Faculty of Science and Technology

MASTER’S THESIS

Study program/ Specialization:
Spring semester, 2011
Offshore Technology/Subsea Technology

Open / Restricted access

Writer:
Rika Afriana …………………………………………
(Writer’s signature)
Faculty supervisor:
Prof. Ove Tobias Gudmestad
External supervisor(s):
Prof. Jan Vidar Aarsnes
Einar B. Glomnes

Titel of thesis:

Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO, Moorings and Riser
Based on Numerical Simulation

Credits (ECTS):
30 ECTS
Key words:
Pages: 222 pages
Coupled Dynamic Analysis, Decoupled
Analysis, Cylindrical Floater, Moorings, Riser + enclosure: 159 pages
WADAM/HYDRO D, RIFLEX, SIMO,
SIMA MARINTEK
Stavanger, July 28, 2011
Date/year

Frontpage for master thesis
Faculty of Science and Technology
Decision made by the Dean October 30th 2009

1 Abstract
M.S.c. Thesis
Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO, Moorings and Riser
Based on Numerical Simulation

The hostile environments are presently one of the challenges that should to be deal with in 
offshore  floating  system  design  where  the  hydrodynamic  interaction  effects  and  dynamic 
responses dominate the major consideration in its design.  
Nowadays, the cylindrical FPSO is being extensively used as an offshore facility in the oil and 
gas  industry.  This  system  has  been  deployed  widely  around  the  world  as  a  unique  design 
facility which is regarded as a promising concept. As a floating offshore system, a cylindrical 
FPSO will be deployed together with slender members (moorings and risers) responding to 
wind, wave and current loading in complex ways.   
In  order  to  quantify  the  coupling  effects  between  each  component  in  an  offshore  floating 
system  and  the  associated  structural  response  in  offshore  structure  design,  two  kind  of 
analyses,  the  decoupled  analysis  and  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  have  been 
presented  in  this  thesis.  It  introduces  a  consistent  analytical  approach  that  ensures  higher 
dynamic  interaction  between  the  floater,  moorings  and  risers.  The  nonlinear‐coupled 
dynamic  analysis  requires  a  complete  model  of  the  floating  offshore  system  including  the 
cylindrical S400 floater, 12 mooring lines and the feasible riser configurations for the 6” and 
8” production risers. Furthermore, the results from the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis 
will  also  be  compared  to  the  separated  analyses  for  each  component  as  a  discussion  of  the 
analysis results. 
The frequency domain and time domain analysis will be implemented to solve the equation 
of motions at the simulations.  The simulation will be conducted in two simulation schemes, 
static  and  dynamic  conditions.  The  3  hours  +  build  up  time  will  be  used  in  the  dynamic 
condition  because  the  time  domain  requires  a  proper  simulation  length  to  have  a  steady 
result. 
Several software computer programs will be used in the analyses. In the separated analysis 
for each component in offshore floating system, the cylindrical floater hydrodynamic analysis 
as  a  decoupled  analysis  is  performed  by  using  the  integrated  software  program  Hydro  D 
which  is  related  to  several  support  software  programs  (Prefem, Wadam  and  Postresp).  For 
mooring  system  analysis  as  a  decoupled  analysis  will  be  analyzed  by  using  SIMO  in  time 
domain analysis. In SIMO, two models (the body model and the station keeping model) will 
be  required  and  the  quasi‐static  design  will  be  applied  as  the  design  method  in  mooring 
system analysis. The analysis for riser system also is done as the decoupled analysis in this 
study. The main purpose of this analysis is to find a feasible single arbitrary configuration for 

ii

each of the 6” and 8” production risers. The riser system analysis will also be performed in 
time domain analysis in RIFLEX for two simulation conditions, static and dynamic conditions. 
After  the  separated  analyses  for  each  component,  a  single  complete  computer  model  that 
includes a cylindrical floater, moorings and risers with use of SIMA will be as the nonlinear‐
coupled dynamic analysis. The analysis is performed in time domain for two conditions, static 
and dynamic conditions. The SIMA Marintek computer will be used in this study because it 
has  the  capability  to  integrate  the  cylindrical  S400  floater,  moorings  and  risers  as  one 
complete  model.  As  an  integrated  dynamic  system,  the  environmental  forces  on  the  floater 
induce  the  motions  which  will  be  introduced  in  a  detail  FEM  (Finite  Element  Model)  of  the 
moorings, risers and cylindrical S400 floater.   
In the end, not only the accurate prediction of the responses of the overall system but also the 
individual responses of the floater, mooring and risers are obtained. The summary of results 
between  the  decoupled  analysis  and  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  will  also  be 
presented briefly in this study. 

iii

1 Acknowledgement
M.S.c. Thesis
Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO, Moorings and Riser
Based on Numerical Simulation

 
This thesis is the final work of my graduate study at the Department of Offshore Technology, 
Faculty of Natural Science and Technology, University of Stavanger, Norway. The thesis has 
been  carried  out  from  February  until  June  2011  at  the  Research  and  Development 
Department in Sevan Marine AS, Arendal. 
I would like to acknowledge and extend my heartfelt gratitude to the following persons who 
have made the completion of this thesis possible:  
My  supervisor,  Professor  Ove  T.  Gudmestad  for  his  interest  to  this  thesis  and  for  his  great 
motivation  to  me.  Without  his  encouragement,  guidance  and  endless  supports,  this  thesis 
would not have been accomplished. Life blessed me with a lot of opportunity after I met him. 
My supervisor in Sevan Marine AS, Professor Jan V. Aarsnes for his advices during this study.  
My supervisor, Einar B. Glomnes who always helpful and willing to take some time togive me 
his guidances. His advices and knowledge are very valuable for this thesis.  
Kåre  Syvertsen,  for  giving  me  the  opportunity  and  providing  me  with  so  many  valuable 
facilities  during  the  thesis  work  at  the  Research  and  Development  Department  in  Sevan 
Marine AS, Arendal.  
Kåre  G.  Breivik,  for  giving  me  the  opportunity  to  write  my  thesis  at  the  Research  and 
Development Department in Sevan Marine AS, Arendal.  
Knot  Mo  and  Elizabeth  Passano  from  Marintek,  for  providing  guidance  regarding  SIMA 
Marintek computer software. 
The people from the Research and Development Department Sevan Marine AS for giving me 
such  a  wonderful  experience  during  this  study.  Tor  Stokke,  Irina  Kjærstad,  Torhild 
Konnestad, Alf Reidar Sandstad, Veslemøy U. Sandstad, Per Høyum. 
All  of  my  friends  in  University  of  Stavanger,  Norway  for  they  supportive  and  fun‐filled 
environment during our study period in University of Stavanger. For Indonesian heroes this 
year: Iswan Herlianto, Adri Maijoni, Eko Yudhi Purwanto, Sari Savitri, Winia Farida and Dian 
Ekawati.  We  have  to  be  very  proud  for  our  achievements.  The  special  thanks  for  Adedayo 
Adebayo, Tonje Charlotte Stald, Morten Langhelle, Henry Ezeanaka, Bamidele Oyewole, Mina 
Jalali,  Markus  Humel,  Jarle  Gundersen,  Ragnhild  O  Steigen,  Sahr  M.  Hussain,  Farhia  B.  Nur, 
Rakhshinda Ahmad and Fery Simbolon, Tomy Nurwanto, Hermanto Ang, Yahya Januarilham, 

iv
 

Surya Dharma, Sakti Tanripada, Sanggi Raksagati. Our university can’t be homie without you 
guys.  
Hans  Marthyn  Franky  Panjaitan,  Iqbal  Ruswandi,  Dilly  Soemantri,  Ahmad  Makintha  Brany, 
Airindy  Felisita,  Maurina  Adriana,  Agung  Ertanto,  Miftachul  Choiri,  Ronny  Costamte, 
Novithasari Dewi Anggraeni, Trimaharika Widarena and Ratna Nita Perwitasari. Many thanks 
for the guidance and valuable advices.     
Apak and Amak, for teaching me the love of science and the belief that almost anything can be 
accomplished  through  hard  work  and  determination.  I  especially  dedicated  this  thesis  for 
them. My brother and sister for their warm supports.  
My loving, supportive, encouraging, and patient soulmate Indra Permana whose faithful and 
always give me his endless support from the beginning till the end of time. This thesis would 
not  have  been  possible  without  his  contributions.    Thank  you  for  always  believe  in  me  to 
chase my dream and pursuit our happiness. Happy wedding! 
I offer my regards to all of those who supported me in any respect during the completion of 
this study. Finally, my greatest regards to Allah SWT for bestowing upon me the courage to 
face the complexities of life and complete this thesis. 
 
 
Rika Afriana 
 

v
 

Table of Contents
M.S.c. Thesis
Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO, Moorings and Riser
Based on Numerical Simulation

Abstract .................................................................................................................................................................................. ii

Acknowledgement ......................................................................................................................................................... iv

Tables of Contents ........................................................................................................................................................ vi

List of Figures .................................................................................................................................................................... ix

List of Tables .................................................................................................................................................................... xv

Chapter 1 Introduction
1.1 Background .............................................................................................................. 1-1
1.2 State of Art ................................................................................................................ 1-2
1.3 Problem Statement ................................................................................................... 1-4
1.4 Purpose and Scope .................................................................................................. 1-5
1.5 Location of Study ...................................................................................................... 1-6

Chapter 2 Theoretical Background
2.1 Equation of Motion for Floating Structure ................................................................. 2-1
2.2 Response of Single Body Structures........................................................................ 2-4
2.3 Second-Order Nonlinear Problems .......................................................................... 2-5
2.3.1 The Mean Wave (Drift) Forces ....................................................................... 2-6
2.3.2 The Slowly Varying (Low frequency) Wave Forces ....................................... 2-9
2.4 Frequency Domain and Time Domain Analysis ....................................................... 2-10
2.4.1 Frequency Domain Analysis .......................................................................... 2-10
2.4.2 Time Domain Analysis.................................................................................... 2-11
2.5 Fundamental Continuum Mechanics Theory and Implementation
of the Finite Element Method ................................................................................... 2-13
2.5.1 Fundamental Continuum Mechanics Theory ................................................. 2-13
2.5.2 Implementation of the Finite Element Method ............................................... 2-16
2.6 Coupling Effects ....................................................................................................... 2-20

Chapter 3 Environmental Conditions
3.1 Water Level .............................................................................................................. 3-3
3.2 Winds ........................................................................................................................ 3-4
3.2.1 The Wind Force Simulated In Time Domain .................................................. 3-5

vi

3.3 Waves ....................................................................................................................... 3-7
3.3.1 Regular waves................................................................................................ 3-7
3.3.2 Irregular Waves .............................................................................................. 3-13
3.4 Currents .................................................................................................................... 3-20
3.4.1 The Current Force Simulated In Time Domain .............................................. 3-22
3.5 Heading Dependency of Environmental Conditions................................................. 3-23

Chapter 4 Methodology of the Analysis
4.1 System Components ................................................................................................ 4-5
4.2 Method Analysis of Nonlinear-coupled dynamic ...................................................... 4-6
4.3 Numerical Simulation Steps ..................................................................................... 4-8

Chapter 5 Hydrodynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO S400
5.1 General Description .................................................................................................. 5-1
5.2 Model Concept and Analysis Steps .......................................................................... 5-4
5.3 Hydrodynamic Response and Stability Analysis ...................................................... 5-11
5.3.1 Stability Analysis ............................................................................................ 5-12
5.3.2 Transfer Functions ......................................................................................... 5-16
5.3.3 Mean Wave (Drift) Force ................................................................................ 5-23
5.3.4 Nonlinear Damping Effect .............................................................................. 5-31

Chapter 6 Moorings Analysis
6.1 Mooring Systems ...................................................................................................... 6-1
6.2 Mooring System Design ........................................................................................... 6-8
6.2.1 Basic Theory for Design ................................................................................. 6-8
6.2.2 Design Criteria................................................................................................ 6-10
6.2.3 Modeling Concept and Analysis Steps........................................................... 6-13
6.3 Moorings Analysis .................................................................................................... 6-21
6.3.1 Static Condition .............................................................................................. 6-21
6.3.2 Dynamic Condition ......................................................................................... 6-22

Chapter 7 Riser Analysis
7.1 Production Riser Systems ........................................................................................ 7-2
7.2 Flexible Riser Design in Shallow Water and Harsh Environments........................... 7-4
7.2.1 Riser Configuration Selections ....................................................................... 7-6
7.2.2 Design Parameters......................................................................................... 7-8
7.2.3 Design Criterion.............................................................................................. 7-9
7.2.4 Methodology Design and Analysis Steps ....................................................... 7-11
7.2.5 The Western Isles Field Layout and Model Properties for
the Riser System ............................................................................................ 7-13
7.2.6 Modeling Concept by RIFLEX ........................................................................ 7-15
7.3 Riser Analysis ........................................................................................................... 7-18
7.3.1 Layout and Schematic Riser Configuration .................................................... 7-18
7.3.2 Static Condition .............................................................................................. 7-21
7.3.3 Dynamic Condition ......................................................................................... 7-26

Chapter 8 Coupled Dynamic Analysis
8.1 Modeling Concept by SIMA Marintek ....................................................................... 8-2

vii

........2 Further Studies ............3 The Nonlinear-Coupled Dynamic Analysis for Slender Members .................................................................................................................. 8-7 8....................................1 Conclusions ............................ 9-9 References Appendix A Response Amplitude Operator (RAO) Appendix B Wave Drift Force Appendix C System Description SIMO Appendix D Riflex Decoupled Input Appendix E SIMA (RIFLEX+SIMO) Coupled Input Appendix F Hydro D Model viii .............................2............... 8-14 Chapter 9 Conclusions and Further Studies 9................................2 The System Response in the Nonlinear-Coupled Dynamic Analysis .................................1 Floater Motions........................................................... 8-7 8........... 9-1 9........... 8-12 8................................ 8..........2.....2 The Horizontal Offset Values .......

................................9 : Hs/Tp Omni directional Hs-Tp contour for the 100-years return period sea state................... ..6 : Bar element in initial and deformed configuration..2-18 Figure 2.........c....... ..................................... ...............................5 : Sinusoidal wave profile .3-6 Figure 3..................... .................................. .......................................................2-17 Figure 2................2-14 Figure 2..............................................................................2-10 Figure 2.......... ............................3-24 ix ............ ..............8 : Directional relative magnitudes of significant wave height..........................2-1 Figure 2...............2-19 Figure 3.......................................2 : Superposition of hydro mechanical and wave loads....3-14 Figure 3.........4 : Motion of a material particle...... ......................................2 : ISO 19901-1 wind spectrum for a mean wind speed of 20 m/s.............................................................................11 : Torsethaugen spectrum..............S........................ In the SIMO .................3-11 Figure 3.................................... Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation Figure 1................3-13 Figure 3.............................................................................3 : The relation between the waves and the motions..... .....................................................3-2 Figure 3..................... Directions are towards which current is flowing3....................3-20 Figure 3.............1 : Definition of location and measurement points for metocean data.....................1 : Definition of rigid-body motion modes................. List of Figures M............... .......................................... ......3-18 Figure 3..... ...............7 : The data for regular waves calculation in WADAM analysis........................ ..... Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO....1 : Floating offshore structure...................5 : Nodal point with translational and rotational degrees of freedom........................ ............. ................................ ...................................3-12 Figure 3...............8 : Prismatic beam....................................1-3 Figure 1.6 : Surface wave definitions based on WADAM ................. ...................................................4 : Atmospheric pressure at the free surface....2-5 Figure 2...........3-22 Figure 3........10 : Jonswap spectrum.............1-7 Figure 2...3-15 Figure 3.....................2-16 Figure 2........3 : Harmonic wave definitions...2 : Field overview...3-10 Figure 3....12 : Ten years directional current profile..3-8 Figure 3....7 : Nodal degrees of freedom for beam element...................13 : The distribution of heading probability of the environmental parameters ............................................................. ..................................................... .....

.. ..4-4 Figure 4....11 : The appearance of HydroD.................................................5-19 Figure 5....5-3 Figure 5...................21 : The amplitude of the response variable for surge in irregular wave condition.....5-22 Figure 5.........5-17 Figure 5... ....................................5-8 Figure 5.5-18 Figure 5. ... 5-24 x .................15 : The amplitude of the response variable for surge in regular wave condition......4-3 Figure 4........13 : Inclined a cylindrical floater S400......................2 : Schematic for nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis... ...........................................5-21 Figure 5.. ...... ... ............................3D model.2 : S400 FPSO .16 : The amplitude of the response variable for sway in regular wave condition.27 : The drift force.................................... ........5-19 Figure 5...........................5-22 Figure 5.................2D model...... ...........................5-7 Figure 5................... ... ..............................4-2 Figure 4.... ............22 : The amplitude of the response variable for sway in irregular wave condition...5-13 Figure 5....3 : Coupled floater motion and slender structure analysis........1 : S400 FPSO ............................5-21 Figure 5............... .... ..... ..4-8 Figure 4...5-5 Figure 5......5-4 Figure 5.. de-coupled analysis.......... .... ..........9 : The data for the Wadam mass models for the cylindrical floater S400........................ .......5-16 Figure 5.........5-10 Figure 5................................................................4-10 Figure 5....8 : Finite element models for a cylindrical floater S400..20 : The amplitude of the response variable for yaw in regular wave condition...10 : The hydrodynamic properties for the Wadam mass model....................3 : Overview of model types..........14 : The movement of GM from the ballasted to fully loaded condition..5-20 Figure 5...................... ... .5-11 Figure 5........ .........................................18 : The amplitude of the response variable for roll in regular wave condition............2D model............ far field versus the pressure integration in sway for regular waves............................4 : An integrated scheme analysis............................5-7 Figure 5.........Figure 3.....................................23 : The amplitude of the response variable for roll in irregular wave condition..12 : A cylindrical floater model of S400 model in HydroD.........25 : The amplitude of the response variable for yaw in irregular wave condition.... ....5-3 Figure 5....26 : The drift force-far field versus the pressure integration in surge for regular waves.. ........24 : The amplitude of the response variable for pitch in irregular wave condition......................... Wadam and Postresp as an integrated program for analysis of a cylindrical floater S400........... ................ .. . ................17 : The amplitude of the response variable for heave in regular wave condition.........14 : 100-years return period design significant wave height and wind speed .....4 : S400 FPSO ................ 5-24 Figure 5........5-23 Figure 5..........................5 : The relation between Prefem.........1 : Illustration of traditional separated analysis......................................................5-9 Figure 5. ...5-5 Figure 5...................... .......................6 : A simple procedure for the hydrodynamic analysis for a cylindrical floater S400...............5-6 Figure 5...............5-18 Figure 5...3-24 Figure 4.................19 : The amplitude of the response variable for pitch in regular wave condition................ .....................5 : Load cases combinations scheme analysis...........7 : Hydro model combinations.

.............. ..........5-31 Figure 5........Figure 5.. ...............5-29 Figure 5.................. far field versus the pressure integration in yaw for regular waves...................6-13 Figure 6..............................5-26 Figure 5... ......... ... ......... ...6-24 Figure 6.... ..........5-27 Figure 5........................... 6-7 Figure 6......... pressure integration in pitch for irregular waves..5-34 Figure 6... .....................38 : The non linear damping effect in surge for regular wave... .............6-20 Figure 6...... ............................................... .........39 : The non linear damping effect in sway for regular wave...............5-30 Figure 5..37 : The drift moment....... .....6-5 Figure 6.. ..........5-33 Figure 5......5-26 Figure 5..........6-21 Figure 6..........41 : The non linear damping effect in roll for regular wave. ...........5-32 Figure 5........11 : The calculation parameters for static and dynamic condition ..... pressure integration in heave for irregular waves....10 : Layout of the SIMO program system and file communication between modules. the low frequency motions for roll.............14 : The global motion response.................5 : The combined fairlead/chain stopper on a cylindrical S400 floater..................................6-9 Figure 6...... far field versus pressure integration in yaw for irregular waves.......42 : The non linear damping effect in pitch for regular wave.............................33 : The drift force..............6-2 Figure 6.............. pressure integration in heave for regular waves.8 : A simple procedure for mooring analysis........6-9 Figure 6.. ............................................40 : The non linear damping effect in heave for regular wave................13 : The global motion response.32 : The drift force....... the low frequency motions for heave........... ....30 : The drift moment.....28 : The drift moment....................35 : The drift force....1 : Environmental forces acting on a moored vessel in head conditions and the transverse motion of catenary mooring lines..... far field versus pressure integration in sway for irregular waves...............12 : The global motion response...........................7 : The forces acting on an element of mooring line.............................. pressure integration in roll for regular waves........................................5-25 Figure 5.......31 : The drift moment....................9 : The structural mass data for a cylindrical S400 floater................................. .....................36 : The drift moment.............34 : The drift moment........ the low frequency motions for surge...................... pressure integration in pitch for regular waves.....2 : Mooring lines layout overview...... .. .......4 : The movable winch on a cylindrical S400 floater..... ................................................................................. .........43 : The non linear damping effect in yaw for regular wave..................... .... .....................6-25 xi ..... .........5-29 Figure 5...... ...........................................5-28 Figure 5.............................6-3 Figure 6....................................... pressure integration in roll for irregular waves.............. .................5-30 Figure 5..6-24 Figure 6.......... far field versus pressure integration in surge for irregular waves...29 : The drift force................................................. .......................5-33 Figure 5. the low frequency motions for sway...........6 : The cable line with symbols..........5-32 Figure 5.........15 : The global motion response........3 : Mooring line composition.6-14 Figure 6..............................................5-28 Figure 5............... .... .....6-8 Figure 6..... ..................................6-23 Figure 6.....

.......................................................................... .............6-34 Figure 6...........37 : The second order wave forces – YR Forces (in Sway). ...............6-36 Figure 6... ..7-4 Figure 7........... ............8 : System definition for the description of the layout configuration design xii .... ..... ... ..........6-27 Figure 6....6-34 Figure 6........ .....27 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line4.....17 : The global motion response.................6-31 Figure 6......26 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line3..........40 : The drift damping forces – YR Forces (in Sway)..........36 : The second order wave forces – XR Forces (in Surge)... ........21 : The total global motion response.. the low frequency motions for yaw.6-33 Figure 6...........................................7-12 Figure 7.6-32 Figure 6........32 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line9.18 : The total global motion response................16 : The global motion response....... ....... .....................................5 : Methodology design for a riser system.7 : Layout of the RIFLEX program system and file communication between modules................... the low frequency motions for pitch....... .....6-31 Figure 6.............23 : The total global motion response.................... .................................38 : The second order wave moment – Moment ZR axis (in Yaw)..................................................................... ...7-3 Figure 7...........6-39 Figure 6...25 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line2........... the total frequency motions for sway.......7-13 Figure 7................7-16 Figure 7.1 : Examples of riser systems ......4 : The influence of vessel offset in riser design.......35 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line12........... .............. .....34 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line11....6-26 Figure 6.....20 : The total global motion response....19 : The total global motion response... the total frequency motions for roll................30 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line7. .............................6-33 Figure 6.....6-40 Figure 6................6-29 Figure 6........ .....................6-38 Figure 6....7-5 Figure 7..... the total frequency motions for pitch... .........6-26 Figure 6. ........6-25 Figure 6............ ...............39 : The drift damping forces – XR Forces (in Surge).......... ...24 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line1.........................28 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line5.................6-41 Figure 7........31 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line7.................................3 : Standard flexible riser configurations.....................6-40 Figure 6........33 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line10.......7-2 Figure 7............22 : The total global motion response........................ ....6 : The riser system for South Drill Centre....................... ............... the total frequency motions for roll..29 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line6......2 : Flexible riser .................. the total frequency motions for surge.......6-35 Figure 6...........6-38 Figure 6........................41 : The drift damping forces – moment ZR axis (in Yaw)................. ... the total frequency motions for heave...6-28 Figure 6..................6-27 Figure 6..................6-35 Figure 6........ .............................. ......6-32 Figure 6..6-28 Figure 6......... ........................................6-36 Figure 6........ ........................................................... ..Figure 6............................ ..

.........9 : The static effective tension for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis.................................8-8 Figure 8.......................20 : The dynamic effective tension for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field.............. ...........16 : The static curvatures for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field...15 : The static curvatures for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field..... .......... ............. ...7-23 Figure 7....... ................ the total frequency motions for heave........8 : The total global motion response... ...............13 : The static bending moment for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field.........7-28 Figure 7...............7-24 Figure 7......................... .......7-19 Figure 7...8-16 Figure 8......11 : The static effective tension for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field..........10 : The static effective tension for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis.7-25 Figure 7....2 : The total global motion response...............4 : The total global motion response.....9 : The riser configuration of the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field............. ..12 : The static effective tension for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field.18 : The displacement envelope curvature for the 8” production riser .........7-30 Figure 7........ the total frequency motions for surge from the station keeping system modeling in SIMO (Chapter 6)......8-8 Figure 8........... ..... 7-31 Figure 8........ the total frequency motions for roll........ ............. the total frequency motions for sway . the total frequency motions for surge......... ..............................................7 : The total global motion response..10 : The riser configuration of the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field...... .......24 : The dynamic curvatures for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field.................................... ..................................7-22 Figure 7.. ..3 : The total global motion response.8-9 Figure 8..........23 : The dynamic curvatures for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field......7-25 Figure 7... ...................... ............. ........11 : The static bending moment for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle xiii ............. of the Arbitrary Riser system configuration (AR)...8-10 Figure 8............ ..........8-10 Figure 8.... ....... ........ the total frequency motions for pitch.......6 : The total global motion response....7-20 Figure 7............................22 : The dynamic bending moment for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field..8-9 Figure 8.. 7-24 Figure 7.. the total frequency motions for yaw.....................7-30 Figure 7..................................................21 : The dynamic bending moment for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field...........................8-6 Figure 8..... ..............17 : The displacement envelope curvature for the 6” production riser ...14 : The static bending moment for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field...7-27 Figure 7............ .............5 : The total global motion response.................8-17 Figure 8....19 : The dynamic effective tension for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field...8-13 Figure 8.....7-29 Figure 7. ........ 7-31 Figure 7..............1 : Library data system of the SIMA Marintek.....7-26 Figure 7...7-17 Figure 7...................

... .................................8-19 Figure 8.. .............................13 : The static curvatures for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis..20 : The dynamic bending moment for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis..... ..................................8-18 Figure 8...... .. .................... .......12 : The static bending moment for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis...........................................17 : The dynamic effective tension for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis......21 : The dynamic curvatures for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis..........8-24 Figure 8..................8-24 Figure 8..............................8-21 Figure 8...................................................8-23 Figure 8.................... ..........8-22 Figure 8..8-18 Figure 8..................8-20 Figure 8.. ......... Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis.............19 : The dynamic bending moment for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis......................18 : The dynamic effective tension for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis.......................8-25 xiv .....................8-25 Figure 8.. ..............15 : The displacement envelope curvature for the 6” production riser .....................22 : The dynamic curvatures for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis.....................8-19 Figure 8..............16 : The displacement envelope curvature for the 8” production riser .............................................................14 : The static curvatures for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis. .....................

..5 : The hydrostatic data for ballasted condition................................................................... Surges and Still Water Depths Based on a Nominal LAT Depth .6-11 Table 6.......................5-15 Table 6....................3 : ULS Line Tension Limits and Design Safety Factors . ....1 : NORSOK Guidance Return Period Combinations in the Design ...........2 : Still Water Levels..................................6 : The mass properties for fully loaded condition..............................3-4 Table 3.........1 : Mooring Line Composition for Sevan 400 FPSO .....................5-2 Table 5..........................6-4 Table 6..............Omnidirectional ............................................................3-4 Table 3.. List of Tables M.. ......7 : The hydrostatic data for fully loaded condition....2 : The Damping and Restoring Matrices for the Ballasted Loading Condition..................................3-21 Table 3..........................................c...................... Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation Table 3....2 : The Detailed Orientation and The Pretension of The Lines ......................... Surge and Total Directional Depth Averaged Currents (cm/s) .1 : S400 FPSO Main Particulars .........11 : The used design environmental conditions for return period condition .........................................5-15 Table 5..5-14 Table 5..7 : Extreme Wave Criteria for eight directional ...........3-16 Table 3................3-3 Table 3................................9 : Tide.5 : The Quadratic Damping Coefficients for Mooring Analysis...................5-10 Table 5............................................. .......... ............................3 : Extreme Water Levels and Depths Based on a Nominal LAT Depth ..........3-21 Table 3.by direction (direction are towards) .6-15 Table 6................... Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO...3-14 Table 3........................3-2 Table 3...........by Direction (From) ..................4 : The mass properties for ballasted condition...................6-6 Table 6....................6 : Directional hs Relative magnitudes .........3-3 Table 3.....................10 : Extreme Total Current Profile (m/s) ..............................................6-16 xv .5-14 Table 5..................3-16 Table 3..........................4 : Extreme Wind Speeds at 10 m asl..............8 : Extreme Wave Height and Asscociated Periods.3 : The Damping and Restoring matrices for the fully loaded condition..................................... ................Omnidirectional ..........................................5-9 Table 5............................3-25 Table 5.............5 : Extreme Wind Speeds at 10 m asl.........................4 : The Linear Damping Coefficients for Mooring Analysis .S.

