boom (250-300m), anchors etc.

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Skimmer.

8.10 HIGH PRESSURE WASHING

High pressure washing methods can be used for all oil types but should not be
used on small substrates (smaller than pebble). Pebble shorelines should be
cleaned with care.

Table 8.10 Use of High pressure Washing Methods on Shorelines

Shoreline Type Any well drained rocky shore (bedrock to pebble).


Constraints As per Table 8.8
Application Wash oil from top of beach to lower. If lower intertidal zones are
unoiled, this may need to be done on elevated tides only.
Deploy booms and skimmers to collect oily run-off.
Pebble beaches only:
Pebble can be reworked/pushed down the beach into the shallow
subtidal and then washed with the high-pressure water-stream.
Pebble can then be reworked/pushed back up the beach. This
method is suitable for light oils and non-viscous oils.
Resource Pump: 100-1000psi @ 20-100 litres/min (1-6 cubic m/hr).
Requirements Hoses: Flexible hose (e.g. fire hose).
Inshore boom (250-300m), anchors etc.
Skimmer.
Eye protection for cleanup personnel.

8.11 USE OF CHEMICAL CLEANING AGENTS

Use of chemical cleaning agents is recommended only when it is necessary to


rapidly remove oil from otherwise difficult to clean shorelines.

Chemical agents available are dispersants. Degreasers should not be used.

Table 8.11 Use of Chemical Cleaning Agents

Shoreline Type Most applicable to bedrock and artificial structures such as


seawalls and boat ramps.
May be used on other shoreline types with extreme care, and
with environmental advice.
Constraints Not suitable for use on vegetated shorelines (mangroves,
saltmarshes) or on, or near, corals.
Oily run-off cannot be contained and recovered. Do not use near
sensitive inshore communities.
Health and safety procedures to be followed (consult MSDS in
NT MOP Manual).
Application May be sprayed neat or diluted.
If tidal flushing is restricted, use hoses to wash shorelines after
application (20 - 60 minutes after application).
Resource Dispersant (see Appendix B).
Requirements Backpack spray packs (see Appendix B).

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8.12 SAND BLASTING AND STEAM CLEANING

These methods can be damaging to structures and substrates being cleaned


and will remove all plants and animals that are living on the substrate.
Consequently they are recommended only for public artificial shorelines (jetties,
boat) where slippery oil could pose a safety risk.

Table 8.12 Use of Sand Blasting and Steam Cleaning

Shoreline Type Artificial structures.


Constraints Not to be used on natural shorelines, particularly if
vegetation or animals present.
Steam cleaning is not suitable for use on fresh volatile
Group I oils (motor spirit). Group II oils (diesel) should be
left to weather.
Application Used by skilled operator under close supervision.
Resource Cleaning unit
Requirements Sorbent boom, snares or other means of collecting runoff.
See Appendix B.

8.13 OTHER METHODS

A number of other cleanup methods have been used, and may be suggested
during an incident. These are discussed briefly below.

8.13.1 Bioremediation

Bioremediation is the artificial stimulation of the natural breakdown of oil by


bacteria. The most commonly applied method involves the addition of high
nitrogen/ phosphate fertilizers to the oiled shoreline. Degradation is a slow
process and should not be regarded as a short-term cleanup method.

Light oils are not amenable to this method as light fractions are non-persistent
and toxic to the microorganisms. The medium components of heavy fuel oils will
degrade but heavy residues will be physically removed by wave action rather
than by degradation.

Generally, this method would only be considered for the longer-term


rehabilitation of environmentally sensitive areas where conventional cleanup
methods cannot be applied.

8.13.2 Cutting of Oiled Vegetation

Cutting of oiled foliage has been suggested for oiled mangroves and saltmarsh.
This may be of benefit if the sediment is unoiled and if access to the swamps
can be achieved without causing damage. However, some saltmarsh species
recover slowly from cutting and damage must be balanced against the likely
damage from the oil. This method should be used under close environmental
supervision.

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8.13.3 Burning of Oiled Vegetation and Debris

This method has been used where the recovery of oiled debris has been
problematic due to large volumes and/or isolation and inaccessibility of the
shoreline.

Light oils will evaporate and so this method is unlikely to be required.

This method may be considered for medium oils, if unweathered. Close


supervision is required to ensure that the method is effective and that operators
are not damaging unoiled vegetation.

Close supervision is required.

Heavy oils do not burn well and generally leave a tarry residue after burning.
This is difficult to remove and may percolate into sediments. Consequently, this
method is not recommended for heavy oils.

8.13.4 Trenching

This involves the digging of a trench through oiled sediment so that fluid,
subsurface oil can leach into the trench. It may be collected from here or
allowed to wash out naturally. This method may alter the drainage pattern and
should not be used in vegetated areas (mangroves, saltmarsh).

8.14 ON SITE WASTE HANDLING

Waste must be transported along the shoreline to temporary storage sites behind the beach.

8.14.1 On-Site Transport

Table 8.13 lists some of the equipment available for transporting of wastes along
shorelines and provides some handling guidelines.

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Table 8.13 On-Site Waste Transport


Transport Method Suitable Comment
Container
Manual Plastic bags Supervisors must set safe handling limits (weight).
Buckets Take care to allow adequate time for task.
Dune buggy and trailer Plastic bags Unstable. Close supervision of activity and safety.
Small Bobcat Plastic bags Check load-bearing capacity of shorelines.
Front-end loader Loose material Ensure vehicles do not travel over oiled
Trucks Plastic bags sediments.
Drums Refueling and secure storage needed for
Skips prolonged use in isolated areas.
Flexible bags
Fork lift Skips Drums must be secured on a palate and should
220litre drums be only part-filled if no lid is used.
Vacuum trucks N/A For liquid only.
Not suitable for volatile products.

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8.14.2 Temporary Storage Sites

Temporary storage sites should selected according to the following criteria:

Good access from beach being cleaned.


Proximity to road (for removal by truck).
Flat or gently sloping ground.
Ease of establishing secure perimeters (if accessible to public).
Absence of native flora, heritage value or other sensitivity.

A number of agencies or personnel may need to be consulted in the selection of


the temporary waste storage site, if these occur outside of the lease area (Table
8.14).

8.14.3 Containers

Suitable types of containers are listed in Section 9.

Note: Container used for storage must be covered if rain is possible, to avoid
overflow.

Table 8.14 Agencies or Personnel to be Consulted in Selection of Waste Storage Sites

Agency/Person Potential Constraint/Condition


Waste Management Consult in most cases but particularly if:
Coordinator (IMT) Wastes may be hazardous.
Storage times may be long (i.e. >2 or 3 days).
Community Liaison Officer If site is on indigenous land.
(IMT) If access is gained across indigenous lands.
If the site is close to indigenous heritage sites.
NRETAS If site is within park.
If access is across parkland.
If site may pose a threat to native fauna.
NRETAS If site is within, or close to, native vegetation.
Sites of potential heritage significance.
Local Government If site is on council land or reserves.
Lands Council If site is on indigenous lands.
Title holder If site is on private land.

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WASTE MANAGEMENT 9

9.1 RESPONSIBILITY

The temporary storage, transport, treatment and disposal of waste material must
be managed if it is to not inhibit cleanup activities or pose any threat to the
environment.

The DPC IC may appoint a Waste Management Coordinator (WMC) to


undertake this task. If large volumes of waste are anticipated, or if the waste is
in a remote location, a Waste Management Unit may be required.

For any spill likely to produce significant amounts of waste, the WMC will develop a
Waste Management Sub-Plan.

Note: The volumes of oily waste recovered may be significantly greater than the
volume of oil spilled, particularly if shorelines are oiled.

It is the responsibility of the relevant IMT Officers/Coordinators to request the


assistance from the Waste Management Coordinator and to advise on the
location and volume of waste storage required.

9.2 ON SITE (FIELD) TEMPORARY STORAGE

Temporary storage containers and facilities may be required at:

Jetties, ramps or other locations where marine response teams bring waste
ashore.
Shoreline segments being cleaned.
Wildlife cleaning facilities.
Canteen and rest areas.
Decontamination centres and equipment cleaning sites.
Advanced Operations Centres.
Incident Control Centre.

Guidelines for the use of storage containers are provided in Table 9.1.

9.3 WASTE MANAGEMENT SITES

The WMC may need to identify a waste management site to store waste from
shoreline or marine operations. The site may be to:

Store collected waste (Table 9.2).


Undertake the final segregation of waste (Table 9.3).
Undertake separation or initial treatment of waste (Table 9.4).

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Table 9.1 Guidelines for the Use of Temporary Storage Containers

Container Suitability Volume Comment


Type Solid Liquid (m3)
Plastic bags R C Up to Onshore Half fill only.
0.04/bag Should be moved using Bobcat or
front-end loader.
Not suitable for light oils, sharps or
long-term storage.
200 litre drums R C 0.2 Onshore Half fill only. Difficult to handle.
Cover required.
Skips R 15-20 Offshore Bottom drainage hole to be
R C Onshore plugged.
Cover required (tarpaulin).
Fast tank(1) C R 10 Onshore Can be used for transport on truck
with care.
Cover available.
Flexi-dam(1) R 10 Onshore Cover supplied.
Flexible bags/ R 1-10 Offshore On deck or off deck.
containers(1) C 1-10 Onshore Load onto trucks prior to filling.
Lancer barge(1) R 25 Offshore Covered.
Rigid tanks (1)
R Variable Onshore Security required (public areas).
Plastic-lined pits C Variable Onshore Needs to be well lined.
Cover needed.
Security required (public areas).
(1) See Appendix B for availability (cf. Equipment: NT and National).
R = Recommended/ preferred.
C = Conditional. May be used or adapted if preferred options are not available.
Not recommended under most circumstances or not applicable.

9.4 Segregation of Waste

Wherever possible wastes should be segregated in accordance with the


preferred segregation in Table 9.2.

For large spills, or those where it is not possible to effectively segregate wastes
in the field, the field' segregations can be used.

Table 9.2 Segregation of Wastes

Field Segregation Preferred Segregation


Liquid Oils Non emulsified oils.
Emulsified oils.
Wastewater Water from temporary storage.
Water from heat or gravity separation of emulsions.
Water from chemically demulsified oil.
Solid Oils High pour point oils.
High viscosity emulsions.
Tar balls.
Oily debris Oil mixed with cobble or sand.
Oil mixed with wood, vegetation, plastics or sorbents.

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9.5 TRANSPORT

Care should be taken that all vessels, vehicles, or containers used for the transport
of oily wastes are sealed and leak-proof.

9.6 WASTE SEPARATION

It may be required to separate oil from associated water, sediment and debris, to
minimise volumes. It is preferable that this is not attempted on the spill site. Waste
separation is usually undertaken offsite at a designated waste processing area. If
this is necessary a number of methods may be used (Table 9.3).

Table 9.3 Separation of Waste Materials

Waste Type Separation Method


Non emulsified oils N/A
Emulsified oils Heat treatment.
Gravity separation(1)
Demulsifiers(2)
Water from: Storage areas N/A(3)
Heat or gravity separation N/A(3)
Chemically separated emulsion N/A
High pour point oils N/A
High viscosity emulsions N/A
Tar balls Sieve to remove sand(1)
Oil and sediment Collect oil leaching from storage areas(1)
Wash with water or solvent.
Oil mixed with wood or other debris Collect oil leaching from storage areas(1)
Wash with water.
(1) May be undertaken at the point of collection (shoreline).
(2) May be undertaken at the point of collection but is not preferred.
(3) Should not be undertaken on site.

9. 7 DISPOSAL

Waste must be disposed of in accordance with NT regulations. Table 9.4 indicates


the possible methods of disposal available.

Table 9.4 Disposal Methods

Type of Material Disposal Method


Liquid oil waste Recycle.
(predominantly oil with some water). Incineration.
Oily Water (mainly water some oil). Oily water separation unit.
Solid oil inorganic waste (sediment). Land-farming/ Bioremediation.
Landfill. Only after oil content reduced to <30 ppm.
Solid oil organic waste (non-synthetic). Land-farming/ Bioremediation.
Landfill. Only after oil content reduced to <30 ppm.
Other Solid Waste Materials Landfill.
(oily synthetic materials). Offsite disposal.
Hazardous materials. Offsite disposal.

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LOGISTICS 10
10.1 RESPONSIBILITY

Logistics is responsible for the provision of equipment, personnel, services and


support materials for the Incident Management Team (IMT).

In most spill responses, the DPC IC will appoint a Logistics Officer to manage
logistics (see Section 2, Figures 2.1 and 2.2).

10.2 LOGISTICS PROCEDURES

The Logistics Officer must keep an accurate record of all equipment, personnel,
services and materials obtained. This record must include:

DPC IC or other authorisation for procurement/activation of resources.


Date requested.
Date received.
Record of IMT personnel supplied with resources.
Date of return of non-consumable items.
Record of demobilisation (cleaning and repair) and return of resources.

Equipment
1.1.1.1 1
0.2.1

1.1.1.2
Equipment located within the Port of Darwin and the NT is listed in Appendix B.
1.1.1.3
Interstate equipment can be requested by the DPC IC (through the NT MPC or
NT SC) from AMSA (see Appendix B).

Industry equipment is available through AMSA or from the Responsible Party, if


the RP is a member of AMOSC.

1.1.1.4
10.2.2 Personnel

The DPC IC may (through the NT MPC or NT SC) request NT personnel from
participating NT Plan agencies (ref. NT MOP Manual, Module B).

Additional support is available from the National Response Team via AMSA
(see Appendix B).

It is the responsibility of the Logistics Officer, or nominated Services Officer (see


Figure 2.2) to ensure that all personnel are supplied with:

Personnel protective equipment.


Accommodation.
Transport or other support.

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10.2.3
1.1.1.4.1 Transport

Field teams must be transported to and from their work-sites. Private vehicles
are not to be used.

Some restrictions also exist with regard to the transport of non-government


personnel in government vehicles.

All IMT personnel should log the following details with the Logistics Officer:

Vehicle type.
Whether government vehicle, hire car or personal.
Registration number.
Any restrictions on use.

The Logistics Officer is responsible for tracking transport resources and for
ensuring that appropriate transport is obtained from hire companies or other
sources.

10.2.4
1.1.1.4.2 Medical Services

It is important that all field personnel have rapid access to medical support. The
Logistics Officer may appoint a Medical Manager to:

Identify the closest doctors, hospitals and ambulance services to all work
sites.
Ensure that this information is incorporated into the H&S Sub-Plan.
Identify or develop medivac procedures.

The medical officer will need to coordinate closely with the H&S Coordinator.

10.2.5 Communications

For tier 1 responses, the DPC IC may appoint a Communications Coordinator


(CC) to ensure that effective communications are maintained between locations
and IMT personnel.

In a Tier 2 or Tier 3 response, the Logistics Officer will appoint the CC.

For remote locations the DPC IC may use the facilities of the Police Fire and
Emergency Services Emergency Centre at Berrimah.

For upper Tier 2 or Tier 3 responses the CC will prepare a Communications


Plan (See Section 5).

The Communications Sub-Plan (ref. NT MOP Manual Module K) should be


modified to produce an incident and location-specific Communications Plan.

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN SECTION
FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION 11

11.1 RESPONSIBILITY

It is important that a record is kept of all:

Actions taken.
Equipment used.
Chemicals used (e.g. location and volume of dispersants).
Services used.

This information may be required to:

Calculate costs (for possible recovery).


Facilitate post-spill monitoring.
Assess efficiency or cost effectiveness of various response methods.

For small responses the DPC IC may appoint an administrative assistant to


undertaken this function.

In a larger (Tier 2 or Tier 3) response a Finance and Administration Section may


be formed (Figure 2.2). In this case a Finance and Administration Officer (FAO)
will be appointed.

The role of the FAO is detailed in Checklist IMT-12 in Appendix A.

11.2 FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION ORGANISATION

The Finance and Administration function can be divided into four main tasks:

Administration, which includes operation of telephones, facsimiles,


computers, radios (if qualified) and messenger services.
Finance, which encompasses accounting and the development and signing
of contracts.
Records, i.e. the collation and filing of all records and forms.
Management of the Incident Control Centre, i.e. ensuring the effective
operation of the DPC ICC.

11.3 FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURES

Finance and Administration procedures are set out in Module C of the NT MOP
Manual. These, generally, relate to large-scale or long-term responses.

The effective display and transmission of information is critical to all Tiers of


response. The display of information within the DPC ICC or other rooms (e.g.
AOCs) is particularly important and guidelines for this are provided in the
following Sections.

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11.4 INFORMATION CONTROL

Documentation and transmission of information relies on the use of:

Forms.
Status Boards.
Wall Maps.
Effective briefings.
Issue of bulletins and press releases. These are prepared by the Media
Liaison Officer (Section 4.5).

11.4.1 Forms

The use of Forms is detailed in Appendix D. A number of Forms are also


provided in the NT MOP Manual Module C.

Note: In most spills very few forms are required. For larger or more prolonged
response the number of forms required is greater. The forms provided in NT
MOP Manual are a resource and their use is not compulsory. Like all other
resources available, they should be used if required and modified as required.

11.4.2 Status Boards

Status Boards are provided in the NT MOP Manual (Module C).

Information should be written on Status Boards only by a designated person


who will record existing data before entering updated information.

11.4.3 Wall Maps

Wall maps, like Status Boards can display much information.

A laminated map of the affected area should be displayed in the DPC ICC
during all spill responses. If unavailable a montage of topographic maps or
marine charts should be pinned to the wall and covered with rigid clear plastic.
Information can then be written on these.

The information on these must also be recorded before being updated. This can
be done using Polaroid or digital cameras to capture the data or by copying
information onto smaller photocopied maps

Note: If shorelines are impacted, topographic maps or OSRA maps should be


used. Marine Charts do not have accurate onshore information.

11.4.4 Briefings

Briefings are initiated and conducted by the DPC IC. In larger tiered responses
Section Officers and Unit Coordinators may also need to hold regular briefings.

Guidelines are provided in Procedure D in Appendix A

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TERMINATING THE RESPONSE 12


12.1 RESPONSIBILITY FOR TERMINATING THE RESPONSE

The decision to terminate a Tier 1 response is taken by the DPC IC in


consultation with the DPC CEO and NT MPC. Tier 2 and Tier 3 responses are
terminated by the DPC IC in consultation with the NT SC.

12.2 CONDITIONS FOR TERMINATION

Generally, the decision to stop active cleanup is taken when efforts are not
returning any tangible benefit. This rarely occurs at the same time for all
components of the response and some Units will be reduced in size, or
demobilised, earlier than others.

12.2.1 Planning and Operations

The size of the Planning Section and the Operations Section are interdependent
and Planning requirements will tend to decline as the Operations Section Units
cease activity.

12.2.2 Marine and Aviation Response

Marine and Aviation responses may be stood down when:

All oil has been recovered; or


The oil slick has dissipated (broken up); or
All oil has impacted shorelines and is unlikely to be refloated (some resources
may remain on standby until shoreline response has been terminated).
The oil slick has gone out to sea and is beyond the range of response options
and
The oil slick is unlikely to return.

12.2.3 Shoreline Response

Shoreline response may be stood down when:

All accessible shorelines are clean (i.e. free of oil).


Cleanup is having no further net beneficial effect.
Cleanup is having a net deleterious effects on the shoreline or associated
plants or animals.
The extent and degree of remaining oil is judged to be acceptable or as having
little or no actual or potential adverse effects.

12.2.4 Wildlife

This is decided by NRETAS in consultation with the DPC IC or NT SC. Wildlife


response may continue for some time and will generally only cease when all
affected animals are cleaned and, those that can be, are rehabilitated.

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12.2.5 Health and Safety

The H&S Unit would be demobilised as the IMT winds down although the H&S
function will continue under the wildlife and waste management responses if the
activities of these Units continue.

12.2.6 Waste Management

In a major spill the management of wastes may continue for a considerable time
beyond the demobilisation of field operations.

This would be managed under the Waste Management Plan.

The responsibility for this would rest with the party responsible for the spill
(if known).

12.2.7 Logistics

Logistics function will continue until all equipment is recovered, cleaned and
returned to its source.