......4 : The Summary of The Global Motion Response of the Cylindrical S400 Floater in the Nonlinear-Coupled Dynamic Analysis and the Station Keeping System Modeling results as found from SIMO (Chapter 6) ..........6-18 Table 6...................................2 : Physical Properties for Risers ............................11 : The Final Static Body Position of A Cylindrical S400 Floater............7-14 Table 7............9-6 Table 9..........5 : The summary of mooring line dynamic tensions of the cylindrical S400 floater in the nonlinear-coupled dynamic analysis ......6-29 Table 6...........................................9-7 xvi ...............................8-7 Table 8....................................6-22 Table 6......Table 6..................................10 : The Wave Drift Damping Coefficients ............................................17 : The Summary of Second Order Wave Forces ................................................6-21 Table 6..........................................3 : Physical Properties for Risers ................2 : Extreme Wave Height and Associated Periods..........................9 : The Wave Drift Damping Coefficients ........................................6-17 Table 6..............18 : The Summary of wave drift damping forces .........6-39 Table 7............................6-19 Table 6...15 : The Summary of Mooring Line Dynamic Tensions of a cylindrical S400 floater .....6 : The Linear Hydrostatic Stiffness Matrix for Mooring Analysis (kg......................................................8-14 Table 9.......................7 : The Quadratic Current Coefficients for 6 DOF Motions From 0 ° to 90 ° .................1 : Design MBR requirements .........................................8-4 Table 8.8 : The Wind Coefficients for 6 DOF Motions From 0 ° to 90 ° .............................................................6-22 Table 6............................7-10 Table 7.............3 : The Summary of The Global Motion Response of A Cylindrical S400 Floater in the Nonlinear-Coupled Dynamic Analysis ...........13 : The Mooring Line Static Tensions ..........6-37 Table 6....................................6-37 Table 6.................8-11 Table 8.12 : The Static Forces and Moments on S400 Floater ......................................8-4 Table 8..........6-16 Table 6..............................7-15 Table 8......................................................................14 : The Summary of The Global Motion Response of A Cylindrical S400 Floater .............1 : The Summary of The Global Motion Response of A Cylindrical S400 Floater in the Nonlinear-Coupled Dynamic Analysis and the Station Keeping System Modeling results as found from SIMO (Chapter 6).Omnidirectional ...................6-18 Table 6.........................................m/s2) .....................................2 : The Summary of Mooring Line Dynamic Tensions in The Nonlinear-Coupled Dynamic Analysis and Mooring Line Dynamic Tensions Results as Found from SIMO (Chapter 6) ...........16 : The Summary of Line Tension Limit and Design Safety Factor ................................1 : The EVA Analysis Results for 100 Years Waves .........................6-30 Table 6..................................

  moorings  and  risers. moorings and  risers  cannot  be  evaluated  since  the  floater.  moorings and risers can be obtained.1 Background Nowadays. This method.  stiffness.  Hence.  wave  and  current  loading  in  complex  ways. this traditional method.  moorings and risers. the hydrodynamic  behavior of the system is only based on hydrodynamic behavior of the hull and ignores all or  part  of  the  interaction  effects  (mass. also known as  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis.   As  a  floating  offshore  system.  the  accurate  prediction of the response for the overall system as well as the individual response of floater. Extensive work during last decade has been performed by many researches.  moorings  and  risers  are  treated  separately.  Moreover.  damping.  one  extensive  method has been introduced and developed in the last decade.  In the traditional way. Kim and Kim (2002) have investigated the global motion of a  1-1 . Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation 1. waves and currents since the  main  coupling  effects  will  be  included  automatically  in  the  analysis. it has  also the ability to move and relocate after the operation is completed and is suitable for all  offshore environments meeting the challenges of the oil and gas industry. the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis of the floating systems is becoming more and  more  important  in  order  to  evaluate  the  dynamic  interaction  among  the  floater. Most  of their implementations that are related to the study will be presented below:  Omberg  and  Larsen  (1998)  concluded  that  the  uncoupled  analysis  may  produce  severely  inaccurate results.   In  order  to  capture  the  interaction  between  the  floater. the cylindrical FPSO is being extensively used as an offshore facility in the oil and  gas  industry.   Lately. Chapter 1 1 Introduction M. the hydrodynamic interaction among the floater. Moreover.  ensures  higher  dynamic  interaction  among  the  components responding to environmental loading due to wind. Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO.  moorings  and risers. Besides that.S. also known as the decoupled analysis.  a  cylindrical  FPSO  will  be  deployed  together  with  slender  members  (moorings  and  risers)  responding  to  wind.  current  loads)  between  the  floater.c.  This  system  has  been  deployed  widely  around  the  world  as  a  unique  design  facility which is regarded as a promising concept for an economic oil production since it has  capability for storage and wider deck that is giving better layout flexibility.

   1. moorings and riser will greatly enhance the understanding of the relevant  physics and the overall performance assessment of the system. This  analysis  will  ensure  higher  dynamic  interaction  between  the  vessel  and  the  slender  system  because of two reasons:   The overall behavior of the floater will be influenced not only from the hydrodynamic  behavior  of  the  hull  but  also  from  the  dynamic  behavior  of  the  slender  members  (moorings and risers)   The  coupling  effects  such  as  restoring. the WIDP has  shallow  water  conditions  and  also  has  harsh  environment.   Based on the reasons above.    Chakrabarti  (2010)  has  mentioned  that  the  requirements  for  a  floating  structure  are  that  it  should  be  moored in place and that the facility under the action from the environment remains within a  specified distance from a desired location achieved by the station keeping.  These  two  major  characteristics  will influence the design of the overall system of the floating offshore system. the Western Isles Development Project (WIDP) that is located in the UKCS. Block  210/24 to the North East of Shetland will be taken as reference case. Chaudry and Yo  Ho (2000) concluded that the full coupling of dynamic equilibrium in actual motions will be  important for moorings and risers motion since the coupling effects give significant influence  to the motion of moorings and risers.turret‐moored FPSO with 12 chain‐polyester‐chain mooring lines and 13 steel catenary risers  in  a  fully  coupled  hull/mooring/riser  dynamic  analysis  and  concluded  that  the  coupled  behavior of vessel. The  station  keeping:  providing  a  connection  between  the  structure  and  the  seafloor  for the purposes of securing the structure   against the environmental loads.    Hence.  damping  and  added  mass  will  be  taken  into  account automatically in the process of analysis.  The  configuration  of  an  offshore  structure  may  be  classified  by  whether  the  structure  is  a  fixed  structure  or  floating  structure. Moreover.   In the study. and  3.  A floating offshore system consists of three principal structural components (Figure 1.2 State of Art Offshore structures are located in the ocean environments without continuous access to dry  land  and  this  causes  offshore  structures  to  have  hydrodynamic  interaction  effects  and  dynamic response as major considerations for their design. Furthermore. Floating  hull:  facilitating  the  space  for  the  operations  of  the  production  work  and  storage for supplies  2. the study has been performed at the Research and Development Department in  Sevan Marine AS.  Furthermore.  All of information in this project  is confidential. They may be required to stay in  position  in  all  weather  conditions.1):  1. Riser system: achieving drilling operations or product transport  1-2 .  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  represents  a  truly  integrated  system  which  ensures accurate prediction of all motions and responses without imposing conservatism. Arendal from February until June 2011. the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis has been addressed as  the proper strategy to improve the understanding of the overall hydrodynamic behavior.

 need to be given as input to the analysis based on a separate assessment.  All  other  coupling  effects  such  as  contribution  damping  and  current  loading  on  the  slender  structures.   Nowadays.  Reference: Chakrabarti.   1-3 . that is the overall behavior of the floating system is dictated not only by  the  hydrodynamic  behavior  of  the  hull  but  also  by  its  interaction  with  the  hydrodynamic/structural behavior of the lines. 2010    The  station‐keeping  may  also  be  achieved  by  a  dynamic  positioning  system  solely  using  thrusters  or  in  combination  with  mooring  lines. a lot of researches have suggested that  the integration between the floating hull.  (1997  and  1998)  concluded  that  the  design  of  a  Floater  Production  System  (FPS)  should  consider  the  fact  that  the  moored  system  and  the  risers  comprise  a  truly  integrated system.   Another  suggestion  has  been  presented  by  Chakrabarti  (2008)  regarding  a  specific  recommendation for the systematic proces of the coupled analysis.    The  mooring  lines  and  risers  provide  restoring forces to the floater.e.  the  offshore  industry  has  used  de‐coupled  analysis  as  the  methodology  for  design of floating offshore platforms with moorings and risers.  Coupled versus Decoupled Analysis  Traditionally. i.   Figure 1.  mooring and the risers as a dynamic system is important in order to capture the interaction  between them and obtain realistic motion values for each individual system. having quasi static restoring force characteristic. but the effects of the mooring and riser system are included  quasi‐statically using non linear springs.1 : Floating offshore structure.   Omberg  et  al.   The de­coupled analysis  Based  on  DNV  definition.  a  de‐coupled  analysis  is  performed  of  the  floater motion in time domain.  DNV­RP­F205  (2010).

  SIMO  and  RIFLEX  for  an  integrated program analysis. uninfluenced by the nonlinear dynamic behavior of moorings or riser.     A single and complete model will include a cylindrical S400 floater. the response of each component in such a system is influenced by the mechanical  and  hydrodynamic  coupling  effect  and  the  proximity  to  the  other  components.  the  complete  system  of  equations  accounting for the rigid body model of the floater as well as the slender body model for the  risers and mooring lines are solved simultaneously using a non‐linear time domain approach  for  the  dynamic  analysis.   Specifically.  Hence.  It  is  still  the  common design practice for floating production systems.   1-4 .  Dynamic  equilibrium  is  obtained  by  the  time  domain  approach  at  each time step ensuring consistent treatment of the floater/slender structure coupling effect.  mooring  and  the  risers  as  a  dynamic  system  will  be  complex  and  become  important.  Hence.   This  study  will  emphasize  on  how  to  perform  the  nonlinear‐coupled  analysis  of  the  floater.  the  hydrodynamic  integration  between  the  floating  hull. moorings and risers. In an integrated dynamic system. The  detailed model for each  component. in which the numerical analysis tool is based on the hydrodynamic behavior of  the floater.  With  reference  to  Connaire  et  al  (2003). Generally. 12 mooring lines and one  of feasible riser configurations. which integrates radiation/diffraction theory with a beam finite element  time‐dependent structural analysis technique for slender offshore structures.Chakrabarti  (2008)  explained  that  the  de‐coupled  analysis  represents  the  traditional  methodology.  all  relevant coupling effects will be analyzed.  The coupling effects are automatically included in the analysis scheme.  little  or  no  integration  between  the  moored  system  and  the  riser  takes  place. waves and  currents.  Moreover.3 Problem Statement As  oil  and  gas  exploitations  move  to  deepwater  and  more  harsh  environment.  moorings  and  risers.  moorings  and  risers  with  efficient  tools  and  procedures  in  order  to  capture  the  interaction  between  the  floater.  This  study  will  present  a  consistent  analytical  approach to ensure higher dynamic interaction between floater.  a  coupled  analysis  capability  has  been  developed  and  extensively verified.      The coupled analysis  On  the  other  hand.  based  on  DNV­RP­F205  (2010). the coupled analysis will verify the integrations of radiation/diffraction  theory  with  a  beam  finite  element  technique  in  time  domain  scenario  analysis.  the  capacity  to  analyze  and  model  test  for  this  situation  are  challenged. The floater. the environmental forces on the floater induce the  motions  which  will  be  introduced  in  a  detailed  finite  element  model  of  the  moorings  and  risers.  Efficient  tools  and  procedures on how to determine dimensioning response will be needed. the study will implement numerical simulation steps by  using  several  analysis  programs  such  as  Wadam/HYDRO  D.  characterization of  the  environments  in  covering  relevant  load  models  and  the  simulation  schemes  will  be  presented in this study.  As a consistent analytical approach. moorings and risers system comprise  an integrated dynamic system responding to environmental loadings due to wind.   1. Furthermore.  more  advance  methodologies  are  needed  to  provide  a  much  deeper  understanding  of  the  system  behavior.

The  study  of  literature  for  the  basic  theory  of  Wadam/HYDRO  D.   Chapter  6  presents  the  general  description  and  configuration  of  the  moorings  that  will  be  used in the analysis.  3. waves and currents  will be presented here.   1.  Generally. Furthermore.4 Purpose and Scope The objective of the study is to document a consistent analytical approach for the nonlinear‐ coupled  analysis  of  the  floater. This chapter will present the  analysis of the floater’s load model based on diffraction theory to obtain the transfer function.   2. moorings and risers.    SIMO  as  a  computer  software  program  for  moored  vessels will be used in order to include the mooring stiffness in the equation of the motions.  In  this  analysis.The analysis will be performed in the frequency  domain  and time domain in order to solve  the problems during the analysis. The analysis  will  be  performed  by  using  several  programs  such  as  Wadam/Hydro  D.    The  resulting  analysis  will  not  only  present  on  the  hydrodynamic  but  also  the  stability  of  the  cylindrical  floater. The study of literature for a floating offshore system and each component.   Chapter 2 presents the theoretical background that will be helpful to give the perspective for  the  analysis. POSTRESP and ORCAFLEX.  This  chapter  will  explain  the  analysis  procedures for system components. the analysis will be performed  by  using  a  diffraction  program.  The  basic  knowledge  and  key  definitions  that  relate  to  the  analysis  will  be  presented here.  Therefore. The corresponding mooring line tensions are established using a quasi static approach.  RIFLEX  and  SIMO. The environmental conditions such as water depth.  Wadam/HYDRO  D.    Chapter  5  presents  the  hydrodynamic  analysis  of  the  cylindrical  S400  FPSO. the study will cover the following activities below:  1. wind. The nonlinear‐coupled analysis perfomance in SIMA.  moorings  and  risers  that  ensure  higher  dynamic  interaction  between floater.   Chapter  3  presents  the  specification  of  data  from  the  environment  based  on  metaocean  design criteria.  SIMO  and  RIFLEX  and other complementary programs such as PREFEM.  1-5 .  These  programs  will  be  used  under  an  integrated  scheme  analysis  to  obtain  a  consistent  analytical approach for the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.  the  effect  of  wind  and  currents  will  be  considered.  The  general  description of the cylindrical S400 FPSO will be presented here. analysis method for nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis  and the numerical simulation steps in the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.  The  hydrodynamic analysis of the hull is performed in the frequency domain analysis as a simple  iterative technique to solve a linear equation of motions to obtain a set frequency dependent  RAO. cylindrical  FPSO.  moorings  and  risers  and  the  therotical  background  that  provides  deeper  understanding on a consistent analytical approach for the numerical simulations. This chapter will also present the combined model between cylindrical  floater  and  moorings  in  time  domain  analysis  by  using  SIMO.  motions  are  found  by  time  integration  enforcing  force  equilibrium  at  all  time  steps.    Chapter  4  presents  the  methodology  of  the  analysis.  mean wave drift forces and non linear damping.

    The  investigations  of  the  riser  configurations  will  use  RIFLEX.  In  other  words. the resulting  analysis for the riser will be presented and compared with the previous analysis based on the  decoupled analysis from Chapter 6 and Chapter 7.  The design life is specified to be 20 years. the cylindrical floater and moorings model from SIMO will be combined together with  an arbitrary riser configuration from RIFLEX in time domain analysis.  Moreover. effective tension. Dana Petroleum E&P Limited (2011)  has mentioned that the  offshore  field Western  Isles is located in the UKCS Block 210/24 to  the North East of Shetland. the offshore Western Isles Field is located in relatively on shallow water condition  and also harsh environment.   The results of the analysis will be a set of accurate predictions for floater motions as well as  the moorings and riser system with regard to the coupling effects.5 Location of Study An overview of the location can  be seen in  Figure 1. Furthermore. In principle.  Chapter 9 provides the conclusions and the recommended further studies from this study. The nearest fixed facility is the Tern platform located 12 km East  of Western Isles.  bending radius and seabed clearance will be presented here.2.  the  investigation  will  be  performed  under  decoupled  analysis  to  obtain  a  single  arbitrary  configuration.   1. the SIMA will combine two  nonlinear  numerical  simulations  together  those  obtained  by  SIMO  and  RIFLEX. 0º 42’ 28” E.The result of the analysis will give us the result of a set of time series of the offset vessel value  under LF motions and also the total motions (LF+WF motions).  Furthermore. The water depth is approximately 170 m. A  discussion of the analysis results such as top angle (hang off position angle).   Chapter  8  presents  a  single  complete  model  that  includes  the  cylindrical  floater.    1-6 .    The  analysis  will  also  be  performed in time domain under two simulation schemes.   Chapter  7  presents  a  feasible  arbitrary  riser  configuration.  moorings  and riser by using SIMA Marintek computer software. static and dynamic conditions. The Western Isles Field is located approximately 61º 13’ 00” N.

  Figure 1.2 : Field overview.  Reference: Dana Petroleum E&P Limited (2011)                  1-7 .

  fundamental continuum mechanics and implementation of finite element method.  Generally.  2.c.  sway and heave while the oscillatory angular motions are referred to as roll.  Further.S. Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO.1.  a  structure  responds  to  environmental  forces  due  to  wind. and finaly  coupling effects.  the  relation  between the motion of the floater and the influence on its responses will be presented below:    A floater is almost always taken as a 6 DOF (degrees of freedom) rigid body motions model  for  its  response  calculations. Chapter 2 1 Theoretical Background M. Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation This chapter will review the basic knowledge to give a perspective for the analysis. Moreover  the  key  definitions  that  are  related  to  the  analysis  will  also  be  explained  here.  non  linear  problems.1 Equation of Motion for Floating Structure Before  the  further  explanation  about  the  equation  of  motion  for  the  floater.  frequency  domain  analysis  and  time  domain. Low  2-1 .  The  basic  theory  about  this  can  be  clearly  found  in  Faltinsen  (1990).   Reference: Journée and Massie (2001)  For  the  analyses  of  the  floater  motions  it  is  needed  to  consider  the  different  hydrodynamic  effects  on  the  floater.1.  The  explanation about the equation of motion will be the starting point then we will continue to  the  structure  response. Wave Frequency (WF). pitch and yaw  based on Figure 2.  the  oscillatory  rigid  body  translation  motions  can  be  referred  to  as  surge. below:    Figure 2. : Definition of rigid‐body motion modes.  waves and currents with motions on three different time scales.

Frequency (LF) and High Frequency (HF). r. The floater will be assumed as having a rigid body. On the other hand...6   (2.. Løken et  al. a moored floater is dynamically excited by ordinary wave frequency load but also  exposed to the mean wave (drift) and slowly‐varying forces from waves or currents. The inviscous fluid effects mostly govern the wave  frequency and high frequency motions while the low frequency motion will be determined by  the viscous fluid effects.. the higher‐order wave forces result from the high  frequency motion (HF) that may induce springing or ringing response (DNV­RP­F205 (2010)). Generally. frequency domain analysis will be applicable for  the  environmental  load  that  gives  satisfactorily  results  by  linearization  theory  while  time  domain analysis will be performed as direct numerical integration of the equation of motions  which involves non linear functions to predict the maximum response and capture the higher  order load effects.   The basic theory concerning this can be clearly found in Newman (1986) and Faltinsen (1990)  The six components of inertia force which are associated with the body mass can be defined  based on the linearized motion assumption as follows:  6 Fi   M ijU j  j  1.  Normally.   The wave frequency motions (WF) are generated by the wave forces on the floater while the  low  frequency  motions  (LF)  are  driven  by  the  mean  wave  (drift)  and  slowly‐varying  forces  from waves or currents. coordinate system and the body mass is:      2-2 . unrestrained and in  a state of equilibrium when in calm water (steady state).  The  large  volume  body  of  a  floater  is  represented  by  a  6  DOF  (Degrees  of  Freedom)  rigid  body motions model. (1999) mentioned that the dynamic equations of equilibrium forces are formulated in the  terms of:   excitation forces   inertia forces   damping forces   and restoring forces  The  solutions  of  the  dynamic  equations  are  found  by  frequency  domain  analysis  or  can  be  derived by time domain analysis.1)  j 1 where the mass matrix   is defined by:    the mass at the centre gravity  the product of moment inertia w. t.

6   Where   denotes the total matrix in the square bracket on the left hand side.    Then the complex amplitude of the body motion in the  ‐th mode. Faltinsen (1990) has emphasized that equation (2. The transfer function  can be calculated if the added mass. … .3)  can  be  solved  by  substituting    in  the  left  hand  side.  the  wave  loads  can  be  obtained  using  the  expression  for  hydrodynamic  forces. 6   The body motion ( ) can be determined by standard matrix‐inversion techniques as follow:  ∑         1.  Furthermore.  six  simultaneous  equations  of  motion  will  be  formulated  by  equating  the  inertia  forces  to  the  sum  of  the  pressure  forces  of  the  fluid  over  the wetted  surface  and  the  forces  due to the body weight which are incorporated in the total static restoring forces as follow:  ∑ ∑      1. 6) of rigid body  The  equation  motion  (2.  regular  waves  of  the  rigid  body  systems are expressed in the global coordinate system below:  ∑      1. A similar approach can be used to determine sway. in response to an incident  wave of unit amplitude. … .  in  the  case  of  a  mechanical  oscillator.Further. … .  where    are  the  complex  amplitude  of  the  motion  modes.  the  relation  between  the  exciting  force  damping and resonant response can be found from the equations of motion. frequency   and direction   can be described by the ratio below:  . … .  This  leads  to  the  six  coupled  algebraic  equations  for  the  real  and  imaginary  parts  of  the  complex  amplitudes  for  surge. 6   Rearranging and adding the added mass (  and damping coeffecients correlations ( ). … .g.3)  where:       = the mass matrix for the structure        = the added mass coefficients         = the damping coefficients     = the complex amplitudes of the exciting forces                       (i is complex unit) for the six of components ( 1. … . exciting and hydrostatic forces are known. 6   (2.   2-3 .  heave and pitch. ∑      1.  When the  motions  are  found.  The  equations  of  motions  for  harmonic  forcing  motion  e. 6    (2. damping.2)  The ratio is known as the transfer function or response amplitude factor. the  equation will be:         1.3) is only generally valid for steady  state sinusoidal motions. roll and yaw.

  Since the system is linear. the waves are far from breaking.2 Response of Single Body Structures The response of the structures in irregular waves can be explained by the assistance of linear  wave  theory.2.  Here.  The  superposition loads can be seen in Figure 2.   Faltinsen (1990) has divided the hydrodynamics problem into two sub‐problems as follow:  1. the wave‐induced motion and  load amplitudes will be linearly proportional when the linear theory is applied. Hydromechanical  load  and  moments  are  induced  by  the  harmonic  oscillations  of  the  rigid  body  which  are  moving  on  the  undisturbed  surface  of  the  fluid. the variance of the response   can be obtained  as follow:  S ω |H ω | dω    (2.  we  consider  a  structure  in  incident  regular  waves  of  amplitude      where  the  wave  steepness is small. damping and restoring terms. wave length and propagation directions. Hence.  2-4 . the response in irregular waves can be given by using the following form  below:   ∑    (2.  2.   More  details  about  the  wave  excitation  load  and  hydromechanical  load  can  be  found  in  Faltinsen (1990) and Journée and Massie (2001). i.  Moreover. the resulting motion in waves can be seen as a superposition of the  motion  of  the  body  in  still  water  and  the  forces  on  the  restrained  body  in  waves.e. Wave  excitation  load  and  moments  are  produced  by  waves  coming  onto  the  restrained  body.On the other hand.    is the sea spectrum  The  response  in  irregular  waves  can  be  formed  as  linear  wave‐induced  motion  or  load  on  structure.  In the limit as  ∞ and ∆ 0.  the  hydrodynamic loads are identified as added mass.  Faltinsen  (1990)  has  mentioned  that  a  useful  consequence  of  linear  theory  is  that we can obtain the results in irregular waves by adding together results from the regular  wave of different amplitudes.5)    2.4)  where:  H ω          = the transfer function. which is the response amplitude         per unit wave amplitude with frequency  ω   δ ω    = a phase angle which is associated with the response  ω     = the frequencies of the oscillation     = 2 ∆ .  This  load  is  composed  of  Frode‐Kriloff  and  diffraction  forces  and  moments.

  both  the  free‐surface  condition  and  the  boundary  condition  are  satisfied  on  the  mean  position  of  the  free‐surface  and  the  submerged  hull  surface  respectively.2.   Reference: Journée and Massie (2001)  2. we keep all terms in the velocity potential and fluid pressure  and wave loads that are either linear with respect to the wave amplitude or proportional to  the square of the wave amplitude. The potential theory is assumed then the problem is solved to the second‐ order in incident wave amplitude.3 Second-Order Nonlinear Problems Faltinsen (1990) has mentioned that the way to solve non‐linear wave‐structure problems for  ship and offshore hydrodynamic is to use perturbation analysis with the wave amplitude as a  small parameter.   A simple way to illustrate the presence of non‐linear wave effects is to consider the quadratic  velocity in the complete Bernoulli’s equation as follow:  | |     (2.  The formula for an approximation of the x‐component of the velocity  can be written as follow:  cos cos .    are the fluid velocity vectors  By  emphasizing  that  equation  (2. the fluid pressure and the velocity of fluid particles on the free‐surface  are linearized. the second‐order theory will also account  more  properly  for  the  non‐linearities  in  the  velocity  of  fluid  particles  on  the  free‐surface.6)    Where:  .   Figure 2.  It  also  approximates  more  accurately  the  fluid  pressure  being  equal  to  the  atmospheric  pressure  on  the  instantaneous position of the free‐surface. . This method is very powerful to give a solution for several  practical problems.6)  provides  only  one  of  the  non‐linear  effects  and  also  considering  an  idealized  sea  state  which  consists  of  two  wave  components  of  the  circular  frequencies      . Further.   In  the  linear  solution. Further.   On the other hand.  Hence. : Superposition of hydro mechanical and wave loads.7)          2-5 . in a second‐order theory. 0    0   (2. the second‐order theory will account more properly for the zero‐normal  flow  condition  on  the  body  at  the  instantaneous  position  of  the  body.

  The  time‐averaged  value  of  this  wave load and the resulting motion component are zero.  Very  large  motion  amplitudes  can  then  result  at  resonance  so  that  a  major  part  of  the  ship’s  dynamic  displacement  (and  resulting  loads  in  the  mooring  system)  can  be  caused  by  these  low‐frequency excitations.  the  forces  oscillating  in  the  difference  frequencies  and  the  forces  oscillating  in  sum  frequencies.  resulting  from  a  constant  load  component.  Obvious sources of these loads are current and wind.   Two  methods  that  can  be  used  to  calculate  the  mean  wave  (drift)  forces  are  the  far  field  method and near field method.By introducing equation (2. there is also  a  so‐called  mean  wave  drift  force.  3. The far field method is based on the equation for conservation  momentum  in  the  fluid  while  the  near  field  method  is  based  on  the  direct  pressure  integration.8)    The equation above gives the three components of the result.7) to equation (2.  These  motions  are  caused  by  non‐linear  elements  in  the  wave  loads  (the  low­frequency  wave  drift  forces). A  mean  displacement  of  the  structure.  Together  with  the  mooring  system.  2.6).  in  combination  with  the  spring  characteristics  of  the  mooring  system.  a  moored  ship  has  a  low  natural  frequency  in  its  horizontal  modes  of  motion  as  well  as  very  little  damping  at  such  frequencies.  Generally. In addition to these.3.  The  effects  of  second  order  wave  forces  are  most  apparent  in  the  behavior  of  anchored  or  moored floating structures. it now follows that:  cos 2 2 cos 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2         (2.  caused  by  the  first  order  wave  loads.  These  are  linear  motions  with  a  harmonic  character.  the  two  main  second‐order  non  linear  terms  that  are  the  mean  wave  (drift) loads and slowly varying wave loads. the mean wave (drift) forces.  This  drift  force  is  caused  by  non‐linear  (second  order)  wave  potential  effects. Journée and Massie (2001) show that the responses of a structure  on the irregular waves for the horizontal motions of moored or anchored floating structures  in a seaway include three important components:  1. An  oscillating  displacement  of  the  structure  at  frequencies  which  are  much  lower  than  those  of  the  irregular  waves.  The  explanation  of  the  difference  between  the  far  field  method  and  the  direct  pressure integration can be found easily in Faltinsen (1990). it is not necessary to solve the  second  order  equations  because  the  time  dependence  over  one  period  of  oscillation  of  the  pressure is zero. An oscillating displacement of the structure at frequencies corresponding to those of  the  waves.  these  loads  determine the new equilibrium position.1 The Mean Wave (Drift) Forces In order to calculate mean wave (drift) forces on a structure.  the  wave‐frequency  region. It means that the second order potential does not result in mean loads.  2-6 .  Further.  2.  the  low‐frequency  region.

11) to derive  a useful formula  for drift forces on a two‐ dimensional  body  in  incident  regular  deep‐water  waves.  a  non‐moving  vertical  circular  cylindrical surface   away from the body. Scalavounos  (1987) has pointed out the relative advantages and disadvantages between them. Further.  One  way  to  obtain  expressions  for  mean  wave  forces  in  regular  waves  is  to  use  the  equations  for  conservation  of  momentum  M(t) in the fluid for a closed surface. On the other  hand.11)    Maruo (1960) used the  equation (2. The result is:       (2.10)    where:        = the normal component of the fluid velocity at the surface S        = the normal component of the velocity of the surface S where the positive      normal direction to be out of the fluid. the force on the body can be found:        1.  that  is  useful  for  cross  checking  theoretical derivation and computational implementation.Hung  and  Taylor  has  explained  the  differences  of  both  methods  clearly  in  the  paper.  The  formulation of mean drift forces and moments for floating bodies.   The  closed  surface  S  consists  of  the  body  surface  . the free‐surface   and the sea bottom   inside   as the boundary conditions. the volume integral can be reduced to a surface integral by using vector algebra and  the Gauss’s divergence theorem as is shown below:     (2. the far field  method maybe more efficient and less demanding on numerical discretisation. .10)  over  one  period  of  oscillation  and  noting  that  the  time  average of    is zero.   Hence. it should be noted that    does not need to be far  away from the body.   The  far  field  method  was  originated  by  Maruo  (1960). the boundary condition can be written as follow:              0            By  time  averaging  equation  (2.12)  where:       = the amplitude of the incident waves  2-7 .  is the fluid velocity and Ω = the control volume  Further.2    (2.  Furthermore.9)    where:  . the near field method is potentially more useful if one wishes to extend the solution to  the  calculation  of  time  harmonic  second  order  forces.   Ω    (2.  The  body  may  be  fixed  or  freely  floating oscillating around a mean position and there is no current and no constant speed on  the body.

  with no current present.14)  Here    is  the  wave  propagation  direction  relative  to  the  x‐axis  and  /   is  the  amplitude  generated by the body far away at large horizontal radial distance    from the  body and the angle   is defined as  cos     sin   Another  way  to  obtain  the  mean  wave  forces  and  moment  is  the  near  field  method. the wave drift‐force can never be larger than   .  the  reflected  wave  amplitude    and  the  wave  drift  force  become  negligible. By analyzing  an incident regular deep water waves on the vertical wall.  This means:    Hence.12) can be written:      (2.  the  wave‐drift  force  will  have  a  peak  in  a  frequency  range  around  the  resonance  frequency.13)  Long wavelengths relative to the cross‐sectional dimensions of the body. when the wavelengths are very short. On the other hand.13)  for  drift‐forces  on  a  three‐dimensional  structure  in  incident  regular  waves.  When the body motions are large.  will go to zero when the wavelength goes to zero.  This  method was introduced by Pinkster and van Oortmerssen (1977) based on the direct pressure  integration.   is zero for all frequencies and all depths of submergence  (Ogilvie (1963)).  This  means. will not disturb the  wave  field.  This means.  The  formula  is  written  as  follows:  . the equation (2.  Maruo  (1960)  has  also  derived  a  formula  similar  to  equation  (2.   = the amplitude of the reflected waves      = the amplitude of the transmitted waves  Further. 2   1.  Maruo’s  formula  follows  by  assuming  the  average  energy  flux  is  zero  through  . In the special  case  of  a  submerged  circular  cylinder  that  is  either  restrained  from  oscillating  or  whose  centre follows a circular orbit.  . the incident waves are  totally  reflected  from  a  surface‐piercing  body  with  a  vertical  hull  surface  in  the  wave  zone.   Further.15)    2-8 . the mean wave (drift) force in irregular seas can be found from the result in regular  sea  by  assuming  a  long‐crested  sea  described  by  sea  spectrum. the asymptotic value agreed with  Maruo’s formula. Here.  For a submerged body. 6    (2. This  means. the amplitude of the reflected waves   will be larger.  the  combined  effect  of  waves  and  current  have  an  effect  on  the  wave  field  and  therefore  on  the  wave‐drift  forces. all three force components and three moments can be found. which can be written as follow:  sin sin    (2.   Further. … .

  Newman  (1974)  has  proposed  a  double  summation  approximation  by  using  the  square  of  a  single  series.  2-9 .17) requires that    being a positive. slow‐drift resonance oscillations occur in surge.8)  and  formally  writing   cos sin       (2.16)  is  still  relatively  time  consuming.3.17). This implies that only N terms should be added together at each time step compared  to    terms by equation (2. For a freely  floating structure with low water plane area. the spectral density of the low frequency will be:  8    (2. The slow‐drift motions are of equal importance as  the linear first‐order motion in design of mooring systems for large‐volume structures.2 The Slowly Varying (Low frequency) Wave Forces The  slow‐drift  motions  are  resonance  oscillations  excited  by  non‐linear  interaction  effect  between the waves and the body motion.   Faltinsen (1990) has suggested having the slow‐drift excitation force in spectral form rather  than in a time series form in order to have inconvenient solution.18)  where    is the mean wave load in direction i for frequency   .17)  Obviously equation (2.2.   According to Pinkster (1975).   Since  the  direct  summation  in  equation  (2. sway and yaw.   The  slow‐drift  excitation  load  can  be  found  by  starting  from  equation  (2. For a  moored structure.16)  where:     = the wave amplitudes       = the wave frequencies     = the random phase angles  N  = the number of wave components       the  coefficients  of  the  second‐order  transfer  functions  for  the  difference  frequency loads associated with       . The formula will be:  2 ∑ cos    (2. the second‐order slow‐drift motions  are most  important for large volume structures.

  In  a  frequency  domain  analysis.  the  wave  spectrum  is  input  to  a  system  that  is  considered  to  possess  linear  characteristics.  it  means  that  the  different ratios between the motion amplitudes and the wave amplitudes and also the phase  shifts between the motions and the waves are constant.  frequencies  and  possibly  propagation  directions.     Reference: Journée and Massie (2001)    In  the  system  above.  Further.  the  floater  motion  has  a  linear  behavior.2. the response spectra and the statistics  of these responses can be found.  2-10 .  As a consequence of linear theory.  the  output  of  the  system  is  the  motions  which  have  an  irregular  behavior. the results of the analysis are given as  descriptions of variables of interest such as floater motion and floater forces as a function of  frequency.      Figure 2.  Further.4. the resulting motions in irregular waves can be obtained  by  adding  together  results  from  regular  waves  of  different  amplitudes.  added  mass  and  damping.3.1 Frequency Domain Analysis A  frequency  domain  analysis  will  be  the  basis  for  generating  the  transfer  functions  for  frequency  dependent  excitation  forces. : The relation between the waves and the motions.  The relation between the waves and the motion can be seen in Figure 2.3.  With  known  wave  energy  spectra  and  the  calculated  frequency characteristics of the responses of the ship.4 Frequency Domain and Time Domain Analysis Frequency  domain  and  time  domain  analysis  will  be  used  in  the  study  to  solve  several  problems in the analysis.  Generally.   2.  the  solutions  of  the  equation  of  motions  are  solved  by  method  of  the  harmonic  analysis  or  methods  using  the  Laplace  and  Fourier  transforms.   Løken  et  al  (1999)  mentioned  that  a  frequency  domain  analysis  is  naturally  suited  to  the  analysis  of  system  exposed  to  random  environments  since  it  provides  a  clear  and  direct  relationship  between  the  spectrum  of  the  environmental  loads  and  the  spectrum  of  the  system response.  DNV­RP­F205  (2010)  has  explained  that  the  equations  of  motion  are  solved  for  each  of  the  incoming  regular  wave  components for a wave frequency analysis.

  The linear equation of motion for a  single body will adapt the equation  of (2.   The  time  domain  analysis  requires  a  proper  simulation  length  to  have  a  steady  result.  positioning  system  and  also  disturbing  effects such as wind.  floater  motion.   The direct numerical integration of the equation of motion will be applied in the time domain  analyses.  The  first  order  wave  exciting  forces  and  second  order  slowly  varying  wave  drift  forces  are  both represented in the form of random time histories.  (1999)  has  mentioned  that  the  time  domain  analysis  will  a  be  very  convenient  way  for  extreme  condition  analysis  since  linearized  analysis  is  not  working  efficiently.4.  It  also  has  advantage in allowing changing the boundary conditions and allowing non‐linear forcing and  stiffness functions.19)  2-11 .   The  theory  of  time  domain  analysis  will  be  adopted  from  Marintek  (2008). rev: 1”. 6) of rigid body    2.  Furthermore.   Furthermore. 6      where:       = the mass matrix for the structure        = the added mass coefficients         = the damping coefficients     = the complex amplitudes of the exciting forces                       (i is complex unit) for the six of components ( 1. . Løken et  al.   Moreover.  the  time  domain  analysis  procedure  consists  of  a  numerical  solution  of  rigid‐  body equation of motion for the floater subject to external actions which may originate in the  fluid  motion  due  to  waves. … .2 Time Domain Analysis In order to solve the problem as close as possibly to the real condition with regarding to non  linear system.Løken et al (1999) also mentioned that analysis in the frequency domain will be a convenient  method to calculate the inviscid hydrodynamic properties for a large floater where the wave  scattering and radiation is important.   The  equation  of  motion  for  a  freely  moving  floater  or  a  moored  structure  in  time  domain  analysis:  . … . The increase of computing time will  be a major effect in the analysis since we adopt a direct numerical integration computation.  the  frequency  domain  requires  linear  equation  of  motion  and  predominantly  linear assumptions. Hence. a wave spectrum is used as a basis for the generation of the random time series. the foundation of the frequency domain approach ‐ is no longer valid. the non‐linear functions of the relevant wave and motion variables such as  drag  forces.  currents.  and  the  non‐linear  positioning  due to mooring system will be involved in the analysis.  finite  motion  and  finite  wave  amplitude  effects.3):  ∑      1.6.    (2.    “SIMO  ­  Theory  Manual Version 3.

  ∞ 0  Also  by  using  the  inverse  Fourier  transform  taking  into  account  that  the  values  of   for.21)    By using the following equation below:  .  A. is zero:  2-12 .e. t < 0. .      (2.  ∞   .      .20)  where:       = the wind drag force         = the first order wave excitation force         = the second order wave excitation force      =  any  other  forces  (specified  forces  and  forces  from  station  keeping  and  coupling  elements. i.)  The wave frequency (WF) motions are excited by the first order wave excitation force while  the  low‐frequency  (LF)  motions  are  excited  by  the  slowly  varying  part  of  the  second  order  wave  excitation  force.  ∞   . etc. Solution by Convolution Integral  Assume that the equations of motion can be written:     (2. solution by convolution integral or by separation of motions. before the "experiment" started.  Two  different  solution  methods  described  in  the  following  two  subsections  are  available  in  SIMO.  the  wind  drag  force  and  the  current  drag  force.  The  high‐frequency  (HF) motions are excited by the sum‐frequency second‐order wave excitation force.  ∞ 0    where:   M  = frequency‐dependent mass matrix  m  = body mass matrix  A  = frequency‐dependent added‐mass  C  = frequency‐dependent potential damping matrix      = linear damping matrix      = quadratic damping matrix  f  = vector function where each element is given by  | |  K  = hydrostatic stiffness matrix  x  = position vector  q  = exciting force vector      The exciting forces on the right‐hand side of equation (2.19) can be written as follow:  .

    The  exciting  force  is  separated  in  a  high‐frequency  part. another method  has  been  developed  by  using  separated  motions. .  In  this  method. the retardation function is computed by a transform of the frequency‐dependent  added‐mass and damping:         (2.  the  fundamental  continuum mechanics.  :  .23) may be very time consuming. Separation of Motions  Solving the integral in equation (2. This subchapter  will  present  the  basic  theoretical  background  for  finite  element  modeling.1 Fundamental Continuum Mechanics Theory Finite element modeling will be the based on the slender structure modeling.23)  .26)  The position vector can then be separated into:     Further.  the  quadratic  damping     is set to be zero and the stiffness K is constant.  The  separated  motion  method  is  a  common  approach  by  using  a  multiple  scale  approach.24)  or similarly:         (2.           (2.     (2. The details in formulation can be found in Malvern (1969).5 Fundamental Continuum Mechanics Theory and Implementation of the Finite Element Method 2.    and  a  low‐frequency  part.    (2.5.27)  While  the  low‐frequency  motions  are  solved  in  the  time  domain.25)  B.  This  method  separates  the  wave‐frequency  part  from  the  low‐frequency  part.28)  2.  the  dynamic  equilibrium equation is written:  0     (2. . the high‐frequency motions to be solved in frequency domain are expressed  by:       (2. the equation of motion becomes:  .  2-13 .22)  Hence.

4.  Generally.   Moreover.  while  the  beam  elements  formulation uses a so called “a co­rotated ghost reference description”.      (2.  “RIFLEX  Theory  Manual  Finite  Element  Formulation”. the motion of the particle for nonlinear analysis can be expressed as:  . If Co is used as initial configuration. this strain tensor is defined by:  2 · ·     (2.  the  total  motion  is  determined  by  combining  the  motion of the local position vector and the motion of the local reference system.The  Lagrangian  description  is  used  to  describe  the  motion  of  the  material  particles.     Reference: Marintek (2010)    Furthermore.30)  2-14 .  This  motion  is  referred  to  a  fixed  global  system  where  the  rectangular  Cartesian  coordinate  frames  are  defined  by  the  base  vector  .29)  Co  = the initial configuration of the body  Cn  = the deformed configuration at a given time t  Cn+1  = a new incremental configuration for time  Δ   The strains in Cn and Cn+1 are referred to the initial configuration Co.  the  formulation  for  the  bar  element  and  beam  element  will  be  adopted  from  Marintek  (2010).  the  strains  are  measured  in  terms  of  the  Green  strain  tensor E.4 below:     Figure 2.    The  motion  of  a  material  particle  can  be  seen  in  Figure 2. : Motion of a material particle.  In  RIFLEX  the  bar  elements  are  formulated  using  “a  total  Lagrangian  description”.   For  the  Lagrangian  formulation. usually this is termed as a  “total  Lagrangian  formulation”.

   Furthermore. the symmetric Piola‐Kirchhoff stress tensor S is always used in conjunction with  Green  strain  tensor  E.33)  Hence the virtual work equation can be formulated by using Green Strain tensor E and Piola‐ Kirchhoff stress tensor S as below:  : · ·    (2.   From  equation (2.31)  Further.  damping  forces are proportional to velocity).  The  surface traction   and body forces    are referred to a unit surface and a unit volume in the  initial reference state.4) and E is the strain tensor which can be expressed as follow:       (2.35) are valid for the bar elements and the beam elements.34)  where:   and   express  the  surface  and  volume  of  the  initial  reference  configuration. an incremental form of the virtual work principle can be written as follow:  : ∆ ∆ : ∆ · ∆ ·    (2. we may conclude that E is a symmetric tensor consisting of both linear  and quadratic terms.  The  symmetric  Piola‐Kirchhoff  stress  tensor  S  referred  to  the  initial  configuration Co will be expressed as follow:      (2.e.  the  dynamic  equilibrium  equation  expressed  in  terms  of  virtual  work  can  be  written.34) and equation (2.  Further. the rectangular components of E referred to     may be expressed as:     (2.4).  Moreover.where:      are  the  length  of  the  line  segment  PQ  before  and  after  deformation  (Figure 2.  2-15 .   The symmetric Piola­Kirchhoff stress tensor S will also be used here as a stress measure.32)  where: the component of the displacement vector u have been introduced.37)  where:   denotes  mass  density  and  ̃  is  a  viscous  damping  density  function  (i.32). as Remseth (1978):  : · ̃ · · ·     (2.35)  where:    indicates  virtual  quantities  and  ∆  is  used  to  denote  finite  but  small  increments  between Cn and  Cn+1 (Figure 2.  Equation (2.36)  And the incremental form of the virtual work equation yields:  : ∆ ∆ : ∆ · ̃∆ · ∆ · ∆ ·      (2.

  three  in  translations and three in rotation.   are the global vetors and  is the rotation matrix which  has nine elements.  i.5  as follow:    Figure 2.   A.e.     Reference: Marintek (2010)    Two of the elements that are mostly used in slender structure modeling are the bar element  and the beam element.  This  is  because  large  rotations  in  space  are  not  true  vectors  and  should be expressed by vectorial components in a base coordinate system.   A nodal point with translational and rotational degrees of freedom can be seen in Figure2.38)  where:   are the base vectors. It is adjusted  to a formulation based on integrated cross‐section forces and small strain theory.2 Implementation of the Finite Element Method The  finite  element  nodal  points  may  have  up  to  six  degrees  of  freedom.2. The orientation of  the nodal point in space is uniquely defined by the base vector transformation:      (2. The Bar Element  The spatial bar element is described in a total Langrangian formulation. : Nodal point with translational and rotational degrees of freedom. The case of a node that is both translated and rotated must  be  treated  more  carefully.5.  2-16 .5.

  the  Green strain is expressed:  ∆ ∆ ∆     (2. The  element  length  is  denoted  Lo  and  L  in  the  initial  and  deformed  configuration. : Bar element in initial and deformed configuration.  Each  of  the  two  nodes  has  three  translational  degrees of freedom.39)  where:  ∆ .   The deformed element length is given by:  ∆ ∆ ∆     (2. Thus.  and  it  is  assumed  that    and    is  the  initial  stress free element length. : ∆    Based  on  a  total  Langrangian  formulation  and  linear  displacement  functions.    Reference: Marintek (2010)    The element is assumed to be straight with an initial cross‐sectional area    which is  constant  along  the  element  length.  2-17 . .41)    where:    is initial strain and    is initial stress.40)    And the Piola‐Kirchhoff stress    can be found from the constitutive law:  .  respectively (Figure 2.   Further.6. the axial force of the element N and the strain   are  given by:          (2.   ∆ .        (2.  small  strain  theory  is  used.42)  where: EA is the axial stiffness.   Figure 2. which are expressed directly in the global coordinate system.6).

  The  explanation  of  the  Green  strain  and  the  torsional  behavior  of  the  beam  in  the  beam element will be based on Figure 2. the beam has 3 translational and 3 rotational degrees of  freedom at each node. It is important to note that the  rotational  degrees  of  freedom  in  Figure  2. The Beam Element   Marintek (2010) has described the beam element by using the concept of co‐rotated  ghost  reference. but St.8 as follow:    2-18 . B. They are defined in relation to the local x. : Nodal degrees of freedom for beam element. Venant torsion is  accounted for   coupling  effects  between  torsion  and  bending  are  neglected. Further. and x‐system in  the   configuration.  warping  resistance and torsional effects are neglected   stability problems are not considered    Figure 2. y.    Reference: Marintek (2010)      As indicated in Figure 2.  Thus.  remains  plane  and  normal to the x‐axis during deformations   lateral contraction caused by axial elongation is neglected   the strains are small   shear deformations due to lateral loading are neglected.7  express  deformational  rotations  in  relation to the co‐rotated straight element. the   configuration is oriented along the x‐axis with  cross‐sectional principal axis in the y‐ and z‐direction.  A  detailed  discussion  of  this  element  together  with  examples  demonstrating its capabilities may be found in Mollestad (1983) and Engseth (1984).7.7.    The beam theory is based on the following assumptions:   a  plane  section  of  the  beam  initially  normal  to  the  x‐axis.

 the Green strain can be formulated:    . . .8.     (2.43)  where:  . : Prismatic beam. .       (2.46)  where:    and    are  linear  interpolation. y  and z may be expressed as:  .      are  the  displacements  of  the  corresponding  point  on  the  reference axis.45)  where:    is the moment of twist and   is the torsional stiffness  Further.8.   Figure 2.    where  . .    where  .   By using equation (2. a standard element formulation gives:   where  .         . .     . the displacement of an arbitrary point P with coordinates x.      (2. . . .  while    and    express  cubic  interpolation functions.  2-19 .    Reference: Marintek (2010)       As shown in Figure 2. .44)  The torsional behavior of the beam is based on the relationship:      (2. . .43) and the assumption that quadratic strain terms that are zero  on the x‐axis are neglected.

  items  3)  and  5)  cannot  be  accounted  for.  the  coupling  effects  are  referred  to  the  influence  on  the  floater  mean  position  and  dynamic  response  from  the  slender  structure  restoring. current. item 1) can be accurately accounted for. Items 2).2.    The inertia:  6) Additional inertia forces due to the mooring and riser system.   In a traditional de‐coupled analysis.  Generally. etc.                                       2-20 .   The following items are considered when discussing the coupling effects:  The restoring forces:  1) Static restoring force from the mooring and riser system as a function of floater offset   2) Current loading and its effects on the restoring force of the mooring and riser systems   3) Seafloor friction (if mooring lines and/or risers have bottom contact   The damping:  4) Damping from mooring and riser system due to dynamics. damping and inertia forces.   5) Friction forces due to hull/riser contact. 4) and  6)  may  be  approximated.  A  coupled  analysis as described previously can include a consistent treatment of all these effects.6 Coupling Effects Based  on  the  explanation  in  DNV­RP­F205  (2010).

 waves and currents for the design conditions.   The  study  will  be  based  on  the  return  period  combinations  for  100  year  waves  and  wind  criteria and 10 years current criteria.    NORSOK  N‐003  (2007)  will  be  taken  as  guidance  for  selection  of  environment condition.       3-1 . The criteria are considered to be independent.  the  blue  circle is the NNS (Northern North Sea) wind waves data measurement set location. The relevant table from NORSOK Standard is presented in Table 3.   The study has also provided a set of wind.  the  hostile  environmental  conditions  may  give  a  high‐level challenge that influences the options for the chosen technical solutions.    Moreover.e. wave and current criteria associated with extreme  events.c. no account is taken of the effects of  joint  probability. the black  triangle  is  the  POL  (Proudman  Oceanographic  Laboratory)  tidal  and  current  data  measurement location. i.   The detail information about the location of the Western Isles is based on PhyseE Ltd (2010)  for “Metocean Criteria for Western Isles”.  This  chapter  will  present  meteorological  and  oceanographic  (metocean)  criteria  for  water  levels.    The  field  is  located in the northern North Sea which has three major characteristics.  the  blue  crosses  are  the  BODC  (British  Oceanographic  Data  Centre)  current  data  measurement  locations. Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation The environmental conditions are very important since they will be the key design factor for  an  offshore  field  development. winds. shallow water depth  and harsh environment with strong currents.      The  red  circle  indicates  the  Western  Isles  location.  the  offshore  field  “Western  Isles”  will  be  taken  as  a  case  study.   In  this  study. Chapter 3 1 Environmental Conditions M.1. Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO.S.1. These data are for the location in  Figure  3.

   Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)    Tabel 3. : Definition of location and measurement points for metocean data.   Figure 3. 1. : NORSOK Guidance Return Period Combinations in the Design    Reference: NORSOK Standard (2007)    3-2 . 1.

    For  the  analysis.3.   The still water level depth relative to the seabed and the surge displacement relative to LAT. 3. Surges and Still Water Depths Based on a Nominal LAT Depth     Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)    Tabel 3. : Still Water Levels.  (Lowest  Astronomical  Tide)  can  be  seen  in  Table  3.    Tabel 3. 2.1 Water Level The  water  depths  are  in  the  range  155  –  170m.2  and  the  extreme  water  depth  can  be  seen in Table 3. : Extreme Water Levels and Depths Based on a Nominal LAT Depth     Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)        3-3 .  The detail information above is on PhyseE Ltd (2010).  the  water  depth  will  be  taken as 170 m a conservative value.3.

 : Extreme Wind Speeds at 10 m asl‐ Omnidirectional    Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)  3-4 .4. a 100 year  hourly wind speed design value of 39 m/s is recommended for the Western Isles.   The wind speed criteria for the eight directional sectors and the omni‐directional wind speed  can be seen in Table 3.4 m/s   The Guidance notes contours from Department of Energy (1990).2 Winds Based on the study of Physe Ltd (2010). 5. wind direction is defined as  “Coming from”. Note that in Table 3.3.5.    Tabel 3. two estimates have been considered for wind speed  design value (1‐hourly mean wind speed at 10 m above sea level) for recommendation at the  Western Isles location:   The NNS data set which gives a value of 38. Hence. it is thought prudent to choose the  slightly more conservative value of 39 m/s (at 1‐hourly mean wind speed). which give a value of  approximately 39 m/s  In light of the close agreement between the two of them.4 and Table 3. : Extreme Wind Speeds at 10 m asl‐ by Direction (From)    Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)  Tabel 3. 4.

  The  wind  speed  design  for  simulation  will  be  taken  as  the  average  speed  occurring  for  a  period  of  1‐hour  duration  at  a  reference  height.4)  For a structure on which the wind fluctuations are important such as a floating structure. The wind gust (the varying part of the wind velocity) is assumed to be a  Gaussian stochastic process. m⁄  at height    above  sea  s level and corresponding to an averaging time period  3600  is given by:  .15 ·    (3.2.    In  the  study.3.  S.  i.  Further.1)  Where the 1 hour mean wind speed   (m/s) is given by:  1 · ln    (3. ·   and  0.043 ·    (3.  one  from  the  mean  speed  and  the  other  from  fluctuations  about  this  mean  value.75 0 172 · · · 10    (3.73 · 10 1 0.41 · · ln    (3.6.1 The Wind Force Simulated In Time Domain Chakrabarti.2)  5.  (2005)  has  mentioned  that  the  wind  generally  has  two  effects. The basic theory about this can be found in Marintek (2008) in “SIMO ­ Theory Manual  Version 3.  the  wind  loads  on  the  floater  will  be  simulated  to  be  2‐dimensional. rev: 1”  For  strong  wind  conditions  the  design  wind  speed.  typically  30  ft  (10m)  above  the  mean  still  water level.  The  wind  loads will be simulated in time domain.  NPD  wind  spectrum  (ISO  19901­1  (2005). 1 0.  The  mean  speed  is  generally treated as a steady load on the offshore structure while the fluctuating wind (gust)  is described by a wind spectrum. no transverse gust and no admittance function will be  used. the  wind spectrum for longitudinal wind speed fluctuations can be described by a formula below:  .5)  where: n= 0. the dynamic wind effect will be significant and  should be not ignored for a floating structure.468     = the spectral density at frequency          = the height above sea level  ⁄      = the 1 hour mean wind speed at 10 m above sea level  3-5 .  wind  spectrum)  will  be  used.  Furthermore.  propagating  parallel  to  the  horizontal  plane  when  using  the  software  program  in  SIMO.06 1 0.3)    and where the turbulence intensity factor   is formulated by:  . the model includes gust spectra both in the mean direction and normal to the  mean wind direction.  Moreover. 0.e.  .

 In the SIMO   implementation the magnitude is limited between 0 and 1/600 Hz.         = the frequency.5    In  SIMO  implementation  of  the  spectrum  is  set  to  zero  above  0.8)    3-6 . 2.   is the mean  wind velocity while     is the gust.7)  By ignoring terms of order  .  Further.6)  where:  the mass density of the air is 1.  This  is  caused  by  wind  gusts  with  significant  energy at periods of the order of the magnitude of a minute. 1 600 0.21 kg/m3 at 20°C. the fluctuating drag force can be written as:     (3.   Since no important variation in the wind over the structure and the wind will flow to frontal  area of the structure.    Figure 3. : ISO 19901‐1 wind spectrum for a mean wind speed of 20 m/s.5  hz  and  is  limited  in  magnitude below 1/600 Hz (Figure 3. and  . Reference: Marintek (2008)  Faltinsen  (1990)  has  also  described  that  wind  can  produce  slowly‐varying  oscillations  of  marine  structures  with  high  natural  periods. the wind gusts force spectrum can be written by the expression below:     (3.2). the mean drag force can be defined as follow:      (3.

 the irregular wave analysis will be important to analyze the slow  drift oscillation because it contains groups of waves.  Hence.  linear  wave  theory  will  govern  the  response  in  regular  wave  (sinusoidal  waves).  particularly  in  shallow  water.  These  motions  can  be  obtained  from regular or random waves by computer analysis by using frequency domain techniques. On the other hand.   Furthermore.10)  Where:  the  index  W  means  wind  then  the  relation  between  gust  spectra  expressed  respectively by circular frequency ω and frequency   in hertz is:  .  The  group  period  excites the slow drift causing a large oscillation amplitude.  the  theory  will  describe  the  properties  of  one  cycle  in  regular  waves  and  these  properties  are  invariant  from  cycle  to  cycle.  Hence.   The motions of the vessel at the frequency of the waves represent an important contribution  to  the  floater  loads  analysis.  The  frequency  domain  technique  involves  determining  the  response  amplitude  operator  (RAO) as a function of the frequency over the full range of wave frequencies.3. S. Fourier series analysis will be used to describe the energy density  spectrum of the irregular waves. (2005) has described that regular waves have the characteristics of having a  period  such  that  each  cycle  has  exactly  the  same  form.11)  3.  Furthermore in this study. The regular waves will be used to calculate the wave‐induced motion and load  on a  cylindrical  floater  while  the  irregular  waves  will  have  contributions  in  describing  the  real  condition of the surface sea which has a combination of many different waves with different  heights and different periods.  regular  waves  and  irregular  waves.       3.   Moreover Faltinsen (1990) has also mentioned that the non linear effects of irregular seas are  important  in  describing  the  horizontal  motion  of  moored  structures  (a  cylindrical  floater  with slender members).  the  power spectrum of    is then related to the gust velocity spectrum by:     (3.   3-7 .9)  The calculation of the slowly varying wind is the same as the calculation of the slowly varying  wave. For instance if we consider head wind the mean square value of the surge motion is:        (3. The slow drift oscillation period can be  quite  long  and  it  can  be  managed  by  the  large  group  envelope  period.Note  that  the  fluctuating  drag  force  is  linearly  dependent  on  the  gust  velocity.1 Regular waves Chakrabarti. 2    (3.3 Waves The  study  will  analyze  the  wave  loads  by  using  two  forms.

   A function  .12)  Two important assumptions will be used here.  A  velocity  potential    can  be  used  to  describe  the  velocity  vector  at  time  t.   Figure 3.  1. ·    (3.3). This means that the wave steepness is so small that terms in the  equations  of  the  waves  with  a  magnitude  in  the  order  of  the  steepness‐squared  can  be  ignored. : Harmonic wave definitions.  it  will  be  necessary  to  assume  that  the  water  surface slope is very small.  In  order  to  use  this  linear  theory  with  waves. . Reference: Journée and Massie (2001)  The potential theory will be used to solve the flow problem in regular waves (Figure 3. Since we  operate  with  the  partial  derivatives  of  the  velocities. .  velocities  and  accelerations  of  the  water  particles  and  also  the  harmonic  pressures  will  have  a  linear  relation with respect to the wave surface elevation. incompressible and inviscid flow. Non‐rotational/inviscid flow   x  0  where:       3-8 . .   of  the  harmonic  waves  has  to  fulfill  the  Continuity  condition  and  the  Laplace equation. . .   and      =  · .  can be found from the partial derivatives of this function with respect to  the directions that will  be equal to the velocities in these directions. Incompressible (Continuity equation for incompressible flow)  · 0  where:  · 0   2. 3.  The clear theory can be found in Gudmestad (2010). .  Using  the  linear  theory  holds  here  that  harmonic  displacements. · .  The  velocity  potential  . .   .  . .  the  partial  differential  equation  can  be  written as follow:  .

 a flat bottom will be considered here. a vertical wall at x=a will be considered here.      (3. Wall Condition  No water can flow through the wall.By using two assumptions above.13)  The  complete  mathematical  problem  of  finding  a  velocity  potential  of  Non‐rotational.  incompressible  fluid  motion  consists  of  the  solution  of  the  Laplace  equation  with  relevant  boundary  conditions  in  the  fluid.18)  Since  we  use  the  water  surface  slope  is  very  small  as  an  assumption.     Hence.   3.17)  This condition means that there will be no flow through the ship surface.  Let’s  consider the velocity in the vertical direction as:    (3. Surface Condition  The distinction between different types of fluid motion results from the condition of  the  boundaries  imposed  on  the  fluid  domain.  linearizing can be applied and gives:  3-9 .     (3. for a ship:    (3. we will find the Laplace equation:  0   0      (3.16)    Where: S(t) is the velocity of the moving wall at time t.  Two  types  of  surface  boundary  conditions will be considered here:  A.     (3. Bottom Condition  No water can flow through the bottom.14)  where: d is the water depth  2.15)  For a moving wall. The kinematical surface condition  “A  water  particle  at  the  free  surface  will  always  remain  at  surface”.   1.  The  boundary  conditions  will  be  found  from  physical  considerations.

19)  Here.21)    Since  we  still  use  the  water  surface  slope  is  very  small  as  an  assumption.  and  the  velocity  at  wave  surface is set equal to the velocity at still surface. The dynamic boundary condition  This  criterion  is  corresponding  with  the  forces  on  the  boundary.     Figure 3.   Also.   (3. 4.  the  non‐linear  cross  term  u   is  disregarded.  linearizing  can  be  applied. the boundary    0 can be applied here and we get:       (3.    B. Reference: Journée and Massie (2001)      The Bernoulli equation for an unstationary irrotational flow:  ·     (3.  At  the  free  surface.23)        3-10 . : Atmospheric pressure at the free surface.  Hence  the  terms  can  be  neglected.20)  At surface    and  . :     (3.22)    Hence.22) at the surface can be written as follow:       (3. the equation of (3.4). the boundary condition is simply that the water pressure is equal to  the constant atmospheric pressure p0 on the free surface (Figure 3.

    Det  Norske  Veritas  (2008)  in  “Sesam  User  Manual for  Wadam‐Wave Analysis by Diffraction and Morison Theory” has defined that the  incident waves may be specified by  either wave lengths.  The still water level is obtained by constant extrapolation in WADAM.5):   . By  combining  two  boundaries. The direction of the incident waves are specified by the angle β between the positive  x‐axis and the propagating direction  while the wave profile represents a wave with its crest  at the origin for t = 0 as shown in Figure 3. : Sinusoidal wave profile.  However.   3-11 .    Further.25)  Where (Figure 3.24)        Figure 3. sin     Now  the  equation  (3.  the  kinematical  surface  condition  and  dynamic  boundary  condition:      (3. the theory above is also known as Airy wave theory (first order potential theory)  and  will  be  adopted  in  WADAM  calculations. wave angular  frequencies or wave  periods. incompressible and non‐rotational.  the  fluid  should  be  follow  the assumptions. 5. the velocity potential is given as:      (3.25)  satisfies  all  the  requirements. Reference: Gudmestad(2010)  Hence.6.