12.2.8 Finance and Administration

Most Units of this Section will terminate at the same time as Logistics,
Operations and Planning. However, the Finance Unit will continue, at a reduced
level, until all claims are processed and costs are determined.

This Unit may be assisted by part of the Records Unit.

12.3 Stand-Down Procedures

12.3.1 Return of Equipment

Upon completion of the response, the DPC IC (or delegate) will:

Arrange recovery of all equipment and unused materials.


Ensure that all equipment is cleaned, to the extent that available facilities
allow.
Ensure that all equipment is returned to the owner by the quickest possible
means (having regard to costs).

Upon its return to the owner the equipment shall be thoroughly serviced in
accordance with equipment maintenance schedules prior to being stored.

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12.3.2 Debrief

The DPC IC will hold a post-spill debriefing for any spill for which a response was
activated. The debrief should address:

Spill causes (if known).


Speed of response activation.
Effectiveness of tactics and strategies.
Equipment suitability.
Health and Safety issues (if any).
Communications.
Integration of OSCP and procedures with other agencies.

12.3.3 Incident Report

The Statutory Agency may request the preparation of a formal Incident Report.

The contents of this should follow the outline of the debrief or other format as
specified.

12.4 COST RECOVERY

All records of costs must be collated for submission to the relevant insurer.

For responses to spills of unknown origin, costs may be submitted to AMSA.

All costs incurred in returning equipment to the owner, cleaning and servicing
must be included in the overall schedule of costs submitted for reimbursement
by the Responsible Party.

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX
STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES A

1.0 STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURES

This Appendix contains:

Procedures for undertaking particular tasks, and


Checklist for fulfilling specific IMT functions during a response.

They are designed as an aid to response and not all directions will be applicable
in all spill scenarios.

Whilst the Procedures and Checklists are designed to guide personnel through
the response they are not a substitute for training or common sense.

Table A.1 Lists the Procedures and Checklists contained in this OSCP.

Additional Procedures and Checklists can be found in the NT MOP Manual.

Table A.1 List of Procedures and Checklists

Number Title Page

POD OSCP-A Initial Marine Oil Pollution Report Information A-2


POD OSCP-B Establishing the Incident Control Centre A-3
POD OSCP-C Preparation of the Incident Action Plan A-5
POD OSCP-D DPC IC Briefing Meeting Procedure A-6
POD OSCP-E Site Control Procedures A-7
POD OSCP-F Establishing a Field Decontamination Facility A-8
POD OSCP-G Sampling and Sample Control Procedures A-9
POD OSCP-H Field Test for the Effectiveness of Dispersants A-11
POD OSCP-I Obtaining Access To Indigenous lands A-12
POD OSCP-J Deployment into Remote Areas A-14
IMT Checklists
POD-IMT-1 DPC Incident Controller A-16
POD-IMT-2 Environmental and Scientific Coordinator A-18
POD-IMT-3 Community Liaison Officer A-19
POD-IMT-4 Media Liaison Officer A-20
POD-IMT-5 Planning Officer A-21
POD-IMT-6 Operations Officer A-22
POD-IMT-7 Marine Coordinator A-23
POD-IMT-8 Shoreline Coordinator A-24
POD-IMT-9 Health and Safety Coordinator A-25
POD-IMT-10 Waste Management Coordinator A-26
POD-IMT-11 Logistics Officer A-27
POD-IMT-12 Finance and Administration Officer A-28

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

PROCEDURE INITIAL MARINE OIL POLLUTION


POD OSCP-A REPORT INFORMATION A
Name of person receiving report
Agency/Division/Role
Time of receipt of report Date / / Time : AM/PM
Report to be forwarded to: Name.
Agency.

Question Prompt/Answer

1 Name of Reporter.
2 Contact Details.
a Telephone No. Bus: A/H: .
b Fax.
c E-mail
3 Position of observer when Aircraft Vessel Ground .
sighting made. Other (Details): .
4 Position of the slick.
5 Source of spill (1).
6 Type of substance spilled(1).
7 Amount of substance spilled(1).
8 Description of slick.
a General.
b Colour. Black Brown Rainbow Silver .
Other (Specify) .
c Area. Length (m), Width (m)
d Other Broken up? Yes No ___
Windrows (Streaks)? Yes No .
9 Direction of slick movement(1)
10 Weather/sea conditions.
Other information

(1) If known

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Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

PROCEDURE ESTABLISHING THE


POD OSCP-B INCIDENT CONTROL CENTRE B
Task Action Location Status
1 Obtain and/or assign DPC ICC equipment.
1.1 Communications.
a Telephone and lines (at least 4).
b Fax lines (at least 2 and obtain numbers).
c Radio receiver (as required).
d Computers (nominate 2 for admin work if required).
1.2 Information Display.
a Set of laminated Status Boards. DPC ICC
b Set of forms (minimum of 5 sets). DPC ICC
c Regional Maps: DPC ICC
i Nautical charts. DPC ICC
ii Topographic maps (2 sets of 1:50,000 ). DPC ICC
d Clear plastic sheets, to cover maps (4m x 1m). DPC ICC
e Overhead projector (in nominated briefing room).
f Whiteboards (1 or 2, depending on room layout). DPC ICC
1.3 Stationary.
a Whiteboard markers (12-24 mixed colours). DPC ICC
b Ballpoint pens (20 black, 20 red). DPC ICC or
c Pencils (20 each of HB, B, 2B). nominated
d Rulers (10 x 30cm and 5 x 100cm)*. store
e Adhesive tape (5 rolls).
f Paper clips.
g Staplers (5) and staples.
h Manila folders (20).
i A4 white paper (2 packs).
j A4 Plastic transparent sleeves (20).
k Bulldog clips (25 mixed sizes).
l A4 spring clip folders/binders (20).
m Transparency sheets (20).
1.4 Computers (see Communications line 8 also).
a Computers for word processing/record keeping.
b Printers (at least 2).
1.5 Administration/ Document Storage.
a Photocopier.
b Document (in and out) trays (12-15).
c Hanging file trays and file folders.
1.6 Copy(s) of the NT OSCP and Appendices
1.7 Tables and chairs.
CONTINUED OVERPAGE

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

ESTABLISHING THE DPC INCIDENT CONTROL CENTRE (DPC ICC) CONTINUED


PROCEDURE ESTABLISHING THE
POD OSCP-B DPC INCIDENT CONTROL CENTRE (DPC ICC)
Task Action Status
2 DPC ICC Set up
2.1 Obtain and/or assign DPC ICC equipment.
2.2 Order and obtain any items needed (lines 8 12)
2.3 Remove any unnecessary papers/materials from DPC ICC.
2.4 Clean white-boards.
2.5 Check connections of telephones, faxes.
2.6 Place OSCPs on the table for reference.
2.7 Place white-board pens and erasers at the whiteboards.
2.8 Advise switchboard to direct incoming calls to the DPC ICC.
2.9 Display appropriate Maps, Status Boards and Charts (Cover all with
plastic if not laminated).
2.10 Position Electronic Whiteboard and ensure it is operational.
2.11 Locate and label areas for each IMT Section mobilised.

Notes:

1. In the location column note the location of resources. Display this in the DPC ICC so that IMT
members can find resources and facilities.
2. Not all items will be needed for a small incident.

END DPC ICC CHECKLIST

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

PROCEDURE PREPARATION OF THE


POD OSCP-C INCIDENT ACTION PLAN C
Generally, a formal, written Incident Action Plan is not required for minor responses.
However, the basic procedures for planning the response are the same for all spills.
An asterisk (*) denotes steps likely to be needed only for Tier 2 or tier 3 responses.

Phase/ Task Action Responsibility Check


Briefing 1 Brief key IMT Officer/Coordinators:
a Current situation:
i Spill location.
ii Spill size.
iii Statutory/Combat Agencies. DPC IC or others as
iv Tier/ Resources mobilised. nominated.
b Predicted situation:
i Trajectory.
ii Resources at risk/ effects.
2 State Aim (or Policy) of Response.
Develop IAP 3 Develop and rank response objectives, DPC IC, and ESC*
based on protection priorities.
4 Develop Strategies for each Objective. DPC IC and all
5 Develop Tactics for each Strategy. Officers /
Coordinators.
6 Identify/obtain any Dispersant use. ESC
permits required for Access to CLO.
strategies Indigenous land.
Sub-Plans 7 Prepare/Review Sub-Plans: *
a Communications Sub-Plan. Logistics Officer. *
b H&S Sub-Plan. H&S Coord. *
c Wildlife Sub-Plan. DIPE PW/ *
Wildlife Officer.
d Media Sub-Plan. MLO *
Logistics 8 Determine need for and location of, DPC IC and all
Advanced Operations Centres or Officers
Staging Areas. /Coordinators.
IAP 9 Document Aim, Objectives and Nominated officer
Preparation Strategies (Form IAP 01) i.e. prepare (Planning Officer in
Draft Incident Action Plan. a Tier 2/3).
10 Attach Sub-Plans to Incident Action DPC IC to *
Plan (IAP). nominated IMT
member
Prepare revised lists of resource
11 All Section Officers/
needs for submission to Logistics Coordinators
Officer.
Approval 12 Approve IAP. Incident Controller
PROCESS TO BE REPEATED THROUGHOUT THE RESPONSE AS SCENARIO,
OBJECTIVES, STRATEGIES OR TACTICS CHANGE

END PLANNING MEETING CHECKLIST

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

PROCEDURE DPC INCIDENT CONTROLLER


POD OSCP-D BRIEFING MEETING PROCEDURE D
Task Action Responsibility Status
Preparation 1 Ensure that Status Boards and Wall Maps FAO or DPC
are displaying current information. ICC Manager
2 Check with DPC IC/Planning Officer:
a Briefing time/location
b Display equipment needed.
3 Set up additional maps/Video/TV as
required.
Briefing 4 Introduction of new IMT personnel and DPC IC
Meeting roles (if assigned).
5 Situation report: DPC IC or
a Location of slick. Planning Officer
b Oil data (character and behaviour).
c Conditions: Weather/Tides/Currents.
d Summary of activities to date.
e Location of AOCs/Staging Areas.
f Constraints: access equipment/labour.
g Spill trajectory.
h Outline of Environmental resources at EA or ESC
threat and sensitivity data (OSRA).
i Safety issues. DPC IC or
H&SC
j Community issues. CLO
k Other issues DPC IC
l Review communications Logistics Officer
requirements.
6 Function/Section/Unit Reports if required: As appropriate
a Media MLO
b Community liaison CLO
c ESC/Environment ESC/EA
d Planning PO
e Operations OO
i Marine MC
ii Shoreline SC
iii Aerial AC
iv Wildlife WC
v Waste WMC
f Logistics LO
g Finance and Administration FAO
i Finance FC
ii Administration FAO
7 Outline of new objectives, strategies and DPC IC
methods.
8 Any other business. DPC IC
END BRIEFING MEETING PROCEDURE

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

PROCEDURE SITE CONTROL


POD OSCP-E PROCEDURE E
Site Control should be established for every site where access is to be controlled. This
includes the DPC ICC, sites of shoreline cleanup, waste storage or any site containing
hazards or hazardous materials (ref. NT MOP Manual Module C).

Task Action Status


1 Identify perimeter of the Hot (secure or prohibited) zone. This may be:
i Oiled shoreline. (Note: This zone should contain all hazards and
sensitive areas where access should be restricted).
ii Response vessels.
iii Area around the slick.
iv Perimeter around aircraft.
v DPC ICC
2 Identify the Hot zone perimeter by sign-posting or establishing a cordon
3 Identify the Warm(exclusion, controlled or support) zone. (Note: This is a
non-contaminated/ non-hazardous zone). For the above examples:
i Area behind beach including all areas used for support (shelter,
canteen, WC, car park).
ii Jetty.
iii Any air space or water area established to exclude non-response
aircraft or vessels.
iv The airport, or perimeter around field heli-pad.
v The building in which the DPC ICC is situated. The car park should
also be within this zone.
4 Identify the Warm zone perimeter by sign-posting or establishing a cordon
5 Establish any required Hot zone perimeter facilities. For example (i) and
(ii) this may include:
i Decontamination facility (see procedure NT OSCP-F).
ii Temporary waste storage.
6 Establish Warm zone perimeter facilities. Generally this is site security.
7 Establish support facilities within Warm zone as required

Note 1 Entry to a Hot Zone should be restricted to:

Personnel involved in the on-site work.


Personnel equipped with appropriate protective gear.
Personnel who have undergone correct training and induction.

Note 2 The Warm Zone surrounds the Hot Zone and is the zone and is generally:

The area from which personnel and equipment are deployed.


The perimeter where site control is exercised i.e. the entry points to the Hot Zone.
Restricted to those people who operate in the Hot Zone and those who support them.

Note 3 The Cold Zone is all public or otherwise unrestricted areas, i.e. those areas outside
of the controlled site.

END SITE CONTROL PROCEDURE

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Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

PROCEDURE ESTABLISHING A
POD OSCP-F FIELD DECONTAMINATION FACILITY F
The size and complexity of field decontamination facilities required will depend on the
character of the oil and on the scale and nature of the cleanup being implemented.
This procedure should be modified to meet the needs of each response.

Task Action Status


1 Select a flat area and clear away stones and other debris.
2 Cover the area with waterproof plastic (tape joins) and secure with steel
pegs.
3 Cover plastic with sorbent mats/rolls. If unavailable, loose organic
sorbent material can be used.
4 Place washing pools and waste storage drums as indicated the Figure
below.
5 Lay entry pathway (from oily area) using plastic and sorbent pads/rolls.
6 If considered necessary, construct a fence or peg and rope barrier along
the entry path and along the boundary between the Hot (oily) zone and
the Warm (clean support area) zone (ref. Procedure NT OSCP-E).
7 Cover area and storage bins if rain is possible.
8 Ensure that vacuum trucks and other waste recovery vehicles can access
the waste bins (mark out an access road if necessary).
9 Provide final wash facilities (wash basins, soap, towels).
10 Supply clean overalls for end of shift and lunch breaks.

Access for Final Wash-up (Sinks) Clean Water


Waste Towels etc
Trucks

Exit to Clean
Wash 3 Area
Clean Clothes

Oily Clothes
Wash 2

Oily Water
Wash 1 Stores &
Washing
Materials

Fence

Entry from Contaminated Area

Schematic Layout of Field Decontamination Facility


END SITE DECONTAMINATION FACILITY PROCEDURE

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Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

PROCEDURE SAMPLING AND SAMPLE


POD OSCP-G CONTROL PROCEDURES G
Detailed sampling and sampling handling procedures are contained in NT MOP Manual
Module M (Appendix M.2). The following is a summary only.
Note: This procedure is for general sampling and is not a procedure for sampling vessels for
prosecution purposes.

Task Action Status


1 Establish reason for sampling and obtain any specific sampling, sample
handling requirements or equipment requirements from the receiving
laboratory. In particular:
a Number of replicate samples.
b Type of container.
c Volume of sample needed.
d Cooling needs and time needed to get to laboratory.
2 Sampling from the surface of water:
a Thin films:
i Use sorbent discs/pads made from glass wool, teflon (PTFE) wool
or stainless steel gauze.
ii Applied lightly to the water surface and then placed inside an
airtight container (see 5) for transport to the laboratory.
ii The use of synthetic sorbents is not recommended. If used send
a clean sample of the sorbent to the laboratory also.
b Thick slicks:
i In the absence of specialised equipment, collect using clean
buckets, dustpans and wide-necked jars.
3 Sampling from solid surfaces:
a Viscous oils and tarballs can be scraped off surfaces using clean steel
or wooden spatulas or spoons, and placed into sample containers.
b Oil adhering to sediment, seaweed, small pieces of wood, plastic
materials or other debris may be collected by placing the oil and
substrate material, into the sample container.
c Note: Oil samples should not be taken by washing oil from surfaces
and no attempt should be made to heat or melt samples taken from
solid surfaces so as to enable them to flow into a container.
4 Sampling from wildlife:
a Cut oiled feathers of fur and place in containers.
b Cut unoiled feathers or fur and send for analysis also.
c Avoid taking samples from specimens that have been stored in plastic
containers.
5 Place each sample into a container:
a Clean glass jars (250-500ml) with wide mouth should be used
b Caps of the glass jars or bottles should be lined with either metal foil or
be made of teflon (PTFE).
6 Label each sample container with:
a Identification code or sample number.
b Date and time of sampling.
c Brief description of sample and collection point location.
Name of person taking sample (and witness).
Continued Overpage

DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-9 of 28


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

SAMPLING AND SAMPLE CONTROL PROCEDURES CONTINUED


PROCEDURE SAMPLING AND SAMPLE
POD OSCP-G CONTROL PROCEDURES

Task Action Status


7 Complete and attach a Chain of Custody label to each jar. This should
contain the information on the label (see 6) and also:
a Signature and printed name of person who collected the sample.
b Signature and printed name of person who witnesses the sample
collection.
c Chain of Custody record, i.e. repeated sequence of:
i Sample handed/sent to.
ii Signature.
iii Date.
iv Sample received by.
v Signature.
vi Date.
8 Separately record the following information on a Sample Record:
a Identification code or sample number.
b Date and time of sampling.
c Description of sample.
d Accurate location from which sample was taken.
e Name, organisation and address of person collecting the sample.
f Name, organisation and address of independent person witnessing
sample collection.
g Sample ownership (for who was it collected).
h Method of sampling (describing any special technique or equipment
used).
i Particulars of any photographs taken.
j Other relevant information e.g:
k i suspected source.
l ii suspected contamination of the sample i.e. have detergents been
used and if known their type and make.
m Chain of Custody record (see 7 above).
9 Send copy of the sample record to the laboratory.
10 Store sample:
a In refrigerators or cold rooms (at not more than 5C) and in the dark.
b Ensure that room is secure or else place sample bottles/jars in
containers with tamper proof seals.
c For samples that may be stored for more than 24 hrs:
To prevent biological degradation of wet samples, the addition of 1ml of
50% hydrochloric acid per litre of water samples is recommended.
Additionally, displacement of air from the container with nitrogen or
carbon dioxide can help to prevent degradation of the sample.
d Ensure sufficient space has been allowed in the container for any
expansion of the sample that might occur.
11 Transport samples safely. Contact aerial carrier for specific conditions.
END SAMPLING AND SAMPLE CONTROL PROCEDURE

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Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

PROCEDURE FIELD TEST FOR THE


POD OSCP-H EFFECTIVENESS OF DISPERSANTS H
The following field test was developed by Dr Don Palmer of the Victorian Institute of Marine
Science, Queenscliffe (now the Martine and Freshwater Resources Institute, Dept Natural
Resources and Environment, Victoria). It is reproduced with permission.

Task Action Status


1 Obtain required equipment:
Clean 20 - 25 ml screw top test tubes with screw cap and neutral plug.
Clean 1 to 2.5 ml disposable syringes with needle.
Various clean wide-mouth (pomade) jars for sampling in field.
Glass pasteur pipettes and bulbs.
10 ml glass syringe with large diameter cannula tip.
2 Place seawater (at ambient temperature of sea surface at spill scene) into test
tube. Fill to mark or to about 2/3 tube volume.
3 Carefully add about 1 ml oil onto surface of water in test tube using an eye
dropper or pasteur pipette. Do not let the oil touch the sides of the tube - apply
directly to the water surface. Note appearance of the oils lower and upper
menisci (oil/air and oil/water interface). Both, but more importantly, the lower
meniscus will be curved and the interface will have a smooth unblemished
appearance.
4 With the test tube slightly above eye level and using another eye dropper or
pipette, add one to two drops only of dispersant directly onto the surface of the oil.
Keeping the test tube very still watch the under surface of the oil very carefully for
signs of change.
5 Note any change to the undersurface of the oil. If the dispersant has penetrated
and combined with the oil, the curved under surface of the oil will quickly flatten
out and may take on a dull rough appearance to the interface. This indicates that
the dispersant has combined with the oil and has lowered its surface tension.
There may be evidence of a clear liquid emanating from the underside of the oil
suggesting that the dispersant has not combined well and has passed through the
oil into the water.
6 Carefully screw the cap onto the top of the test tube. Examine the underside
surface of the oil again for signs of wisps of oil breaking away from the underside
of the slick and entering the water.
7 In a smooth and steady manner, invert the test tube 180o and back to the upright
position once every six cycles. Note the appearance of the oil.
a Has it entered the water?
b Are small particles visible and can light penetrate through the water/oil
suspension?
c Has the water gone cloudy and opaque?
d Is the oil still on the surface of the water or has it taken the form of large
particles on or near the surface?
If the oil has entered the water as an opaque brown coloured (but not white) cloud,
the dispersant has been effective.
8 Place the test tube in an upright position and leave it to settle for five minutes.
After five minutes, examine the test tube to see how much of the oil has returned
to the surface. If the water is still cloudy, the dispersant has been very effective
and the spilled oil is definitely amenable to treatment with the test dispersant.