 : Surface wave definitions based on WADAM Reference: Det Norske Veritas (2008)    The incident wave used in WADAM is defined as:    or    cos  cos sin     (3.26)    The  fluid  velocity          and  acceleration        for  the  incident wave:  cosh cos   sinh sinh  sin    sinh cosh sin   sinh sinh  cos    sinh   (3. z=0 at still water level    = direction of wave propagation          3-12 .27)  where:  d  = depth  k  = absolute value of wave number     = wave angular frequency  A  = wave amplitude    = location in the x‐y plane  cos sin    = two dimensional wave number  z  = vertical coordinate with z‐axis upward. 6.   Figure 3.

3.  Moreover.8 m   Knowledge of other criteria in the region suggest that a value of 15. S. Extreme Wave Criteria  In this study.7:  Figure 3. ULS regular wave (H0 = 25 m) and FLS  regular wave (H0 = 6 m) as shown in Figure 3. (2005) has also mentioned that in a random ocean the waves appear in group  and should be described by statistical or spectral form. Hence. 7.  This  threshold  level  may  be  the  mean  wave  height.6 m is very  much in line with expectation for the Western Isles location  3-13 .   Chakrabarti. irregular waves will be a good representation action in order to describe the  real condition.Further. : The data for regular waves calculation in WADAM analysis.  The  study  from  Physe  Ltd  (2010)  has  mentioned  that  the  estimation for the 100 year significant wave height design value is based on:   The NNS data set gives a value of 15.2 Irregular Waves The  ocean  waves  are  random  and  not  well  represented  by  sinusoidal  waves.   A.56 m   The  HSE  report  from  “HSE  Research  Report  392:  Wave  mapping  in  UK  waters”  from  Physe  Ltd  (2005)  presents  contours  of  100  year  Hs  which  give  a  value  of  approximately 15. the extreme wave criteria will be based on the return period combinations  for  100  year  wave  criteria. 3. WADAM will be used to calculate the wave frequency dependent floater motions and  mean drift forces by using two kinds of regular waves. One method of defining a group is to  establish  a  threshold  value  and  to  consider  a  group  to  be  a  sequence  of  waves  given  by  an  envelope  that  exceeds  this  value.  the  real  sea  has  a  combination  of  many  different  waves  with  different  heights  and  different  periods.  the  significant wave height or a similar statistical wave height parameters.

 The omni‐directional wave condition and  the wave spectra will also be given.7. Hence.  The  extreme  wave  criteria  for  the  eight  directional  sectors  and  the  omni‐directional  can  be  seen  in  Table  3.  Note  that  in  Table  3. a 100 year significant wave height design value will  be presented for the eight directional sectors. a 100 year significant wave height design value of 15.  the  wave  direction  is  defined  as  “Coming  from”.     Tabel 3.6 and Figure 3.6 m is recommended for the  Western Isles location.      3-14 . 6. : Directional hs Relative magnitudes    Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)      Figure 3.7  and  Table  3.  The  study  from  from  Physe  Ltd  (2010)  has  presented  the  directional  distributions  of  extreme significant wave heights as given in Table 3. Furthermore. : Directional relative magnitudes of significant wave height.8.8. Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)    A  100  years  form  contour  of  Hs  and  Tp  can  be  seen  in  Figure  3.9. 8.

 9. : Hs/Tp Omni directional Hs‐Tp contour for the 100‐years return period sea state. Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)            3-15 .          Figure 3.

 8. : Extreme Wave Criteria for eight directional    Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)    Tabel 3. 7. : Extreme Wave Height and Associated Periods‐ Omnidirectional    Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)        3-16 . Tabel 3.

 the linear theory can be used to obtain  the results in the irregular waves by adding together the results from the regular waves  as a practice solution. In other words.   In order to describe the real surface of the sea. may be described by  the process      during the time period from –T/2 to T/2. at x = 0. this can be written as:    ∑ cos    (3.  Hence. In order to investigate how the energy in the sea  is distributed on the different frequencies.    Wind  seas  are  generated  by  the  local  wind while swell are not related to the local wind but originated from a wind‐driven sea  that travels out of an area. the wave spectrum as a function   will be  given:      (3.  The  wave  energy spectrum describes the energy content of an ocean wave and its distribution over  a frequency range of the random wave. any wave process can be written as a sum of “cosine” or “sinus” waves with given  amplitudes   and phases  .B. which determines the energy in different frequency and/or  direction bands.  The  energy  in  a  harmonic  wave  is  proportional  to  the  amplitude  squared. Further  the height of the surface at a selected location in the sea.28)  After trigonometric manipulations.  the  energy  transfer  from one wave component to another can be discarded.31)  where:    Significant wave height:  4 4      (3.29)    where:      and      Thus.  A  certain  limited  history of measured waves in time history from 0 to time T will be considered.  The most appropriate spectral form depends on the geographical area  and the severity of the sea state to be modeled.32)  3-17 .30)  ∆ The moment of the spectrum are defined by:     (3. Description of Ocean Waves as Sea Spectrum  It  is  often  useful  to  describe  a  sea  state  in  terms  of  the  linear  random  wave  model  by  specifying a wave spectrum.      can be described  by Fourier series:    ∑ cos   sin    (3.  wind  seas  and  swells. the Fourier series analysis will be used to describe  the irregular waves by using an assumption that the irregular waves contains  a Fourier  series  of  linear  waves  that  do  not  interact  with  each  other.  The  basic  theory  about  this  will  be  adopted  from  Gudmestad  (2010).  The shape of wave spectra varies widely  with  the  wave  conditions. Then.

Jonswap Spectrum (Figure 3.  Furthermore in the study. two spectrum formulas will be used.     3-18 .Expected period between zero up crossings:  2    (3.  .   where:             = Philip constant      = peakedness parameter      = spectral width parameter    Figure 3. PhyseE  Ltd  (2010)  has  recommended  the  Jonswap  spectrum  as  the  formulation  of  the  wave  frequency spectrum for Western Isles.10):  exp 1. : Jonswap spectrum.33)  and dominating harmonic period:     (3. 10.35)  which has 5 parameters. . .34)  The  two  most  frequently  used  standard  formulations  of  the  wave  frequency  spectrum   are the Pierson‐Moskowitz and the JONSWAP spectrum for developing sea. the Jonswap (Join North  Sea  wave  Project)  spectrum  and  Torsethaugen  spectrum  (the  Jonswap  double  peaked)  as a comparison.25 exp     (3.    1. .

 (2004). K.  This  means.11):  A  double  peak  spectral  for  wind  dominated  sea  .   2. Torsethaugen Spectrum based on Torsethaugen. 3.1 ln /   3-19 .  where    is  the  spectral  period  and    =  the  spectral  period  for  fully  developed  sea  at  the  actual  location.26     1 1.   Spectral parameter for wind dominated sea  :   Primary Peak   Significant wave height:              1    Spectral peak period:     Peak enhancement factor:  2       /    Secondary Peak   Significant wave height:  1               Spectral peak period:     Peak enhancement factor:  1    Where:     Resulting spectral formula    j 1 primary sea system and j 2 secondary sea system  1     1     16 16            .  the  sea  states  have  a  significant  wave  height  that  is  higher  than  value  corresponding to locally fully developed sea with the given spectral period. (Figure 3.

09    1    and     and         Figure 3. And  0.  3-20 .   The  current  criteria  will  be  presented  for  the  eight  directional  sectors  and  the  vertical  current  profile  will  be  given.  the  current  data  for  the  Western  Isles  location  consist as: tide (M2+S2) (cm/s).32 1.07 ·                    0.5     (3. Construction and Certification”:  ·        0 0.36)  where:    = the speed of tidal current at height z above bed    = the depth mean speed of the tidal current    = height above sea bed    = total water depth  the speed of current is also considered to induce a current at the surface of 3% of the wind  speed. surge current (cm/s) and total current (cm/s).  The  vertical  current  profile  for  the  Western  Isles  will  be  calculated  from  Guidance  Notes. The study will  be based on the return period combinations for 10 years current criteria. 11.  Department  of  Energy  (1990)  for  “Offshore  Installations:  Guidance on Design.4 Currents Based  on  the  study  from  Physe  Ltd  (2010).07    1    0. : Torsethaugen spectrum.5   0. 3.

 The graph of vertical current profile can be seen in Figure 3. 9.10. : Extreme Total Current Profile (m/s) ‐ by direction (direction are towards)    Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)    3-21 .9 and Table  3.12. 10.    Tabel 3.The 10 years current criteria for eight directional sectors can be seen in Table 3. : Tide. Surge and Total Directional Depth Averaged Currents (cm/s)  at Western Isles Location    Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)    Tabel 3.  Note  that  in  this  table  current  direction  is  defined  as  “Towards”  which  the  current  is  flowing.

 tidal component.  The  speed  and  direction  of  the  current  at  specified  water  depths  are  represented  by  a  current  profile. the total current is the vector sum of the current from  local wind. Directions are towards which current is flowing.  Traditionally. (2005) mentions that the  current at the sea surface is mainly introduced by the wind effect on the water. ocean circulation.  3-22 .  Furthermore.1 The Current Force Simulated In Time Domain Current is a common occurrence in the open ocean. Strokes drift. 12. local density‐driven current and  set‐up  phenomena.   Figure 3.   Current loads on the ship can be representing by drag force in longitudinal direction due to  the  frictional  force.  the  viscous  hull  surge  and  the  sway  forces  and  the  yaw  moment  have  been  calculated  based  on  the  current  coefficients  and  the  instantaneous  magnitude  of  the  translational  relative  velocity  between  the  vessel  and  the  fluid. Chakrabarti.6. Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010)    3.4. : Ten years directional current profile. S.  The  basic  theory  about  this  can  be  found  in  Faltinsen  (1990)  and  Marintek  (2008)  in  “SIMO  ­  Theory  Manual Version 3. rev: 1”. variation of  atmospheric  pressure  and  tidal  effects  and  that  current  is  also  presented  in  the  subsurface  and the seafloor regions.  The  surface  current  may  affect  the  drift  of  the  floating  structure.

 the distributions of the cross flow along the hull for yaw  moment    will be the sum of the Munk moment and the viscous yaw moment:  sin  |sin |   sin  |sin |    (3.40)  where:  . Uw.37)  where:   is the angle between the current velocity and the longitudinal x‐axis.  Moreover. as function of heading  are shown in Figure 3. The criteria will be based on the return period combinations for  100  year  waves  and  wind.  are the added mass in surge and sway .   is the wetted  surface of the ship and   can be calculated from:  | |     (3.  the  forces  obtained  from  the  vessel  translation  and  the  current. cos  |cos |    (3.The  calculation  procedure  for  surge  follows  the  ship  resistance  estimation.   is the length of ship.  The  following  approximate formula as follows:  .  Note  that  the  heading  dependency  of  current  speeds  is  not  included.  The  environmental  parameters  contain  waves.38)  where:   is current velocity. Hs and wind speed.  The distribution of heading probability of the environmental parameters in for all year data  will  be  found  in  Figure  3.  wind  and  current speed.39)  Due  to  the  quadratic  nature  of  the  viscous  hull  forces.   3.  The  data  is  presented  as  design  Hs  and  Uw  values  for  heading  divided  by  design  omni‐directinal Hs and Uw value.  3-23 .14.5 Heading Dependency of Environmental Conditions The  heading  position  of  the  floater  will  influence  the  environmental  criteria  in  the  design. Hence. the design significant wave height. The transverse  current force    for sway will be:  sin  |sin |     (3.    is kinematic viscosity of the sea water  While the transverse viscous current forces and yaw moment follow the cross flow principle  as long as the current direction is not close to the longitudinal axis of the ship. respectively.13.  the  forces  obtained  from  a  yaw  induced  cross  flow  cannot  be  separated  and then  added.

Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)    3-24 .    Figure 3. : 100‐years return period design significant wave height and wind speed   as function of heading for all year data. 13. : The distribution of heading probability of the environmental parameters   for all year data. Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)    Figure 3. 14.

  Tabel 3.  are based on the definition “Coming From”.The  study  will  be  based  on  the  return  period  combinations  for  100  year  waves  and  wind  criteria  and  10  years  current  criteria  as  basis  design.    The  used  design  environmental  conditions  for  return  period  condition  wind  and  wave  as  function  of  heading  are  listed  in  Table  3. : The used design environmental conditions for return period condition   wind and wave as function of heading    Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)                                    3-25 .  Note  that  all  environmental  data  in  tables.11  respectively.  concerning  directions. 11.

 H.  the  influence  of  current  forces on the moorings and risers on the position‐dependent vessel forces (stiffness)  is incorporated as an additional current force on the vessel.S. et al. the velocity‐ dependent  forces  (damping)  are  neglected  or  implemented  in  a  rough  manner  by  linear  damping  forces  acting  on  the  floater  itself.  2.    Second.    4-1 . First.  Furthermore. Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO.  Two simplifications are usually made in the vessel motion analysis. usually as linear damping forces acting on the floater. The  important  damping  effect  from  moorings  and  risers  on  LF  motions  has  to  be  included in a simple way. The  mean  loads  on  moorings  and  risers  are  normally  not  accounted  for. the result for the  horizontal forces and the line tension may be inaccurate. (1997).g.    According to Omberg. Omberg and Larsen (1998) also have mentioned the main shortcoming of this  method such as:  1. Hence. Apply the vessel motions from the first step as top end excitation of the moorings and  risers in order to calculate dynamic loads in these elements.1):  1. chapter 4 1 Methodology of the Analysis M.c.  2. have been elaborated  to  quantify  the  coupling  effects  between  a  floating  offshore  system  (a  floater  and  the  moorings  and  riser)  and  the  associated  structural  response  (e. the decoupled analysis and the coupled analysis. the motions of a floating vessel and  the  load  effects  in  moorings  and  risers  have  been  analyzed  by  a  separated  two‐step  procedure (Figure 4.  the  interaction between current forces on the underwater elements and the mean offset  and LF motions of the floater are neglected. Simulate  motions  of  the  floater  based  on  “large  body  theory”  in  which  load  effects  from moorings and risers are modeled as non linear position dependent forces only. Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation Two kind of analyses.  motion  responses)  in  offshore structure designs. traditionally way.  Hence.

z) Step 1:  Step 2:  Vessel motion analysis Dynamic mooring and  riser analysis   Figure 4. such as a moored ship.   Further.   Non  linear  time  domain  analysis. waves  and  currents  since  the  main  coupling  effects  will  be  included  automatically  in  the  analysis. z Large  Apply top end  z(t) body  motions x(t)  model and z(t) x x(t) Stiffness k(x.2). moorings and risers) when responding to environmental loading due to wind.   The  total  load  (from  environmental  loading.  irregular  wave  frequency  (WF)  and  low  frequency  (LF)  environmental  loading  are  required  to  give  an  adequate  representation  of  the  dynamic  behavior of the coupled vessel and slender system (moorings and risers).  All  relevant  coupling  effects  can  be  adequately  accounted  for  using  a  fully  coupled  analysis  where  the  vessel  force  model  is  introduced  in  a  detailed  FE  model  of  the  complete  slender  structure system including moorings and risers. it’s very clear that the de‐coupled analysis is based on the hydrodynamic behavior of  the floater only and uninfluenced by the nonlinear dynamic behavior of moorings or riser.  dynamic  included)  from  the  “slender  body  models” of moorings and risers are transferred as a force into the “large body model” of the  4-2 . a new (coupled) method that ensures truly integrated dynamic system is required to  minimize  the  effect  of  the  main  shortcomings.  Reference: adapted from Omberg and Larsen (1998)  Hence.  This  method  also  known  as  the  nonlinear‐ coupled  dynamic  analysis  ensures  evaluation  of  the  dynamic  interaction  among  them  (a  floater.  This method presents a single complete model that includes the cylindrical floater.  the  precision  of  the  floater  motions  and  the  detailed  slender  structure  response  are  difficult  to  obtain  since  the  interaction  between  the  components  cannot  be  captured. 1 : Illustration of traditional separated analysis. de‐coupled analysis. As  a  consequence. moorings  and risers (Figure 4.   This  method  is  sufficiently  accurate  to  obtain  good  prediction  of  motion  for  mooring  lines  and  riser  dynamics  but  it  may  be  severely  inaccurate  for  a  system  that  is  sensitive  to  low  frequency (LF) response.

 2 : Schematic for nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis. Because in the de‐ coupled analysis.  As  an  example. As a consequence.  damping  and  added  mass  will  be  taken  into  account  automatically  in  the  process  of  analysis.  the  mean  current  forces  on  moorings  and  risers will change the horizontal restoring force and mooring line tension for a given  vessel offset.  velocity  dependent forces (damping) from moorings and risers are automatically included.  Reference: adapted from Omberg and Larsen (1998)    The  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  ensures  higher  dynamic  interaction  between  the  vessel and the slender systems because of the reasons below:   The overall behavior of the floater will be influenced not only from the hydrodynamic  behavior  of  the  hull  but  also  from  the  dynamic  behavior  of  the  slender  members  (moorings  and  risers).  This  is  the  main  advantage for performing coupled analysis rather than decoupled analysis.  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  represents  a  truly  integrated  system  which  ensures the accurate prediction of response simultaneously for the overall system as well as  the individual response of floater.   Since the accurate prediction of the response for the overall system can be generated.floater. the offset value is not applied based on the equilibrium of the static result  4-3 .  As  an  example. this will  also  improve  the  estimates  of  the  dynamic  loads  in  moorings  and  risers.  Hence.         Figure 4. moorings and risers. more  accurate estimate of the mean offset and LF motion can be gained.  The  forces  on  of  the  floater  are  implemented  as  nodal  force  at  the  top  end  of  finite  element models of the moorings and risers.   The  coupling  effects  such  as  the  restoring  effect.

3:      Figure 4.      4-4 .each time step but it is applied based on a single representative offset value only.3. It will also capture possible  LF slender structure dynamics as well as the influence from the LF response (possibly quasi‐ static) on the WF response.  The approach to perform the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis can be adopted from DNV­ RP­F205 (2010) in Figure 4. too  conservative results of a single representative offset value for dynamic loads in mooring and  risers may be generated in the de‐coupled analysis. 3 : Coupled floater motion and slender structure analysis. Hence.  Reference: adapted from DNV­RP­F205 (2010)  Two  branches  of  different  alternatives  for  interfacing  coupled  motion  analysis  with  subsequent slender structure analysis can be seen from Figure 4.  The traditional assumptions which consider WF floater motion as dynamic excitation while  LF  floater  motions  are  accounted  by  an  additional  offset  (branch  b).  Then. This effect will be important for moorings and risers designs.  the  slender  structure is consequently assumed to respond quasi‐static to LF floater motions. The time series of floater  motions  (WF  and  LF  motions)  are  computed  by  the  coupled  floater  motion  analysis  as  boundary conditions in the slender structure analysis (branch a).

  All  the  system  components  are  described  in  a  Finite  Element  Model. the WF and LF are generally described as stochastic  processes. the model will be quite complex and use a “master‐slave” approach for connecting the  riser and the frequency‐dependent floater and moorings.  LF  motion and Total motion (WF+LF). the bar element is formulated using a “total Lagrangian description”.  Two  different  types  of  elements  are  introduced  in  the  model. introducing a memory‐effect in the time domain analysis.     Moreover.  Further  the  frequency  dependent  added  mass  and  damping  coefficients  will  be  converted to a retardation function. while  the beam element formulation uses a “co‐rotated ghost reference description”.  The  wave  forces  acting  on  the  vessel  are  calculated  from  a  hydrodynamic  analysis  program  which  is  based  on  diffraction  theory  (WADAM)  obtaining  a  set  of  frequency  dependent  coefficient  for  inertia.  waves  and  currents. Therefore. Hydrodynamic model of the floater  The  cylindrical  FPSO  will  be  modeled  as  a  large  volume  body.  contains  a  brief  explanation  of  a  single  complete  model that includes cylindrical floater.  system  components. wind gust and viscous drift  These  response  components  will  consequently  also  be  present  in  the  slender  structure response.        4-5 . it will a suitable model to represent moorings.1 System Components In  this  subchapter.  a  3D  bar/cable  element  where  the  bending  stiffness  is  negligible  and  a  3D  beam  element  to  include  the  bending stiffness.   On the other hand. damping and exciting forces.  The basic theory about this can be found in Chapter 2 based on Marintek (2010) for  “RIFLEX  Theory  Manual  Finite  Element  Formulation”.  As  a  single  complete  model  that  includes  cylindrical  floater.  The  HF  responses  are  not  included  in  the  analysis  since  the  cylindrical  FPSO are not sensitive to the HF response.   Global  position  of  the  cylindrical  FPSO  will  be  calculated  based  on  WF  motion. moorings and riser exposed to environmental loading  due  to  wind. The frequency dependent forces are included as a  convolution integral.  moorings  and  riser. the floater motions may contain the following components:   Mean response due to steady currents.  B.   The bar element presents only 3 translational DOF per node and do not provide the  rotational stiffness. Furthermore.  In vessel motion analysis.   A. mean wave drift and mean wind load   WF response due to 1st order wave excitation   LF response due wave drift.  This  model  is  represented  by  a  6  DOF  rigid  body  motion  model.4.    The  procedure  for  a  riser  sytem  model  can  be  found  in  details  in  Marintek  (2010)  for  “RIFLEX  User  Manual  Finite Element Formulation”. Slender Structures  Slender  structures  are  modeled  by  means  of  finite  element  line  systems. Linear and quadratic forces are included. the beam element will incorporate rotational stiffness and it will  be a suitable model to represent the flexible riser.

2 Method Analysis of Nonlinear-coupled dynamic The  method  of  analysis  will  be  adopted  from  Omberg. .  velocity  and acceleration vectors respectively.  It is described by the speed and direction.  The  varying  part  of  the  wind  velocity  in  the  mean  direction is described by the NPD wind gust spectrum (Marintek (2008) for “SIMO ‐  Theory Manual Version 3.  Simulation  of  3  hours  will  be  performed  to  obtain  extreme response estimates with sufficient statistical confidence.  propagating  parallel  to  the  horizontal  plane.  period. C.   The  wind  is  assumed  to  be  2D  i. This can be done by input of discrete values  and it will be interpolated to actual node position by definition of standard profiles. .  This  method  will  generate the solution of the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis in time domain using a non‐ linear  integration  scheme  that  ensures  consistent  treatment  of  the  coupling  effect  between  the cylindrical FPSO and the slender members.    is  the  external  load  vectors.e.  et  al.    represent  inertia. .    (4.6.  during  computation.  In  the  irregular  wave  analysis.  4.  direction  and  phase  characteristics. rev: 1).  .  .  This  current  profile  is  assumed  to  move  with  surface  i.  The  model includes gust spectra both in the mean direction and normal to the mean wind  direction.   4-6 .  The  wind  forces  will  be  calculated  by  the  direction‐dependent  coefficient  specifying  linear and quadratic forces as functions of wind directions relative to the vessel. .  The current forces will be calculated by using the direction‐dependent  coefficients  specifying  linear  and  quadratic  forces  as  functions  of  current  directions  relative to the vessel.  The current velocity is normally assumed to be constant with time at a given position.   The  wave  description  may  be  defined  as  single  regular  wave  which  has  a  specified  height.e.   The  dynamic  loading  from  wind  and  waves  is  modeled  as  a  stationary  stochastic  process  in  a  coupled  analysis. .  The  wind  gust  (the  varying  part  of  the  wind  velocity)  is  assumed  to  be  a  Gausian  stochastic  process. .  the  depth for interpolation within the current table is measured below the instantaneous  wave surface.  Irregular  waves  are  also  considered  in  the  analysis  based  on  Torsethaugen  (double  peak)  spectra.  damping  and  internal  reaction  force  vectors  respectively.  Airy  linear  wave  theory  will  be  used  as  the  basis  for  practical  application  in  the  analysis.  The governing dynamic equilibrium equation of the spatially discredited system is expressed  by:  .  H. The interpolated value of the current velocity is added vectorially to the  wave velocity.  the  seastate  is  represented  in  the  time  domain  by  an  ensemble  of  regular  wave  components  that  are  generated  from  the  wave  spectrum. Environmental modeling   The external forces are mainly due to environmental loadings from wave and current  that  are  acting  on  the  submerged  portion  of  the  cylindrical  FPSO  and  wind  that  is  acting on the exposed portion of the topside. .  (1997).1)  where:    .   are  the  structural  displacement.

1) can be found from an incremental solution  procedure  using  a  dynamic  time  integration  scheme  according  to  the  Newmark   family  method.1) may be due to the displacement dependencies in the inertia  and damping forces and also because of the coupling effect between the external load vector  and  structural  displacement  and  velocity.   Further. The applied FEM procedure is a displacement formulation that allows for  unlimited  displacements  and  rotations  in  the  3‐dimensional  space  while  the  strains  are  assumed to be moderate.  Introducing  the  tangential  mass. Time series of wave kinematics.  can be expressed as:  . environmental forces and specified forces.  H.4)  where: ∆ .  can be expressed as:  . and ∆  are the incremental nodal displacements.   All force vectors and system matrices are established by assembly of element contributions  and nodal component contributions.  Besides. the cylindrical FPSO is regarded as a nodal component in the  FEM model. .   4-7 . forced  displacement. .  including also 2nd order wave forces. the  linearized incremental equation of motion is given by:  ∆ ∆ ∆ ∆     (4.   In the coupled dynamic analysis. Newton–Raphson iteration is used for equilibrium iteration.  et  al.  The external load vector accounts for weight and buoyancy.     (4. velocities and accelerations  respectively.  damping  and  stiffness  matrices  at  the  start  of  the  time  increment and implementation of the residual force vector from the previous time step.2)  where:    is  the  system  mass  matrix  that  includes  structural  mass.1). and wind speed are stored for sufficient duration for a  set of positions expected to be required in the analysis. the numerical solution for equation (4.  while the damping force vectors  .The inertia force vectors  .  Omberg.  The  internal  reaction  force  vector  .  The  relationship  between  inertial  reaction  forces  and deformations also may give nonlinearities in equation (4. the vessel  inertia forces represent the vessel mass and the frequency‐independent part of added mass  that are included in the mass matrix of the system.    (4. The forces on the vessel are represented by a large volume body and computed  separately for each time step and included in the external load vector  . a gradually build up of  excitation should also be obtained in order to avoid instabilities in the start‐up the analysis. ∆ .  mass  accounting  for  internal fluid flow and hydrodynamic mass. .  In addition.  Nonlinearities in equation (4.3)  where:  C  is  the  system  damping  matrix  that  includes  contributions  from  internal  structural  damping and discrete dashpot dampers. . the excitation time series should be  generated by the FFT technique before the dynamic analysis.  (1997)  have  also  mentioned  about  the  practical  implementations  for  time  domain analysis with irregular wind and wave excitation.   is  calculated  based  on  instantaneous  state  of  the  stress in elements.

  Several strategies can be proposed to achieve computational efficiency but it should always  give  an  adequate  representation  of  the  coupling  effects.  This  is  a  main  disadvantage when performing the coupled analysis. The analysis will be done in WADAM to compute the rigid body floater motion of the  S400 based on diffraction theory to obtain the transfer function. 4 : An integrated scheme analysis.    As  the  first  step. Efficient tools and procedures on how  to perform the analysis will be needed. below:  Floater Analysis (WADAM) Frequency domain  Wave load analysis based on Diffraction theory  Output: Stability analysis. It also requires the detailed model for each component  and  characterization  of  the  environments  in  covering  relevant  load  models.  moorings  and  risers. Floater + Moorings (SIMO) Riser (RIFLEX decoupled)  Wave load. effective tension. 12 mooring lines  and one feasible riser configurations.    The  analysis  will  be  performed by using several programs such as WADAM/Hydro D. WF and Total Motion) and Riser analysis (hangoff angle position. etc Time Domain Fully Coupled SIMA (Riflex+Simo)  Wave load. Global Position (LF. currents and wind analysis  Wave load and currents based on Time based on Time domain simulation domain simulation  Output: Time Series of Transfer Function.  In  the  study.  the  cylindrical  floater  motion  analysis  will  be  performed  as  a  decoupled  analysis.4. currents and wind analysis based on Time domain simulation  Output: Time Series of Transfer Function.3 Numerical Simulation Steps The  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  demand  substantial  computer  capacity  since  it  requires a single and complete model including the cylindrical floater S400.  moorings and risers by implementing the numerical simulation steps in order to capture the  interaction  between  the  cylindrical  floater.4. RIFLEX and SIMO.  we  will  present  a  consistent  analytical  approach  to  ensure  better  dynamic  interaction  between  floater.  Output: Feasible Riser configuration and Global Position (LF. mean wave drift forces and  4-8 . Transfer function (RAO). MBR.   An  integrated analysis scheme to obtain  a consistent  analytical approach for the nonlinear‐ coupled dynamic analysis can be seen in Figure 4. 2nd order (drift force and non linear damping) and hydrodynamic coeff. clashing check and seabed clearance)   Where: MBR = Minimum Bending Radius of the flexible pipes  Figure 4. WF and Total Riser analysis as quick check Motion).  Hence  the  analysis  will  be  more  time  consuming  than  the  de‐coupled  analysis.

 Static forces and moments on cylindrical floater S400 and mooring line tension  will be obtained from the static results.  The resulting analysis will not only  present  the  hydrodynamics  but  also  the  stability  of  the  cylindrical  floater.  The  corresponding  mooring  line  tensions  are  established  using a quasi static approach.  In  WADAM.  bending  radius  and  seabed  clearance  will  be  given  in  order  to  get  a  feasible  configuration. Two kinds of  Finite Element  Models (FEM).  The analysis will  also  be  performed  in  time  domain  under  two  simulation  schemes.    As  the  final  step.  The  vessel  motions  i.  Motions  are  found  by  time  integration  enforcing  force  equilibrium  at  each  time  steps.  a  consistent  analysis  ensuring  higher  dynamic  interaction  between  floater.  the  cylindrical  floater  and  the  moorings  will  be  analyzed  in  computer  software  program SIMO. For the structural analysis.  effective  tension. all given  in time series. SIMO is also used as tool to compute floater motion as like WADAM  but  in  time  domain  analysis  through  use  of  retardation  functions  and  it  also  analyzes  the  station‐keeping behavior. The outputs of the analysis are floater motions in time domain.  the  cylindrical  floater  will  be  modeled  as  a  dual  model  configuration. The model configuration of the cylindrical floater and the resultsing analysis  are converted to SIMO. moorings and risers can be gained.  The  main  purpose of the analysis is to find a feasible single arbitrary configuration.non  linear  damping.  For  analysis  results  such  as  top  angle  (hang  off  position  angle). waves and currents will be  considered  here.  Hence.  a  panel  FEM  and a  Morison FEM  will be combined in this configuration.  The  analysis  is  performed in the frequency domain as a simple iterative technique to solve a linear equation  of motions to obtain a set frequency dependent RAO.  The  simulation  will  be  performed  for  two  cases. In dynamic simulation.e.  the  dynamic  slender  structure  analysis  for  riser  configuration  will  also  be  performed  in  RIFLEX  as  decoupled  analysis  in  order  to  reduce  time  analysis.  mooring line tension and the global position of cylindrical floater or the offset value.  the  cylindrical  S400  floater  and  mooring  from  the  SIMO  analysis  will  be  integrated with an arbitrary riser configuration from RIFLEX as a single and complete model  by  using  SIMA.  static  and  dynamic  conditions.   Further. The environmental loading due to wind.  static  and  dynamic  simulations.  the  transfer  function  from  the  WADAM  results  will  be  applied as top end excitation for the moorings and risers in order to calculate dynamic loads  in  these  elements.                     4-9 . the sea states are simulated  for  3  hours  plus  build‐up  time.   Besides  that. the Morison FEM and the  panel FEM are connected in a super element hierarchy.

 below:   Floater Analysis (WADAM) Frequency domain  Wave load analysis based on Diffraction theory ULS and FLS Output: Irregular Stability Wave (Hs 15. Figure 4. currents Irregular and Wave (Hs wind 15. etc Time Domain Fully Coupled SIMA (Riflex+Simo)  Wave load.                          4-10 . currents and wind analysis 2ndyeorder force  Drift Force based 100 ar son Time Wave Irregular domain simulation (Hs 15.6analysis. Transfer m and Tp 15 s) for Jonswap function and (RAO).6 m andanalysis Tp 15 s)  Wave load and currents based on Time 2nd for order force  Drift Force based Jonswapon and Time domainnsimulation Torsethauge 100 ye ar s Irre gular Wave (Hs 15. 5 : Load cases combinations scheme analysis.      The analyses are performed in accordance with the scheme give in. for Jonswap and Torsethauge n Output:  10 Feasible Riser configuration and years currents and Static offset 25 m Global Position (LF. WF and Total Ballast Condition RiserCondition analysis as quick check Ballast Motion).6 m and Tp 15 s) Output: for JonswapTime Series ofnTransfer Function. Position WindWF (NPD) and Total Drift Force Motion) and Riser analysis (hangoff angle Ballast Condition position. effective tension. Floater + Moorings (SIMO) Riser (RIFLEX decoupled) Wave 100 ye ar sload. MBR. and Torsethauge 10Global years currents and (LF.6 m and Tp 15 s) domain simulation 10Output: years currents Drift Force Timeand Done Windof Series (NPD) Transfer Function. Torsethauge n 2nd order (drift force and Ballast and Fully non linear Load Condition damping) and hydrodynamic coeff. clashing check and seabed clearance)   Figure 4.5.

  Storage  and  Offloading  vessel  (FPSO)  S400  is  used  for  the  floating  production  and  storage  of  hydrocarbons.  S400  and  present  the hydrodynamic analysis of the floater based on diffraction theory to obtain hydrodynamic  response of the floater.  It  has  capability  to  store  hydrocarbons  within the range from 300 to 2. Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation This  chapter  will  present  the  general  description  of  the  cylindrical  FPSO. Chapter 5 1 Hydrodynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO S400 M. Other design characteristics include:    no turret  and swivel   spread mooring   segregated ballast   wider and high deck load capacity   offloading to tankers   is moveable    etc  5-1 . Moreover. Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO.  Production.   From  the  resulting  analysis  the  hydrodynamic  responses  such  as:  transfer  function.  the  results  from  Wadam  the  analysis  will  be  used  to  perform  time  domain simulation which includes second order wave and mooring analysis by the program  SIMO.000. The  analysis has been performed in the frequency domain analysis for problem solving.   Furthermore.  mean  wave drift forces and non linear damping and also the stability of the cylindrical floater Will  be  presented  Further.c. the analysis will be performed by using a diffraction program.  5. the modeling concept and the analysis steps in Wadam will  be presented briefly.000 bbls. Wadam/HYDRO  D for single body (free cylindrical floater) without moorings (Det Norske Veritas (2008)).1 General Description The  Sevan  Floating.S.

2. : S400 FPSO Main Particulars    Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)                      5-2 .  the  3D  model  and  2D  model can be seen in Figure 5.  Further.1.  Tabel 5.1 and Figure 5.The  main  particulars  for  S400  FPSO  are  summarized  in  Table  5.  Two  different  platform  drafts  are  specified  for  fully  loaded  and  ballast  conditions. 1.

 : S400 FPSO ‐ 2D model. 1.   Reference: Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)        Figure 5. 2. : S400 FPSO ‐ 3D model.   Figure 5.   Reference: Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)  5-3 .

 Further. Wadam and Postresp as an integrated program  for floater analysis can be seen in Figure 5.  The  Wadam analysis control data is generated by the Hydrodynamic design tool HydroD.  as  the  most  important  contributor to derive the response of motion in a floater. The regular waves are chosen to analyze  the  motion  response  of  the  floater  in  the  frequency  domain  while  the  irregular  waves  are  chosen to describe the real conditions.   Reference: adapted from Det Norske Veritas (2008)    Frequency domain analysis is chosen in this analysis as a simple iterative technique to derive  the motion response of a floater and the calculation of wave loads.   A cylindrical S400  floater will be  modeled both as a hydro  and a  mass  model which do not  involve  the  influence  of  moorings  and  risers.FEM) are build in Prefem as the basic hydro model input  in  HydroD  then  the  models  are  read  by  Wadam  from  the  Input  Interface  File  (T‐file).    5-4 .5.    A  simple  flow  diagram  which describes the relation between Prefem. The  analysis  is  based  on  the  wave  loads  acting  on  the  floater  only.   Prefem has the function to generate a finite element model as basic hydro model in Wadam  while  Postresp  has  the  function  to  present  the  resulting  analysis. HydroD is an integral part of the SESAM system which is related  to several programs such as Prefem.  The  hydro  model  will  be  used  for  calculating  hydrodynamic loads from potential theory and Morison’s equation while the mass model is  used both in the hydrostatic calculations to report imbalances between weight and buoyancy  of the structure and in the equation of motion.5.2 Model Concept and Analysis Steps The cylindrical floater hydrodynamic analysis will be performed as a decoupled analysis.4.   First.  the  floater  hydrodynamic  analysis  is  performed  by  using  the  integrated  software program HydroD.  Furthermore. Wadam and Postresp in Figure 5. 3. The analysis will also be  performed for regular waves and irregular waves.    Figure 5. the finite element models (T*.  the  results  may  be  stored  on  a  Hydrodynamic  Results  Interface  File  (G‐file)  for  statistical  postprocessing in Postresp. : Overview of model types.

 : The relation between Prefem.   Figure 5. : S400 FPSO ‐ 2D model. Wadam and Postresp as an integrated program for analysis  of a cylindrical S400 floater.  5-5 . 5.   Reference: Det Norske Veritas (2008)    Prefem Preprocessor sotfware for producing Finite Element (FE) modelling (Panel model and Morisson model) Wadam (Hydro D) Dual Model (panel model and Morison model) as Hydrostructure Postresp Presentation of the result   Figure 5. 4.

   5-6 . Two forms of regular waves will be used  in the analysis.  modeling the cylindrical floater.1 General Description.    Data and Assumptions Dimension and  General Data Enviromental Load specification S400 Regular Waves Irregular Waves Modeling Hydrodynamic  Mass Model Hydro Model properties  Panel Model Morison Model Loading Conditions Water line position Draft of floater Restoring matrix Damping matrix Analysis and Results Mean Wave (Drift)  Non‐linear  Hydrodynamic  Stability  Transfer Function Force Damping Effects Coefficients   Figure 5. the Jonswap (Joint North  Sea  Wave  Project)  spectrum  and  The  Torsethaugen  spectrum  (the  Jonswap  double  peaked) to describe the real conditions.    Environment Load  Regular wave and irregular waves will be considered as environmental loads which  have directions set coming from 180 degree.    The  hydrodynamic  analysis  by  using  HydroD  will  be  divided  into  data  and  assumptions. : A simple procedure for the hydrodynamic analysis for a cylindrical floater S400. loading conditions and analysis and results. 6. ULS regular wave (H0 = 25 m) and FLS regular wave (H0  = 6 m) while  two spectrum formulas will be used for the irregular waves.6.   The  input  for  the  analysis  will  be  based  on  data  and  assumptions. It also has a set of defined frequency ranges  from 2 s ‐ 30 s because the analysis will be performed by frequency domain analysis.A  simple  procedure  for  the  hydrodynamic  analysis  for  a  cylindrical  floater  S400  has  been  described in Figure 5.  It  will  be  categorized  as  follow:   General Data   Dimensions and Specifications of the Cylindrical Floater S400  The  detail  information  of  the  dimensions  and  the  specification  for  the  cylindrical  floater S400 can be found in subchapter 5.

     5-7 . Note that different superelement number should be  used in the analysis.  Reference: adapted from Det Norske Veritas (2008)      Figure 5.  The  dual  model  is  used  when  both  potential theory and Morison’s equation shall be applied to the same part of the hydro model.  Hence the buoyancy volume in the fully loaded condition will be higher.   The  floater  will  be  heavier  in  fully  loaded  condition  than  in  the  ballast  loading  condition. the analysis also requires mass model. : Finite element models for a cylindrical floater S400. Hence. The mass model is relevant  for  the  floating  structure  only  and  may  be  defined  either  by  finite  elements  with  mass  properties or as a global mass matrix. the analysis requires finite element models that have been built in Prefem as basic  input for the Hydro model. 7.    Besides the hydro model.   + =   Figure 5. : Hydro model combinations.7  while  Figure  5. two kinds of data will be used here with respect to loading conditions (Figure  5.9).  Two types of finite element models are used a combination of a  panel‐  and  a  Morison  model  ‐  called  a  dual  model.   Further. An overview of the hydro model combination for the dual model can be  seen  in  Figure  5. Further information  for  the wave input can be found in Chapter  3. 8.  The mass model is used to analyze the stability of the  floater.  The  dual  model  must  be  used  when  pressure  distribution  from  potential  theory  shall  be  transferred to a beam structural model.8  describes  the  finite  element  models  for  a  cylindrical  floater S400 that are used in the analysis. Environmental  Conditions.

 z =16.    Further.2  The damping and the restoring matrix have been provided from model tests carried out by  Sevan Marine (2011). The drag coefficients and element diameters for calculating  hydrodynamic  loads  are  chosen  with  respect  to  the  loading  condition.32 m  The damping matrix and the restoring matrix for the ballasted loading condition can  be seen in Table 5.10).1   Fully load loading condition.  for  fully  loaded  condition.    The  hydrodynamic  properties  should  be  defined  since  they  will  influence  the  magnitude  of  the wave load acting on a floater. The physical  properties of the air and water such as the density and kinematic viscosity are also listed in  the environment modeling.  the  drag  coefficient  on  the  Morison  element  is  the  most  important  parameter  in  the  mass  model.  ballasted  and  fully  loaded  conditions. 9.72 m  The  damping  matrix  and  the  restoring  matrix  for  the  fully  loaded  condition  can  be  seen in Table 5. Mass model for ballast  Mass model for fully load  loading condition loading condition   Figure 5. z = 20. In  this analysis.  5-8 . the loading conditions will be defined based on the z‐coordinate at the waterline.  we  can  use  Cd  =  5500  while Cd = 5000 for the ballasted condition (Sevan Marine (2011) (Figure 5. : The data for the Wadam mass models for the cylindrical floater S400.  Moreover. two loading conditions are chosen:   Ballast loading condition.

  Damping Matrix for Ballast Loading Condition Motions X Y Z RX RY RZ Surge 800000 N*s/m 0 N*s/m 0 N*s/m 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s Sway 0 N*s/m 800000 N*s/m 0 N*s/m 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s Heave 0 N*s/m 0 N*s/m 0 N*s/m 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s Roll 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s*m 0 N*s*m 0 N*s*m Pitch 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s*m 0 N*s*m 0 N*s*m Yaw 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s*m 0 N*s*m 1e+010 N*s*m Restoring Matrix for Ballast Loading Condition Motions X Y Z RX RY RZ Surge 1140000 N/m 0 N/m 0 N/m 0 N ‐18500000 N 0 N Sway 0 N/m 1140000 N/m 0 N/m 18500000 N 0 N 0 N Heave 0 N/m 0 N/m 0 N/m 0 N 0 N 0 N Roll 0 N 5930000 N 0 N 469000000 N*m 0 N*m 0 N*m Pitch ‐5930000 N 0 N 0 N 0 N*m 469000000 N*m 0 N*m Yaw 0 N 0 N 0 N 0 N*m 0 N*m 0 N*m             5-9 . 10. Mass model for ballast loading  Mass model for fully load loading  condition condition   Figure 5.  Table 5. 1 : The Damping and Restoring Matrices for the Ballasted Loading Condition. : The hydrodynamic properties for mass model in Hydro D computer software program.

 11. 2 : The Damping and Restoring Matrices for the Fully Loaded Condition. Table 5. : The appearance of HydroD.  Damping Matrix for Fully Loading Condition Motions X Y Z RX RY RZ Surge 800000 N*s/m 0 N*s/m 0 N*s/m 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s Sway 0 N*s/m 800000 N*s/m 0 N*s/m 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s Heave 0 N*s/m 0 N*s/m 0 N*s/m 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s Roll 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s*m 0 N*s*m 0 N*s*m Pitch 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s*m 0 N*s*m 1e+010 N*s*m Yaw 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s 0 N*s*m 0 N*s*m 0 N*s*m   Restoring Matrix for Fully Loading Condition Motions X Y Z RX RY RZ Surge  900000 N/m 0 N/m 0 N/m 0 N 0 N 0 N Sway 0 N/m 900000 N/m 0 N/m 17000000 N 0 N 0 N Heave 0 N/m 0 N/m 0 N/m 0 N 0 N 0 N Roll 0 N 17000000 N 0 N 900000000 N*m 0 N*m 0 N*m Pitch 0 N 0 N 0 N 0 N*m 900000000 N*m 0 N*m Yaw 0 N 0 N 0 N 0 N*m 0 N*m 0 N*m   The  appearance  of  the  cylindrical  floater  S400  in  HydroD  can  be  seen  in  Figure  5.11 above. Hydro D has two main windows.     5-10 . the data organizations and the  model view.11  and  Figure 5.12 below:  Data Organizations Model view   Figure 5.  From the Figure 5.

  the low frequency motion comes  from secondary order wave loads such  as the  mean  wave  (drift)  force  and  slowly  varying  wave  force.  This  is  a  relatively  simple  and  efficient  method  to  solve  the  problem since we can assume a linear equation of motion. the linear force transfer  function or Response Amplitude Operator (RAO) can be generated from this analysis.  the  hydrodynamic  analysis  will  be  the  key  factor  to  analyze  the  performance  of  the  cylindrical  floater from its motions. 12. The result will be strongly depending on the first  order  motions  from  the  wave  frequency  load.  These  waves may coincide with the natural frequency of its system and produce resonance.  On  the  other  hand. : A cylindrical floater model of S400 model in HydroD. On the  other hand.    5-11 . Further.  Further.  Normally.  it  is  very  important  for  a  cylindrical  floater  since  it  is  related  to  the  ability  of  the  structure  to  produce  waves.  it  will  give  relatively  smaller  magnitude  forces  compared  to  first  order  force. It will also be the starting point to analyze the stability of the floater and is also  important  for  the  success  of  subsequent  hydrodynamic  analysis.  5.  the  quadratic  transfer  function can be produced from this analysis.  The  motions  of  the  cylindrical  floater  are  mainly  constructed  from  the  wave  frequency  motion  and  low  frequency  motion  components.   Figure 5.  The  hydrostatic  analysis  will  be  governed  by  the  structure  weight  and  buoyancy  force balance.  Furthermore.3 Hydrodynamic Response and Stability Analysis The  response  of  the  floater  can  be  divided  into  hydrostatic  analysis  and  hydrodynamic  analysis.  the  wave  frequency  motion  comes from the wave frequency loads as the first order wave loads and should be analyzed in  the  frequency  domain  analysis.  However.

3.   Eight  combinations  will  be  considered  here  with  respect  to  environmental  load  and  the  waterline position as follow:   Regular wave with Ho=25 m for ballasted at z=16.  to  resist  the  overturning  forces  and  return  to  its  original  position  after the disturbing forces are removed.6m and Tp=15. an uprighting moment larger than zero can only be achieved if: 0  0 where: = the metacentre height = the uprighting moment From the geometry.73 as FLS fully load case   Irregular  wave  with  Jonswap  spectrum  (Hs=15.1 Stability Analysis Stability analysis describes the position of the floater in static equilibrium where the forces of  gravity  and  buoyancy  are  equal  and  acting  in  opposite  directions  in  line  with  one  another. the metacentre height is given as follows: where: = the distance between the keel K and the centre of buoyancy B = the distance between the centre of buoyancy B and the metacentre M = the distance between the keel K and the centre of gravity G 5-12 .73 m as Torsethaugen _fullyload case  5. It requires initial stability. Initial stability is achieved  from a small perturbation from its original position.73 m as Jonswap_fullyload case   Irregular  wave  with  Torsethaugen  spectrum(Hs=15. Hence. in this setting a  ship  or  a  floating  vessel.6m  and  Tp=15.35 m as ULS ballast case   Regular wave with Ho=6 m for ballasted at z=16. We have initial stability when we have  an uprighting moment larger than zero. the floater will be back to its initial position  when the inclining moment is taken away. the resulting of stability. Furthermore from Gudmestad (2010).5s) for ballasted  at z=16.5s) for fully loaded at  z=20.  Ship Hydrostatic (2002) has mentioned that stability is the ability of a body.6m and Tp=15.35 m as Jonswap_Ballast case   Irregular wave with Torsethaugen spectrum (Hs=15. first order motions and second order forces will  be presented as the starting point to determine global performance of the cylindrical floater.35 m as FLS ballast case   Regular wave with Ho=25 m for fully loaded at z=20.3.73 m as ULS fully load case   Regular wave with Ho=25 m for fully loaded at z=20.  The RAO of the cylindrical floater will be presented here as the parts of Wadam result while  the QTF will not be presented since the analyses are done by the frequency domain analysis.5s)  for  fully  loaded at z=20.6m  and  Tp=15.35 m as Torsethaugen _Ballast case   Irregular wave with Jonswap spectrum (Hs=15.In subchapter 5.5s)  for  ballasted  at  z=16.

The stability of a cylindrical floater can be also analyzed from the roll period. 14. A floater has higher stability if a floater has the ability to roll back in shorter time since ~ √ where: = the roll period = the width of ship = the metacentre height The result analysis for stability of a cylindrical floater S400 can be seen in Table 5. 5-13 . a cylindrical floater S400 has good initial stability since 0 and the movement of from the ballasted to fully loaded condition can be seen in Figure 5. : Inclined a cylindrical floater S400.  Reference: adapted from Gudmestad (2010)  The requirement for   0 will be related to freeboard also.6 for ballasted and fully loaded conditions. 13. Based on the results. Mk ф G B B’ K Figure 5.3 until Table 5.

24E‐13 [L] YCB ‐8.00E+00 [M*L**2/T**2]                         5-14 .07E+07 [M] Weight Of The Structure M*G 6. Stability Analysis for Ballast for z= 16.  Mass Properties and Structural Data Symbol Values Unit Mass Of The Structure M 7.84E+03 [L**2] Centre Of Buoyancy XCB 3.93E+08 [M*L/T**2] Centre Of Gravity XG 0.08E+00 [L] Heave‐Heave Restoring Cefficient C33 3.91E+09 [M*L**2/T**2] Pitch‐Pitch Restoring Cefficient C55 4. 3 : The mass properties for ballasted condition.58E+00 [L] Longitudinal   Metacentric Height GM4 7.00E+00 [L**2] Pitch‐Yaw Centrifugal Moment XZRAD 0.00E+00 [L] YG 0.07E+07 [M] Water Plane Area WPLA 3.90E+04 [L**3] Mass Of Displaced Volume RHO*VOL 7.86E+07 [M/T**2] Heave‐Roll Restoring Cefficient C34 0.82E+01 [L] Roll  Radius Of Gyration XRAD 2.00E+00 [L] ZG 1.20E+01 [L] Roll‐Pitch Centrifugal Moment XYRAD 0.91E‐13 [L] ZCB 7.00E+00 [M*L/T**2] Roll‐Roll Restoring Cefficient C44 4.00E+00 [M*L/T**2] Heave‐Pitch Restoring Cefficient C35 0.20E+01 [L] Pitch Radius Of Gyration ZRAD 3.  Hydrostatic Data Symbol Values Unit Displaced Volume VOL 6.00E+00 [L**2]     Table 5.A.35m  Table 5.08E+00 [L] Transverse   Metacentric Height GM5 7.00E+00 [L**2] Roll‐Yaw Centrifugal Moment YZRAD 0. 4 : The hydrostatic data for ballasted condition.20E+01 [L] Yaw Radius Of Gyration YRAD 2.91E+09 [M*L**2/T**2] Roll‐Pitch Restoring Cefficient C45 0.

58E+04 [L**3] Mass Of Displaced Volume RHO*VOL 8.00E+00 [M*L/T**2] Roll‐Roll Restoring Cefficient C44 5.26E+00 [L] Transverse   Metacentric Height GM5 6.84E+03 [L**2] Centre Of Buoyancy XCB 2. Stability Analysis for Fully load for z= 20.62E+08 [M*L/T**2] Centre Of Gravity XG 0.73E+00 [L] Longitudinal   Metacentric Height GM4 6.39E+09 [M*L**2/T**2] Roll‐Pitch Restoring Cefficient C45 0.  Hydrostatic Data Symbol Values Unit Displaced Volume VOL 8.20E+01 [L] Roll‐Pitch Centrifugal Moment XYRAD 0.00E+00 [L] ZG 1.00E+00 [L**2]     Table 5.00E+00 [L] YG 0.  Mass Properties and Structural Data Symbol Values Unit Mass Of The Structure M 8.00E+00 [M*L/T**2] Heave‐Pitch Restoring Cefficient C35 0.61E‐13 [L] YCB ‐7.79E+07 [M] Weight Of The Structure M*G 8.82E+01 [L] Roll  Radius Of Gyration XRAD 2.20E+01 [L] Pitch Radius Of Gyration ZRAD 3.79E+07 [M] Water Plane Area WPLA 3. 5 : The mass properties for fully loaded condition.72m  Table 5.39E+09 [M*L**2/T**2] Pitch‐Pitch Restoring Cefficient C55 5.00E+00 [L**2] Pitch‐Yaw Centrifugal Moment XZRAD 0.B.17E‐13 [L] ZCB 9.20E+01 [L] Yaw Radius Of Gyration YRAD 2. 6 : The hydrostatic data for fully loaded condition.00E+00 [L**2] Roll‐Yaw Centrifugal Moment YZRAD 0.86E+07 [M/T**2] Heave‐Roll Restoring Cefficient C34 0.00E+00 [M*L**2/T**2]                     5-15 .26E+00 [L] Heave‐Heave Restoring Cefficient C33 3.

 It means that the RAO will  be produced from the first order force component i.73m). the regular waves also give a good screening result to analyze  the response of the cylindrical floater.08  while  in  the  fully  loaded  condition.e.   5-16 .  Below. the irregular wave forms can also be used to generate the RAO in order to describe  the real conditions of the sea.  the  centre  of  gravity  will  also  moves  up  and  the  distance  between  the  keel K and the centre of gravity G       will be also higher.  When  the  ballast  tanks  are  full.00 6.  the  RAO  of  the  cylindrical floater S400 will be presented by using two forms of regular waves.20 16 16.26. Further the energy from  the  wave  load  will  be  transferred  to  the  floaters  response  by  transfer  functions  RAO  with  respect to all 6 DOF (surge.14  shows  that  the  stability  of  the  cylindrical  floater  S400  in  ballasted  condition  (Z=16.  However. heave.5 19 19.6  m and Tp= 15 s and Torsethaugen Spectrum. It is the main reason the stability of a cylindrical floater S400 becomes  lower than its position in the ballast condition.  the    will be lower. the wave load.40 y = ‐0.5 17 17.   5.  the  keel  position will move down and the distance between the keel and the buoyancy centre    will  be  higher.    Figure  5.3.158 6. The Movement of The Metacentre Height from  Ballast to Fullyload Condition The matacentre height 7. Hs=15.   The  RAO  is  very  important  to  reflecting  the  key  performance  of  the  floater  because  it  can  describe  how  the  response  of  the  vessel  varies  with  the  frequency. roll.5 21 The Waterline position (z)   Figure 5. 14.80 6. Ho= 25 m and  Ho=  6  m  from  direction  180°.2 Transfer Functions The  transfer  function  or  the  Response  Amplitude  Operator  (RAO)  will  represent  the  amplitude of harmonic or sinusoidal response to harmonic load.1883x + 10.20 7.6 m and Tp= 15 s.35 m) is higher than in fully loaded condition (Z=20.     However. sway. Hs=15.  These cases are chosen based on environmental condition in Chapter 3.60 6. In addition. The irregular waves are based on Jonswap Spectrum.  The  regular  waves  are  chosen  as  a  practical  solution  to  generate the RAO. : The movement of   from the ballasted to fully loaded condition.  the  metacentre  height  is    =6.5 20 20.  In  the  ballasted  condition.  the  metacentre  height  is    =7.5 18 18. pitch and yaw). Since the    is higher than  .

1 Periode (s)   Figure 5.3 0. : The amplitude of the response variable for surge in regular wave condition.73 m as ULS fully loaded case   Regular wave with Ho=25 m for fully load at z=20.5 0.20  while  the  RAO  in  irregular waves can be seen in Figures 5.73 as FLS fully loaded case     The surge motions    Amplitude of Response Variable For Surge in Regular Waves Condition 1.7 FLS Fully Load ULS Fully Load 0.15  ­  5.1 Amplitude (m/m)  0.    A.The responses of the cylindrical floater S400 with respect to 6 DOFs can be seen in the figures  below.  The  RAO  in  regular  waves  can  be  seen  in  Figures  5.21 ­ 5.35 m as FLS ballasted case   Regular wave with Ho=25 m for fully load at z=20.9 FLS Ballast ULS Ballast 0. 15.7 1.25. Regular waves  Four conditions have been chosen to describe the amplitude of the response variable in  regular wave condition with respect to 6 DOF motions of a floater.35 m as ULS ballasted case   Regular wave with Ho=6 m for ballast at z=16.1 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ‐0.5 1.                      5-17 .     Regular wave with Ho=25 m for ballast at z=16.3 1.

 17.        5-18 .0014 0.001 FLS Ballast 0. : The amplitude of the response variable for heave in regular wave condition.2 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s)   Figure 5.6 ULS Fully Load 0.2 1 Amplitude (m/m)  FLS Ballast 0. 16. : The amplitude of the response variable for sway in regular wave condition.0004 0.0002 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ‐0.0012 Amplitude (m/m)  0.0018 0.0008 ULS Ballast FLS Fully Load 0.0002 Periode (s)   Figure 5.4 0.0016 0.6 1.0006 ULS Fully Load 0.     The heave motions    Amplitude of Response Variable For Heave in Regular Waves Condition 1.4 1.8 ULS Ballast FLS Fully Load 0.  The sway motions    Amplitude of Response Variable For Sway in Regular Waves Condition 0.

 19.008 Amplitude (m/deg)  FLS Ballast 0. 18.3 ULS Fully Load 0. : The amplitude of the response variable for roll in regular wave condition.  The roll motions    Amplitude of Response Variable For Roll in Regular Waves Condition 0. : The amplitude of the response variable for pitch in regular wave condition.8 0.4 ULS Ballast FLS Fully Load 0.1 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s)   Figure 5.2 0.002 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s)   Figure 5.004 0.7 0.      5-19 .006 ULS Ballast FLS Fully Load ULS Fully Load 0.01 0.     The pitch motions    Amplitude of Response Variable For Pitch in Regular Waves Condition 0.6 0.012 0.5 Amplitude (m/deg)  FLS Ballast 0.

  Hence  Figure  5.5s) for fully loaded at  z=20. 20.  as  a  straight  circular  cylinder.35 m as Jonswap Ballast case   Irregular wave with Torsethaugen spectrum (Hs=15.15.  Normally  the  motions  in  the  vertical  plane  are  decisive  for  the  cylindrical  floater. Irregular waves  Four conditions have been chosen to describe the amplitude of the response variable in  irregular wave condition with respect to 6 DOF motions of a floater.  It means that the  cylindrical floater S400 will follow the wave behavior and gives little resistance.    The  cylindrical  floater  has  unique  dimension  characteristic.20. this happens because of the influence of the direction of wave comes from 180°.17  ­5.16  and  5.6m  and  Tp=15.  5. The yaw motions    Amplitude of Response Variable For Yaw in Regular Waves Condition 1E‐09 9E‐10 8E‐10 7E‐10 6E‐10 Amplitude (m/deg)  5E‐10 FLS Ballast ULS Ballast 4E‐10 FLS Fully Load ULS Fully Load 3E‐10 2E‐10 1E‐10 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ‐1E‐10 Periode (s)   Figure 5.6m and Tp=15.35 m as Torsethaugen Ballast case   Irregular wave with Jonswap spectrum (Hs=15. the  cylindrical  floater  S400  also  gives  significant  responses  for  the  surge  motion  for  short  periods.    Based  on  the  information  from  Figures  5.  roll  and  pitch  motions  will  be  important  in  the  performance of the floater.  it  may  be  seen  that  the  cylindrical  floater  S400  has  a  tendency  to  be  “soft”  in  the  horizontal  plane  with  respect  to  surge.6m and Tp=15.73 m as Jonswap fullyload case  5-20 .     Irregular  wave  with  Jonswap  spectrum  (Hs=15. sway  and yaw motions when these motions are in longer periods.19  shows  that  heave.     B.5s) for ballasted  at z=16. the surge motion in 0° will coincide  with the sway in 90° and the surge motion in 90° will coincide with the sway in 0°. : The amplitude of the response variable for yaw in regular wave condition.   Hence the axis in x and y will be symmetric. However.  As examples.5s)  for  ballasted  at  z=16.

8 Torsethaugen Ballast Jonswap Fully Load 0.4 0. Irregular  wave  with  Torsethaugen  spectrum  (Hs=15.0002 Amplitude (m/m)  0.00015 Jonswap Ballast Torsethaugen Ballast 0.0001 Jonswap Fully Load Torsethaugen Fully Load 0.5s)  for  fully   loaded at z=20.2 Amplitude (m/m)  1 Jonswap Ballast 0.        5-21 .73 m as Torsethaugen fullyload case   The surge motions  Amplitude of Response Variable For Surge in Irregular Waves Condition 1.6 Torsethaugen Fully Load 0. : The amplitude of the response variable for surge in irregular wave condition.00025 0. 22. : The amplitude of the response variable for sway in irregular wave condition.6m  and  Tp=15.6 1.00005 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s)   Figure 5.4 1. 21.2 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s)   Figure 5.     The sway motions  Amplitude of Response Variable For Sway in Irregular Waves Condition 0.