END FIELD TEST FOR THE EFFECTIVENESS OF DISPERSANTS PROCEDURE

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Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

PROCEDURE OBTAINING ACCESS TO


POD OSCP-I INDIGENOUS LANDS I
Authorised Officers of NT Agencies have the right to access Aboriginal Title lands in order to
undertake any tasks required in fulfillment of their statutory obligations (ref. Module E, Section 2.0). In
emergency response this would extend to officers of all NT Plan agencies and support staff.

However, it should be remembered that the primary objective of most incident responses is to
minimise environmental damage and to facilitate natural and community recovery. This is best
achieved with the assistance of, and in cooperation with, Aboriginal Land Councils.

The following Checklist outlines the recommended procedure for obtaining access to Aboriginal lands.
These are summarised in the flowchart overpage.

Notification procedures must also include the notification of owners of threatened shorelines and
waters). In cases where areas of significant heritage value are threatened, of land owners should be
involvement in response planning and in the provision of on-site advice is required (ref. NT MOP
Manual Module C, Section 9.3).

Task Action Responsibility Status


1 a If aboriginal land is threatened by an oil spill contact the Incident
relevant land council and advise of the situation. Request Controller
access permits as required, or
b If the impact of oil is imminent deploy teams to protect the
shoreline and then contact the Land Council to request
permits.
2 Once Permits are obtained deploy teams as required and
3 Provide Land Council details of team deployments and, when
available, a list of names of response personnel involved, and
4 Inform the NT MPC of the situation (via SITREP, Form Rep02).
5 If the issue of a permit is denied or is not forthcoming, contact (by
radio/telephone) the NT MPC or (if activated) the NT SC and
inform them of the situation.
6 Deploy and initiate response, continue response or demobilise as
directed by the NT SC.
7 Activate and brief the Community Liaison Officer (CLO).

1 On notification by the DPC IC, notify the NT OSC and advise on NT MPC
whether a permit has been obtained.
2 Support the activities of the

1 On notification, by the DPC IC or NT MPC, that a permit has been NT SC


obtained notify the Minister (provide full POLREP, Form Rep01 or
SITREP, Form Rep02).
2 If a permit has not been obtained assess the situation and,
instruct the DPC IC to deploy and initiate response, continue
response or demobilise as deemed necessary.
3 Contact Land Council and confer on issue.
4 Contact Minister and advise of action taken.
5 Confer with DPC IC and NT MPC as required.
CONTINUED OVERPAGE

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Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

OBTAINING ACCESS TO INDIGENOUS TITLE LANDS CONTINUED


1 On instruction from the DPC IC, contact Land Council: Community
a Obtain permits if these have not been obtained. Liaison
b Facilitate the resolution of any issues or concerns on the part Officer
of the Land Council. (ref. Checklist
c Facilitate the involvement of Land Council personnel in IMT-8)
response planning.
d Facilitate involvement of Lands Council personnel in
provision of on-site advice to response teams.

Incident Controller
Is oil impact on shoreline or
sensitive resources imminent?
(<24 hrs)
No Yes
Contact Land Council and request Deploy Response Teams
permit to enter lands or waters and initiate response.
under title.

Notify NT MPC and advise of


actions taken.
Notify NT SC (if active.)

Permit issued?
Yes No

Deploy Response Teams


Inform NT MPC or NT SC.
and initiate response.

Advise and brief Community


Liaison Officer (CLO).

NT MPC
CLO Contact NT SC.
Contact Land Council and Confer with CLO.
discuss issues and concerns.
Advise IC of Land Council
concerns and facilitate NT SC
resolution.
Approve and authorise
deployment and response
actions.
Contact Land Council and
confer on issue.
Contact Minister and advise
of action taken.
Confer with IC and CLO on-site.

Summary of Procedure for Obtaining Access to Indigenous Lands

DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-13 of 28


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

PROCEDURE DEPLOYMENT INTO


POD OSCP-J REMOTE AREAS J
Task Action Responsibility Status
1 Determine need to deploy teams into remote area: Logistics Officer &
a Number of personnel, i.e: Operations Officer
i Marine response.
ii Shoreline response.
iii Wildlife.
iv Waste.
b Equipment.
c Duration of each of the above deployments.
2 Advise Incident Controller Operations Officer
3 Assess resources needs: Logistics Officer in
a Accommodation. consultation with
b Transport for personnel. Operations Officer
c Catering and water supply. and Unit
d Decontamination/washing facilities. Coordinators
d Toilets.
e Field support (shade/rest areas).
f Other support.
g Fuel.
h Equipment storage area or facility.
i On site maintenance.
j Waste storage areas.
k Other.
4 Assess existing access (see list in 6 below). Logistics officer
5 Advise Incident Controller Operations officer
6 If necessary, deploy assessment team to investigate: Deployed by
a Road condition (including river crossings). Operations Officer.
b Ferry/barge services. Team to include
c Boat ramps. Operations and
d Airstrips. Logistics personnel
7 Assess requirements and develop a Field Logistics Officer in
Deployment Sub-Plan. This may require 2 phases: consultation with
a Consider and consult with the following: Operations Officer
i Vegetation clearance. DIPE
Environment
and Heritage.
ii Aboriginal lands. CLO
iii Equipment needs. DPC IC
b Consider and consult with the following: Logistics Officer in
i Traffic volumes and NT Police & consultation with
need traffic control. CLO Operations Officer
ii Transport services such Contractors
as barges, trucks etc.
8 Advise Incident Controller and request approval
9 If approved, execute Sub-Plans
10 Monitor progress Planning Officer
END OF DEPLOYMENT INTO REMOTE AREAS CHECKLIST

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Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST DPC INCIDENT


POD-IMT-1 CONTROLLER
IC
Note: Reporting and Incident Assessment procedures are documented in Action Flowchart 1
and in Section 4 of the OSCP.

Phase Action Time


Activation/ 1 Obtain details of spill and any actions taken by the spiller or
Mobilisation person on scene. Check the following:
a Time of initial (this) call.
b Name/title of caller.
c Location of incident.
d Nature of incident.
e Time of incident/incident report.
f Source of the report.
g Volume of oil spilled.
h Type of oil spilled.
i Wind & current data.
2 Start Personal Log.
3 Verify that relevant agencies have been advised
(via POLREP; Form REP 01) (Section 3.2).
a DLP Marine
b DPC CEO
C AMSA, EPG.
Establishing 4 Authorise any immediate action required from on site
Control personnel.
5 Dispatch person to establish nominated DPC ICC.
6 Mobilise IMT (as required) to the DPC ICC and assign IMT
roles.
7 Proceed to the DPC ICC and verify that it has been set-up.
8 Establish radio or telephone contact with Responsible Party
DLP Marine, AMSA or other relevant agencies.
9 For Tier2/3 spills, call the NT SC and confirm POLREP.
Evaluation 10 Determine trajectory:
a Manual estimate.
b Commission computer oil spill trajectory modelling
(as per Appendix B).
11 Determine resources at risk (consult ESC).
12 Reassess the Response Tier, in consultation with the
Responsible Party and the NT SC.
Planning 13 Arrange aerial surveillance.
14 Convene planning meeting (see Procedure POD OSCP-B).
15 Instruct Logistics Officer to compile a resource list (labour,
equipment, transport and other support) and authorise
procurement of additional needs.
16 Instruct MLO to prepare initial media/public release.
CONTINUED OVERPAGE

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Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

DPC INCIDENT CONTROLLERS CHECKLIST CONTINUED.


Phase Action Time
Ongoing 17 Implement spill response actions as per OSCP and IAP.
Response 18 Continue to monitor slick (position, trajectory, behaviour)
through the Planning Officer.
19 Monitor the response by scheduling and undertaking regular
briefings/debriefings of IMT (in a tier 2/3 response, the
planning Officer will monitor this for the DPC IC).
20 Amend the IAP as required. Inform Statutory Agency and NT
SC of any changes via SITREP (Form REP 02).
21 For upper Tier 2or Tier 3: Call for additional resources, as
necessary, from NT SC or on-scene AMSA adviser .
22 Issue regular SITREPS (log release) to:
a DLP Marine, i.e. NT MPC/NT SC.
b Statutory Agency (if not DIPE marine).
c AMSA, EPG.
d Responsible Party.
e IMT members (posted in DPC ICC).
23 Ensure that IMT is supplied with food, drink etc. (in Tier 2/3
this is undertaken by the DPC ICC Manager (part of the
Finance and Admin Unit).
24 Arrange relief for IMT members.
25 Monitor H&S performance through Operations Officer (Tier 1)
or Incident Safety Officer or H&S Coordinator (Tier 2/3).
26 Monitor waste volumes and management through Waste
Management Coordinator.
27 Tier 1: Commission media statements from the MLO. These
must be authorised and released through the NT SC.
28 If necessary, give permission to use dispersants. Consult with
the ESC -unless used to combat an emergency.
Response 29 Terminate response if conditions are met (OSCP Section 12)
Termination 30 Advise the NT SC, AMSA EPG and other Statutory Agency.
31 Ensure that all IMT members and Support Agencies are
informed of stand-down (issue final SITREP, Form REP 02).
32 Monitor, and ensure a safe and complete demobilisation.
33 Debrief IMT.
Post Spill 34 Attend NT SC debrief as required.
35 Ensure that all records are retrieved, collated and stored.
36 Prepare schedule of costs and supporting documentation.
END DPC IC CHECKLIST

DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-16 of 28


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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST ENVIRONMENTAL AND SCIENTIFIC


POD-IMT-2 COORDINATOR
ESC
The ESC will advise the DPC IC on environmental matters including sensitivities, priorities and
potential adverse effects of oil and cleanup activities.

Phase Action Time


Activation/ 1 Upon callout, report to Incident Controller/DPC ICC.
Mobilisation 2 Start Personal Log.
3 Attend Initial Briefing/Planning meeting.
4 Activate OSRA.
Assessment 5 Obtain available data re:
a Weather).
b Tides, currents.
c Topography/shoreline character Access OSRA if
d Environmental sensitivity data required
e Spill trajectory (OSTM from AMSA as per Appendix B).
f Oil data (character/behaviour) (Appendix E or ADIOS).
g Action taken to date.
6 Consult other agency personnel as appropriate and identify
any personnel that may be required as part of the IMT.
7 Advise the DPC IC of staffing requirements for environment
support.
Planning 8 Attend planning meetings with DPC IC and other IMT
members.
9 Provide input (re 6-8 above) and identify information
available and still required.
10 Advise DPC IC on environmental sensitivities and
consequent protection and cleanup priorities.
Ongoing 11 Monitor environmental conditions (see 4 above) and
Response response. Keep DPC IC informed of any changed risks or
priorities.
12 Ensure that environmental Support Agencies are kept
informed via SITREPS (Form REP 02).
13 Monitor and model oil character, advise DPC IC of any
significant changes.
14 In a major response, liaise with the Environment Unit of the
Planning Section.
Response 15 Advise environmental Support Agencies of termination.
Termination 16 Collate all records and data and send to Finance and
Administration Section.
17 Attend IMT debrief, if required.
Post Spill 18 Ensure that all records are retrieved, collated and stored.
19 Provide schedule of costs and supporting documentation to
DPC IC.

END ESC CHECKLIST

DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-17 of 28


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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST COMMUNITY LIAISON


POD-IMT-3 OFFICER
CLO
The Community Liaison Officer will advise the DPC IC indigenous matters including sensitivities,
priorities and social impact.
The CLO will also liaise with the local community and ensure that they are kept informed and have
opportunity to have input into the response planning process.

Phase Action Time


Activation/ 1 Upon callout, report to Incident Controller/DPC ICC.
Mobilisation 2 Start Personal Log.
3 Attend Initial Briefing/Planning meeting.
Assessment 4 Obtain available data re:
a Location and trajectory of slick.
b Size of slick and type of oil.
c Potential hazards to the local community.
d Shorelines or resources impacted, or likely to be
impacted.
5 Advise the DPC IC of any real or potential sensitivities or
local concerns.
Planning 6 Attend planning meetings with DPC IC and other IMT
members.
7 Advise DPC IC on local community sensitivities and
consequent protection and cleanup priorities.
8 If necessary initiate community liaison programme to
identify concerns and priorities.
9 Review the initial media/community release (prepared by
MLO).
Ongoing 10 Monitor conditions (see 4 above) and response. Keep
Response DPC IC informed of any changed risks or priorities.
11 Ensure that Local community agencies are kept informed
via bulletins.
12 Assist field teams with any field liaison required.
13 As required, assist field teams in gaining access to areas
outside of the mining lease.
Response 14 Advise local community agencies of termination.
Termination 15 Attend IMT debrief, if required.
Post Spill 16 Ensure that all records are retrieved, collated and stored.
17 Provide schedule of costs and supporting documentation to
DPC IC.

END CLO CHECKLIST

DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-18 of 28


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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST MEDIA LIAISON


POD-IMT-4 OFFICER
MLO
All Media releases issued for Port of Darwin controlled responses (Tier 1) should be approved by the
DPC CEO or DPC IC if delegated by the PDC CEO.

Phase Action Time


Mobilisation 1 Report to Incident Controller at DPC ICC.
/ Activation 2 Start Personal Log.
3 Attend briefing with DPC IC.
Planning 4 Review the Media Sub-Plan.
5 Prepare, in consultation with the DPC IC, a schedule for
media releases.
Ongoing 6 Assist the DPC IC in the preparation of SITREPS
Response (Form REP 02).
7 Monitor media broadcasts and newspapers and advise the
DPC IC of issues arising.
8 Prepare and release regular media bulletins, as authorised
by the DPC IC (Tier 1or lower Tier 2) or NT SC (upper Tier
2 or Tier 3).
9 Arrange facilities for media representatives:
10 Arrange field visits for the media.
11 Brief DPC IC for interviews and attend if requested.
12 Attend regular briefings.
Post 13 Prepare a report on the Media aspects of the response if
Response requested by the DPC IC.
14 Attend debrief if requested.

END MLO CHECKLIST

DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-19 of 28


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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST PLANNING OFFICER


POD-IMT-5 (TIER 2/3 ONLY)
PO
A Planning Officer is appointed to major spill responses to coordinate the Planning Process under the
direction of the DPC IC.
The Planning Officer will implement procedures set out in NT MOP Manual Module C,
Procedure POD-OSCP-B in this Appendix, and in Section 5 of this OSCP

Phase Action Time


Activation/ 1 Upon callout, report to Incident Controller/DPC ICC.
Mobilisation 2 Start Personal Log.
3 Attend Initial Briefing.
Assessment 4 Obtain and collate data re:
a Weather.
b Tides, currents.
c Wildlife effects.
d Shorelines or other resources impacted.
e Slick POLREP.
location Manual Calculations. OSCP Appendix B.
OSTM modelling.
Request aerial surveillance from DPC IC.
f Action taken to date.
5 Assist DPC IC in re-determining response Tier.
6 Advise the DPC IC of staffing requirements for Planning
Section.
Planning 7 Coordinate Planning meeting schedule for DPC IC and
record development of the IAP.
8 Coordinate and collate Sub-Plans prepared by Section
Officers and check compliance with the objectives and
strategies of the Draft IAP (OSCP Section 5).
9 Collate IAP for DPC IC.
Ongoing 10 Collect, collate and distribute data (see task 4 above) as
Response required.
11 Monitor performance of response against objectives and
alert the DPC IC if revision of the IAP is warranted.
Response 12 On notification by the DPC IC, Planning Section personnel.
Termination 13 Ensure that all equipment is cleaned, repaired and returned
to stores.
14 Attend IMT debrief, if required.
Post Spill 15 Ensure that all records are retrieved/ collated/ stored.
16 Provide costs and supporting documentation to DPC IC.
END OO CHECKLIST

DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-20 of 28


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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST OPERATIONS
POD-IMT-6 OFFICER
OO
Phase Action Time
Activation/ 1 Upon callout, report to Incident Controller/DPC ICC.
Mobilisation 2 Start Personal Log.
3 Attend Initial Briefing.
Assessment 4 Tier 1 only: Assist EA to obtain and collate data re:
a Weather.
b Tides, currents.
c Action taken to date.
5 Advise the DPC IC of staffing requirements for marine
response.
Planning 6 Tier 1: In consultation with the DPC IC, develop marine and
shoreline response plans.
7 Tier 2/3: Develop Operational Sub-Plans in compliance with
the objectives and strategies of the Draft IAP (OSCP
Section 5). These are developed in consultation with
Marine Coordinator, Shoreline Coordinator and other
Coordinators.
8 Collate equipment/ labour/ transport requirements for
operations and provide list to the DPC IC (Tier1) or Logistics
Officer (Tier 2/3).
Ongoing 9 Allocate resources within the Operations Section.
Response 10 Direct and coordinate operations (field) response activities.
Ensure that teams (Tier 1) or Units (Tier2/3) receive:
a H&S and other inductions
b Information; i.e. Briefings/Weather.
c Personal protective equipment.
d Supplies and support services.
11 Tier 1: Monitor activities of non-response craft and request
(via DPC IC) an exclusion zone -if necessary.
(This is done by the Marine Coordinator in Tier2/3).
12 Obtain regular (daily) data:
a Location of slick: aerial surveillance reports.
b Condition of the oil (field reports, modelling).
c Sea state and weather.
13 If required, request (from DPC IC) aerial observer support
for containment and recovery operations, and for vessel
dispersant spraying operations.
14 Inform environment Adviser (Tier 1) or Waste Management
Coordinator (Tier 2/3) of anticipated waste volumes/type.
Response 15 On notification by the DPC IC, advise vessels and other
Termination field personnel of termination.
16 Ensure that all Field Teams return safely.
17 Ensure that all equipment is cleaned, repaired and returned
to stores.
18 Attend IMT debrief, if required.
Post Spill 19 Ensure that all records are retrieved/ collated/ stored.
20 Provide costs and supporting documentation to DPC IC.
END OO CHECKLIST

DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-21 of 28


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST MARINE COORDINATOR


POD-IMT-7 (TIER 2/3 ONLY)
MC
Phase Action Time
Activation/ 1 Upon callout, report to Incident Controller/DPC ICC.
Mobilisation 2 Start Personal Log.
3 Attend Initial Briefing.
Assessment 4 Once briefed by the DPC IC or OO, advise the OO of likely
staffing/equipment requirements or constraints for marine
response.
Planning 5 In consultation with the OO, develop and update a Marine
Sub-Plan for the IAP.
6 Calculate marine response equipment/ labour/ transport
requirements and provide to Logistics Officer.
Ongoing 7 Direct and coordinate marine response activities.
Response 8 Prepare work-orders for marine response teams.
9 Ensure that Marine Response Teams receive required:
a Information; i.e. Briefings/ Inductions/ Weather.
b Personal protective equipment.
c Supplies.
10 Monitor activities of non-response craft and, if necessary,
request (via OO) an exclusion zone -.
11 Obtain regular (daily) data (from OO or Planning Section):
a Location of slick: aerial surveillance reports.
b Condition of the oil (field reports, modelling).
c Sea state and weather.
12 If permission is given to use dispersants, coordinate vessel
based dispersant operations.
13 Monitor aerial spraying activities and ensure that vessels
are clear.
14 Request (from OO) aerial observer support for containment
and recovery operations, and for vessel dispersant spraying
operations.
15 Inform Waste Management Coordinator of anticipated waste
volumes and type.
16 Document all use of equipment, consumables and services.
Response 17 Advise vessels and other Marine Unit personnel of
Termination termination.
18 Ensure that all Field Teams return safely.
19 Ensure that all equipment is cleaned, repaired and returned
to stores.
20 Attend IMT debrief, if required.
Post Spill 21 Ensure that all records are retrieved/ collated/ stored.
22 Provide costs and supporting documentation to DPC IC.
END MC CHECKLIST

DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-22 of 28


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST SHORELINE COORDINATOR


POD-IMT-8 (TIER 2/3 ONLY)
SC
Phase Action Time
Mobilisation 1 Upon callout, report to Incident Controller/DPC ICC.
/ Activation 2 Start Personal Log.
3 Attend Initial Briefing.
4 Assist EC to obtain and collate available data re:
a Weather.
b Tides, currents.
c Action taken to date.
Assessment 5 Advise the DPC IC of likely staffing, equipment and logistics
requirements for shoreline response. Advise OO of known
constraints.
Planning 6 In consultation with the OO, develop and update a Shoreline
Sub-Plan for the IAP.
7 Calculate shoreline response equipment/ labour/ transport
requirements and provide to OO or Logistics Officer.
Ongoing 8 Obtain regular (daily) data on:
Response a Location of oil: aerial surveillance reports and Shoreline
Assessment Team data.
b Condition of the oil (field reports, modelling).
9 Prepare work-orders for shoreline response teams.
10 Ensure that Shoreline Teams receive required:
a Information; i.e. Briefings/ Inductions/ Weather.
b Personal protective equipment.
c Communications equipment.
d Supplies.
11 Monitor activities of non-response personnel and request
(via DPC IC) security -if necessary.
12 If permission is given to use dispersants onshore , ensure
that all H&S procedures are followed.
13 Ensure the provision of land transport for shoreline cleanup
and assessment teams (via Logistics Officer).
14 Coordinate Shoreline Assessment Teams.
15 Coordinate Shoreline Cleanup Teams.
16 Document all use of equipment, consumables and services.
Response 17 Advise shoreline response teams and ensure that all return
Termination safely.
18 Ensure that all equipment is cleaned, repaired and returned
to stores.
19 Attend IMT debrief, if required.
Post Spill 20 Ensure that all records are retrieved/ collated/ stored.
21 Provide costs and supporting documentation to OC.
END SC CHECKLIST

DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-23 of 28


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST HEALTH AND SAFETY COORDINATOR


POD-IMT-9 (TIER 2/3 ONLY)
HSC
Phase Action Time
Activation/ 1 Upon callout, report to Incident Controller/DPC ICC.
Mobilisation 2 Start Personal Log.
3 Attend Initial Briefing.
Assessment 4 Advise the DPC IC of staffing and logistics requirements for
Health and Safety function.
Planning 5 Obtain information on the oil type and assess whether it
poses particular health or safety risks (e.g. fire or other
hazard).
6 Develop and update a Shoreline Sub-Plan to implement the
IAP shoreline response strategies.
Ongoing 7 Implement H&S induction process for all personnel.
Response 8 Ensure that proper H&S procedures have been
implemented for the response.
9 Rectify any practices which breach the H&S procedures
implemented for the response.
10 Obtain regular (daily) data on:
a Activities of response field teams.
b Condition of the oil (field reports, modelling).
11 Ensure that proper H&S procedures have been
implemented for the response, i.e. teams receive:
a Safety inductions.
b Personal protective equipment.
c Communications equipment.
d Supplies.
Response 12 Compile any incident Reports for debriefing.
Termination 13 Attend IMT debrief, if required.
Post Spill 14 Ensure that all records are retrieved/ collated/ stored.
15 Provide costs and supporting documentation to DPC IC.

END HSC CHECKLIST

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST WASTE MANAGEMENT COORDINATOR


POD-IMT-10 (TIER 2/3 ONLY)
WMC
Phase Action Time
Activation/ 1 Upon callout, report to Incident Controller/ DPC ICC.
Mobilisation 2 Start Personal Log.
3 Attend Initial Briefing.
Assessment 4 Make preliminary assessment of waste types and volumes.
5 Advise the OO of likely staffing and logistics requirements
for waste management response.
Planning 6 In consultation with the OO, develop and update a Waste
Management Sub-Plan.
7 Calculate waste management equipment/ labour/ transport
requirements and provide to Logistics Officer (via OO).
Ongoing 8 As required advise marine and shoreline response field
Response teams on the temporary storage of collected oil.
9 Coordinate the transport of oil and oiled debris to central
storage, or permanent disposal, sites.
10 Obtain regular (daily) data on:
a Location of oily waste.
b Type and volume of waste being generated.
11 Prepare work-orders for waste management teams and
personnel.
12 Coordinate and deploy any field waste management teams.
13 Document all use of equipment, consumables and services.
Response 14 Advise field teams and ensure that all return safely.
Termination 15 Ensure that all equipment is cleaned, repaired and returned
to stores.
16 Compile a waste inventory.
17 Prepare a long-term waste management strategy if
required.
18 Attend IMT debrief, if required.
Post Spill 19 Ensure that all records are retrieved/ collated/ stored.
20 Provide costs and supporting documentation to DPC IC.

END WMC CHECKLIST

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST LOGISTICS
POD-IMT-11 OFFICER
LO
Phase/Task Action Time
Activation/ 1 Upon callout, report to Incident Controller in DPC ICC.
Mobilisation 2 Start Personal Log.
3 Attend Initial Briefing.
Assessment 4 Advise the DPC IC of staffing and other requirements.
Planning 5 Attend initial planning meeting with DPC IC and IMT.
6 Compile service & support requirements list for IMT.
7 Tier 2/3 only: Develop Logistics Sub-Plan.
8 Tier2/3 or response over a wide area: Develop a
Communications Sub-Plan (nominate a Communications
Coordinator, CC).
Ongoing 13 Coordinate and process requests for resources.
Response 14 Prepare & record procurement and service contracts.
15 Record all equipment and services commissioned or
supplied and costs.
16 Establish staging areas/ storage facilities as required.
17 Liaise with the DPC IC and other Officers/Coordinators and
calculate future service & support requirements, re:
a Procure personnel and equipment as directed.
b Provide adequate storage for equipment.
c Delivery of resources.
d Shelters and field amenities.
e Accommodation.
f Catering services.
g Field decontamination facilities.
h Security for all areas of the response.
i Transport.
j Fuel.
k Maintenance.
l Appropriate communications.
m Technical support.
n First aid services.
o Ambulance services.
p Record of First Aid/CPR trained personnel.
18 Establish check in/out procedures and records for
personnel and equipment.
19 Provide for the ongoing maintenance of equipment.
Response 20 Inform all Logistics personnel of termination.
Termination 21 Ensure that all equipment is accounted for/ returned.
22 Ensure that all equipment is cleaned, repaired and returned
to owner or supplier.
23 Compile list of consumed/lost/damaged equipment.
24 Attend DPC IC debrief.
25 Ensure that all records are collated and given the DPC IC.

END LO CHECKLIST

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Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

CHECKLIST FINANCE AND ADMINISTRATION OFFICER


POD-IMT-12 (TIER 2/3 ONLY)
FAO
Phase/Task Action Time
Reporting/ 1 Upon callout, report to Incident Controller.
Activation 2 Start Personal Log.
3 Attend Initial Briefing.
Assessment 4 In consultation with the DPC IC determine staffing
requirements.
Establishing 5 Call in required staff.
Section 6 Allocate work locations and Tasks to Section personnel.
8 Brief Section personnel.
Planning 9 Attend initial planning meeting with DPC IC and other Section
officers.
10 Identify service & support requirements.
11 Ensure that the DPC IC and Section Officers are aware of the
administrative arrangements in place.
Ongoing 12 Oversee functions (see 17-) and keep DPC IC informed
Response 13 Log all procurements and, where appropriate, commence
payment/cost recovery procedures.
14 Overview legal requirements and take action/advise DPC IC
as appropriate.
15 Record and process all damages claims.
16 Maintain a Log of all Section activities for Administrative
Support Report.
Administration Unit (Administration Coordinator):
17 Provide staff to undertake administrative services, including:
a Communications; telephones, facsimiles radios (qualified
personnel only), courier services.
b Clerical services; typing.
Finance Unit (Finance Coordinator):
18 Administer contracting services.
19 Pay all accounts and costs associated with the incident.
20 Collate expenditure records for cost recovery.
Records Unit (Records Coordinator):
21 Collate response personnel time sheets
22 Implement a records management system.
Incident Control Centre Management Unit (DPC ICC Manager) :
23 Establish DPC ICC.
24 Maintain Status Boards.
25 Manage information flow within the DPC ICC.
26 Administer DPC ICC security.
Response 27 Collate all records.
Termination 28 Secure records and notify DPC IC that records are collated and
secured.
29 Upon advice from DPC IC arrange for records to be stored or sent
to nominated accounting agency for further processing.
30 Undertake an inventory of all equipment and consumables and
return as instructed.
Post Spill 31 Attend debrief or other meetings as required.
END FAO CHECKLIST
DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-27 of 28
Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX A

DPC OSCP-App A 01/09/2013 Page A-28 of 28


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX B

Note: All Tables are at the end of this Appendix


Item Source
Aircraft: Consult Appendix G under services. If local aircraft are unavailable,
Surveillance or sources cannot be located, contact the NT MPC for assistance.
Aircraft: Spraying Activation of the Fixed Wing Aerial Dispersant Capability (FWADC) is
Operations through the NT MPC or NT SC. Who will contact the AMSAs Duty
Officer, via AusSAR (see Appendix G).
Charts The following Charts cover Darwin and environs (see also Maps):

AUS 26 Approaches to Port of Darwin (1:75,000).


AUS 24 Port Darwin, Wickham Point (1: 10,000)
AUS 27 Port Darwin Middle Arm including Channel Island
(1:10,000)
AUS 28 Port of Darwin (1:25,000).
AUS 309m Darwin to Penguin Shoal (Eastern Sheet) (1:300,000).

The following Charts cover NT waters:

AUS 14m Groote Eylandt - Approaches to Milner Bay (1:75,000).


AUS 20m Clarence Strait (1:50,000).
AUS 304 Wellesley Island to Vanderlin Island (1:300,000).
AUS 306 Cape Vanderlin to Cape Grey (1:300,000).
AUS 308 Goulburn Islands to Melville Island (1:300,000).
AUS 316 Charles Point to Pelican Islet, inc. Victoria River
(1:300,000).
AUS 318m Pelican Island to Penguin Shoal(1:300,000).
AUS 442 Cape Don to Cape Wessel (1:500,000).
AUS 715m Cape Arnhem to Cape Wessel (inc. Gove Hr).
AUS 720 Port Essington to Cape Hotham (1:150,000).
AUS 722 Cape Hotham to Cape Fourcroy (1:150,000).
AUS 724m Fog Bay to Port Keats (1:150,000).
AUS 725m Port Keats to Victoria River (1:150,000).
Communications Oil spill response communications on site are based on VHF radio.
See Section 9.2.5
Contact Numbers A full Contact Directory is provided in Appendix G.
Defence Force The NT SC may request Defence Force assistance through
Assistance Emergency Management Australia (EMA), or through AMSA, EPG
(who will contact EMA). EMA will arrange for Defence Force
assistance once all avenues of utilising commercial resources have
been exhausted, or where time frames are such that it is impractical to
use normal commercial resources.
Documentation Basic forms are provided in Appendix D. NT MOP Manual (Module C)
provides additional forms. See Section 5 of this OSCP.
Environmental Environmental information is available from the NT ESC. See also
Information Oil Spill Response Atlas (OSRA).
Equipment: AMOSC equipment will be released on the request of an Authorised
AMOSC Officer (see Appendix G) or via AMSA, EPG.
Equipment: Communications equipment for the IMT can be obtained from the
Communications nominated Communications Coordinator (see Section 10.2.5).
Equipment: Darwin Darwin-based response equipment, location, and other resources are
listed in Table B.1.
Equipment: NT The equipment available in NT is listed in Table B.1. This can be
accessed via the IC or NT SC.
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX B

Equipment: National stockpiles are listed in the MOSES database (ref. National
National Plan Marine Oil Spill Contingency Plan Appendix 4), which can be
accessed through the IC, NT SC or AMSA. National Plan equipment
stored in NT can be released by:

Authorised Australian Maritime Safety Authority Officers.


Any designated NT Releasing Officer (ref. Appendix G).
Equipment: Oil Under AMOSPlan industry can access mutual aid from other industry
Company company resources if the Responsible party is a member of AMOSC.
To activate the plan a request for assistance is made from the RP
Mutual Aid Contact (MAC, see Appendix G) of the to the MAC of a
company that is able to provide assistance.
Environmental See Appendix C.
Data Also refer to Oil Spill Response Atlas (OSRA) below.
Glossary See NT MOP Manual, Module N.
Health and Safety See Section 6.5 of this OSCP and also NT MOP Manual Module I.
International International assistance can be obtained through the NT SC who will
Assistance contact AMSA, EPG.

5073 5173
Darwin Koolpinyah
5072 5172
Bynoe Noonamah

Materials Safety Provided in NT MOP, Module J.


Data Sheets
Media Refer to Section 4.4. For NT arrangements see NT MOP Manual,
Module H.
Oil Behaviour See Appendix E.
Oil Character For local oils see Appendix E. Module M of NT MOP Manual contains
an inventory of a large number of oils and lists their characteristics.
The character of the oil should be determined from the RP, destination
facility or producer of the oil. The following details should be obtained
as soon as possible:

Product name.
Specific gravity (density).
Flash point.
Viscosity at current temperature, or reference temperature.
Pour point.
Wax content.
Asphaltene content.
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX B

Oil Spill Response Information on environmental resources can be obtained from the Oil
Atlas (OSRA) Spill Response Atlas (OSRA) held by the DIPE Environment and
Heritage, Environment and Heritage (see Contact Directory, Appendix
G).
Oil Spill Trajectory Oil spill trajectory modelling is available from AMSA, EPG Canberra
Modelling and can be run at the request of the IC/NT MPC or NT SC.

The Oil Spill Trajectory Model (OSTM) can be accessed by contacting:

AMSA, EPG Duty Officer.


AMSAs Web Site, www.amsa.gov.au.
After hours, AusSAR who will contact the AMSA, EPG Duty Officer.

The AMSA Oil Spill Trajectory Modelling (OSTM) Request form


should be used and sent by either e-mail or fax. The form is available
on the AMSA web site and on the digital (CD) version of NT MOP
Manual, Module C.

Arrangements may be made with AMSA, EPG for model output to be


sent, (via facsimile or e-mail) to the ICC, or other location, at regular
intervals.

Caution: Like all models, the output is a prediction only and is


not a substitute for field observations
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX B

Oil Spill Trajectory The trajectory of a spill can be roughly calculated by adding the
Calculation surface current velocity to 3% of the wind velocity. This is done using
a vector diagram (see below):

Movement of slick (Sv) = 3% of


Sum of the two vectors Wind

Wind Vector (Wv)


Sv = Cv + (3% of Wv) Vector

v)
(C
or
ct
Ve
nt
re
ur
eC
ac
rf
Su
Oil Weathering Oil fate predictions can be obtained from AMSA, EPG. This is
Modelling available through OSTM and also through the Automated Data
Inquiry for Oil Spills (ADIOS) model developed by the US National
Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). ADIOS can
also be run by:

NT SC.
AMOSC.
AMSA.
Personnel: Personnel can be obtained through the NT MPC and, for large
NT responses, the NT SC.
Personnel: National Response Team (NRT) members are can be seconded
National through AMSA, EPG. This should be requested through the NT MPC
or NT SC.
Personnel: Member companies can obtain equipment operators and other
Industry personnel via AMOSC.
Sampling A sampling protocol is included in Appendix A, Checklist G and also in
NT MOP Manual, Module M, Attachment II.
Training See Appendix F.
Weather Regional weather conditions and predictions are available from the
Duty Officer of the Bureau of Meteorology (24 hour contact).

Local weather information should also be from the Port Operations


office.
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX B

Table B.1 NT Equipment

Description Owner Custodian I.D. No.


Darwin
DISPERSANT ARDROX 6120 8.0t AMSA DPC MOD-0393
DISPERSANT BP A-B 30.0t AMSA DPC MOD-0394
DISPERSANT - SHELL VDC 4.0t BP BP MOD-A334
DISPERSANT - BP AB 1.0t SHELL Shell MOD-A371
PUMP - DISPERSANT SYSTEM - WSL AMSA DPC PAL-4338
PUMP - DISPERSANT SYSTEM - WSL AMSA DPC PAL-4346
PUMP - DISPERSANT SYSTEM - WSL AMSA DPC PAL-4432
PUMP - DISPERSANT SYSTEM - WSL AMSA DPC PAL-4437
SPRAY UNIT VESSEL MOUNTED VIKOSPRAY BP BP PAL-A017
SPRAY BUCKET - DISPERSANT HELICOPTER - SIMPLEX AMSA DPC PDK-5098
SPRAY BUCKET - DISPERSANT HELICOPTER - SIMPLEX 1 AMSA DPC PDK-NEW
TANK - RECOVERED OIL FLEXIDAM 10000 LT AMSA DPC PBD10735
TANK - RECOVERED OIL FLEXIDAM 10000 LT AMSA DPC PBD10736
TANK - RECOVERED OIL COLLAPSIBLE TRANSPAC AMSA DPC PBD-4385
TANK - RECOVERED OIL COLLAPSIBLE TRANSPAC AMSA DPC PBD-4475
SKIMMER - WEIR - FOILEX MINI AMSA DPC PDA10772
SKIMMER - ROPE MOP - ORI PIRANHA 1000 AMSA DPC PDD-4463
BOOM - SELF BUOYANT - AUST-POL D2 60 m AMSA DPC PDF-4451
BOOM - SELF BUOYANT - AUST-POL D2 240 m AMSA DPC PDF-4944
BOOM - SELF BUOYANT SLICKBAR MK32E 900 m AMSA DPC PDF7661A
BOOM - SELF INFLATING - VERSATECH ZOOM 12/18 300 m AMSA DPC PDH-4239
BOOM - BEACH - STRUCTUREFLEX LAND SEA 600 m AMSA DPC PDI11634/
PDI12491
ANCHOR KIT - SMALL 15KG SET OF 8 AMSA DPC PDO10781
BOOM - BEACH - STRUCTURFLEX LAND SEA 200 m AMSA DPC UNK-0005
TRAILER - BOX TANDEM AXLE AMSA DPC VCA-4229
TRAILER - OIL SPILL SHELL DPC VCA-A272
PUNT - ALUMINIUM - KAYFA 5.2M AMSA DPC WCA-4981
Gove
DISPERSANT BP A-B 10 t AMSA Alcan MOD-0395
DISPERSANT - BP AB 5t ALCAN MOD-A368
PUMP - DISPERSANT SYSTEM - WSL AMSA PAL-4332
PUMP - DISPERSANT SYSTEM - WSL AMSA PAL-4334
TANK - OIL COLLAPSIBLE RECOVERY (CORT) ALCAN PBD-A068
SKIMMER - WEIR DESMI 250 ALCAN PDA-A095
BOOM SELF BUOYANT AUSTPOL CUBE 400 m ALCAN PDF-A152
BOOM SELF BUOYANT AUSTPOL D2 200 m ALCAN PDF-A153
BOOM INFLATABLE RO-BOOM (BEACH) 60 m ALCAN PDG-A174
BOOM BEACH AUSTPOL BEACH BOOM 62 m ALCAN PDI-A205
Groote Eylandt
DISPERSANT BP A-B 5.4 T AMSA GEMCO MOD-0396
BOOM - SELF BUOYANT - STRUCTURFLEX GP 300 m AMSA NEW-0018
PUMP - DISPERSANT SYSTEM - WSL AMSA PAL-4911
TANK - RECOVERED OIL FLEXIDAM 10000 LT AMSA PBD11965
TANK - RECOVERED OIL FLEXIDAM 10000 LT AMSA PBD11966
SKIMMER - WEIR - FOILEX MINI AMSA PDA11038
BOOM - SELF BUOYANT - PACIFIC GP 800 300 m AMSA PDF-4296
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX

ENVIRONMENTAL C
INFORMATION

Table C.1 Very High Sensitivity Areas

Location/Resource Description Map Ref.