0006 Torsethaugen Fully Load 0.6 0.0012 0.0008 Torsethaugen Ballast Jonswap Fully Load 0.3 Torsethaugen Fully Load 0.0016 0.5 Amplitude (m/deg)  Jonswap Ballast 0. : The amplitude of the response variable for roll in irregular wave condition.     The pitch motions  Amplitude of Response Variable For Pitch in Irregular Waves Condition 0.4 Torsethaugen Ballast Jonswap Fully Load 0.0004 0. 23.8 0. 24.  The roll motions  Amplitude of Response Variable For Roll in Irregular Waves Condition 0.7 0.1 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s)   Figure 5. : The amplitude of the response variable for pitch in irregular wave condition.001 Amplitude (m/deg)  Jonswap Ballast 0.0002 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s)   Figure 5.2 0.      5-22 .0014 0.

31.25.29 ­ 5.3 Mean Wave (Drift) Force The mean wave (drift) forces on a structure can be calculated due to linear incident waves in  Wadam.  Furthermore.  roll  and  pitch)  the  results  based  on  the  pressure  integration  calculation  method can be seen in Figures 5. : The amplitude of the response variable for yaw in irregular wave condition.    It  is  not  necessary  to  include  the  second  order  terms  since  the  second  order  potential does not result in mean loads. 32 ­ 5.  5.4E‐10 1.  sway  and  yaw)  based  on  conservation  momentum  versus  the  pressure  integration  calculation  method  can  be  seen  in  Figures  5. 25.  the  mean  wave  drift  forces  are  also  calculated for the irregular wave forms. we will use the RAOs from the  irregular wave analysis as the input to next step.28  while  for  the  remaining  degrees  of  freedom  (heave.  The yaw motions  Amplitude of Response Variable For Yaw in Irregular Waves Condition 1.31. Hence.   The mean wave (drift) force from the two calculation methods.3. 37.  the  RAOs  in  the  irregular waves give better behavior for the responses.2. The results can be seen in Figures 5. the mean wave (drift) force for the three horizontal degrees of freedom (surge.  Moreover.26 – 5.    Based on the information from Figures 5.2E‐10 1E‐10 Amplitude (m/deg)  8E‐11 Jonswap Ballast Torsethaugen Ballast 6E‐11 Jonswap Fully Load Torsethaugen Fully Load 4E‐11 2E‐11 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s)   Figure 5. the cylindrical floater motion and moorings  analysis in SIMO. the RAOs in irregular waves may be seen  to  have  the  same  tendency  as  the  RAOs  in  the  regular  waves.    5-23 .  As  like  as  transfer  functions  in  subchapter  5. The far field method is based on  the equation for conservation of momentum in the fluid while the near field method is based  on the direct pressure integration. the far field method and the  near field method will be presented in Figures 5.3.21 ­ 5.26  ­  5.

 far field versus the pressure integration in sway for regular waves. 27. A. Mean wave (drift) force for regular waves     The drift force in surge   Mean Wave (Drift) Force for Regular Waves in Surge Based on Pressure Integration vs Conservation Momentum 450000 400000 350000 300000 Amplitude (N) 250000 200000 150000 100000 50000 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ FLS Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ ULS Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ FLS Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ ULS Fully Load   Figure 5.  5-24 . : The drift force. 26. : The drift force.     The drift force in sway  Mean Wave (Drift) Force for Regular Waves in Sway Based on Pressure Integration vs Conservation Momentum 120 100 80 Amplitude (N) 60 40 20 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ FLS Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ ULS Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ FLS Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ ULS Fully Load   Figure 5. far field versus the pressure integration in surge for regular waves.

 however after 10 s the tendency in  the results will be looking similar.      The  numerical  discretization  of  the  geometry  for  the  cylindrical  floater  S400  are  strongly  related  to  the  number  of  elements  in  the  panel  model.         5-25 . the resulting calculations from the far field  method give more well‐organized results than the pressure integration method.26 – 5.  have  pointed  that  the  far  field  method  maybe  more  efficient  than  the  pressure  integration  method  since  the  the  far  field  method  is  less  demanding  on  numerical  discretization. 28.    From Figure 5.   From Figure 5.  a  finer  discretization  of  the  geometry is can only be generated if the FEM for the panel model has a good surface mesh (a  more massive model). : The drift moment.28 above. these results from Figures 5. the mean wave (drift) force based on conservation of momentum  versus  the  pressure  integration  calculation  method  for  surge  shows  some  differences  in  calculation results in the range short periods below 10 s. far field versus the pressure integration in yaw for regular waves.  Furthermore. the mean wave (drift) force based on conservation of momentum  versus  the  pressure  integration  calculation  method  for  sway  shows  much  variation  in  the  calculation results.  Hence.26 above. Furthermore.  the  resulting  calculations  from  the  far  field  method also give more well‐organized results than the pressure integration method.27 above.   Hence.  The drift moment in yaw  Mean Wave (Drift) Moment for Regular Waves in Yaw Based on Pressure Integration vs Conservation Momentum 4500 4000 3500 3000 Amplitude (N) 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ FLS Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ ULS Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ FLS Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration  ‐ ULS Fully Load   Figure 5.28 agree with Hung and Taylor and Scalavounos  (1978).  Calculation disturbance from numerical model effects is the main reason  for  the  variation  in  the  results. the mean wave (drift) force based on conservation of momentum  versus  the  pressure  integration  calculation  method  for  yaw  shows  some  differences  in  the  calculation results where most of them coincide along the periods.  From Figure 5.

    5-26 . 29. 30. pressure integration in roll for regular waves. : The drift force. pressure integration in heave for regular waves. The drift force in heave   Mean Wave (Drift) Force for Regular Waves in Heave Based on Pressure Integration  350000 300000 250000 200000 Amplitude (N) 150000 100000 50000 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Fully Load   Figure 5.m) 20000 15000 10000 5000 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Fully Load   Figure 5. : The drift moment.     The drift moment in roll  Mean Wave (Drift) Moment for Regular Waves in Roll Based on Pressure Integration  35000 30000 25000 Amplitude (N.

m) 4000000 3000000 2000000 1000000 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ FLS Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ ULS Fully Load   Figure 5. pressure integration in pitch for regular waves. 31.  The drift moment in pitch    Mean Wave (Drift) Moment for Regular Waves in Pitch Based on Pressure Integration  7000000 6000000 5000000 Amplitude (N.                                  5-27 . : The drift moment.

     The drift force in sway  Mean Wave (Drift) Force for Irregular Waves in Sway Based on Pressure Integration vs Conservation Momentum 40 35 30 25 Amplitude (N) 20 15 10 5 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ‐5 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Jonswap Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Jonswap Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Fully Load   Figure 5. 33. 32.29 – 5.On the other hand. : The drift force. far field versus pressure integration in surge for irregular waves.    5-28 . roll and pitch (Figures 5.   B. Mean wave (drift) force for irregular waves   The drift force in surge   Mean Wave (Drift) Force for Irregular Waves in Surge Based on Pressure Integration vs Conservation Momentum 450000 400000 350000 300000 Amplitude (N) 250000 200000 150000 100000 50000 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Jonswap Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Jonswap Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Fully Load   Figure 5. the pressure integration method is potentially more useful to obtain the  solution for  mean wave (drift) force in heave. : The drift force.31) because  the far field method has limitation in generating these particular solutions. far field versus pressure integration in sway for irregular waves.

 far field versus pressure integration in yaw for irregular waves.        5-29 . The drift moment in yaw  Mean Wave (Drift) Moment for Irregular Waves in Yaw Based on Pressure Integration vs Conservation Momentum 900 800 700 600 500 Amplitude (N) 400 300 200 100 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 ‐100 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Jonswap Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Ballast Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Jonswap Fully Load Conservation Momentum Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Fully Load   Figure 5. pressure integration in heave for irregular waves.     The drift force in heave  Mean Wave (Drift) Force for Regular Waves in Heave Based on Pressure Integration  300000 250000 200000 Amplitude (N) 150000 100000 50000 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap  Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap  Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Fully Load   Figure 5. : The drift moment. : The drift force. 34. 35.

 : The drift moment. : The drift moment.  5-30 . 36.     The drift moment in pitch  Mean Wave (Drift) Moment for Regular Waves in Pitch Based on Pressure Integration  5000000 4500000 4000000 3500000 3000000 Amplitude (N. pressure integration in roll for irregular waves. 37. pressure integration in pitch for irregular waves.m) 2500 2000 1500 1000 500 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap  Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap  Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Fully Load   Figure 5. The drift moment in roll  Mean Wave (Drift) Moment for Regular Waves in Roll Based on Pressure Integration  4500 4000 3500 3000 Amplitude (N.m) 2500000 2000000 1500000 1000000 500000 0 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 Periode (s) Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap  Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Ballast Pressure Integration ‐ Jonswap  Fully Load Pressure Integration ‐ Torsethaugen Fully Load   Figure 5.

3. However.  Hence. meaning that this will represent a damping mechanism for the slow  drift motion excited by the second‐order difference frequency forces or due to the interaction  of the waves with the current. the cylindrical floater motion and moorings  analysis in SIMO. DRIFT 1 (force in x‐direction) 50000 45000 40000 35000 30000 Amplitude (N) 25000 Ballast 20000 Fully Load 15000 10000 5000 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Periode (s)   Figure 5.37.  we  will  use  the  irregular wave results as the input to next step.43 below:   The non linear damping effect in surge     Non Linear Damping Effect of Drift Force‐PressureIntegration Regular Wave.  the  mean  wave  (drift)  force  in  the  irregular  waves  gives  better  and  more  well‐organized  results.32  ­  5.4 Nonlinear Damping Effect The nonlinear damping effect can be described from the rate of change of the mean drift force  between two forms of regular waves (Ho= 25m and Ho= 6m). 38.38 –  5. The sign of this rate of change  is in most cases negative. we use absolute value in this case in order  to show  the magnitude value of the force.  5.                5-31 .   The calculation is based on the pressure integration methods hence the computation of the  wave  drift  damping  requires  a  free  surface  mesh  which  is  defined  as  input  exactly  like  the  free surface mesh for the second‐order analysis.   The non linear damping effects for the cylindrical floater S400 can be seen in Figures 5. : The non linear damping effect in surge for regular wave.Based  on  the  information  from  Figures  5.

 39.  DRIFT 3 (force in z‐direction) 120000 100000 80000 Amplitude (N) 60000 Ballast Fully Load 40000 20000 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Periode (s)   Figure 5.  DRIFT 2 (force in y‐direction) 90 80 70 60 50 Amplitude (N) 40 Ballast Fully Load 30 20 10 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Periode (s)   Figure 5. : The non linear damping effect in heave for regular wave. 40.        5-32 .     The non linear damping effect in heave     Non Linear Damping Effect of Drift Force‐PressureIntegration Regular Wave. : The non linear damping effect in sway for regular wave. The non linear damping effect in sway     Non Linear Damping Effect of Drift Force‐PressureIntegration Regular Wave.

        5-33 .  DRIFT 4 (moment about x‐direction) 25000 20000 15000 Amplitude (N.     The non linear damping effect in pitch    Non Linear Damping Effect of Drift Force‐PressureIntegration Regular Wave. : The non linear damping effect in roll for regular wave.m) 2000000 Ballast 1500000 Fully Load 1000000 500000 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Periode (s)   Figure 5. 41. 42.m) Ballast 10000 Fully Load 5000 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Periode (s)   Figure 5. The non linear damping effect in roll    Non Linear Damping Effect of Drift Force‐PressureIntegration Regular Wave. : The non linear damping effect in pitch for regular wave.  DRIFT 5 (moment about y‐direction) 4000000 3500000 3000000 2500000 Amplitude (N.

m) 1500 Ballast Fully Load 1000 500 0 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Periode (s)   Figure 5. 43.                                    5-34 . : The non linear damping effect in yaw for regular wave.  The non linear damping effect in yaw    Non Linear Damping Effect of Drift Force‐PressureIntegration Regular Wave.  DRIFT 6 (moment about z‐direction) 3000 2500 2000 Amplitude (N.

Chapter

6
1 Moorings Analysis
M.S.c. Thesis
Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO, Moorings and Riser
Based on Numerical Simulation

In  this  chapter  the  general  description  regarding  the  mooring  system  and  the  moorings 
analysis  to  obtain  the  horizontal  offset  values  and  moorings  tension  will  be  presented. 
Moreover,  the  modeling  concept  and  the  steps  for  the  analysis  in  SIMO  will  be  presented 
briefly.  
Furthermore, the cylindrical S400 floater and moorings are modeled by using software SIMO 
for simulation of motions and station‐keeping behavior of the floater, the analysis has been 
performed in time domain.  
The moorings lay out and composition of lines will be presented here. The analysis has been 
performed in SIMO for static and dynamic conditions.  The static condition will give results 
such  as  static  moment  and  forces  for  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  and  moorings  and  also  the 
bodies position in static condition; while in the dynamic condition the results will be motion 
response  given  by  time  series,  the  second  order  wave  forces  and  also  wave  drift  damping 
forces and also the positioning system forces for the moorings. 

6.1 Mooring Systems
It is essential that floating structures have precise motions and position systems. Hence, the 
mooring system is important to hold the structure against winds, waves and currents (Figure 
6.1). Chakrabarti, S. (2005) has mentioned that mooring system design is a trade‐off between 
making the system compliant enough to avoid excessive forces on the floater and making it 
stiff  enough  to  avoid  difficulties  due  to  excessive  offsets.  This  is  very  difficult  in  shallow 
water.  Chakrabarti, S. (2005) also suggests to develop increasingly integrated moorings/riser 
system  design  methods  to  optimize  the  system  components  to  ensure  lifetime  system 
integrity.  

6-1

 
Figure 6. 1. : Environmental forces acting on a moored vessel in head conditions and the transverse 
motion of catenary mooring lines.   
Reference: Chakrabarti S. (2005) 

 
The  mooring  system  for  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  will  adopt  the  spread  mooring  system 
without using a thruster to stay in the desired position. The spread of mooring lines as in a 
conventionally  mooring  system  each  of  the  lines  forms  a  catenary  shape.    A  spread  of 
mooring lines generates a non linear restoring force by relying on an increase or decreases in 
line tension as the mooring lines lift off or settle on the seabed. The force increases with the 
horizontal offset and balances quasy‐steady environmental loads on the surface platform.  
Furthermore, Faltinsen (1990) has mentioned that the tension forces in the lines depend on 
their weight and elastic properties and are also depending on the manner in which moorings 
are laid. Besides, the longitudinal motion and transverse motions of the moorings themselves 
can also influence the response of a floater through line dynamics. Hence, the moorings have 
an effective stiffness composed of an elastic and a geometric stiffness which combined with 
the motion of the unit will introduce forces on lines.  
The  mooring system for the cylindrical S400 floater consists of  12  mooring lines which are 
distributed on 3 clusters (3 groups of 4 lines). The overall line lay out of the mooring lines is 
shown in Figure 6.2 below: 
 

6-2

 
Figure 6. 2. : Mooring lines layout overview.   
Reference: Sevan Marine (2011) 

 
The mooring lines for a cylindrical S400 floater will be made from combination of chain and 
polyester  rope.  The  polyester  has  been  considered  in  the  design  because  it  has  good 
characteristics such as being lighter, relatively very flexible and having capability to absorb 
imposed dynamic motions through extension without causing an excessive dynamic tension. 
Moreover, it also reduces the line length of mooring lines.    
The  composition  of  a  mooring  line  for  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  will  be  fairlead,  top  chain 
segments, upper polyester segment and lower polyester segment, anchor chain segment and 
anchor.  The given length of the top chain represent the “as installed” initial length of the top 
chain measured from fairlead to the polyester rope connection. The total length of this chain 
segment is 125 m. 
The details of the composition of each of the 12 mooring lines are shown in Table 6.1 and in 
Figure 6.3. 

6-3

Table 6. 1. : Mooring Line Composition for Sevan 400 FPSO 

Segment Type (From  Nominal  Axial stiffness EA  Weight in air  Submerged 
Lenghth (m)
Anchor) diameter (mm) (kN) (kN/m) Weight  (kN/m)

Anchor ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐ ‐
Anchor Chain 50 155 1.76E+06 4.71 4.1
Link 1 ‐ ‐ 25 22
Lower Polyester Rope 400 260 See comments below 0.46 0.12
Buoy w. link 5 ‐ ‐ 225 ‐125
Upper Polyester Rope 700 260 See comments below 0.46 0.12
Link 1 1 ‐ 25 22
Top Chain 125 155 1.76E+06 4.71 4.1  

Reference: Sevan Marine (2011) 

Comments: 
For the axial stiffness of the polyester rope, different mooring line stiffness values have to be 
considered. The following stiffness values are defined based on DNV­OS­E301 (2004). Typical 
values of stiffness data for fibre moorings are determined from the test program of the actual 
polyester rope. 
In this study, two typical values of stiffness data for polyester are used: 
1. Static  stiffness  also  called  drift  stiffness  is  the  intermediate  of  stiffness  values  for 
polyester from 18.4 MBL (Minimum Breaking Load) 
2. Dynamic  stiffness  also  called  storm  stiffness  is  the maximum  of  stiffness  values  for 
polyester from 18.4 MBL (Minimum Breaking Load) 

Moreover, the MBL of the polyester Rope and Chain are: 
1. 260 mm Polyester Rope; MBL=19250 kN 
2. 155 mm Chain, Grade R4; MBL=20802 kN 

The  corrosion  properties  for  the  chains  are  also  considered  in the  design.  According  to  ISO 
19901‐7 (2005), a corrosion allowance referred to the chain diameter, can be taken to be 0.4 
mm/year  for  splash  zone  and  0.2  mm/year  for  the  remaining  length.  Using  the  combined 
fairlead/chain  stopper  solution  the  entire  load  carrying  part  of  the  mooring  chain  (i.e.  part 
outside the Chain stopper) will be below splash zone. 0.2 mm/year corrosion allowance has 
therefore  been  assumed.  Based  on  the  specified  a  design  life  of  20  years  and  assuming  no 
replacement of mooring lines, this gives a reduction of the diameter of 4 mm, which implies: 
155 mm Chain, Grade R4; MBL=19942 kN (Including 20 years corrosion margin). 
The  choice  of  anchor  will  be  based  on  the  actual  soil  conditions.  At  present,  use  of  suction 
anchors is the base case.  
Furthermore, the mooring line composition can also be seen in Figure 6.3 below: 
 
 
 

6-4

 
Figure 6. 3. : Mooring line composition.  
Reference: Sevan Marine (2011) 

6-5

The  detailed  orientation  and  the  pretension  of  the  lines  will  be  given  based  on  the  SIMO 
configuration and can be seen in Table 6.2 as follow: 
Table 6. 2. : The Detailed Orientation and The Pretension of The Lines  
for Mooring System of Sevan 400 FPSO 

Name X (m) Y  (m) Z  (m) Pretension (kN) Direction (degree)

S400_Line1 31.2 ‐18 ‐9.35 1.75E+03 342
S400_Line2 31.2 ‐18 ‐9.35 1.75E+03 340
S400_Line3 31.2 ‐18 ‐9.35 1.75E+03 330
S400_Line4 31.2 ‐18 ‐9.35 1.75E+03 328
S400_Line5 ‐31.2 ‐18 ‐9.35 1.75E+03 212
S400_Line6 ‐31.2 ‐18 ‐9.35 1.75E+03 210
S400_Line7 ‐31.2 ‐18 ‐9.35 1.75E+03 200
S400_Line8 ‐31.2 ‐18 ‐9.35 1.75E+03 198
S400_Line9 0 36 ‐9.35 1.50E+03 97
S400_Line10 0 36 ‐9.35 1.50E+03 95
S400_Line11 0 36 ‐9.35 1.50E+03 85
S400_Line12 0 36 ‐9.35 1.50E+03 83  
Reference: Sevan Marine (2011) 

 
The initial tension or pre‐tension in mooring lines are established by the use of winches on 
the  floater.  The  winches  pull  on  the  mooring  lines  to  set  up  the  desirable  configurations. 
Hence,  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  will  be  also  equipped  with  the  mooring  winches.  The 
mooring winches are located on the main deck. The mooring winches will be of the rotating 
type with one winch for each cluster. The winches can be skidded on rails on the main deck to 
cover the different lines in the cluster. 
By using the winches, a cylindrical S400 floater can be moved to different positions relative 
to its defined zero position. The maximum radius will depend on the length of the top chain 
and the storage capacity of the chain lockers. The present mooring system solution is based 
on a maximum offset radius of 75 m. This imply that the Sevan Floater, may be located at any 
position within a radius of 75 m from its defined zero position. 
The movable winches will be installed by one winch per cluster on the main deck. The typical 
winch that will be applied on a cylindrical S400 floater can be seen in Figure 6.4 below: 

6-6

 
Figure 6. 4. : The movable winch on a cylindrical S400 floater.  
Reference: Sevan Marine (2011) 

Besides  the  moveable  winches,  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  will  be  also  equipped  with 
combined  fairlead/chain  stoppers.  This  combined  solution  has  the  following  advantages 
compared to the traditional solution with fairlead at the FPSO side and chain stopper at the 
main deck such as: 
 Since the position of the chain stopper is below splash zone, it will gives less required 
corrosion  allowance  for  the  loaded  part  of  the  Chain  (0.2  mm/year  relative  to  0.4 
mm/year, according to ISO 19901­7 (2005)) 
 It  also  gives  lower  resulting  mooring  forces  at  fairlead  interface  towards  hull 
structure  and  reduced  strength  requirements  at  main  deck  (no  mooring  forces 
transferred to this level) 

However, this is also a drawback with this solution. It makes the chain stoppers not directly 
accessible for inspection and maintenance. 
The  fairlead  and  chain  stoppers  (i.e. chain  stopper  outside  fairlead)  are  located  at  the  bilge 
box; it can be seen in Figure 6.5 below: 

6-7

 S. (2005).   Figure 6.  the  basic  mechanics  of  catenary  moorings  is  still  satisfactory  to  be  used  as  a  basic  theory  for  model  the  concept.6 and Figure 6. 5.1 Basic Theory for Design Since  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  adopts  the  spread  mooring  system. : The combined fairlead/chain stopper on a cylindrical S400 floater. the basic mechanics of catenary moorings will be described by the catenary model.   Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)  6.2.      6.  This  force  will be expressed by the mooring tension that will also be influenced by the horizontal offset  values.  Further.7 below:  6-8 . The theoretical background of the catenary mooring lines has been adopted from  Faltinsen (1990) and Chakrabarti.  From the behavior of catenary moorings  one can derive line tension and horizontal force in  moorings.   The  catenary  model  for  a  single  line  mooring  and  the  force  acting  on  a  segment  of  the  mooring line is depicted in Figure 6.2 Mooring System Design The aim of the moorings analysis is to ensure that the mooring system has adequate capacity  to  generate  a  non‐linear  restoring  force  to  provide  the  station‐keeping  function.

  Figure 6. S.   Reference: Chakrabarti. : The forces acting on an element of mooring line.   Reference: Chakrabarti. : The cable line with symbols. 6. (2005)    6-9 . 7. S. (2005)      Figure 6.

 By analyzing the equilibrium in normal and tangential directions  in one element of the mooring line.2)  In  order  to  simplify  the  equation  above.The  term  w  represents  the  constant  submerged  line  weight  per  unit  length. the  design  requirements  should  be  considered  to  withstand  environmental  conditions  and  accommodate space restrictions caused by the subsea spatial layout or the riser system.  The  assumptions  are  neglecting  bending  stiffness  and  the  single  line  in  a  vertical  plane  coincides with the x‐z plane.7)  It is noted that the above analysis assumes that the line is horizontal at the lower end without  no  uplift.2 Design Criteria Chakrabarti. h. can be obtained as follow:     (6.  S.2.  The  design  requirements  of  the  mooring  system  for  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  have  been  listed by Sevan Marine (2011) as follow:   The  mooring  system  shall  fulfill  the  requirements  to  safety  factors  both  in  intact  condition and with mooring line failures and shall limit the lateral excursions within  the limits of the riser design. written in terms of the catenary length   and depth    as:     (6.6)  and the horizontal component of line tension is constant along the line and is given by:      (6. It is noted that elastic stretch can be important and needs to be considered when  lines become tight or for a large suspended line weight (large w or deepwater)  The vertical dimension. and the suspended line length.4)  Giving the tension in the line at the top. The mean hydrodynamic  forces on the element are given by D and F per unit length. the vertical component of line tension at the top end becomes:     (6.  Furthermore.  T  is  the  line  tension. we can write equations as follow:     (6.  6-10 .  6.  the  multi‐element  lines  made  up  by  varying  lengths  and  physical  properties are used to increase the non‐linear restoring force in the system.  (2005)  has  mentioned  that  although  the  spread  of  mooring  lines  is  the  simplest in terms of design. S.1)  1    (6. Hence.3)  1    (6.5)  Hence. A is the cross‐sectional area and E is the elastic modulus.  the  hydrodynamic  forces  from  F  and  D  will  be  neglected. it may not be the optimum in terms of performance.

 i. Quasi‐static design  Van den Boom (1985) has mentioned that the quasi‐static design comprises dynamic  motion  analysis  of  the  moored  structure  and  computations  of  mooring  line  tension  based  on  the  extreme  position  of  the  floater  and  the  static  load‐excursion  characteristic of the mooring system. the mooring system  shall not depend on thruster assistance.43  Redundancy check  Dynamic  80 %  1.  The mooring system shall make the FPSO passively moored.25  Transient  Quasi‐static or dynamic 95 %  1.3.e.  including  damage  condition  with  one  line  broken   The  mooring  system  shall  comply  with  required  safety  factors  and  offsets  such  that  the  FPSO  can  continue  production  operations  in  the  100  year  return  period  storm  conditions without interruptions caused by mooring constraints. 3.   The available design method that can be applied for the mooring system is as follow:  1.  the  application  of  design  requirement  for  mooring  line  failures  or  damage  condition with one line broken criteria will not be considered. a tension limit should be expressed  as a percentage of its MBL after reductions for corrosion and wear. Sevan Marine (2011) also listed the acceptance criteria for  tension limits for Ultimate Limit States (ULS) based on ISO 19901­7 (2005). the design safety factor for the mooring line will be applied only in the intact  condition for Ultimate Limit States (ULS).   6-11 . in which design safety factors are also listed. The design safety  factor is defined as the ratio between the Minimum Breaking Load (MBL) of the mooring line  component and the maximum tension in the same component.67  Redundancy check  Quasi‐static  70 %  1. For a mooring component.  The  mooring  system  will  be  designed  according  to  the  specified  minimum  safety  factors  as  defined in ISO 19901­7 (2005).  Tension  limits  for  various  conditions  and  analysis  methods  shall  be  set  in  accordance  with  Table 6.05  Reference: ISO 19901‐7 (2005)    In this study.   Table 6.00  Intact  Dynamic  60 %  1.  In  this  study.   The  Sevan  FPSO  mooring  equipment  and  mooring  system  shall  have  sufficient  structural/mechanical  integrity  with  respect  to  continuous  operations  during  the  specified design life.   The  mooring  system  with  the  FPSO  connected  shall  be  designed  to  withstand  100‐ year  return  period  storm  conditions.   Besides the design requirements. : ULS Line Tension Limits and Design Safety Factors Line tension limit  Analysis condition  Analysis method  Design safety factor  (percent of MBL)  Intact  Quasi‐static  50 %  2. Due it the circular shape of the Sevan FPSO  weather vaning is not an issue.

 bending and torsional moment from the lines  are normally neglected. Dynamic design  Chakrabarti.  a  static  configuration  must  first  be  established  with  non‐linear analysis where the effect of line dynamics on platform motion is mutually  included  in  the  time‐domain  solution.  the  equations  of  motion  are  integrated  in  time domain.   The  main  difference  between  the  LMM  and  FEM  is  the  FEM  utilizes  interpolation functions to describe the behavior of a given variable internal to  the element in terms of the displacement (or other generalized co‐ordinates). Furthermore. (2005) has also explained that the quasi‐static analysis is  usually  non‐linear  in  that  the  catenary  stiffness  at  each  horizontal  offset  is  used  within  the  equations  of  motion.  The  equation  of  motion  for  single  elements  are  obtained  by  applying  the  interpolation  function  to  the  kinematic  relations  (strain/displacement).  .     and the Finite Element Method (FEM). Inertial effects between the line and fluid are also included.  specifically  the  hydrodynamic  damping  effects  caused  by  the  relative  motion  between  the  line  and  fluid. S.    | |    (6.  The  terms  . Material damping.  Generally.8)  In each degree of freedom to give the motions.   Two methods using discrete element techniques for dynamic simulation are:   The Lumped Mass Method (LMM)   This technique involves the lumping of all effect of mass. coupling between the motions can  also  be  included.  linear  and  viscous  damping  respectively  with    representing  the  time  varying  external forcing.  S.   A  frequency  response  method  (where  the  mooring  stiffness  is  treated  as  linear) Wave force and low frequency dynamic responses to both wave drift  and  wind  gust  effects  are  calculated  as  for  a  linear  single  degree  of  freedom  system  2. external forces and  internal  reactions  at  a  finite  number  of  point  (“nodes”)  along  the  line. Chakrabarti.  Further.  Dynamic  methods  also  include  the  additional  loads  from  the  mooring  system  other  than  restoring  forces.     6-12 .  (2005)  has  mentioned  that  the  full  dynamic  analysis  is  usually  performed  in  design. .  These  equations  may  be  solved  in  time  domain  directly  using  finite  difference  techniques.  There are two types of calculation that are carried out:   A time domain simulation that allows for the wave induced floater forces and  responses  at  the  wave  and  drift  frequency  while  treating  wind  and  current  forces  as  being  steady  and  using  the  mooring  stiffness  curve  without  considering line dynamics.  By  applying the equations of dynamic equilibrium and continuity (stress/strain)  to  each  mass  a  set  of  discrete  equation  for  the  motion  is  derived.  and   refer  to  the  floater  mass.  constitutive  relations  (stress/strain)  and  the  equations  of  dynamic  equilibrium.  added  mass. The solution procedure is similar to the LMM.