Mandorah Jetty and High use recreation and C3: 1
Beach Tourism.
Woods Inlet High use recreational fishing and crabbing. C3: 2
Feeding habitat for Snub-Nosed Dolphin.
West Arm Significant bird habitat. C3: 3
Weed Reef Significant bird habitat at low tide. C3: 4
Creek C Significant bird habitat. C3: 5
(off Middle Arm)
Middle Arm Significant bird habitat. C3: 6
Water intakes
Channel island Power generation and cooling water intake. C3: 7
Coral communities (National Estate Register).
Recreational fishing, diving.
Tourism.
Research and education site.
Mangroves.
East Arm/ Elizabeth Significant bird habitat. C3: 8
River
East Arm Mangroves. C3: 9
South Shell and Significant bird habitat. C3: 10
Catalina Islands Soft coral communities.
Aircraft wreck.
Doctors Gully/ Tourism (fish feeding). C3: 11
Lameroo Beach/ East High use recreation.
Point Boating.
Mindil Beach and Tourism and local use (markets). C3: 12
Cullen Bay High recreational use.
Canal estate.
Dudley-Point to Significant bird habitat. C3:13
Coconut Grove
shoreline.
Frances Bay and Mangroves. C3:14
associated Creeks / High recreational use fishing, crabbing, prawning).
Camerons Beach/King
River/Hope Inlet
Casuarina Beach Significant bird habitat. C3: 15
High recreational use.
Nightcliff Beach High recreational use. C3: 16

DPC OSCP-C Date of Issue: 26/02/2013 Page: C-1 of 12


Amendment 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX C

Table C.2 Moderate-High Sensitivity Areas

Location/Resource Description Map Ref.


W & E of Charles Point Dugong habitat. C3:a
Seagrass beds.
No 6 Buoy High use recreational use (diving) C3: b
NW end of Weed reef/ High use recreational use fishing and diving. C3: c
Plater Rock/ Stevens
Rock
SSE off Weed Reef/ Artificial reefs (WWII and other shipwrecks). C3:d
Frances Bay/ East Arm Recreational fishing and diving.
W bank of Middle Arm Prawn mariculture farm. C3: e
Middle Arm (Middle Prawn mariculture farm. C3:f
Head to Channel Is.)
East Arm Pearl oyster aquaculture leases. C3:g
Sadgroves Creek/ Anchorage. C3: h
Frances Bay Water intake for barramundi farm.
Recreational fishing and crabbing.
Stokes Hill Wharf and High recreational use. C3:I
shoreline Tourism. C.4,
Bird habitat.
Vesteys Beach Seawater intake to Vesteys Lake. C3:j
Ludmilla Creek Seawater intake to Lake Alexander. C3: k
Vesteys Beach Anchorage. C3: l
Fanny bay Sailing Club and
Trailer Boat Club.
Recreation and tourism.
Angler Reef Recreational Fishing and diving. C3: m
Buffalo Creek Very high recreational use; fishing, prawning. C3: n
Micket Creek Very high recreational use; fishing, prawning. C3: o
Mica Beach/ Talc Head High recreational use. C3: p
Dudley Point/East Point Coral reefs and rock reefs. C3: q
Aquatic reserve.
Recreation use (diving, reef walking).
Elizabeth River Pearl oyster aquaculture. C3: r

Table C.3 Other Areas

Frances Bay Mooring Recreational vessels, public amenity C.4: 2


Basin
Ludmilla Creek Water intakes C.5: 1
(Lake Alexander)
Vesteys Beach Water intakes C.5: 2
(Vesteys Lake)
Old Stokes Hill Power Water intakes at old Stokes Hill Power Station C.4: 14
Station. Aquaculture
East Arm Water intakes C.7: 1
Aquaculture.

DPC OSCP-C Date of Issue: 26/02/2013 Page: C-2 of 12


Amendment 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX C

Figure C.1
Key to Maps

Map C.5 Map C.6


Map C.4

Map C.1 Map C.7

Map C.3
Map C.2
PoD OSCP-C Date of Issue: 01/09/2002 Page: C-3 of 12
Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX C

Oil Map C.1


Spill
Response Regional Sensitivities
Atlas

(Key is overpage)

PoD OSCP-C Date of Issue: 01/09/2002 Page: C-4 of 12


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX C

Figure C.2 Key to Map C.1 and C.2

PoD OSCP-C Date of Issue: 01/09/2002 Page: C-5 of 12


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX C

Map C.2 Regional Sensitivities:


Close-up of Darwin Harbour
(see key in Figure C.2)

PoD OSCP-C Date of Issue: 01/09/2002 Page: C-6 of 12


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX C

Map C.3 Sensitive


m Areas
Beagle Gulf Lee Point
n Refer to Table C.1 and
a o C.2 for key.
15
14 14
14
Charles Point 16
11q 13 k
b 14
l
1 j
12 h
p c 11 i
Ea d
2 st
Ar d
4 m 10
9 8
rm
d g
st A

High Sensitivity f 8
We

Medium Sensitivity
3
1 a Location (see Tables) M
id 7
dl
e e Arm
5 6

PoD OSCP-C Date of Issue: 01/09/2002 Page: C-7 of 12


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN SECTION 1

LWM
2
3

6 5 4

7
8

9
10

11
12

13
14

19
18 15
29 16
LW
M
17
28
20 4E
No
27 4W 3E
No No
26 22
3W 21
No
2E
No 23
2 W
No
25 24

Map C.4 Port of Darwin Wharves and Shore Facilities: West


(See Table C.4 for key to Maps C.2 to C.4)

PoD OSCP-C Date of Issue: 01/09/2002


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN SECTION 1

Table C.4 Key to Maps C.4 to C.6

Map C.4
1 Mobil and Ampol tanks 16 Small boat pontoon
2 Francis Bay Mooring Basin 17 Police landing
3 Francis Bay Lock (35.3m x 14.6m) 18 No 2 Shed; Oil spill equipment
4 DSRE Synchrolift 19 Container depot
5 Darwin Ship Maintenance Services 20 Cruise ship terminal
6 Shell terminal 21 No3 Stokes Hill Wharf
7 Fishermans Wharf 22 Operations Office: Incident Control Centre
8 Hornibrooks pontoon 23 No 2 Fort Hill Wharf
9 Perkins Shipping 24 Ro-Ro
10 Barge ramps 25 No 1 Iron Ore Wharf
11 Barge Express 26 Acid terminal
12 Francis Bay Marine 27 Incinerator
13 Defence oil tanks 28 DPC workshop
14 Old Stokes Hill Power Station intakes 29 LPG depot
15 Stoke Hill gatehouse
Map C.5
1 Ludmilla Creek intake 2 Vesteys Lake intake
Map C.6
East Arm
Map C.7
1 Aquaculture water intake

PoD OSCP-C Date of Issue: 01/09/2002


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN SECTION 1

C oc onu t t
o
g
a
B
Gro ve

1
Ea st Po int

ve
ri
D R
Port Wa r Ludmilla
La ke D
Alexan d e r

d
a
o
R
Dud le y Po int
Creek

DickW
ard

Lud m illa
t
o
g
a
B

Ross Smith
Fa nn ie The Na rro ws
FANNIE BAY Ba y
STUART

Avenue
Ve ste y s Be a c h

Pa ra p

2
Ba yview
Ha ve n

Bullo c ky Po in t

H
IG
H
WA
Y D
vrie

Avenue O F

M ind il Be a c h
Sadgroves
Din a h
Stu a rt Pa rk Be a ch
M yilly Po in t

Gilruth The
Ga rde ns
U
T
S
R
A
T
g
ierB
rennan
C ullen Ba y

EMERY POINT
La rra keya h Mc Minn

La rra ke ya h Ba rra c ks Street


Cavenagh

Elliot Point Daly Street


Mitchell Fra n c e s
Street
Doc tors Gully
Ba y

DARWIN
La m eroo Be ac h Street

Stokes Hill

Stokes Hill Wha rf

bo o m wharf Fo rt Hill Wh arf

Map C.5 Vesteys Beach and Ludmilla Creek Inlets


(See Table C.4 for key to Maps C.2 to C.4)

PoD OSCP-C Date of Issue: 01/09/2002


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN SECTION 1

Map C.6 East Arm


(See Table C.4 for key to Maps C.2 to C.4)

PoD OSCP-C Date of Issue: 01/09/2002


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN SECTION 1

Map C.7 Middle Arm Aquaculture Intake

PoD OSCP-C Date of Issue: 01/09/2002


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX

DOCUMENTATION D
1.0 THE NEED FOR DOCUMENTATION

It is important that information generated and distributed for spill response


preparedness, and during a spill response, is accurately recorded, transmitted,
acted upon and, ultimately, stored for future use.

2.0 Forms

Two types of Form are supplied for use with this OSCP (See below).

2.1 OSCP Forms

These are used for the maintenance of the OSCP and relate mainly to OSCP
maintenance.

2.2 Incident Management Team Forms

These are designed for use during a spill response. These IMT Forms support
the ICS procedures outlined in Module C of the NT MOP Manual. Table 1 lists
the available IMT Forms and their use.

Note: In a small response (e.g. a Tier 1 or lower Tier 2) only a few of these will
be required. In a larger (upper Tier 2 or tier 3) or more prolonged response
more documentation may be required.

Table 2 indicates which IMT Role is likely to use the various forms. Personnel
nominated against the various IMT functions should be familiar with the purpose
and structure of the relevant forms.

2.3 Tracking Incident Management Forms

All forms used during an incident should be given a Reference Number.

Completed forms should be numbered with an alpha-numeric Reference


Number showing source and number, e.g. IC/ 03 denotes the third form issued
by the Incident Controller. Otherwise, the date and time should be inserted.

2.4 Supplied Forms

POLREP, SITREP and LOG Forms are supplied in hard copy at the end of this
Appendix. All other forms are supplied with the NT MOP Manual CD ROM.

DPC OSCP-D 26/02/2013 Page D-1 of 8


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX D

Table D.1 List of Incident Management Team Forms

Form No. Title Purpose


Reporting and Message Forms
REP 01 Marine Pollution Incident Report Report details of the incident for initial assessment and
Form (POLREP). planning.
REP 02 Marine Pollution Situation Report Report current status of the response and incident.
(SITREP).
REP 03 Title TBA. Detailed incident reporting form to be sent to AMSA.
REP 04 Message Form. Memos, faxes, telephone call messages.
REP 05 Message Cover Sheet. Used to preface documents for dispatch or for messages to
be relayed to a large number of people.
Incident Control
IC 01 IMT Key Role Allocation and Documents the names and contact details of IMT members.
Contacts An equivalent status Board is also used.
IC 02 Contact List Lists IMT members and contact numbers.
Incident Action Plan (IAP) Forms
IAP 01 IAP Part 1: Strategy Aim, Objectives and Strategies
IAP 02 IAP Part 2: Tactics Tactics (methods), resources required and deployments.
IAP 03 IAP: Deployment
Status and Resource Tracking Forms
STA 01 Status Update: Incident details To document and authorise inputs and changes to the
STA 02 Status Update: Weather. respective Status Boards.
STA 03 Status Update:
Tides/Sunrise/Sunset. The forms may be used as an alternative to the use of
STA 04 Status Update: Environmental Status Boards in lower Tiered responses or where wall
Resources at Risk. space for Status Boards is limited.
STA 05 Status Update: Meeting Schedule.
STA 06 Status Update: Media Schedule. The Forms allow the tracking of activities, equipment and
STA 07 Status Update: Equipment personnel resources and document activities of the
Deployment. Operations Section Units.
STA 08 Status Update: Personnel
Deployment. Once Status boards have been updated these forms would
STA 09 Wildlife Status be sent to the Records Unit/ Finance and Administration
STA 10 Section for filing.
Status Update: Media/ Public
Bulletins.
Workforce Management Forms
WM 01 Labour Registration Form. To determine suitable allocation of personnel to Tasks.
WM 02 Personnel Assignment Form. Used to assign personnel to Section/ Units/ Tasks.
WM 03 General Work Order Form. Provides authority, guidelines and instructions for the
undertaking of specific Tasks.
WM 04 Workplace Incident Form. Used to report incidents or other occurrence that require
remedial action.
WM 05 Personal or Section/ Unit Log To record Personal, Section or Unit work activities.
Logistics Forms
LO 01 Resource Requisition/Allocation To request resources (equipment/materials/personnel), and
Form. to track the acquisition, allocation and delivery of these.
LO 02 Equipment Tracking Log To track supply/return of equipment from Logistics Section
or stores.
Specialist Forms (Numbered according to Section and Unit)
OA 01 Aerial Observation Report Form To record aerial surveillance flight observations.
OS 01 Shoreline Assessment Form. To document oil distribution on specific shorelines.
OS 02 Shoreline Status Tracking Form. To track shoreline assessment and cleanup activities.
OW 01 Waste Tracking Form. To track waste generated, transported and stored.
LC 01 Radio Communications Allocation Logs the allocation of equipment and frequencies to IMT
Sections and Units.
LM 01 Medical Resources. Lists the Medical resources available and contact details.
OSTM Oil Spill Trajectory Model Form Form to be filled out and sent to AMSA in order to get Oil
Spill Trajectory run of spill.

DPC OSCP-D 26/02/2013 Page D-2 of 8


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM FORM
REP 01

MARINE POLLUTION INCIDENT REPORT


(POLREP)
This POLREP is to be completed with as much information as possible (regardless of the
size of the spill) and faxed to:
NT MPC at DLP Marine , Fax: (08) 8924 6868, and

Duty Officer, AMSA, EPG Fax: (02) 6230 6868


Other: __________________ Fax: ________________
Date/Time of Report _____/_____/_____ ____:_____ (24 hr) Ref. No.
Date/Time of Incident
Location of Incident
Latitude Longitude
Original Report Source Name

Position

Contact Address
Telephone
Fax
Mobile
Nature of the Incident
& Spill Source

Point of Discharge
Identity &Position of
Adjacent Vessels
(if source unknown)

Cause of Discharge
Oil Type or Description
Nature & Extent of
Pollution

Movement & Speed of


Movement

Has Discharge Stopped?


TURN OVER FOR PAGE 2 OF POLREP

DPC OSCP-D 26/02/2013 Page D-3 of 8


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM FORM
REP 01
POLREP PAGE 2
Weather/ Sea/ Tide
Conditions

Combat Agency
Incident Controller Name
Contact Telephone
Fax
Mobile
Statutory Agency
Initial Response Actions

Samples Taken? Yes No If Yes, Detail


Images Taken? If Yes, Detail Photographs Video Digital Photo
(Tick Box)

Additional Information

POLREP Prepared By Name


Agency
Position/ Role
Contact Telephone
Fax
Mobile
Attachments? Yes No I If Yes Note No of Pages Attached: ______

DPC OSCP-D 26/02/2013 Page D-4 of 8


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM FORM
REP 02

MARINE POLLUTION SITUATION REPORT (SITREP)


Precedence Urgent Immediate Standard Ref. No.
This Form is to be completed with as much information as possible (regardless of the size of the spill)
and faxed to:
NT MPC at NT DLP Marine, Fax: (08) 8924 7009, and
Duty Officer, AMSA, EPG Fax: (02) 6230 6868
Other: __________________ Fax: ________________
Final SITREP? Yes No Next SITREP ___:____ on ___ / ___ / ___
Date/Time
POLREP Reference
Incident Name
Latitude Longitude
SITREP Prepared By Name
Agency
Position/
Role
Contact Telephone
Fax
Mobile
Summary of Events
Since Last Report
(POLREP/SITREP)

Expected
Developments

Areas Threatened

Planned Actions

TURN OVER FOR PAGE 2 OF SITREP

DPC OSCP-D 26/02/2013 Page D-5 of 8


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM FORM
REP 02
SITREP PAGE 2
Details of Assistance
Required

Other information

Attachments? Yes No I If Yes Note No of Pages Attached: __________

DPC OSCP-D 26/02/2013 Page D-6 of 8


Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN
INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM FORM
WM 05

PERSONAL LOG OR SECTION/ UNIT LOG


Spill Incident Ref. No.
Name/ Section Unit

Date Time Details Cost

Page No:____________

POD OSCP-D 01/07/2002 Page D-7 of 8


Amendment: 00
DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY SECTION
PLAN
1
INTRODUCTION

1.1 AIM AND OBJECTIVES

1.1.1 Aim

To minimise the effect of any marine oil pollution incident in Port of Darwin
waters, through rapid, effective and appropriate response procedures.

1.1.2 Objectives

1. To ensure that the Port of Darwin and other NT agencies respond


according to the priorities set out in Section 1.2, or according to the
response aims and priorities set by the NT SC or Incident Controller during
a response .
2. To ensure a full and effective integration and utilisation of NT and National
response efforts and resources.
3. To ensure that procedures are consistent with those set out in the NT
Marine Oil Pollution Manual (NT MOP Manual).
4. To identify protection and cleanup priorities.
5. To protect the interests of Port of Darwin, employees and local community,
through objectives 1-4.

This OSCP details the Port of Darwin response to marine oil pollution. NT
administrative procedures and preparedness guidelines are provided in the
NT MOP Manual.

1.2 PRIORITIES

The priorities of any marine oil pollution response are, in decreasing order of
importance, the protection of:

1. Human health and safety.


2. Habitat and cultural resources.
3. Rare and/or endangered flora and fauna.
4. Commercial resources.
5. Recreational and amenity areas.

1.3 AUTHORITY

This OSCP has been prepared and issued in accordance with the NT response
arrangements detailed in NT Plan (ref. NT MOP Manual).

The Darwin Port Corporation (DPC) has Statutory Agency responsibility for the
combat of spills within the Port of Darwin under the NT Darwin Port
Corporation Act, 1999.

Statutory Agency and Combat Agency responsibilities are shown in Figure 1.1.
DPC OSCP-01 26/02/2013 Page 1-1 of 6
Amendment: 00
DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY SECTION
PLAN
1
INTRODUCTION
Shoreline responsibilities are summarised in Table 1.1

DPC OSCP-01 26/02/2013 Page 1-2 of 6


Amendment: 00
DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY SECTION 1
PLAN

Commonwealth Waters:
SA = AMSA
CA = RP/AMSA

Offshore E&P:
SA = DOR
CA = RP

NT Waters:
SA = DLP Marine
Within Ports: M =
CA i RP/DLP Marine
SA = Port Authority
CA = Terminal Operator/RP
or Port Authority

(Note RP = Responsible Party, CA = Combat Agency, SA = Statutory Agency)

Figure 1.1 Statutory and Combat Agency Responsibilities in NT


and Adjacent Commonwealth Waters

Table 1.1 Statutory and Combat Agencies for Shorelines

Jurisdiction Source Statutory Combat Agency (1)


of Spill Agency Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3
Within Mining Any NT DOR Company or Company or offshore Combat
Leases RP (Spiller) Agency (DLP Marine) if
associated with a spill at sea.
Commonwealth Any Comm Dept. Responsible NT DLP Marine, Port or other
land administering the Party, or as in Agency at the request of the
land Tier 2/3 if Commonwealth or landowner.
Aboriginal title Any Relevant Land source is
Council unknown
Crown land Any NRETAS /other NRETAS or offshore Combat
designated Agency (DLP Marine) if
Authority associated with a spill at sea.
Leasehold land Any Leaseholder
Freehold land Any Local authority Local authority
(1) Response Tiers, or levels of response, are defined in Section 2.
(2) Land spills of noxious and hazardous substances are dealt with under the NT Fire and Rescue
Service Standard Operating Procedure No 001: HAZMAT. AMSA is the Statutory and Combat
Agency for spills of hazardous and noxious substances from vessels in Commonwealth waters.
DIPE Marine is the Statutory Agency for these spills in NT waters . The DLP Marine would call

DPC OSCP-01 26/02/2013 Page 1-3 of 6


Amendment: 00
DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY SECTION 1
PLAN

upon the assistance of the NTPFRS in order to fulfil the Combat


Agency role.
1.4 DARWIN PORT CORPORATION RESPONSIBILITIES

As Statutory Agency for marine oil pollution in the Port of Darwin, the DPC will:

Maintain and update this OSCP.


Maintain an adequate level of response preparedness in Port of Darwin.
Participate on the NT Marine Pollution Management Committee.
Act as Combat Agency for oil spills in Port of Darwin.
Support other Combat Agencies for spills outside of Port of Darwin.
Undertake investigations and prosecutions.
In consultation with the nominated NT MPC (DLP Marine), facilitate
activation of suitable cost recovery procedures.

1.5 RESPONSIBILITY OF OTHER AGENCIES

The roles and responsibilities of Government and Port agencies are detailed in
the NT MOP Manual (Module B) and summarised in Table 1.2.

1.6 SCOPE OF THE PLAN

1.6.1 Area Covered

The Port of Darwin OSCP applies to all oil spills that occur within the Port of
Darwin.

1.6.2 Spill Source

This OSCP covers spills that may occur from vessels operating within the Port,
shore facilities within the Port or from unknown sources. Identified potential,
spill sources, locations, sizes and oil types are noted in Table 1.3.

1.6.3 Oil Types

Strategies in this OSCP relate to the oils likely to be spilt in Port of Darwin:

Intermediate Fuel oil (IFO) Diesel. Jet fuel-A.


Heavy fuel oil (HFO). Aviation gasoline Lubricating oils.
Motor spirit. (Avgas).

The character and behaviour of these oils are included in Appendix D.

1.7 INTEGRATION WITH OTHER PLANS

The NT OSCP is consistent with:

NT Marine Oil Pollution Manual.


NT Oil Spill Contingency Plan.
NT Fire and Rescue Service Standard Operational Procedures.
Port of Milner Bay (GEMCO) OSCP.
Nhulunbuy (Alcan) Oil Spill Contingency Plan.
DPC OSCP-01 26/02/2013 Page 1-4 of 6
Amendment: 00
DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY SECTION 1
PLAN

Offshore exploration and production facility plans.


Bing Bong Oil Spill Contingency Plan.

DPC OSCP-01 26/02/2013 Page 1-5 of 6


Amendment: 00
DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY SECTION 1
PLAN

National Plan to Combat Pollution of the Sea by Oil and Other Noxious and
Hazardous Substances (the National Plan or NATPLAN).
AMOSC (AMOSPlan).

Table 1.2 Summary of Spill Response Responsibilities of Other Agencies

Agency Key Responsibilities


Port Maintain and document a satisfactory level of (Tier 1) response preparedness by;
Authorities Providing and maintaining suitable spill response equipment.
and Training and equipping a suitable team of personnel to manage a Tier 1 level
Corporations response and to assist NT agencies in Tier 2/3 responses.
Undertaking regular exercises and participation in NT and National Plan
exercises.
Maintaining National Plan or other equipment on loan to the Port.
NRETAS Provision of advice for cleanup of shorelines under NTG jurisdiction.
Through the ESC, provide advice to the IC and NT MPC on natural and
socioeconomic resources.
Operate the Oil Spill Response Atlas (OSRA).
Provide advice on waste management.
Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able. Coordination and supply
personnel and other resources for the capture, cleanup and management of
oiled wildlife.
Through the ESC, provide advice to the IC and NT MPC on natural resources.
Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able.
DOR DOR, through its Petroleum Operations Section, is the Statutory Authority for
non-vessel spills resulting from offshore exploration and production activities in
NT waters and contiguous Commonwealth waters.
In the event of a Tier 2 or Tier 3 response, NT DBIRD will request the
assistance of either AMSA or DIPE Marine in fulfilling the role of Combat
Agency.
NT Assist the Incident Controller, as required.
Emergency Provide communications for remote marine oil pollution incident responses.
Services and Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able.
NT Police
Fire and Support the Combat Agency in responding to chemical spills.
Rescue During an oil spill response assist the Incident Controller by providing NT FRS
Services equipment as appropriate.
Local Cleanup oil on shorelines if impact is minor. Otherwise,
Government Provide local advice on areas threatened by pollution.
Assistance with liaison between the Incident Controller and local communities.
Provision of personnel and equipment for shoreline cleanup operations.
NT Work Safe Assist the Incident Controller in maintaining safe working conditions during the
response (ref. NTMOP Manual Module C).
Australian Provide skilled individuals from the National Response Team.
Maritime Provide advice to the Incident Controller, NT MPC and/or NT SC.
Safety Run oil spill trajectory analyses.
Authority Mobilise fixed-wing aerial dispersant spraying aircraft.
(AMSA) Mobilise equipment from interstate or overseas.
Assist in the tracking of suspect vessels.
Assist in the sampling of oils from suspect vessels.
Assist in salvage operation.
Undertake search and rescue (via AusSAR, a division of AMSA).
AMOSC Supply equipment and operators upon request from a member company or
AMSA.
DPC OSCP-01 26/02/2013 Page 1-6 of 6
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DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY SECTION 1
PLAN

1.8 SPILL RISKS IN PORT OF DARWIN WATERS

Locations at which oil spills can be expected to occur, and oil types that could be
released at each location, are shown in Table 1.2. Table 1.2 also provides
potential spill volumes that could arise from a variety of incidents.

Table 1.3 Indicative Oil Spill Volumes for Various Spill Scenarios in Port of Darwin

Source Incident Location(s) Oil Potential


Type Volume(1)
Offshore Grounding or Darwin Diesel Fuel
Supply collision(Total loss) Harbour Cargo Diesel 500 t
Vessel Lube oil
Loading accident Diesel Small <1 t
Tug/Pilot Grounding (Total Within Port Diesel 100t (Est. total
Vessel loss) fuel held).
Collision Channel or 25 t (1 tank)
Berth
Fishing Fuel bunkering Frances Bay Diesel Small < t
Vessels accident Mooring Basin
Fishermans
Wharf
Grounding or Channel/wharf Diesel 12t (Est. total
collision(Total loss) fuel held).
Fuel Tanker Grounding Any Cargo Diesel. Up to 3,000t
Note: Tanker (Total loss) Motor spirit. (1 centre tank
size usually Avgas. +2 wing
36,000 dwt Kerosene. tanks).
Heavy fuel oil 1,000t (Total
fuel loss).
Collision Wharf Cargo Diesel. 700t
Channel Motor spirit. (1 wing tank).
Other Avgas.
Kerosene.
Heavy fuel oil 500t (1 tank).
Unloading accident Wharf Cargo Diesel. 160t Based on
Wharf pipeline Wharf Motor spirit. 15min
break Possible spill Avgas. discharge &
into storm- Kerosene. pumping rate
water drains of 650 tph.
leading to
Sandgroves
Creek and
Frances Bay.
Onshore Tank rupture Stuart Park Diesel, Motor spirit, Negligible.
Storage Avgas or Kerosene. tanks are
Tanks bunded
(1) Indicative maximum credible scenario. Actual volumes will vary according to vessel
configuration and incident character.
(2) HFO is unlikely to be spilt in this scenario as most vessels have bottom tanks.

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DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY SECTION 1
PLAN

DPC OSCP-01 26/02/2013 Page 1-8 of 6


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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX

OIL CHARACTER E
1.0 OILS IN NT AND DARWIN PORT WATERS

Table E.1 lists the type and character of oils transported in NT coastal waters
and the Port of Darwin. Of these, crude oils are unlikely to enter Darwin.

Table E.1 Oils Transported in NT and Darwin Port Waters

Oil Oil Density Viscosity Flash Pour


Name Group (S.G) (cSt)(1) Point (oC) Point (oC)
Motor Spirit-Leaded I 0.755 <1 30 Low
Motor Spirit-Unleaded I 0.7306 <1 38-40 Low
Aviation Gasoline (Avgas) I 0.79 <2.0 40 -80 <-40
Jet Fuel-A I 0.7973 ~4.0 38-40 Low
Diesel II 0.8272 3.5 50-60 Low
Lubricating Oils III 0.86 - 0.88 Variable 50 to very Low
(30-240) high
Heavy Fuel Oil (HFO) IV >0.95 High Very high High
Crudes II-IV Variable Variable Variable Variable
(1) At 15.5oC. All are fluid except some fresh or weathered Heavy Fuel oils.

Many marine spill response methods are limited by oil characteristics


(e.g. viscosity) or characteristics of the slick (surface area or slick thickness). It
is important, therefore, to determine or predict the properties and behaviour of
oils at sea.

Oil properties and behaviour depend not only on oil type but also on ambient
conditions, particularly temperature, winds and sea state.

A general review of oil character and the implications of these for spill response
can be found in NT MOP Manual (Module M).

2.0 OIL BEHAVIOUR

Table E.2 General Weathering Trends for Various Oil Types

Weathering Motor Avgas Jet Fuel- Diesel Lube HFO


Process Spirit- A Oils*
Spreading. Rapid Rapid Rapid Rapid Rapid- Slow-
Moderate Moderate
Evaporation High Moderate Moderate Low Very Low*
Emulsification Little or no Low*- Moderate*- High High(1) Low-High
tendency Moderate High
Physical Rapid Rapid Rapid Rapid Variable Low
Dispersion
Dissolution Little Little LittleLittle or Little or Little
None None*
Photo-oxidation Not Not Not Not Not Not
significant significant Significant significant significant significant
Sedimentation Very Low Very Low Low Probability unless in Moderate Moderate-
Probability Probability contact with muds High*
(1) Highly variable characteristics between oils of the same group

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DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY APPENDIX
PLAN E

Table E.3 Predicted Persistence Oils at Sea


(Figures Indicate % Remaining at Sea)(1)

Volume Time Motor Avgas Jet Diesel Lube HFO


Spilled after Spill Spirit Fuel Oils*
1 hr 17 40 66 69 100 100
2 hrs 9 21 47 52 99(>150) 99
10 3 hrs * 14 36 40 98 (>190) 98
tonnes 4 hrs * 9 27 30 98 (230) 97
5 hrs * * 21 23 97 (270) 96
6 hrs * * 16 17 97 (>300) 95
7 hrs * * 13 12 96(>300) 94
8 hrs * * 10 9 96>300) 93
9 hrs * * * * 96(>300) 92
12 hrs * * * * 95 (>300) 89 (100)
24 hrs * * * * 92 (300) 82 (120)
36 hrs * * * * 89 (300) 79 (120)
48 hrs * * * * 86 (>280) 75 (120)
1 hr 35 66 80 100 100
2 hrs 23 42 65 100(150) 100
3 hrs 16 29 56 61 100 (200) 100
4 hrs 13 21 48 100 (240) 99
100 5 hrs 10 15 41 100 (270) 99
tonnes 6 hrs * 12 35 39 100 (300) 99
7 hrs * 9 30 100 (300) 98
8 hrs * * 26 100 (300) 97
9 hrs * * 23 26 100 (>300) 96
12 hrs * * 14 15 99 (>300) 91
15 hrs * * 10 9 98 (>300) 90
18 hrs * * * * 97 (>300) 88
24 hrs * * * * 96 (>300) 87
48 hrs * * * * 92 (>300) 79 (120)
1 hr 47 80 88 100 100
2 hrs 34 59 78 100 (150) 100
3 hrs 26 45 70 73 100 (200) 100
500 6 hrs 14 21 51 55 100 (300) 100
tonnes 9 hrs 10 13 44 42 100 (300) 99
12 hrs * * 27 32 100 (>300) 98
15 hrs * * 24 100 (>300) 97
18 hrs * * 16 17 100 (>300) 96
21 hrs * * 10 12 100 (>300) 95
24 hrs * * * * 100 (>300) 94
48 hrs * * * * 97 (>300) 84 (120)
* = Oil slick expected to be broken up
(1) Weathering rates assume sea temperatures of 250C, and winds of 15 knots. Higher wind speeds
and warmer seas would increase losses.
(2) See Table 5.
(3) Volumes in brackets indicate potential volume of slick taking into account emulsification
These should be considered upper estimates.
(4) Numbers in italics are for spill volumes above those that can be spilt in NT.

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DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY APPENDIX
PLAN E

3.0 RESPONSE IMPLICATIONS

3.1 Group I Oils

The rapid spreading rates of these oils indicates that containment strategies are
unlikely to succeed in the open sea. Inshore containment using booms deployed
in a collection array may be possible.

The rapid evaporation rate and low flash point indicate that containment
strategies should only be attempted after initial weathering has occurred and
only if sensitive resources are threatened

These oils pose a significant health and safety risk when fresh.

The use of dispersants is not warranted unless the oil poses a fire risk and other
fire prevention strategies (e.g. use of foam) are unavailable. Dispersant use is
generally not advisable because:

The oil film is too thin for effective application, or


Dispersed oil would be toxic to marine life.
The oil is not persistent.

3.2 Diesel Fuel Oil

Although classed as persistent oils, diesels are expected to undergo a rapid


spreading and evaporative loss in warm waters and, consequently, slicks are
likely to break up. Diesel oils tend not to form emulsions at temperatures or
mixing energies likely to be found in the region and so this will not inhibit
spreading of the slick or evaporation rates.

Modelling of diesel using the ADIOS Model indicate that up to 80% of a small
diesel spill would be dissipated within 6 hours of release. Less than 10% of the
oil is likely to persist beyond 24 hours post spill (Table E.2).

The rapid spreading rate of diesel presents problems for containment strategies
at sea but if contained, diesel is easily recovered with sorbent or oleophilic disc
skimmers.

Although dispersible, the rapid spread makes this strategy ineffective; i.e. the oil
film is generally too thin

3.3 Lubricating Oils

Lubricating oils are highly persistent and are characterised by a very high
tendency to form emulsions with seawater and a low evaporation rate. These
features can combine to produce large volumes of mousse at sea in a
relatively short time

The viscosity of the emulsions can, with continuous weathering, present


difficulties for dispersant application and recovery using skimmers

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DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY APPENDIX
PLAN E

3.4 Heavy Fuel Oils (HFO)

Heavy fuel oils are carried by bulk carriers as fuel. Although highly variable in
their composition, all HFOs are highly persistent and have high viscosities. They
are prone to emulsify, after a short period of weathering.

Viscosity is considerably increased by weathering. Emulsification may also


result in a significant increase in the volume of the slick.

4.0 USING ADIOS TO PREDICT OIL BEHAVIOUR

The Automated Data Inquiry for Oil Spills (ADIOS) program models the
behaviour of oil under various conditions.

The model requires the user to input:

Oil type (by name).


Spill volume.
Instantaneous spill or timed release.
Wind speed.
Wave height (or set defaults based on wind).
Sea temperature.
Sea salinity and density (or defaults based on temperature).

Output is either as a table or graph and includes:

Changes to oil:
- Density.
- Viscosity.
- Water content (emulsification).
Evaporative loss.
Physical dispersion.
Oil budget, i.e. percentage or volume of oil lost and remaining at sea.

Note: ADIOS provides for the volume of oil remaining at sea. For emulsified
oils, the slick volume must be adjusted for water content:

Slick Volume = Oil Volume


(1-water content)

E.g: If there is 10m3 of oil remaining and the water content of the slick is 60%
then there is 25m3 of emulsion still at sea, i.e:

Slick volume = 10 = 10 = 25m3


(1- 0.6) 0.4

Note: ADIOS does not model the behaviour of oils on shorelines.

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PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX

MAINTAINING PREPAREDNESS F
F.1 MAINTAINING THE OSCP

The DPC Harbourmaster, as nominated Incident Controller, is responsible for:

Holding the Master Copy of the OSCP.


Ensuring that copies of the OSCP are distributed.
Distributing revised Pages, Sections or Appendices to all holders of
controlled OSCP copies.
Maintaining the OSCP distribution record.

Responsibility for maintaining the currency of the various OSCP Sections and
Appendices is shown in Table F.1.

Table F.1 Revision Schedule for the OSCP

Section Title Frequency of Review


1 Introduction
2 Response Organisation
3 Reporting and Activation After any significant change to DPC,
4 Incident Control NT or National organisation
5 Planning
6 Operations After each exercise or spill response.
7 Marine Response
8 Shoreline Response
9 Waste Management
10 Logistics
11 Finance and Administration
12 Terminating the Response
App A Operating Procedures
App B Equipment & Support Services Annual
App C Environmental Information Annual
App D Documentation Annual
App E Oil Character After introduction of any new oil type.
App F Maintaining Preparedness Annual
App G Contact Directory 6 months

F.2 TRAINING

Training is essential if personnel are to act quickly, effectively and safely.

Table F.2 shows the levels of training desirable for personnel nominated against
the various IMT roles (See section 2).

Available training courses are described in Section F.2.1

Table G.1, in Appendix G, lists personnel nominated against spill response roles.
This should be monitored against the requirements stipulated in Table F.2.

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Amendment 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX F

Table F.2 Levels of Training for Nominated IMT Members

Training(1)
Response Function Operators Familiarisation ICS/AIIMS/IMT Field Desk-Top Other
and level Course Course Management Exercise exercise
Incident Controller 2 2 2 1 1
Community Liaison Officer 2 1
Incident Safety Officer 2 1
Environment and Scientific ESC Workshop
Coordinator
Environmental Coordinator 2 ESC Workshop
Media Liaison Officer 2 1
Planning Officer 2 1
Planning Unit Coordinators 3 1
Operations Officer 2 2 3 1 1
Marine Coordinator 1 2 1 1
Marine Response Team 1 3 1 1
Shoreline Coordinator 2 1 1 2 Shoreline
Shoreline Team Leaders 3 1 1 Cleanup Course
OH&S Coordinator 3 1
Waste Management Coordinator 3 1
Logistics Officer 2 1
Logistics Unit Coordinators 3 1
Communications Coordinator
Finance and Administration Officer 2 1
Finance and Admin Unit Coordinators 3 1
(1) Numbers refer to frequency of training, i.e. 1 indicates a suitable course once per year, 2 indicates a course every two years,
0.5 indicates a course/exercise twice a year. Course descriptions are provided in Section F.2.1.
(2) Plus appropriate qualifications for task, e.g. radio operators license for Communications Coordinator and Medical Qualifications for Medical Coordinator

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PLAN F

Table 6.2 Summary of Available Training Courses


Course Presented By Duration
Environmental Training (see also Shoreline Courses)
Environmental and Scientific Coordinators Workshop AMSA 3 days
Scientific Response 2 days
Familiarisation Courses
Oil Spill Management Workshop AMSA 3 days
Oil Spill Response Workshop AMOSC 4 days
Oil Spill Familiarisation Course ORCA 3 or 4 days
Finance and Administration Courses
Oil Spill Administration Workshop AMSA 2 days
Operator Training (Equipment)
Oil Spill Operators Workshop (Geelong or on-site) AMOSC 3 days
(1)
National Response Team Training AMSA
Oil Spill Equipment and Deployment Workshop ORCA 1-3 days(1)

Exercises (Desk Top and/or Field)


National Plan Exercise AMSA and Approx. 2
(varying national locations, every two years) States/NT days
Oil companies and numerous other private AMOSC Variable but
companies do these. Link usually 1 day
ORCA
Shoreline Response Training
Shoreline Response Workshop AMOSC 2 days
Shoreline Response Workshop AMSA 2 days
Shoreline Response Course (Familiarisation) ORCA 2 days
Shoreline Response Management Course ORCA 1-2 days
Shoreline Assessment Course ORCA 1 day(1)
Higher Management Courses
State Marine Pollution Controllers Workshop AMSA 2 days
Management Overview Workshop AMOSC 1 day

(1) Variable course length.