8  as follow:   Data and Assumptions General Data Enviromental Load Irregular waves (Torsethaugen Spectrum) NPD Wind Spectrum Current profile 100 years wave 100 years wind 10 years currents Modeling Mooring layout Body Model  Station Keeping  (Adopted from Wadam/HydroD)  Model (Quasi‐static) Mooring lines type Kinetics Radiations Analysis and Results Horizontal offset  Moorings Line  Response Motions  values Tension     Figure 6.   6.  Furthermore.   6-13 .3 Modeling Concept and Analysis Steps The  moorings  system  will  be  modeled  by  using  the  computer  program. SIMO has the capability to perform both of them.  Moreover.  van  den  Boom  (1985)  has  suggested  that  dynamic  analysis  should  be  performed  in  the  design  because  the  dynamic  behavior  of  mooring  lines  strongly  increases the maximum line tensions and may affect the low frequency motions of a  moored structure by increase of the virtual stiffness and the damping of the system.35.  However  in  this  chapter.  with  S400  ballasted  at  a  draft  of  z=16.  SIMO.  Here. 8.  mooring  analysis  will  be  performed  in  quasi‐  static  while  dynamic  analysis  (the  Finite  Element  Method  (FEM))  will  be  performed  in  Chapter 8.   The steps of the moorings analysis for the cylindrical S400 floater can be seen in Figure 6.2.  in  the  design  application  the  corresponding  mooring  line  tensions  are  established  both  using  a  quasi‐static  approach  and  including  the  contribution  from  the  mooring  line  dynamic. The  research  related  to  these  methods  can  be  found  in  van  den  Boom  (1985).  the  analysis  has  been  performed  in  time  domain  for  problem solving.   Further. quasi static analysis and simplified  dynamic  analysis.  the  design  of  the  mooring  system  in  MIMOSA  has  been  performed  by  Sevan  Marine  (2011). The spread mooring system will be based on the model used in MIMOSA in  the  frequency  domain. : A simple procedure for mooring analysis.  The  analysis  implementation  will  also  include  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  as  the  body  based  on  the  model  used  in  the  diffraction  program  Wadam/Hydro D in chapter 5.

Mass force  The  mass  force  will  be  determined  by  the  body  mass.6m and Tp=15.   The body model will be adopted from Wadam/Hydro D. wind and currents will be considered in the analysis and simulated in time  series.The mooring analysis by using SIMO will be divided into data and assumptions.9 below:      Figure 6.   Further.    The analysis will use the load combination below:   The wave: Jonswap double peaked spectrum (Hs=15. 9. The FEM model of a cylindrical S400  floater  (Hydro  and  Mass  model)  and  the  wave  load  from  Wadam/HydroD  will  be  read  into  INPMOD.  the  centre  of  gravity  and  the  mass  moment  of  inertia  with  respect  to  origin  for  a  cylindrical  S400  floater.   The input for the analysis will be based on data and assumptions categorized as follow:   General data   Environmental Load  The wave. In addition. such as:  1. the analysis requires two models. : The structural mass data for a cylindrical S400 floater.  The  structural mass data can be seen in Figure 6. The environmental load data will be based on the return period combinations  for 100 year waves and wind criteria and 10 years current criteria.5s)    The wind: NPD Spectrum wind   The current: Current profile   The  general  data  and  the  environmental  load  data  will  be  input  to  INPMOD  as  a  part  of  system  descriptions. the kinetic and radiation data as the body data will be input to INPMOD  to obtain the forces that are acting on the hull. the body model and the station keeping model.  Further  information  about  environmental  load  data  can  be  found  in  Chapter 3. modeling and  analysis and results.             6-14 .

00E‐04 0 0 0 Roll 0 0 0 4.4 ­ 6.   The following low frequency damping contributions are considered not only from the  body but also from the mooring lines for:    Viscous hull damping    Wave drift damping    Mooring line damping  The viscous damping will partly be covered by the current force coefficient while the  wave drift damping will be derived from the mean drift force. 4. Mooring line damping  is represented by a low frequency damping of the form:  .90E‐02 0 0 0 2.  When  the  damping  at  low  frequency  is  very  small. · .50E+06    Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)            6-15 .  the  following  data have been established in Table 6.   = the linear low frequency damping in DOF number i  .   = the quadratic low frequency damping in DOF number i  . .     (6.2.  Sevan  Marine  has  recently  performed  model  tests  for  Sevan  FPSO’s  to  define  the  damping  coefficients  for  the  calibration  of  the  numerical  model. : The Linear Damping Coefficients for Mooring Analysis Surge Sway Heave Roll Pitch Yaw Surge 9.  the  low  frequency  resonant  amplitude motions can be predicted if the magnitude of the damping is known.5:  Table 6. .  Sevan  Marine  (2011)  has  mentioned  that  the  linear and quadratic damping term will be highly different.00E‐04 0 0 Pitch 0 0 0 0 4. Low‐frequency hydrodynamic damping forces  The  low  frequency  damping  should  be  included  in  the  design  because  the  low  frequency  force  can  generate  large  amplitude  resonant  motions.20E‐02 0 0 0 1.  it  causes  the  second  order  slowly  varying  forces  to  generate  large  amplitude  resonant  motions.90E‐02 0 0 0 0 0 Sway 0 9.9)  where:  . · .  Hence. Based on the calibration  towards  previous  model  test  results  and  scaling  to  actual  floater  size.   = the slow drift velocities in DOF number i  In  order  to  verify  the  magnitude  value  of  the  damping.20E‐02 Heave 0 0 4.00E‐04 0 Yaw 0 2.

 5.41E+06 0 0 Pitch 0 0 0 0 4.  and  heave)  and  also  6-16 .20E‐02 Heave 0 0 1.50E+06   Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)  3.50E+04 0 0 Pitch 0 0 0 0 3.   Further.6 below:  Table 6.41E+06 0 Yaw 0 0 0 0 0 0   Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)  4.  The  coefficients  for  hydrostatic  stiffness  forces  are  determined  from  model  test  results. : The Quadratic Damping Coefficients for Mooring Analysis Surge Sway Heave Roll Pitch Yaw Surge 1. also known  as  the  wave  drift  forces.  sway.00E+03 0 0 0 Roll 0 0 0 3.50E+04 0 Yaw 0 2. Table 6. : The Linear Hydrostatic Stiffness Matrix for Mooring Analysis (kg.  the  first  order  transfer  motion  (RAO)  will  be  considered  in  6  DOF  motion  of  a  floater  for  translational  motions  (surge. 6. Both of them  will be input to INPMOD as a part of the program input.86E+04 0 0 0 Roll 0 0 0 4.  and  roll  response  motions.m/s2) Surge Sway Heave Roll Pitch Yaw Surge 0 0 0 0 0 0 Sway 0 0 0 0 0 0 Heave 0 0 3. Hydrostatic stiffness forces  The  hydrostatic  stiffness  fully  governs  the  heave.20E‐02 0 0 0 1.  have  been  shown  to  be  proportional  to  the  square  of  the  wave height. the first order wave forces are described in the frequency domain as a linear  motion transfer function. also denoted Response Amplitude Operator (RAO) while the  second order wave forces are described as the mean wave (drift) force. The forces on a floater caused by the wave excitation may be split  into two parts:   First order oscillatory forces with the wave frequency   Second  order  slowly  varying  forces  with  frequencies  much  lower  than  the  wave frequency  Wichers  and  Huijisman  (1984)  has  explained  that  the  first  order  oscillatory  wave  forces  on  a  floater  cause    ship  motions  with  frequencies  equal  to  the  frequencies  present in the spectrum of the waves while the second order wave forces.40E+04 0 0 0 2.  pitch.   Furthermore.  These  data  will  be  established  based  on  the  test  results  from  Sevan  Marine  (2011) in Table 6. Wave excitation forces  A Floating structure moored at sea is subjected to forces that tend to shift them from  its desired position.40E+04 0 0 0 0 0 Sway 0 1.

00E+03  0 7  90  0 500 0 4.46E+03  ‐2. Current forces  The current forces are calculated using the following equation:  ·     (6. Wind forces  The wind is calculated using the following equation:  ·    (6. rotational  motions  (roll.00E+03  ‐1.  the  linear  coefficient.83E+03  ‐3.  5. 7.86E+03  ‐2.10)  where:   is current speed.   The further details can be found in Appendices A and B.04E+03  ‐4.  pitch  and  yaw).7  below:   Table 6.   is the force coefficients for current.   The  current  coefficients  are  divided  into  the  linear  current  force  coefficients  C1  and  quadratic  current  force  coefficients  C2. : The Quadratic Current Coefficients for 6 DOF Motions From 0 ° to 90 °  C21  C22  C23  C24  C25  C26  Direction  No  Surge  Sway  Heave  Roll  Pitch  Yaw  (deg)  (kNs2/m2)  1  0  500 0 0 0  0  0 2  15  483 129 0 1.    The  mean  wave  (drift)  force  will  be  considered  for  translation  motions  surge  and  sway  from  0°  to  90°.   6.00E+03  ‐3.  The current loads on a ship will be represented by drag forces in form of viscous hull  surge  and  sway  forces  and  also  as  yaw  moment.86E+03  0 4  45  354 354 0 2.8  below:    6-17 .  The  wind  coefficients  for  6  DOF  motions  from  0  °  to  90  °  can  be  seen  in  Table  6.00E+03  0 3  30  433 250 0 2.  the  coefficients  above  will  be  used  to  predict  the  viscous  damping  that  is  acting on a floater.11)  where:   is the wind speed.  Usually  for  the  current  drag  forces  acting  on  the  hull.  The  quadratic  current  force coefficients C2 for the 6 DOF motions from 0 ° to 90 ° can be seen in Table 6.04E+03  0 Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)  Besides.  C1  is  not  used  in  the  analysis.  Both  of  them  will  be  described  from  0°  to  90°.  The  mean  wave  (drift)  force  for  the  rest  of  DOF  will  be  considered as zero.46E+03  0 5  60  250 433 0 3.   is the force coefficient for wind.83E+03  0 6  75  129 483 0 3.  These  will  be  calculated  based  on  current  coefficients  from  current  tests  where  the  mooring  and  riser  system  were  included.

33 2 16 0.6  0 2  15  1. (Marintek (2008))  The wave drift damping coefficients are given for two numbers of peak periods.   Hence.    It  means  this  damping  can  be  considered  based  on  the  first  order  wave  forces.  Generally.35 0 ‐21.33 0.68 0 ‐8.86  0 3  30  1.  This  damping  will  happen  due  to  the  forces  causing  harmonic  motions.  this  damping  should  be  used  in  the  equation  of  motion  for  sinusoidal  waves. DNV­RP­F205 (2010) has defined that the wave  drift  damping  forces  is  the  increase  in  the  second‐order  difference  frequency  force  experienced by a structure moving with a small forward speed in waves.95 0 ‐10.72  0 4  45  0.35 0 0 0  21.35 0 ‐5.0     (6. 13s  and 16s.3 0 ‐20.   For  a  floater. 9.59  0 7  90  0 1. the Newman method will be implemented.12)  where:  l   In this analysis.8  0 5  60  0.17 0.9 below:    Table 6.  the  mean  wave  drift  damping  is  considered  based  on  an  expansion  of  the mean drift force Fd:  .95 0.71  15.59  20.  Hence.  Det  Norske  Veritas  (2008)  in  “Sesam  User  Manual  for  Wadam‐Wave  Analysis  by Diffraction and Morison Theory” has mentioned that the transfer function should  6-18 . Potential damping forces  Potential  damping  can  be  determined  from  potential  theory. Simplified wave drift damping forces  The wave drift damping forces will be very important to calculate the potential flow  effect for the low frequency motions.68 1.6  0  0   Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)  7. : The Wind Coefficients for 6 DOF Motions From 0 ° to 90 ° W11  W12  W13  W14  W15  W16  Wind Direction  Surge  Sway  Heave  Roll  Pitch  Yaw  No  (deg)  (kNs2/m2)  1  0  1.86  5.72  8.71  0 6  75  0. . surge and sway  as can be seen in Table 6.35 1. 8. Table 6.8  10.17 0 ‐15.33   Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)  8. : The Wave Drift Damping Coefficients  Wd1 Wd2 No Periods 2 2  (kNs /m ) 1 13 0.  the  linear  transfer  functions (RAO) are important to give good prediction about the potential damping.33 0.3 0. These coefficients will be considered for the 2 DOF motions.

33E+05 0 Sway 0 3. generally be smooth to avoid large jumps.   As for the data such as the mooring  line compositions (Table 6. the mooring lines  will be attached for station keeping in the  model of the system.7 – User’s Documentation”.  Hence. Further.  The  mooring  lines  are  treated  individually  based  on  property  characteristic  such as: material.   By using the quasi‐static model.  The  radiation  is  found  when  a  floater  oscillates  without  waves.  The implementation of a catenary mooring line model in SIMO is based  on the model used in the mooring analysis program MIMOSA based on quasi static analysis in  the frequency domain.  the  added  mass  and  potential  damping will be included in retardation functions.  Because  the  analysis method chose a quasy‐static analysis thus the procedure for calculating the mooring  line configuration is based on a "shooting method” or iteration on boundary conditions at one  end  in  order  to  satisfy  specified  boundary  conditions  at  the  other.1). the detailed orientation  and the pretension for the mooring system will be input to INPMOD for the catenary mooring  line model in SIMO. the moorings tension arising due to a floater motions can be  calculated.10 as follow:  Table 6.  in the “Marintek Report: Mimosa 5.31E+07 0 0 Pitch ‐6.70E+04 0 0 0 ‐6.  the  mooring  lines  are  assumed  to  form  catenaries  and  will  be  modeled  by  the  catenary  equations. it was shown by (Cummins. The added mass coefficient can be  seen in Table 6.34E+05 0 0 0 5.  Using  this  procedure  a  fairly accurate static equilibrium configuration for a multi segment line can be obtained with  a minimum of computational efforts. 10.   Since  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  adopts  the  spread  mooring  system.34E+05 0 5. the potential damping is also strongly related to the added mass due to the  radiation  effects. in SIMO.31E+07 0 Yaw 0 0 0 0 0 0 Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)  After the body model is  made.  the  added  mass  coefficient  will  be  considered  in  the  analysis  in  order  to  describe  the  hydrodynamic  interaction.   Besides.  Further. This not only for WF mooring line tension or LF mooring line tension but also for  the combination of the LF and WF mooring line tension. the catenary mooring line model is extended to the  time  domain.  The procedure for a catenary mooring line model can be found in details in Marintek (2007). dimension.70E+04 0 6.56E+05 0 0 Roll 0 6. 1962) that the frequency dependence of added  mass  and  potential  damping  can  be  seen  as  a  consequence  of  a  convolution  term  in  the radiation potential.  Moreover.  6-19 . Large jumps in the transfer functions will  cause  too  large  wave  period  step  and  cause  difficulties  to  predict  the  potential  damping.33E+05 0 0 Heave 0 0 1. : The Wave Drift Damping Coefficients  Surge Sway Heave Roll Pitch Yaw Surge 3. length etc.

  Moreover.  Further.8)  will  be  integrated  to  SIMO  in  INPMOD  module. A static equilibrium position and the static force  will be calculated in this module. 10. The INPMOD module will generate the  system description file. these data will be read by STAMOD to define the  initial condition for the dynamic simulation. OUTMOD and PLOMOD) by a file system as shown in Figure  6.  The detail information about  6-20 .  SIMO  consist  of  six  different  modules  (INPMOD. SYSFIL. Further.  The  result  of  the  simulation in time series will be read by OUTMOD module then the plot of the time series and  statistical parameters can be access from the PLOMOD module. DYNMOD. The dynamic simulation in time domain will be performed  in  DYNMOD  module  in  order  to  calculate  the  response  of  the  system. : Layout of the SIMO program system and file communication between modules.  all  inputs  from  the  simple  procedure  for  mooring  analysis  (Figure  6. station keeping  and also the environmental data. which contains a description about the body.10 below:     Figure 6. STAMOD.    The INPMOD module has the function to gather all data inputs and also to provide interfaces  for external input data sources from Wadam/Hydro D.

  the  response motions will be used to define the horizontal offset of a cylindrical S400 floater.  The  results  from  the  static  condition  are  derived  without  variation  of  the  environmental  loads  while it will be taken into account in the dynamic condition.3 Moorings Analysis The  mooring  analysis  are  carried  out  in  two  conditions.   The results  from the static condition  will be the  final static  body position  and  mooring line  static tensions while the results from the dynamic condition are time series of second order  wave  forces  and  the  wave  drift  damping  forces. 11.3.11  below:  Figure 6. : The calculation parameters for static and dynamic condition     6.  this position will be the initial condition for the dynamic simulation.  The calculation parameters that will be used for mooring analysis can be seen in Figure 6.  These  also  represent  the  mooring  line  dynamic  tensions  and  the  response  motions  of  a  cylindrical  S400  floater. “SIMO ‐ Theory Manual Version 3.  Further.”     6. : The Final Static Body Position of A Cylindrical S400 Floater Static Body Position Body X Y Z Rx Ry Rz S400 0 0 0 0 0 0     6-21 .    Table 6. Further. rev: 1.the input of these modules that are used in the analysis can be found in Appendix C. 11.11.  Further  information can be seen in Marintek (2008).1 Static Condition A static equilibrium position for a cylindrical S400 floater can be seen in Table 6.  static  and  dynamic  condition.6.

  and  Table  6. The Floater Motions   The  global  motion  response  of  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  can  be  categorized  based  on  their  frequency  of  the  motion. the supported analysis results for the time series of second order wave forces and  the wave drift damping forces will also be presented in this chapter.12.  the  floater  motions  in  time  domain.3. 13.  Since  the  analysis  has  been  performed  in  time  domain  for  problem  solving.  the  horizontal  offset  values  and  the  mooring  line  dynamic  tensions  will  be  presented  as  time  series results.  Generally.    Table 6.   A.  The dynamic condition has been simulated for “3 hours +” build up time.  These  will  also  be  the  initial  conditions  for  the  dynamic  simulation.   Further. : The Static Forces and Moments on S400 Floater     Table 6.    6-22 .  these  analysis  results  will  be  compared  with  the  related  results  in  Chapter  8  (the  floater motion. : The Mooring Line Static Tensions     6.   Besides.13.2 Dynamic Condition The  aims  of  mooring  analysis  are  presented  in  this  chapter.While the static forces and moments that are acting on a cylindrical S400 floater can be seen  in  Table  6. horizontal offset and mooring line tension).  two  types  of  frequency  motions  will  be  the  results of the particular effects of the environmental loads. 12.

 a global motion response. : The global motion response. 12. the low frequency motions for surge.  will  be  described  by  a  transfer  function  or  a  Response Amplitude Operator (RAO).  the low frequency motions (LF motions) is generated by the second order forces such as  the mean wave (drift) forces and the slowly‐varying forces from waves or currents.  the  global  motion  response  the  wave  frequency  motions  (WF  motions).  Further.     The global motion response. Further information can be found in chapter 5.  the  global  motion  response. the low frequency motions for surge      Figure 6.12 to Figure 6.  Second.     The  Second  global  motion  response.17.   Since the magnitude of the second order forces are small compared to the magnitude of  the first order forces.                         6-23 . First. the global motion response wave frequency motions (WF motions)  will  govern  a  floater’s  response  characteristic  mostly.  is  generated by the first order wave force on a floater.  the  low  frequency  motions  (LF  motions)  can  be  found from Figure 6.  the  wave  frequency  motions.

 13. the low frequency motions for sway      Figure 6. the low frequency motions for heave      Figure 6. : The global motion response. the low frequency motions for sway.    The global motion response. : The global motion response.      The global motion response. 14. the low frequency motions for heave.      6-24 .

 the low frequency motions for roll      Figure 6. the low frequency motions for pitch. : The global motion response. : The global motion response.     The global motion response.        6-25 . 15. 16. the low frequency motions for pitch      Figure 6. the low frequency motions for roll.  The global motion response.

 the total frequency motions for surge.  the  global  motion  response  for  the  total  motion  as  combination  of  the  low  frequency  motions  (LF  motions)  and  wave  frequency  motions  (WF  motions)  can  be  found from Figure 6. the low frequency motions for yaw    Figure 6.23. the low frequency motions for yaw.      6-26 . 17.  The global motion response.   The total global motion response.18 to Figure 6. : The global motion response.    Besides. : The total global motion response. the total frequency motions for surge      Figure 6. 18.

 the total frequency motions for heave      Figure 6. : The total global motion response. the total frequency motions for sway      Figure 6. the total frequency motions for heave. : The total global motion response. 20. 19.            6-27 . The total global motion response.     The total global motion response. the total frequency motions for sway.

 the total frequency motions for pitch      Figure 6. the total frequency motions for roll      Figure 6. the total frequency motions for pitch.  The total global motion response. : The total global motion response. 22. : The total global motion response.     The total global motion response. the total frequency motions for roll. 21.        6-28 .

30 ‐0. The total global motion response.89 4.73 The Global Motion Response in Total Frequency Motions Std.26 0. below:  Table 6.96 4.03 1.05 2.78 0. the total frequency motions for roll.38 0.00 2.37 3.89 0.82 7.00 1. : The Summary of The Global Motion Response of A Cylindrical S400 Floater The Global Motion Response in Low Frequency Motions Std.42 1.47 5.42 0.  Kurtosi Channel Min Max Mean Skewness Dev.08 ‐3.00 2.22 0.60 0. the total frequency motions for yaw      Figure 6.64 Heave ZG translation LF Motion ‐1.05 2.15 ‐3.86 1.19 Heave ZG translation Total Motion ‐15. The summary of  the  global  motion  response  for  the  low  frequency  motions  and  the  total  frequency  motions can be seen in Table 6.73     6-29 .15 3.    B.91 Yaw ZG rotation Total Motion ‐2.00 2. : The total global motion response.28 Roll XL rotation LF Motion ‐4.80 1.42 1.55 ‐0.44 1.93 Sway YG translation Total Motion ‐8.03 2. 14.37 2.32 Sway YG translation LF Motion ‐6.14 ‐0.80 0.31 0.09 ‐0.35 ‐0.60 ‐0.14.69 5.09 2.98 ‐0.73 8.60 Yaw ZG rotation LF Motion ‐2.60 0.00 1.83 Pitch YL rotation LF Motion ‐4.00 2. s Surge XG translation Total Motion ‐22. The Horizontal Offset Values  The horizontal offset can be derived from the global motion response.22 3.96 5.31 0.50 3.96 ‐0.04 1.89 Pitch YL rotation Total Motion ‐9.41 2.40 1.02 4. 23.10 ‐0.80 4.48 ‐0.  Kurtosi Channel Min Max Mean Skewness Dev.60 3.50 5.73 ‐0. s Surge XG translation LF Motion ‐13.82 0.97 Roll XL rotation Total Motion ‐5.

04 0.84 3824.89 0.27 370.97 873.01 S400_Line6 763.01 S400_Line11 1068.01 9634.6m and Tp=15.80 3530.71 2535.07 3059. Mooring Line Dynamic Tensions   The mooring line dynamic tensions of a cylindrical S400 floater have been found for the  environmental data: 100 years wind + 100 years wave + 10 years currents as follow:   The wave    : Jonswap double peaked spectrum (Hs=15.37 m  The max offset   : 22.87 3791.01 S400_Line4 1050.12 0.36 359.52 1426.29 0.6 m and Tp= 15s) should be the main reason for  this result.53 362.  the  horizontal  offset  of  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  for  the  environmental  data.27 8967. : The Summary of Mooring Line Dynamic Tensions of a cylindrical S400 floater  Min Tension  Max Tension  Mean  Channel Std.99 2420.00 0.48 358.82 2521.00 0.19 2440.00 0.37 253.18 1418.00 0.40 1750.32 343.00 0.81 1424. These responses are resulting due to  surge  excitation  from  the  second  order  force  such  as  the  mean  wave  (drift)  forces  and  the slowly‐varying forces from waves or currents.00 0.00 0.06 1724.00 0.10 340.73 0.00 0.5s)   The wind     : NPD Spectrum wind  The current     : Current profile   The static offset:    : 3.04 0.12 0. Based on Table 6.88 983.34 1607.61 347.15 below:    Table 6. Dev.82 m    C.11 8822.95 3721.5s)    The wind    : NPD Spectrum wind   The current    : Current profile   The summary of the mooring line dynamic tension for a cylindrical S400 floater can be  seen in Table 6.14.35 4003.36 0.28 998.01 S400_Line10 1061.00 0.01 S400_Line8 754.01 S400_Line12 1071.00 0.31 3001.  the  analysis  also  shows  that  a  cylindrical  S400  floater  maybe  particularly  sensitive to total heave in total frequency motion (LF+WF). The magnitude of the values  of the first order wave forces (Hs =15.01 S400_Line7 755.01     6-30 .87 1418.   Besides.01 S400_Line3 1048.89 0.80 9547.6m and Tp=15.     Further.08 0. 15.01 S400_Line9 1060.01 S400_Line5 764.01 S400_Line2 1040.00 0.74 0.  100 years wind + 100 years wave + 10 years currents can be determined as follow:  The wave     : Jonswap double peaked spectrum (Hs=15. it is clear that a cylindrical S400 floater will experience significant  surge motion in LF  and  total frequency (LF+WF). Skewness Kurtosis kN kN Tension kN S400_Line1 1035.46 0.74 1586.06 894.36 264.

 24. While the result of mooring line dynamic tensions gives by time series for each line can  be seen from  Figure 6.24 to Figure 6.     The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line2    Figure 6. : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line2.      6-31 . 25.35 below:   The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line1    Figure 6. : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line1.

 27. 26.          6-32 . : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line4.  The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line3    Figure 6.     The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line4    Figure 6. : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line3.

 : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line5.     The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line6      Figure 6. 28. : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line6. 29.  The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line5    Figure 6.        6-33 .

 30. 31. : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line7.     The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line8    Figure 6. : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line7.  The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line7    Figure 6.          6-34 .

     The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line10    Figure 6. : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line10. : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line9.          6-35 . 32.  The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line9    Figure 6. 33.

     The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line12    Figure 6. : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line12. 35.          6-36 . 34. : The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line11.  The mooring line dynamic tensions in time series for S400_Line11    Figure 6.

02 S400_Line3 1048.    Table 6.08 S400_Line8 754. 16.92 kN ‐0.29 S400_Line11 1068. XR Force (in Surge) ‐25039.41 S400_Line10 1061.12 0.  the  specified minimum safety factor is 2.48 3581. the criteria above are met for the mooring system design for a cylindrical S400 floater.32 343. The results can be seen in Table  6.11 8822.00 KNm 0.86 kN 1287.00 KNm 0.00 KNm 0.82 2521.70 5.71 2535.19 2440.46 0.03 S400_Line9 1060.38.37 253.00 0.80 3530.00 0.74 0.76 0.  Channel Skewness Kurtosis kN kN Tension kN Dev.01 19.02 Moment‐ZR axis (in Yaw) 0.36 264.27 8967.01 18.61 5.  Moreover.  Further.99 2420. The Results  The  resulting  analysis  for  dynamic  condition  such  as  the  time  series  of  second  order  wave  forces  and  the  wave  drift  damping  forces  will  be  also  presented  here.  the  acceptance  criteria  for  the  tension  in  the  Ultimate  Limit  State (ULS) for intact stability when using a quasi‐static method should be line tension limit  50%  of  the  Minimum  Breaking  Load  (MBL)  of  the  mooring  line  component.81 1424.34 1607.97 kN 102.01 15.83 2.00 0.95 3721.  sway and yaw can be seen in Table 6.00 0.05 2.06 1724.27 370.18 S400_Line5 764.     D.01 15.00 as defined in ISO 19901­7 (2005).01 19.73 0.00 0. : The Summary of Line Tension Limit and Design Safety Factor  Min Tension  Max Tension  Mean  Line Tension Limit  Design Safety  Channel Std.61 347.04 0.01 45.17 kN 47.17 S400_Line12 1071.80 4.00 0.01 50.89 6.01 19.16 below:    Table 6.28 998.52 1426.00 0.29 0.89 0.34 5.00 0.60 2.00       6-37 .01 46.33 5.31 3001.01 49.40 1750.91 kN 25.00 0.00 0.07 3059.01 18. 17.33 0.00 0.18 1418.58 2.84 3824.79.01 YR Force (In Sway) ‐501.15 S400_Line4 1050.97 873.45 S400_Line6 763.36 to Figure 6.17 while the graphs can be found from Figure  6.00 0.37 S400_Line7 755.80 9547.74 1586.10 340.08 0.00 0.87 5.35 4003.00 0.88 983.12 0.     1.81     Based  on  ISO  19901­7  (2005).04 0.06 894.36 0.36 359.00 0. Dev.  Hence.The forces in a mooring line will also be checked with the acceptance criteria for tension in  the Ultimate Limit State (ULS) based on ISO 19901­7 (2005).87 1418. Skewness Kurtosis kN kN Tension kN (% of MBL) Factor S400_Line1 1035.01 kN ‐2547.53 362.87 3791.  these  results  will  be  compared  to  the  result  in  Chapter  8  to  show  the  influence  of  the  hydrodynamic interaction.89 0.01 9634.59 6.00 0.00 S400_Line2 1040. The second order wave forces  The summary of the results for the second order wave forces are described in surge. : The Summary of Second Order Wave Forces  Min Tension  Max Tension  Mean  Std.01 20.

      Figure 6. 36.    6-38 . : The second order wave forces – XR Forces (in Surge). 37. : The second order wave forces – YR Forces (in Sway).   Figure 6.

41.01 YR Force (In Sway) ‐37. sway and yaw.00 KNm 0.99 kN 441.00 0. 38.18 while the graphs can be found from Figure  6. The wave drift damping forces  The results for the wave drift damping forces are described for surge.00       6-39 .  The summary can be seen in Table 6.88 kN ‐439. : The second order wave moment – Moment ZR axis (in Yaw).00 0.77 kN 20.00 0. XR Force (in Surge) ‐4570. 18.00 KNm 0.06 kN 2193.  Table 6.    2.00 KNm 0.70 kN 350.05 Moment‐ZR axis (in Yaw) 0.26 0.39 to Figure 6.   Figure 6.66 0.24 kN 9.00 0. : The Summary of wave drift damping forces Min Tension  Max Tension  Mean  Std.  Channel Skewness Kurtosis kN kN Tension kN Dev.

  Figure 6.                6-40 . 39. : The drift damping forces – YR Forces (in Sway). 40.      Figure 6. : The drift damping forces – XR Forces (in Surge).