PoD OSCP-F F-3 of 4


Date of Issue: 01/09/2002
Amendment: 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN
Appendix
RESPONSE ORGANISATION GF

TABLE OF CONTENTS

0.0 PORT OF DARWIN


0.1 Darwin Port Corporation

1.0 NORTHERN TERRITORY


1.1 Spill Response Nominated Positions
1.2 NT Government Agencies
1.3 NT Ports
1.4 NT Oil Industry Mutual Aid Contacts
1.5 Other NT Support Agencies/ Contacts

2.0 NATIONAL AGENCIES


2.1 Commonwealth Government
2.2 National Industry

3.0 INTERSTATE AGENCIES


3.1 New South Wales
3.2 Queensland
3.3 South Australia
3.4 Tasmania
3.5 Victoria
3.6 Western Australia

4.0 OTHER AGENCIES

GENERAL EXTERNAL EMERGENCY NUMBER: 000

DIPE POLLUTION HOTLINE: 1800 064 567

PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL EMERGENCY: 8999 3974 / 8922 0675

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RESPONSE ORGANISATION GF

0.0 PORT OF DARWIN


0.1 Darwin Port Corporation
Oil Spill Emergency Number 8999 3974 1800 064 5
8922 0675
DPC Office 8922 0655
DPC Harbourmaster Tony O Malley 8999 3867 0428 181 480 0428 181 480 8941 203
Nominated Incident Controller
Andrew Hays 8999 3972 0400 237 661 0400 237 661

Marine Pilots Duty Pilot 8999 1361


Nicholas Leonard 8999 5330 0459 818 058 0459 818 058

Ian Bennett 8999 5330 0428 699 009 0428 699 009

Elliot Bibby 8999 5290 0427 743 412 0427 743 412

Chris Cooper 8999 5305 0401 117 058 0401 117 058

Alistair Logan 8999 5124 0401 117 071 0401 117 071

Simon Howorth 8999 5305 0401 117 075 0401 117 075

Andy Hughes 0400 629 864 0400 629 864

Fort Hill Wharf Gate House 8981 0461 0401 117 057
East Arm Gate House 8947 4205 0401 117 090

1.0 NORTHERN TERRITORY


1.1 Spill Response Nominated Positions
Chairman, NT State Committee Nicholas 8924 7322 0401 116 097 0401 116 097 8924 732
Papandonakis
NT Spill Commander Nicholas 8924 7322 0401 110 268 0411 110 268 8924 793
Papandonakis
Deputy NT Spill Commmander Simon Saunders 8924 7453 0401 110 092 0401 110 092 8924 700

Marine Pollution Coordinator John Abbey 8924 7101 8924 700

Deputy Marine Pollution Coordinator Brad Thompson 8924 7103 0408 896 937 8924 700

Environment and Scientific Nigel Green 8924 4050 0401 118 331 0401 118 331 8924 405
Support Coordinator (ESC)
AMSA Darwin Doug Robinson 8947 3794 0418 899 000 0418 899 000 8947 387

1.2 NT Agencies
1.2.1 Bureau of Meteorology
Darwin Office 8920 3826 8920 3826 8920 380
Severe Weather Warnings 8982 3820 8920 3820
Cyclone Warnings 8982 3820 1300 659 211 1902 935 2
Coastal Water 1902 935 2
Satellite Pictures Aust. Region 1902 935 2
WA 1902 935 2
1.2.2 Department of Mines and Energy
Energy Division 8999 5299
Director Ball Russell 8999 5460 8999 553

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RESPONSE ORGANISATION GF

Director Alan Holland 8999 5357 8981 710

1.2.3 Department of Lands, Planning and the Environment


Pollution Hotline 1800 064 567
Media Liaison Officer Martin Bennett 8924 7004 0400 301 761 0400 301 761 8924 704
Executive Director, Transport Adrian Murray 8924 7038 0401 110 268 0401 110 268 8924 793

Director, Marine Safety Garry Mayer 8999 5242 8941 6442 0408 840 475 8999 530

Marine Pollution Coordinator Jas Anand 8999 5238 8945 6882 0408 802 575 8999 530

Environment and Heritage Office 8924 4139

ESC Janice Warren 8924 4002 8980 7335 8924 405

OSRA Kathy Nash 8924 4022 8924 405

1.2.5 Department of Land Resource Management


Environment and Heritage Fiona Ku 8924 4139 8924 405

ESC
Parks and Wildlife
Director Operations Bill Binns 8999 4560 0401 111 710 8999 455

Wildlife Rescue 8999 4536

1.2.6 NT Emergency Service


Assistant Director Mike Bowman 8922 3639 8988 1770 0417 858 143 8947 216

Headquarters 8922 3630 8922 3344 8947 216


NT Fire and Rescue Service
Headquarters 8946 4107 000 8946 412
Chief Fire Officer Darryl Pepper 8946 4124 8946 412

Asst Chief Fire Officer Bob Newman 8946 4124

Commander Geoff Barnes 8946 4102

1.2.7 NT Police
Headquarters 8922 3344 000 8927 038
1.2.8 Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries
Darwin Office 8999 2133 8999 208
1.2.9 Aboriginal Areas Protection Authority
Darwin Office 8981 4700 8981 416
1.2.10 Work Health
Manager OH&S Neil Watson 8999 5140 0401 116 867 8999 514

1.2.11 Indigenous Lands/Heritage


Northern Land Council 8920 5100
1.2.12 RAN
Port Manager Darwin David Plummer 8935 5420 0407 612052
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1.3 NT Ports
1.3.1 Darwin
DPC Harbourmaster Tony O Malley 8999 3867 0428 181 480 0428 181 480 8941 203

Assistant Harbourmaster Andrew Hays 8999 3972 0400 237 661 0400 237 661 8941 203

1.3 NT Ports Continued


1.3.2 Groote Eylandt (GEMCO)
Port Operations Superintendent Wayne Fielder 8987 4251 8987 4425 8987 420

Harbourmaster/Pilot Peter Stanley 8987 4284 8987 7153 8987 420

1.3.3 Gove (Alcan Gove Pty Ltd)


Plant Services Manager Jim Watters 8987 5385 0417 810 343 8987 540

Port Captain Helen Cole 8987 5416 0418 856 062 8987 541

Marine Manager Mike Brown 8987 5417 0417 840 910 8987 541

Gate House 8987 5345


1.3.4 Bing Bong
Asst Port Captain Jorgen Berg/ 8975 9850 8975 9799 8975 982
Phil Barry

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1.4 NT Oil Industry Mutual Aid Contacts


BP Darwin Larry Neelands 8946 8901 0410 479 479 0410 479 479 8946 894

Shell Darwin Steve Roe 8936 1223 8983 3661 0418 533 741 8941 150

Mobil Darwin Garry Hinchcliffe 8981 5199 8981 0051 0417 353 128 8981 690

Offshore Jabiru/Challis 0411 222 292


Northern Endeavour Mike Willett 08 9348 4724 0408 900 745 08 9348 53

1.5 Other NT Support Agencies/ Contacts


1.5.1 Air Services: Fixed Wing
Air North Darwin Peter Renton 8920 4070 8920409
Wimray 8945 2755 8945 2755 8945 273
Pearl Aviation Darwin Fergus 8920 6666 0418 951 568 8945 366
OBranagain
MAF (Nhulunbuy) 8987 2777 8987 2600 8987 243
Northern Air Charter 8945 5444 8945 597
Laynhapuy Aviation (Nhulunbuy) 8987 3155 0418 804 599 8987 145

1.5.2 Air Services: Helicopters


Bristow Helicopters (Darwin) Graham Morley 8945 4310 0419 769 202 0419 769 200 8945 427
CHC Helicopters (Darwin AP) Veronica 8945 3888 0408 372 880 8945 385
Robertson
Jayrow 8945 0944 8945 0944 8945 157
Laynhapuy (Nhulunbuy) 8987 3155 0418 804 599 88987 14
Arafura Helicopters 8948 2982 0414 898 128 8948 216
Far North Helicopters 8955 5803 0413 940 617
1.5.3 Marine Services
Gulf Freight Services 8947 5122 8947 376
Tiwi Barge 8947 1118 8947 026
TOLL Shipping Darwin Ron Mason 8982 2000 8941 041
Darwin Tug and Line Les Barolits 8981 4588 0418 890 130 8981 457
1.5.4 Road Transport
Ascot Haulage Darwin 8984 4922 8984 4442 8984 373
Brambles Darwin 8924 1333 0418 893 060 8947 224
Toll Express Darwin 8984 4466 8984 496
1.5.5 Waste Contractors
Darwin City Council 8982 2582 0405 327 576
Wastemaster 8935 1111 8932 4577
NT Liquid Waste & Oil Recyclers 8947 2688 0417 225 300 8947 267
Collex Waste Management 8932 4297 8932 533

2.0 NATIONAL AGENCIES

2.1 Commonwealth Government


2.1.1 AusSAR Rescue Coordination Centre
Aviation 02 6230 6899 1800 815 257 1800 6230
Maritime call for: Aerial Dispersant 02 6230 6811 1800 641 792 1800 6230
Spray mobilisation & Oil Spill

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Trajectory modelling
2.1.2 Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA)
Maritime Operations EMERGENCY 02 6253 4400 02 6257 2
Duty Officer (via RCC) Duty Officer 02 6230 6811 1800 641 792
GM Maritime Operations David Baird 02 6279 5935 0418 622 824 02 6279 5
(Commonwealth MPC)
Manager Env. Protection Group Ray Lipscombe 02 6279 5929 02 6269 0800 0418 633 107 02 6279 5
2.1.3 Civil Aviation Safety Authority
Office 131757 131757
2.1.4 Dept Industry, Science and Resources
Gen. Mgr. Exploration & Devpt. Steve Payne 02 6272 4595 02 6272 4
Manager, Offshore Safety Paul Butler 02 6271 6632
2.1.5 Australian Customs Service (Coastwatch)
Canberra Office 1800 061 800 02 6275 6

2.2 National Industry


2.2.1 Australian Marine Oil Spill Centre
Office 03 5272 1555 03 5272 1
Emergency 0438 379 328

AMOSC Manager Don Blackmore 03 5272 1555 0418 398 363 0418 398 363
2.2.2 Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association (APPEA)
Office 02 6247 0960

3.0 OTHER STATES

3.1 New South Wales


State Marine Pollution Controller Matt Taylor 02 9364 2004 02 9962 9000 0411 261 086 02 9364 20
02 9563 8601 #241 919

3.2 Queensland
State Marine Pollution Controller John Watkinson 07 3224 2809 0419 300 152 0419 300 152 07 3221 0

Queensland Transport Jim Huggett 07 3224 2832 07 3224 2832 0417 705 571 07 3404 30

Principal Advisor (MEPU) John Wright 07 3224 2620 0417 704 680

Senior Advisor (Legal) Jeff Hardy 07 3224 2830


Pollution Emergency Plans 07 3224 8939
Senior Technical Officer Chris Priestly 07 3404 3045
Senior Maritime Officer Kimberly Foster 07 3404 3967

3.3 South Australia


State Marine Pollution Controller Carl Kavena 08 8347 5063 08 8378 2380 0408 848 129 08 8347 50

Deputy MPC Walter Ferrao 08 8347 5022 0401 124 170

SA ESC Peter Pfennig 08 8204 2065


Primary Industries & Res. SA Adelaide Office 08 8274 7680 08 8373 32
Petroleum Operations, Director Bob Laws 08 8274 7612

3.4 Tasmania

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RESPONSE ORGANISATION GF

State Marine Pollution Controller Warren Jones 03 6233 6336 03 6235 4431 0418 526 242 03 6233 56

3.5 Victoria
Victorian MPC Joe Buffone 03 9655 9783 0409 958 090
Vic ESC David Ball 03 52810210
Mineral and Petroleum Victoria Office 03 9412 5103 03 9412 5
(Dept. Natural Resources and
Environment)

3.6 Western Australia


WA Dept of Minerals & Petroleum Petroleum 08 9222 3622 08 9222 35
Resources (DMPR) Operations
Safety Branch Manager 08 9222 3254 08 9386 1996 0408 931 393 08 9222 37
Richard Craddock
Safety Branch Duty Officer 08 9480 9096
Petroleum Operations, Director 08 9222 3291 08 9447 9646
Ian Fraser
Petroleum Technologist 08 9222 3267 08 381 7191
Steve Walsh
Snr Env. Assessor Graham Cobby 08 9222 3142 08 9222 31

WA Police, Dampier 08 9183 1144 08 8927 8888 08 9183 10

WA Dept for Planning and Office


Infrastructure , Transport
Executive Director, Maritime Dennis Forte 08 9239 2100 0419 909 832 08 9239 22
(Chairman,State Committee)
Director, Marine Safety 08 9239 2105 08 9239 22
Manager, Environment Protection John Brooker 08 9216 8902 08 9482 4839 0417 038 157 08 9216 89
Unit (ERG Coordinator)

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RESPONSE ORGANISATION GF

Marine Environment Protection Unit Con Sappelli 08 9216 8233 08 9342 4078 0418 924 143 08 9216 89

Marine Emergency Ops Centre Duty Officer 08 9216 8272 08 9216 8999 08 9216 89
(0800-1700, 7days)

4.0 OTHER AGENCIES


AMR Adelaide (Fixed Wing Dennis Elliot 08 8281 8433 08 8281 8433 0419 817 235 08 8281 3
Dispersant Contract Services)*
Asia Pacific ASA East Brian King 07 5574 1112
(Trajectory modelling) West Scott Langtry 08 9382 1468
Briggs Marine Environmental Hakan Lange 0011 60 3 291 0011 60 0011 603
Service Malaysia (SE Asia/Pacific) 0688 123304225 0699
Aberdeen John McMertie 0011 44 1224 0011 44 1224 0011 44 1
898 666 898 666 896 950
CR Cox = P&I Clubs Ajay Tandon 08 9339 8222 08 9316 4849 041187 1311 08 933980

East Asia Response (EARL) +65 266 1566 + 65 266 1566 +65 266 2
Singapore
Leeder Consulting John Leeder 03 9434 4551 0418 344 987 0418 344 987 03 9435 2
(Oil and other analysis)

ORCA (Oil Spill Response Colin Moore 03 9689 0668 0414 839 849 0414 839 849 03 9397 34
Company Australia)
Oil Spill Response (OSRL) +44 2380 331 +44 208 345 +44 468 537 +44 2380
Southampton, UK 551 6789#OIL 39 489 972
Taronga Park Zoo Sydney General 02 9969 2777 02 9925 3911 02 9969 7
(Wildlife Cleaning) # 299 011
Senior Curator Erna Walraven 02 9978 4609 02 9807 3558 019 129 956 02 9978 4
United Salvage 07 3895 1031 07 3895 1031 07 3895 1
Contact via AMSA if Fixed Wing Aerial Dispersant is required.

2.1 NATIONAL PLAN ARRANGEMENTS

Administrative arrangements under the National Plan are detailed in the NT


Module E of the MOP Manual.

Available incident response support is detailed in Appendix B.

2.2 NT ADMINISTRATIVE ARRANGEMENTS

2.2.1 NT Plan

NT Plan comprises the NT Marine Oil Pollution Manual (NT MOP Manual) and
NT, Port and facility Oil Spill Contingency Plans.

The NT MOP Manual details the administrative arrangements for managing


marine oil pollution preparedness and response in NT together with guidelines
for procedures to be integrated into each OSCP.

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RESPONSE ORGANISATION GF

2.2.2 Nominated NT Officers

A number of response preparedness and incident response functions have been


assigned to individuals. The people assigned to these, and their day-to day job
titles, varies and so they are referred to in NT Plan and in this OSCP, by their
marine oil pollution management titles:

NT Oil Spill Commander (NT SC).


Deputy NT SC.
Chairman, NT Committee.
NT Marine Pollution Coordinator (NT MPC).
Environmental and Scientific Coordinator (ESC).

The identities and contact details of the current position holders are provided in the front of the
Contact Directory (Appendix G).

Incident response functions are outlined below. Administrative functions are


detailed in Module B of the NT MOP Manual.

2.3 PORT OF DARWIN RESPONSE PREPAREDNESS ARRANGEMENTS

Spill response preparedness in the Port of Darwin is coordinated by the


nominated DPC Incident Controller. This is the DPC Harbourmaster.

Procedures for the maintenance of response preparedness are detailed in


Appendix F.

2.4 DIVISION OF RESPONSIBILITY

The National Plan Administrative Arrangements defines Statutory Agencies and


Combat Agencies. As used in NT Plan, these terms are defined below.

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2.4.1 Statutory Agency

The agency having the legislative responsibility for responding to marine spills in
the area in which the incident has occurred, or else for ensuring that an
appropriate response is mounted by the Responsible Party (i.e. the spiller) or
other nominated agency.

2.4.2 Combat Agency

The Combat Agency is the agency nominated to have operational control over
the spill response. NT Combat Agencies are listed in Table 2.1.

2.4.3 Support Agencies



These include any agency that provides, or may provide, essential services,
personnel or material to support a spill response. This may be through the
Combat Agency or other Support Agency. Support Agencies may be
Government or Non-Government agencies.

2.5 LEVELS OF RESPONSE: RESPONSE TIERS

Spill response is based on a number of levels, or Tiers (Table 2.1). Each Tier is
defined according to the level of resources committed, support agencies and the
agency assuming the role of Combat Agency.

Table 2.1 Description of Response Tiers(1) in Port of Darwin Waters

Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3


Level of Control
Responsible Party Active: IMT(2) Support Roles IMT(2) Support Roles
Incident Control
Port of Darwin Notified/ Standby Active: Active:
(nominated Incident or Active(4): Incident Control(3) Incident Control(3)
Controller) Incident Control
NT DLP NT MPC Notified/Active Active
Marine (Monitoring/Standb Support/ Coordination of Resources
y)
NT SC Notified Notified Active
(Support/Monitoring) (High level control)
Possible Triggers for Determining Response Tier(4)
Indicative Spill Size(4) 0 10 tonnes 10-1,000 >1,000 tonnes
tonnes
Potential for Economic Low Moderate High
or Environmental (Not Significant) (Local or Short-term (Regional or Long-
Damage or Harm Significance) term Significance)
(1) Procedures for the determination of the Tier are detailed in Section 3.3.
(2) IMT = Incident Management Team. In most cases the Responsible Party will be involved in higher
Tiered responses but will not generally be in control of the response.
(3) For spills in NT waters, the Control Agency may be NT DIPE Marine or other agency nominated
by the NT SC.
(4) Indicative only. Highly dependent on a number of considerations.

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2.6 SPILL RESPONSE ORGANISATION: THE INCIDENT MANAGEMENT TEAM

Operational control of all oil spill responses rests with the Incident Management
Team (IMT) under the control of an Incident Controller (IC).

2.6.1 IMT Functions and Roles

IMT functions and roles are outlined in Table 2.2. These functions are allocated
to the IMT members as required.

2.6.2 Size and Structure

Responsibility for determining the size and structure of a Tier 1 IMT rests with
the nominated Incident Controller.

2.6.3 Tier 1 Response

A large response team is not required for a Tier 1 response or small Tier 2
response and some people can be allocated a number of roles.

DPC CEO NT SC

Incident Controller ESC

Media Liaison Marine Shoreline


Officer Coordinator Coordinator

Waste Logistics
Management Officer
Coordinator
Control
Support/Advice

Figure 2.1 Indicative Tier 1 Incident Management Team

Note Responsibility for determining the size and structure of the IMT rests with the
nominated Incident Controller in consultation with the NT SC or NT MPC.

2.6.4 Tier 2 and Tier 3 Responses

A large response will require a large team and each function will be assigned to
an individual or even a response Section, Unit or Team. Figure 2.2 illustrates
the distribution of functions, and the names of IMT members, for a major
response.

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NT Spill NT Counter
Commander Disaster
Committee
Upper Tier 2
& Tier 3 DPC CEO
NT Marine
Pollution Coordinator
Media Liaison
Officer
ESC

Tier 1 &
Lower Tier 2 Incident Controller Advisers

Community Liaison Officer Incident Safety Officer

Planning Operations Logistics Finance & Admin


Officer Officer Officer Officer

Response Marine Procurement Administration


Planning Coordinator Coordinator
Coordinator
Coordinator
Aviation Services Finance
Situation Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator
Coordinator
Shoreline Transport Records
Resource Coordinator Coordinator Coordinator
Coordinator
Wildlife Medical ICC
Environment Coordinator Manager Manager
Coordinator
Staging Area
H&S
Consultation Coordinator Managers
Coordinator
Waste Communications
Management Coordinator
Coordinator
Control
Support
Note (1) The Environmental and Scientific Coordinator (ESC) may be with the NT MPC or

proceed to the ICC to advise the Incident Controller.

Figure 2.2 Incident Management Team Structure for a Major Response

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2.6.5 Nominated IMT Positions

Personnel nominated against key IMT roles (Figure 2.1) are listed in the front of
the Contact Directory (Appendix G).

2.7 RESPONSE SUPPORT

2.7.1 The Port of Darwin Crisis Management Team (CMT)

For incidents that threaten the operation of the Port. The DPC Incident Controller, in consultation
with the DPC CEO, may mobilise a Crisis Management Team. The composition of this team will
reflect the nature of the incident and management strategies required.

2.7.2 NT Plan Resources

The NT MPC will coordinate provision of NT and National Plan (see below)
equipment and human resources for any response in NT waters.

2.7.3 National Plan Resources

National Plan equipment and personnel from the National Response Team
(NRT) are also available from the Australian Maritime Safety Authority. This can
be accessed through the DLP Marine (NT MPC or NT SC).

DLP Marine may request AMSA to coordinate the supply of equipment or


personnel directly with the nominated Incident Controller.

Additional support services are listed in Appendix B.

2.7.4 Industry Support

Industry assistance is available through the Australian Marine Oil Spill Centre
(AMOSC), an industry funded response facility based at North Corio Quay,
Geelong, Victoria. AMOSC resources include:

AMOSC spill response equipment.


Oil company equipment based at various locations.
Trained industry response (Core Group) personnel.

Procedures for accessing oil industry assistance for a spill response, through
AMOSC, are documented in AMOSPlan.

Resources are available directly to member Companies at the request of one of


the affected Oil Companys Authorising Officers, or to Port Authorities through
AMSA.

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Table 2.2 NT and DPC Incident Management Roles (ref. Figure 2.2)

Function Role
NT Command and NT Spill Commander Monitor the progress of all marine oil pollution response in NT w
Support (NT SC) adjacent Commonwealth waters, through the NT MPC.
Appoint the Incident Controller for responses under the jurisdiction of
Marine.
Undertake high level management of a spill response including all liai
the Office if the Chief Minister, the Minister and his/ her advisers
Management of media and public relations, i.e.,
- Overseeing media response through the Media Liaison Unit.
- Authorising press releases/media information bulletins.
- Participating in media interviews/press conferences as require
Liaising with teams managing other aspects of a major incident,
Salvage, fire and other emergency response and search and res
NT Deputy SC The Deputy NT SC will assist the NT SC as required.
NT Marine Pollution The NT MPC will provide support to the Incident Controller during an
Coordinator response. This includes:
(NT MPC) Monitor the response and coordinating the supply of any additional
equipment from within NT or from interstate as required.
Provide technical or scientific support by mobilising the ESC or o
advisers and support personnel.
Liaise with AMSA for the provision of on-site assistance.
Keep the NT SC (or Deputy NT SC) informed.
NT Environmental The ESC will:
and Scientific Provide support to the Incident Controller.
Coordinator (ESC) Coordinate and collate environmental and other scientific advice as
required.
Mobilise and manage OSRA officer for the provision of maps and info
from the OSRA database, and integration with AMSA oil spill trajecto
Media Liaison Manages media relations. Prepares press statements, organises pre
briefings and supports the IC/NT SC in dealing with media.

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Table 2.2 Continued Incident Management Roles (ref. Figure 3.2)
Function Role
Incident Control Incident Control The overall planning and control of the spill response.

Incident Safety For larger responses an Incident Safety Officer (ISO) may be appoin
oversee sites safety management.

Community Liaison The Community Liaison Officer (CLO) is responsible for liaising with
(Indigenous) indigenous communities affected by the incident and for organising a
indigenous lands and for the protection of cultural resources.

The coordination, monitoring and review of Incident Action Plans. Planning personnel will colla
Planning information and consolidate the policy, objectives, strategies and tactics developed by the Incid
Controller/IMT. Specific functions include:
Situation The collection, processing and organisation of information. E.g. oil s
trajectory modelling, weather, sea-state.
Resources Tracking of the deployment of resources.
Environment Responsible for the collection and collation of environment data/ adv
obtaining environmental data from OSRA, the ESC and local source
Consultation Consultation with the non-indigenous community and commercial op
Directs all field operations in the response.
Operations Marine Coordination and direction of all activities undertaken by waterborne
equipment.
Aviation Coordination and direction of all activities undertaken utilising aircraf
aerial dispersant spraying, aerial surveillance and transport.
Shoreline Planning and coordination of shoreline assessment and cleanup act
Wildlife Implementation of the NT Oiled Wildlife Plan, i.e. the collection, trea
rehabilitation of oiled wildlife.
Health and Safety Development and implementation of the Health & Safety Sub-Plan.
Waste Management Coordination of the containment, storage, transport and disposal of
oil and oily waste. Also instruction in on-site handling, storage and/o
separation and treatment.

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Table 2.2 Continued Incident Management Roles (ref. Figure 2.2)


Function Role
Logistics Responsible for ensuring that the IMT is provided with adequate resources to enable an effecti
response. Specific functions include:
Procurement Acquisition of personnel and equipment.
Services Acquisition of services and facilities.
Transport Provision of aviation, land and sea transport services.
Communications Preparation of Communications Sub-Plan and for ensuring the provi
communications services and support.
Medical Provision of medical services where needed.
Finance and Responsible for the provision of administrative services to the IC, Sections and Units of the IMT
Administration the management of financial (costs) information. Functions include:
Administration Administrative services to operate telephones, facsimiles, computers
(if qualified) and messenger services.
Finance Accounting and contracting services.
Records Collation and filing of records and forms including, time sheets, equi
usage records and personnel records.
ICC Management Ensures effective operation of the ICC, including management of inf
transfer of within the ICC, (Status Boards, faxes/ messages delivery
despatch), administering the meeting schedule, ICC security etc.

1.1 AIM AND OBJECTIVES

1.1.1 Aim

To minimise the effect of any marine oil pollution incident in Port of Darwin
waters, through rapid, effective and appropriate response procedures.

1.1.2 Objectives

1. To ensure that the Port of Darwin and other NT agencies respond


according to the priorities set out in Section 1.2, or according to the
response aims and priorities set by the NT SC or Incident Controller during
a response .
2. To ensure a full and effective integration and utilisation of NT and National
response efforts and resources.
3. To ensure that procedures are consistent with those set out in the NT
Marine Oil Pollution Manual (NT MOP Manual).
4. To identify protection and cleanup priorities.
5. To protect the interests of Port of Darwin, employees and local community,
through objectives 1-4.

This OSCP details the Port of Darwin response to marine oil pollution. NT
administrative procedures and preparedness guidelines are provided in the
NT MOP Manual.

1.2 PRIORITIES

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The priorities of any marine oil pollution response are, in decreasing order of
importance, the protection of:

1. Human health and safety.


2. Habitat and cultural resources.
3. Rare and/or endangered flora and fauna.
4. Commercial resources.
5. Recreational and amenity areas.

1.3 AUTHORITY

This OSCP has been prepared and issued in accordance with the NT response
arrangements detailed in NT Plan (ref. NT MOP Manual).

The Darwin Port Corporation (DPC) has Statutory Agency responsibility for the
combat of spills within the Port of Darwin under the NT Darwin Port
Corporation Act, 1999.

Statutory Agency and Combat Agency responsibilities are shown in Figure 1.1.
Shoreline responsibilities are summarised in Table 1.1

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Commonwealth Waters:
SA = AMSA
CA = RP/AMSA

Offshore E&P:
SA = DOR
CA = RP

NT Waters:
SA = DLP Marine
Within Ports: M =
CA i RP/DLP Marine
SA = Port Authority
CA = Terminal Operator/RP
or Port Authority

(Note RP = Responsible Party, CA = Combat Agency, SA = Statutory Agency)

Figure 1.1 Statutory and Combat Agency Responsibilities in NT


and Adjacent Commonwealth Waters

Table 1.1 Statutory and Combat Agencies for Shorelines

Jurisdiction Source Statutory Combat Agency (1)


of Spill Agency Tier 1 Tier 2 Tier 3
Within Mining Any NT DOR Company or Company or offshore Combat
Leases RP (Spiller) Agency (DLP Marine) if
associated with a spill at sea.
Commonwealth Any Comm Dept. Responsible NT DLP Marine, Port or other
land administering the Party, or as in Agency at the request of the
land Tier 2/3 if Commonwealth or landowner.
Aboriginal title Any Relevant Land source is
Council unknown
Crown land Any NRETAS /other NRETAS or offshore Combat
designated Agency (DLP Marine) if
Authority associated with a spill at sea.
Leasehold land Any Leaseholder
Freehold land Any Local authority Local authority
(1) Response Tiers, or levels of response, are defined in Section 2.
(2) Land spills of noxious and hazardous substances are dealt with under the NT Fire and Rescue
Service Standard Operating Procedure No 001: HAZMAT. AMSA is the Statutory and Combat
Agency for spills of hazardous and noxious substances from vessels in Commonwealth waters.
DIPE Marine is the Statutory Agency for these spills in NT waters . The DLP Marine would call

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upon the assistance of the NTPFRS in order to fulfil the Combat


Agency role.
1.4 DARWIN PORT CORPORATION RESPONSIBILITIES

As Statutory Agency for marine oil pollution in the Port of Darwin, the DPC will:

Maintain and update this OSCP.


Maintain an adequate level of response preparedness in Port of Darwin.
Participate on the NT Marine Pollution Management Committee.
Act as Combat Agency for oil spills in Port of Darwin.
Support other Combat Agencies for spills outside of Port of Darwin.
Undertake investigations and prosecutions.
In consultation with the nominated NT MPC (DLP Marine), facilitate
activation of suitable cost recovery procedures.

1.5 RESPONSIBILITY OF OTHER AGENCIES

The roles and responsibilities of Government and Port agencies are detailed in
the NT MOP Manual (Module B) and summarised in Table 1.2.

1.6 SCOPE OF THE PLAN

1.6.1 Area Covered

The Port of Darwin OSCP applies to all oil spills that occur within the Port of
Darwin.

1.6.2 Spill Source

This OSCP covers spills that may occur from vessels operating within the Port,
shore facilities within the Port or from unknown sources. Identified potential,
spill sources, locations, sizes and oil types are noted in Table 1.3.

1.6.3 Oil Types

Strategies in this OSCP relate to the oils likely to be spilt in Port of Darwin:

Intermediate Fuel oil (IFO) Diesel. Jet fuel-A.


Heavy fuel oil (HFO). Aviation gasoline Lubricating oils.
Motor spirit. (Avgas).

The character and behaviour of these oils are included in Appendix D.

1.7 INTEGRATION WITH OTHER PLANS

The NT OSCP is consistent with:

NT Marine Oil Pollution Manual.


NT Oil Spill Contingency Plan.
NT Fire and Rescue Service Standard Operational Procedures.
Port of Milner Bay (GEMCO) OSCP.
Nhulunbuy (Alcan) Oil Spill Contingency Plan.
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Offshore exploration and production facility plans.


Bing Bong Oil Spill Contingency Plan.

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National Plan to Combat Pollution of the Sea by Oil and Other Noxious and
Hazardous Substances (the National Plan or NATPLAN).
AMOSC (AMOSPlan).

Table 1.2 Summary of Spill Response Responsibilities of Other Agencies

Agency Key Responsibilities


Port Maintain and document a satisfactory level of (Tier 1) response preparedness by;
Authorities Providing and maintaining suitable spill response equipment.
and Training and equipping a suitable team of personnel to manage a Tier 1 level
Corporations response and to assist NT agencies in Tier 2/3 responses.
Undertaking regular exercises and participation in NT and National Plan
exercises.
Maintaining National Plan or other equipment on loan to the Port.
NRETAS Provision of advice for cleanup of shorelines under NTG jurisdiction.
Through the ESC, provide advice to the IC and NT MPC on natural and
socioeconomic resources.
Operate the Oil Spill Response Atlas (OSRA).
Provide advice on waste management.
Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able. Coordination and supply
personnel and other resources for the capture, cleanup and management of
oiled wildlife.
Through the ESC, provide advice to the IC and NT MPC on natural resources.
Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able.
DOR DOR, through its Petroleum Operations Section, is the Statutory Authority for
non-vessel spills resulting from offshore exploration and production activities in
NT waters and contiguous Commonwealth waters.
In the event of a Tier 2 or Tier 3 response, NT DBIRD will request the
assistance of either AMSA or DIPE Marine in fulfilling the role of Combat
Agency.
NT Assist the Incident Controller, as required.
Emergency Provide communications for remote marine oil pollution incident responses.
Services and Supply personnel to the IMT as required and able.
NT Police
Fire and Support the Combat Agency in responding to chemical spills.
Rescue During an oil spill response assist the Incident Controller by providing NT FRS
Services equipment as appropriate.
Local Cleanup oil on shorelines if impact is minor. Otherwise,
Government Provide local advice on areas threatened by pollution.
Assistance with liaison between the Incident Controller and local communities.
Provision of personnel and equipment for shoreline cleanup operations.
NT Work Safe Assist the Incident Controller in maintaining safe working conditions during the
response (ref. NTMOP Manual Module C).
Australian Provide skilled individuals from the National Response Team.
Maritime Provide advice to the Incident Controller, NT MPC and/or NT SC.
Safety Run oil spill trajectory analyses.
Authority Mobilise fixed-wing aerial dispersant spraying aircraft.
(AMSA) Mobilise equipment from interstate or overseas.
Assist in the tracking of suspect vessels.
Assist in the sampling of oils from suspect vessels.
Assist in salvage operation.
Undertake search and rescue (via AusSAR, a division of AMSA).
AMOSC Supply equipment and operators upon request from a member company or
AMSA.
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1.8 SPILL RISKS IN PORT OF DARWIN WATERS

Locations at which oil spills can be expected to occur, and oil types that could be
released at each location, are shown in Table 1.2. Table 1.2 also provides
potential spill volumes that could arise from a variety of incidents.

Table 1.3 Indicative Oil Spill Volumes for Various Spill Scenarios in Port of Darwin

Source Incident Location(s) Oil Potential


Type Volume(1)
Offshore Grounding or Darwin Diesel Fuel
Supply collision(Total loss) Harbour Cargo Diesel 500 t
Vessel Lube oil
Loading accident Diesel Small <1 t
Tug/Pilot Grounding (Total Within Port Diesel 100t (Est. total
Vessel loss) fuel held).
Collision Channel or 25 t (1 tank)
Berth
Fishing Fuel bunkering Frances Bay Diesel Small < t
Vessels accident Mooring Basin
Fishermans
Wharf
Grounding or Channel/wharf Diesel 12t (Est. total
collision(Total loss) fuel held).
Fuel Tanker Grounding Any Cargo Diesel. Up to 3,000t
Note: Tanker (Total loss) Motor spirit. (1 centre tank
size usually Avgas. +2 wing
36,000 dwt Kerosene. tanks).
Heavy fuel oil 1,000t (Total
fuel loss).
Collision Wharf Cargo Diesel. 700t
Channel Motor spirit. (1 wing tank).
Other Avgas.
Kerosene.
Heavy fuel oil 500t (1 tank).
Unloading accident Wharf Cargo Diesel. 160t Based on
Wharf pipeline Wharf Motor spirit. 15min
break Possible spill Avgas. discharge &
into storm- Kerosene. pumping rate
water drains of 650 tph.
leading to
Sandgroves
Creek and
Frances Bay.
Onshore Tank rupture Stuart Park Diesel, Motor spirit, Negligible.
Storage Avgas or Kerosene. tanks are
Tanks bunded
(1) Indicative maximum credible scenario. Actual volumes will vary according to vessel
configuration and incident character.
(2) HFO is unlikely to be spilt in this scenario as most vessels have bottom tanks.

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OIL SPILL EQUIPMENT H


G.1 Oil Spill Equipment AMSA

AMSA has the following equipment in Darwin;

600 meters of Slickbar MKE 32 solid flotation boom in 15 meter lengths


250 meters of Zooom self inflating curtain boom in 25 meter lengths
460 meters of Structure flex land sea booms in 20 meter lengths
5 x 100 meter kits of Structure flex air inflated curtain boom with
accessories
1 Vikoma rapid deployment high sprint off shore boom kit in 10 foot
container
1 Nofi current buster sweep system in 10 foot container
2 land sea boom accessory kits for land sea booms ( pump, blower and 4
anchors )
2 Honda / Onga pump and blower kits for land sea booms
2 x 5 of 30kg anchor kits in nally bins
4 x 5 of 15kg anchor kits in nally bins
1 Ori Piranha rope mop skimmer in a trailer
2 x 15 ton multi head skimmer
1 x 50 ton weir skimmer with brush adaptor
2 x 2.6 ton transpacs for temporary liquid waste
1 x 20 ton towable storage bag for liquid waste
2 x Alfedo vessel dispersant spray systems
2 X Simplex helicopter spray buckets
1 aircraft dispersant transfer pump kit complete with dry break coupling
1 portable dispersant transfer pump
Components of wild life kit

F.2 Oil Spill Equipment DPC

DPC has the following equipment in the Oil Spill Shed;

Boom Self-buoyant Slickbar (15m lengths)


Boom Structureflex land/sea (20m lengths)
Boom Self Buoyant Austpol D2 (fence boom) 60m
Tandem Trailer T81145
Land sea boom kits. In stillages each containing:
o 4 x 15kg anchor kits.
o 1 x stihl backpack blower.
o 1 x water pump.
o Hoses.
o Tow connector.
o Repair and tool kits.
Flexidam 10,000 litre
Skimmer Weir Foilex
Anchor kits 15kg
POD OSCP-H Date of Issue: 26/02/2013 Page: H-1 of 2
Amendment 00
PORT OF DARWIN OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY PLAN APPENDIX

OIL SPILL EQUIPMENT H


Vikospray pump unit and associated spray arms etc.

DPC has the following equipment in Oil Spill response trailers at the following
locations.

East Arm Wharf Oil Spill Trailer located at the Bulk Liquids Berth
3 x safety goggles
2 x brooms
1 rake
2 x shovel
150x 110 Pads (absorbent)
2 x safety sign
1 250 litre drum pump
4 x 20kg bucket of absorbent
40 dusk masks
2 high visibility vests
1 pair of orange overalls (97R)
1 pair of orange coveralls (107R)
4 pairs of disposable overalls
8 x absorbent
2 x floating boom
8 pairs of rubber gloves
2 x hard hats
1 x 12 volt electric pump
1 x 10 metre hose and wand
1 x 20 metre extension lead
1 battery charger
1 backpack spray unit
5 x AES 300 Boom
20 x BAT waste bags
2 pairs of riggers gloves
1 x BPAB jerry can
1 Battery

Fort Hill Wharf located next to the Stevedore Hut (key held in Control Tower);
9 x safety goggles
2 x brooms
2 x rake
2 x shovel
121 x 110 Pads (absorbent)
1 x safety sign
1 205 litre drum pump
20 dusk masks
2 high visibility vests
1 pair of orange overalls (97R)
4 x disposable overalls
6 metres of floating boom
3 x Absorbent
4 x safety cones

POD OSCP-H Date of Issue: 26/02/2013 Page: H-2 of 2


Amendment 00
DARWIN PORT CORPORATION OIL SPILL CONTINGENCY APPENDIX
PLAN H

5 x rubber gloves
3 x BPAB 20lt
2 x hard hats
0 petrol engine pump
1 x 9m hose & trigger
0 5m suction hose
1 rope
1 backpack spray unit
2 x AES300 Boom
2 x rigger gloves
20 x BAT waste bags.

Mooring Basin:
4 x safety goggles
2 x brooms
2 x rakes
2 x shovels
2 x squeegee
200 x pad110 pads
2 x safety signs
20 x dust masks
2 x high vis vest
9 x disposable overalls
4 x boom floating 6m
10 x absorbent
10 x safety cones
15 x rubber gloves
2 x BPAB 20lt
2 x hard hats
16 x safety glasses
1 x rope
1 x backpack spray unit
6 x AES300 boom
2 x rigger gloves
20 BAT waste bags

POD OSCP-H Date of Issue: 26/02/2013 Page: H-3 of 2


Amendment 00