 : The drift damping forces – moment ZR axis (in Yaw). 41.   Figure 6.                                          6-41 .

 moorings and riser.  the  dynamic slender structure analysis for riser configuration will be performed in RIFLEX as a  decoupled  analysis  in  order  to  reduce  time  analysis.   Furthermore. Chapter 7 1 Riser Analysis M.  moorings  and  risers.  The  main  purpose  of  the  analysis  is  to  find  a  feasible  single  arbitrary  configuration.  effective  tension.  This  is  the  main  advantage  for  performing  coupled  analysis  rather  than  the  decoupled  analysis.   Several  strategies  can  be  proposed  to  achieve  higher  efficiency  analysis.c. the  modeling concept and the steps when analysis in RIFLEX will be presented briefly.  the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis represents a truly integrated system which ensures the  accurate  prediction  of  response  simultaneously  for  the  overall  system  as  well  as  the  individual  response  of  floater.  On  the  other  hand.  In  this  case.  the  analysis  results  will  be  presented  such  as  top  angle  (hang  off  position  angle).          7-1 .  it  also  requires  many  efforts  and  is  very  time  consuming  since  this  analysis  demand  substantial  efforts since it requires a single and complete model including a floater. Moreover.  As  we  know. static and dynamic conditions.  In  this  chapter.S. It  also  requires  the  detailed  model  for  each  component  and  characterization  of  the  environments in covering relevant load models.  bending  radius  and  seabed  clearance briefly  in  order  to  document  the feasible configurations. Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation This  chapter  will  present  a  general  description  of  the  riser  system  and  present  the  riser  analysis  to  obtain  a  feasible  configuration  for  a  floating  offshore  system. Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO.    The  analysis  will  also  be  performed  in  time  domain analysis under two simulation schemes. this chapter will also explain the basic knowledge of a riser system to give the  perspective for the analysis.

1 Production Riser Systems Based  on  American  Petroleum  Institute  definitions.):   Top tensioned riser   Compliant riser (flexible riser)   Hybrid riser being a combination of tensioned and compliant risers.  DNV­ OS­F201 (2001) has categorized the production riser system into (Figure 7.  production/injection to export.  and  environmental conditions.  In  the  riser  system  design.    7-2 . Additional functions of risers according to area of application are  provided as follows:   Conveys fluid between the wells and the floater in production and injection risers.  design  of  pressure/temperature.  the  riser  system  is  a  key  element  in  providing  safety  in  all  phases  from  drilling.  completion/workover.1. field layout such as number and type of risers and mooring layout.      Hence.  mechanical  characteristics  of  the  riser.   The  riser  system  design  drivers  also  include  a  number  of  factors  such  as. The main function of a riser is to transport fluids or gas from  seabed to a host platform. 1.  API  (1998).  host  vessel  access/hang‐off location.  the  dynamic  behavior  of  the  floater  at  the  surface  will  mainly  govern  the  chosen  riser  type.    Top tensioned riser Compliant riser Hybrid riser    Figure 7.  water  depth.   Guide  drilling  or  workover  tools  and  tubulars  to  and  into  the  wells  for  drilling  and  workover risers.  according  to  the  ability  to  cope  with  floater  motion. : Examples of riser systems  Reference : Karunakaran (2008)    Besides  the  floater’s  motion.   Export fluid from floater to pipeline for export risers.  the  riser  system  design  will  be  governed  by  the  floater  type.7.

3.  The  system  flexibility  is  achieved  by  arranging  the  flexible  pipe  in  some  of  the  basic configurations below (Figure 7. Brazil and  West of Africa.  each  metallic  and  polymer  layer  satisfies  particular  strength/weight/flexibility/  containment  and  chemical  requirements.  Moreover.  These  layers  will  ensure  that  flexible  risers  could  accommodate  high  curvature.). Gulf of Mexico.   According to Chandwani and Larsen (1997).Since  the  base  case  for  the  study  is  in  North  Sea  region  and  the  facilities  should  be  built  to  withstand  very  harsh  weather  conditions  in  shallow  waters  (approximately  170  m). The flexible riser has been extensively applied in North Sea. The design flexibility to have high dynamic resistance allows flexible  riser to work in deeper waters and harsher environments. 2.g.    Figure 7.):   7-3 .  the  application of a flexible riser (compliant riser) will be very suitable in this floating offshore  system. : Flexible riser   Reference : Chandwani and Larsen (1997)  A  dynamic  flexible  riser  system  can  be  designed  for  most  types  of  floating  production  structures.  a  flexible  riser  provides  the  flexibility to cope with the floater’s motions.  heave  compensation system.   Its structure consists of concentric extruded polymer and reinforcing helical metallic layers  (Figure  7.  As  shown.  allowing  ease  of  installation  and accommodation of dynamic motion. a flexible riser is defined as an unbonded flexible  pipe  designed  to  specific  engineering  requirements.2. Configurations of flexible risers are formed such  that  they  could  absorb  floater  motions  without  having  additional  equipment  e.

        7-4 .    The  combination  of  harsh  environment  and  limited  water  depth  conditions  leads  to  significant challenges in riser design:   Limited  water  depth  gives  very  little  room  between  the  FPSO  and  the  seabed. the far and near conditions.  some  basic  requirements  shall  be  taken  into  account  while  determining  the  riser  configurations such as the global behavior and geometry of riser.  According  to  Yong  Bai  et  al  (2005).    Another challenge comes from the configuration itself.   Reference : Karunakaran (2010)    Furthermore. Limited water depth leads to  large vessel offset and this will govern the pliancy requirements for the two extreme  configurations.  it  also  gives  real  challenges for riser system design.   Since  the  field  is  located  in  shallow  water  condition  and  also  harsh  environment. structural integrity. means of support.2 Flexible Riser Design in Shallow Water and Harsh Environments In this study. cross sectional properties. the riser configuration design shall be performed according to the production  requirements  and  the  site‐specific  environmental  conditions. many key issues of riser system design which are related to the combination of  shallow  water  and  harsh  environmental  conditions  will  be  the  primary  focus.  These  situations  will  give  the  challenges  of  designing  the  riser  system  and  will  increase  the  complexity of riser system design.   Figure 7. in the riser design.  the  application  of  cylindrical  FPSO  will  give  many  advantages. 3.  7. : Standard flexible riser configurations.  However. material and costs. rigidity  and continuity of riser.  This  condition  leads  to  significant  impact  from  the  environmental  loading  and  the  vessel  motion itself.

  Another  potential  problem  is  risk  of  compression  forces at touchdown area (TDA). below:    Figure 7.  Another condition that will be a main consideration is the impact loading that generates from  shock  due  to  snapping  in  slack  condition.Influence of the large vessel motion and the harsh environmental loadings  In  deep  water. This condition cannot happen smoothly in shallow  water.  as  presented  in  Figure 7. the impact of the vessel’s motion from pitch and roll will be significant  in  shallow  water.  large  drag  forces  from  the  environment  will  result  from  the  combination  of  strong  current  and  large  waves.   Influence of large vessel offset  As the riser system has to absorb vessel motions.  These  motions  will  be  one  of  the  reasons  why  the  effective  top  tension  becomes larger at the hang off position. As vessel offset increases due to harsh environment.  the  vessel  motion  represents  a  significant  loading  impact  and  it  will  be  damped gradually along the riser length.  far  and  near  conditions.4. 4. options for riser  configuration  become  limited.  potential  clashing  with  adjacent  moorings  is  high.  or  conventional free hanging steel catenary riser will experience high bending moment at  touchdown point.  Didier  Hanoge  (2010)  has  mentioned  that  vessel  offset  has  major  influence  on  the  riser  configuration  design. Not only the effective top tension but also the angle  position will be larger at the hang off position.  Significant  vessel  motion. large vessel motions will have direct impact  on the riser behavior.  a  Top  tensioned  riser  may  not  be  applied.  The harsh environment also leads to a significant dynamic riser behavior.  For  small  submerged  weight  of  riser  under  extreme  currents. Furthermore. : The influence of vessel offset in riser design.  (roll  and  pitch  motion)  creates slack in one position. generating a significant shock for the system. This stored energy releases quickly when the wave passes and  snapping occurs in the riser system. In shallow water.  It  governs  the  pliancy  requirement  and  the  riser  system  must  accommodate  the  two  extreme  configurations.  Reference: Didier Hanoge (2010)     7-5 .  Hence.

  The  flexible  risers  were  specified  and  installed  in  the  Encova  field  offshore  Brazil  as  part  of  a  floating  production  system  (Machado  and  Dumay  (1980))  then  these risers have been used extensively at North Sea. Gulf of Mexico. the distance between the vessel’s centers of motions to the riser hang  off  will  be  taken  as  single  representative  offset  (a  conservative  value)  due  to  the  vessel  motions (pitch and surge). the higher the offset value is. Flexible riser  Most of fields with floating production around the world are associated with flexible  risers.  7. such as:  7-6 .  Since  the  riser  system  will  be  designed  according  to  the decoupled analysis. such as riser systems and moorings (design layout)   Activity of other vessels in the vicinity   Ease  of  laying  and  retrieval  and  future  requirements  of  maintenance  (future  development)   Inspection and worker operations  It  should  be  highlighted  that  the  dynamic  responses  of  a  riser  are  strong  related  to  the  environmental loading due to the wave‐current combination and the interaction arising from  the  structural  non‐linear  behavior  of  the  riser  itself. In the far case. the dynamic response of a riser system to the environmental conditions will  play the key role in selection of a feasible configuration for a riser. the deeper the water depth.  Hoffman  et  al  (1991)  also  pointed  out  some  prominent  characteristics  for  flexible  risers.  these  effects  will  have  significant  influence  from  hydrodynamic  force  coefficients.1 Riser Configuration Selections These  real  challenges  discussed  above  will  represent  essential  information  to  design  the  optimum  riser  configuration  for  a  floating  offshore  system  in  Western  Isles  Field.   Hoffman  et  al  (1991)  has  also  mentioned  about  the  important  factors  that  should  also  be  considered during the configuration selection:   Interference with others. However in terms of  percentage. retrieve. Chandwani and Larsen (1997) has also stated that the flexible riser  is suitable for shallow to medium water depths (>600m).  The  flexible  riser  has  the  ability  to  accommodate  high  curvature  and  dynamic  motions which results in good performance for harsh environments such as Offshore  Norway. the riser length must be long enough to avoid an  over  stretch  that  would  result  in  an  unacceptable  tension.  the  value  will  be  eminent.   A number of riser concepts offer technical and commercial advantages for shallow water and  harsh  environmental  condition. This leads to flexible riser as a proven technology especially for shallow to  mid water depth.Furthermore.2.  Hence.  current  velocity  profiles  and  relative  direction of waves and currents. Brazil and West  of Africa.  As  we  mention above.  while  in  the  near  case  the  riser  length must be short enough to avoid over bending or clashing issues. corrosion resistant and reusable.  The  alternative  riser  concepts  that  can  be  developed  for  these situations are:  1.  In  shallow  water  and  harsh  environmental conditions. the effects of the wave‐current combination are very significant in  the  magnitude  and  in  the  direction  of  fluid  forces. It is easy to install.

  Hence.  Large  heave  and  surge motions from host platform due to harsh environment result in buckling issues  at the touchdown point. lazy wave.  Besides  that. It may be  used  at  larger  diameters.  A  Lazy  Wave  riser  configuration  has  been  chosen  in  this  project.   These risers have also relatively lower fatigue sensitivity than steel catenary risers by  being flexible and can be applied in many possibility configurations such as the steep  wave.  These  risers  are  cheaper  than  the  flexible  risers  and  also can be used in greater water depths without a disproportionate increase in cost. This riser configuration will hopefully not only be a robust solution for riser but also  as an economic design. at the touchdown area. This makes the seabed touchdown point shift.  2.  Moreover. the application of flexible riser (compliant riser) will be  very  suitable  in  this  floating  offshore  system. lazy‐S and free hanging.  buoyancy  modules  are  used  to  reduce  overall  tension  at  the  upper  region  and  improve  the  curvature  at  the  lower  region.  Increasing  pliancy  of  the  system  is  the  main  reasons  to  modify  the  configuration by introducing  a lazy  wave with  a multiple  buoyancy section  at the hog bend  position.   However.  the  SCRs  could  be  the  economical  solution  but  these  risers  require  good  engineering studies to minimize the risks due to their potential problems in design.  The  vortex  induced  vibrations  due  to  currents  in  deepwater  application  another  issue  for  SCR  design.  it  also  provides  small  resistance  to  lateral  disturbances  caused  by wave and current induced hydrodynamic loadings.  In  shallow  water  riser  design.  And Karve et al. removing  the  need  for  mid‐depth  buoys.  Comparing the two riser types above.  the  riser  system  must  be  strong  enough  to  withstand  high  tension and bending moments due to the harsh environment and significant vessel motions.  As a result.  the  SCRs  are  very  sensitive  to  environmental  loading.    Besides  that.  Hence it must have high structural axial stiffness and relatively low structural  bending stiffness.  these  risers  are  available  in  continuous  lengths  thereby  avoiding  seals  and  makeup  joints  every  50 feet as required by steel risers. (1988) have also mentioned that a flexible riser offers the advantage  of  having  inherent  heave  compliance  in  the  catenary  thereby  greatly  reducing  the  complexity  of  the  riser‐to‐rig  and  riser‐to‐subsea  interfaces. steep‐S.  making  the  region  highly  sensitive  to  the  fatigue  damage.  In  storm  conditions  the  riser  undergoes  large  dynamic  deflections  and  must  remain  in  tension  throughout  their  response. the pipe is subjected to maximum and almost zero  curvature.  The  riser  accommodates  the  floating  platform  motion  and  hydrodynamic  loading  by  being  flexible.  higher  pressures  and  temperatures  and  also  may  be  produced more easily.    As one of the solutions to reduce the impact of the vessel’s motions  and the environmental  loading. It has the capacity to be suspended in longer lengths. The length of pipe between the supports changes when the  host platform moves. Steel catenary riser  The Steel Catenary Riser (SCR) is one direct alternative to the flexible riser. hence moving the  point of maximum curvature up and down along the length of the pipe at the seabed.  the  buoyancy  modules  will  create  7-7 .

  For  the  operating  condition this limit state corresponds to the maximum resistance to an applied loads  with  a  10‐2  annual  exceedence  probability.  Hence  the  load  combination  for  the  riser  will be defined as follow:   100  years  Irregular  Wave  (Hs=15.   The riser will be analyzed in a short term periodic condition (i.e. the riser will not be empty or gas filled or in the other words. vessel motions and riser properties.  the  Ultimate  Limit  State  (ULS)  requires  that  the  riser  must  remain  intact  and  avoid  rupture.  The  other  factors  that  should  also  be  considered  are  the  hang  off  location.32 m  Furthermore. the limit state design criteria will be the Ultimate Limit State (ULS) to  determine  the  level  of  safety  required  for  the  riser  conditions. just after installation (at 0  years operation) without any variation of riser characteristics (e.the riser shape desired easier.  the  system  geometry  and  the  sizing  of  riser  and  ancillary  components. The main design parameters are the choice of riser configuration. the hog bend position gives positive significant  effects for the response of the riser system.  The  bending  stiffeners  can  be  used  to  avoid  overbending  and  increase  the  curvature to acceptable levels at the hang off connection.  riser  system  design  will  cover  normal  operations  (when  the  riser  is  filled  with  the  operating  contents). The analysis will also not cover for compartment  damage in order to simplify the study.  Based  on  DNV.g.  Other  ancillary  components  will  be  used  to  fulfill  pliancy  requirements  in  the  riser  design  optimization.  A.   7-8 .5  s)  for  Torsethaugen  (Jonswap double peaked)    10 years currents   Static offset ± 25 m   At Ballast condition .2 Design Parameters The  design  of  a  flexible  riser  system  should  be  related  to  many  design  parameters  such  as  environmental conditions.6  m  and  Tp=15. Furthermore. the length of  the  riser.  Hence.  the  location  of  touchdown  point and also the position of the wells.  DNV­ OS­F201  (2001). These parameters should be  well defined. In the static analysis only  the  static  riser  configuration  with  and  without  vessel  offset  and  dynamic  analysis  of  the  entire system will be performed by combining static loads with dynamic environmental loads  based on the movements of the riser at the top (far and near). draft  z =16.e.  but  not  necessary  be  able  to  operate.  The system design will be checked by static and dynamic analysis. not  analyzed in a condition with slug). Limit State Design Criteria and Design Conditions  In this analysis.  the  riser  will  always  be  filled  with  stabilized crude (i.  B. the dimension and weight  of the riser and the ancillary components). All of these parameters should be optimized to gain a  feasible riser configuration. Sensitivity analysis  A  sensitivity  analysis  will  be  done  to  study  the  variation  of  the  output  results  for  different  variations  of  the  input  data  to  enhance  and  increase  the  understanding  of  the riser system’s behavior and to reduce the error possibilities.   7.2.

2. Pressures due to internal contents and external hydrostatics  3. attachments.  7-9 . (2005) have categorized the loads acting on marine risers as follows:   Functional loads  Loads  due  to  the  existence  of  the  riser  system  without  environmental  and  accidental effects. vessel impact and operational malfunction  7. slugs or pigs  3. Thermal effects  5. Loads due to internal contents flow. Buoyancy  4. The following shall be considered as functional loads:  1. Loads due to installation  4.  The  following  shall  be  considered  as  environmental loads:  1. Dropped objects  3. Weight of marine growth.3 Design Criterion The design of a flexible riser system is usually based on the allowable pipe curvature or MBR  (Minimum  Bending  Radius)  and  allowable  tensions  which  are  prescribed  by  the  manufacturer. Sensitivity analysis should be done with respect to:   Dimension and weight of the riser   Buoyancy elements   Seabed friction  Due  to  short  time  available  for  the  thesis  work. Current loads   Accidental loads  Loads  caused  by  the  surrounding  environment  that  are  not  classified  as  functional or accidental loads. The following shall be considered as accidental  loads:  1.  C.  the  sensitivity  analysis  will  not  be  reported in this study. Loads due to vessel restraints   Environmental loads  Loads  caused  by  the  surrounding  environment  that  are  not  classified  as  functional  or  accidental  loads. These criteria will also be influenced by the clearance area between the riser  and other parts of the floating offshore system. Riser collisions. tubing contents  2. Partial loss of station keeping capability  2. surges. Nominal top tension  The following should be considered as appropriate:  1. Weight of riser and contents  2. Load designs  Yong Bai et al. Wave loads  2.

 : Design MBR requirements  MBR Design Criterion Static application 1. The minimum clearances are also specified to avoid  clashing problems between the riser and the seabed or the riser and the vessel or the riser  and mooring lines. 1.   B.           7-10 . Seabed clearance and line clashing  Minimum clearances are specified to avoid clashing problems between the riser and  the seabed or the riser and the vessel and between the riser or other adjacent risers.  the cables or the mooring systems.   The  system  should  also  be  designed  such  that  the  flexible  pipe  is  always  in  tension  throughout its dynamic response cycle.   The main requirements from the results of the analysis will be based on:    A.  This  is  to  ensure  that  overstressing  or  compression  will  not happen along the upper location around the hang off position. any compression would  be avoided with upper limit of 5  kN  because  compression  may  cause  (birdcaging  and)  buckling  which  may  affect  the  integrity of the riser adversely and reduce the service life.25 times storage MBR   Reference: Braestrup (2005)  D. Effective tension  In this design analysis.1 below:  Table 7.The allowable curvature and the tension are based on a full scales test from the manufacturer  combined with stress analysis carried out by the manufacturer and these limits ensure that  the  flexible  pipe  will  not  be  overstressed  when  responding  to  dynamic  loads  and  vessel  motions. Top angle position   In this design analysis. Bending radius  Minimum  bending  radius  (MBR)  for  the  flexible  pipe  is  governed  by  the  allowable  strain of the polymeric layers and the permissible relative movements of the wires in  the  metallic  armour  layers  during  pipe  bending.  Minimum  bending  radius  (MBR)  criterions are determined based on Braestrup (2005):   Bending radius requirements can be seen in Table 7. Seabed clearance at the sag bend position is 5 m  and line clashing checks are performed.5 times storage MBR Abnormal operation  1. maximum top angle positions for the design will be limited to  around 15‐20 deg in static analysis and less than 45 deg at dynamic analysis for the  Ultimate  Limit  State  (ALS).0 times storage MBR Dynamic application Normal operation 1.  C.

 In the de‐coupled analysis.  the  environment  characteristics  in  the  area  will  also  influence  the  magnitude  of  the  representative offset value.  Further.  However  in  terms  of  percentage.  the  value  will  be  reduced  with  depth.5. Simple steps of the riser analysis for the cylindrical S400  floater based on the decoupled analysis can be seen in Figure 7.   The riser design is iterative and the process may continue until all the design requirements  are  optimum.7.  this  value  is  determined  by  hypothetical  or  empirical  calculations  from  the  previous  projects.    Further  the  analysis  will  be  performed  in  time  domain  as  problem  solving  method.  the  deeper  the  water  depth.  Hence.  the  higher  the  offset  value  is.  This  analysis  only  depends  on  the  vessel’s  Response  Amplitude Operator (RAO) as input without any influence from secondary order force.  Furthermore.  far  and  near  conditions.  there is only little integration between the cylindrical S400 floater and the riser.  Time  domain  analysis  should  be  used  in  the  riser  analysis  since  we  have  to  deal  with  non  linear  systems such as drag forces. finite motion and finite wave amplitude effects. Hence. these effects from the vessel motions and environmental loadings will be simulated  in  the  two  extreme  riser  configurations.  These  far  and  near  conditions  will  be  represented  by  a  representative  offset  value.  this  analysis  only  considers  the  vessel  motion  where  the  wave  load  comes  from  the  wave  frequency  loads  as  first  order  wave  loads  while  the  low  frequency  motion  that  comes  from  secondary  order  wave  load  such  as  the  mean  wave  (drift)  force  and  slowly  varying  wave  force  will  be  neglected.4 Methodology Design and Analysis Steps In this chapter.2.   Generally.   The variations of representative offset values are carried to investigate the effect on the riser  based on different vessel positions. the riser system will be analyzed by using RIFLEX for decoupled analysis in  order to reduce time analysis.   Moreover. the results of simulated motions of  a cylindrical S400 floater based on “large body theory” in WADAM will be transferred as top  end excitation of the riser in order to calculate dynamic loads in these elements.:   7-11 .  A  methodology  is  needed  to  provide  a  systematic  design  to  fulfill  the  requirements of the global analysis. the static configuration of the riser system will be  strongly influenced by the variations of the representative offset value.  These  values  should  also  accommodate the mean and low frequency motion (LF) since we neglect these terms of the  vessel motions in this simulation.  Besides  the  water  depth.

1. internal diameter.g. outside diameter. Riser System Data and  Assumption Design Criteria Limitation Load Combination Modeling Challenge Riser Configuration Result Modeling Design Criteria  Check Modification No /Adjustment OK Sensitivity analysis Yes Final Riser Design   Figure 7.  the  data  and  assumptions  used  as  input  will  be  identified  to  provide  all  relevant  situations  for  the  design  criterions  and  limit  states. the data and the assumptions will be categorized as below:    The field layout data  Water depth and orientation of the riser and hang off coordinates of the riser can be  determined from Western Isles Field layout   Pipe data sheets and ancillary components  Type  of  pipe  (flexible  riser). pipe data sheets and ancillary components  can be found in Subchapter 7.2.  A Lazy Wave riser configuration has  been chosen based on reasonable proponents discussed in subchapter 7.  the  conveyed  fluid  and  contents  data. etc).    The detail information about the field layout data.g. : Methodology design for a riser system. the structure  and  limit  specification  (e.  the  riser  system  for  the  Western  Isles  Field  will  be  modeled  as  a  single  production riser for with 6” and 8” diameter in RIFLEX.    In  this  study. 5.  bending  stiffness.  the  dimension  specification for the risers (e.  Furthermore.   As  the  first  step  in  the  riser  system  design.2.5.  axial  stiffness  and  minimum  bending  radius) and the ancillary components data.  7-12 .

5. : The riser system for South Drill Centre.  wave  profile  for  100  years  condition  and  seabed friction coefficient   The vessel response and the variations of a representative offset value  The vessel response will be based on the first order wave forces which are described  in the frequency domain as a linear motion transfer function.  The environmental data   Current  profile  for  10  years  condition.  The vessel offset will be determined as a representative offset value by hypothetically  empirical  calculations. 6.5 The Western Isles Field Layout and Model Properties for the Riser System A. The further details can be found in Appendix A.  The  variations  of  the  representative  offset  values  are  carried  out  to  investigate the effect on the riser based on different vessel positions for two extreme  riser configurations. also denoted Response  Amplitude Operator (RAO). The Western Isles Field Layout  The  Western  Isles  Field  consists  of  two  drill  centers  denoted  North  Drill  Centre  and  South Drill Centre.  7.  These  values  will  accommodate  mean  and  low  frequency  motion  (LF). the study  will only model two risers for the South Drill Centre.  7-13 .  below:  North Riser System Sevan S400   Figure 7.2. Separate risers are routed to the two drill centers. the far and near conditions. However. for 6” and 8” production risers in  RIFLEX as depicted in Figure 7.2.6.     The detail information about a representative offset value can be found in Subchapter 7.

 we are only concerned with the drag forces.76 2.  axial  tensile stiffness and minimum bending radius.    As slender structures.  Gudmestad  (2007)  has  mentioned that the thickness has a linear relation to the strength capability of the  riser.    Optimization  has  to  be  done  to  get  proper  dimensions  based  on the design conditions such as pressure and mass flow.    The  structural  limits  are  given  by  maximum  tension. the offshore field Western Isles Field is located on  shallow water conditions and  also harsh environment.9 311.32m).  In this analysis.   B.32 m). Model Properties for the Riser System   1.5m.Moreover. Flexible riser properties  The  flexible  riser  properties  contain  the  data  about  dimensions  and  weight  of  the  riser.9 208.3 below:  Table 7.  On other side.0 m both at radius 33. Physical properties for the risers  Dimension and weight of the riser will give contributions to the functional loads  on  the  riser  and  the  strength  capability  of  the  riser. the risers will also experience drag forces and lift forces in  constant  currents. the economical  reason  should  be  the  main  consideration  because  higher  thickness  will  spend  higher  resources.  structural  limits  and  also  hydrodynamic coefficients can be found in Table 7. Higher thickness gives higher strength value.  Spacing  of  Risers at FPSO hang‐off is 3. ‐16. The water depth is approximately 170 m.  The  drag  forces  are  caused  by  the  friction  between  the  cylinder  and  the  fluid.  bending  stiffness.5 Weight in air kg/m 145 150 2 Bending stiffness @ 20 deg C kNm 33 40 Axial stiffness MN 500 1000 MBR storage m 1. the lift forces will be neglected because they will not have a big difference  pressure between upstream and downstream. : Physical Properties for Risers  Parameter Unit 6" 8" Outer diameter mm 270. Since the analysis  will be modeled in ballast loading condition (z =16.5 m from FPSO center.  the  structural  limit  prescribed  from  manufacture  and  hydrodynamic  coefficients.7 Inner diameter mm 156.  The  orientation  of  the  riser  system  will  be  at  330  degrees  relative  Grid  North.     A. 2.  These  forces  will  be  affected  by  the  roughness  of  the  cylinder.  The  data  about  dimensions  and  weight  for  risers.02   Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)     7-14 . Hence the riser hang off position  will be at (33. A rough cylinder will set up larger eddy currents and the forces will be  larger.2 and Table 7. On the other  hand.

25 0.       The procedure for the riser system model can be found in details in Marintek (2010) “RIFLEX  User Manual Finite Element Formulation”. Table 7.7. The program system consists of three programs or  modules communicating by a file system as shown in Figure 7.2 0.2.  3. Buoyancy modules  The analysis will include buoyancy modules in order to:   Achieving  stable  configuration. 3.2 0.2 0 Bouyancy modules 0. Moreover. Bending stiffener  The bending stiffeners are used to avoid overbending and increase the curvature to  acceptable levels.  distributed  buoyancy  will  be  used  to  comply  the motions of the FSU without undue stress onto the flexible riser due to the  environmental forces   Minimizing  compression  and  excessive  bending  in  the  touchdown  region  as  buffer   Decreasing the tension required at the surface  In  the  analysis.2   Reference: Sevan Marine (2011)     2. In the analysis.  The  basic  theory  about  this  can  be  found  in  Chapter  2  based  on  Marintek (2010) for “RIFLEX Theory Manual Finite Element Formulation”. below:  7-15 . : Physical Properties for Risers  Normal drag Tangential drag Normal added mass Bare line 0.  buoyancy  modules  are  distributed  over  specific  lengths  of  the  riser  configuration and the suitable dry weight of buoyant elements will be assigned along  the buoyancy section as a variable parameter. It will be applied at the top position of the risers to reduce the free  floating of the sag bend. it will be assigned as a variable parameter. the riser will be  modeled  with  beam  elements  which  will  be  formulated  by  using  a  “co‐rotated  ghost  reference  description”.   7.6 Modeling Concept by RIFLEX The  riser  design  will  be  modeled  by  using  RIFLEX  based  on  the  finite  element  technique  which has proved to be a powerful tool for several applications.

    The  flexible  riser  that  will  be  modeled  in  RIFLEX  will  adopt  an  Arbitrary  Riser  system  configuration (AR).  These points are denoted supernodes. fixed  or prescribed depending on their boundary condition modelling.  In  the  DYNMOD  module. The detailed information  about the input to these modules as being used in the analysis can be found in Appendix D.    The FREMOD and PLOMOD modules will not be used in this analysis. 7. This system will determine the layout configuration of a riser based on its  topology  and  boundary  conditions. these supernodes are classified as free. Further. Further these results are used to define  the initial configuration for a succeeding dynamic analysis in DYNMOD module. The results  of the simulation in time series format will be read by OUTMOD module then the plot of the  time series and statistical parameters can be access from PLOMOD.  time  domain  dynamic  analyses  based  on  the  final  static  configuration will be performed in order to calculate the responses of the system. The INPMOD module has the function to gather all data inputs and organizes a  data base for use during the subsequent analyses in STAMOD. PLOMOD module is just  a plot routine.  The data for  the  element  mesh.  The STAMOD module has the  function to perform several types of static analyses.   Figure 7.   7-16 .  stressfree  configuration  and  key  data  for  the  finite  element  analysis  are  also generated by STAMOD module based on system data given as input to INPMOD module. : Layout of the RIFLEX program system and file communication between modules.  The  system  topology  is  in  general  described  in  terms  of  branching  points  and  terminal  points.  The  system  definition  starts  with  definition  of  the  topology  and  proceeds  in  increasing  detail  to  the  line  and  component  descriptions.

 The number of elements in each  segment will influence the accuracy of the result.           7-17 .  This  configuration  will  represent  the  initial  and  no  structural  forces/deformations along a riser.    If  a  supernode  is  denoted free.  the  riser  line  in  the  layout  configuration  design  of  the  riser  will  be  defined  as  Arbitrary Riser system (AR) which has 2 supernodes and 5 segments with many elements in  each segment. all degrees of freedom are free while in the fixed constrained node. The description of the layout configuration  design in the Arbitrary Riser system configuration (AR) can be seen in Figure 7. 8.  It  will  use  supernodes  which  are  denoted  as  free  or  fixed.  Besides  supernodes. all degrees  of freedom are fixed.  the  initial  layout  configuration  of  a  riser  will  also  be  defined  as  a  stressfree  configuration.  A  free  constrained  node  will  be  used  for  modeling  a  joint  point  between a bending stiffener and a body line of the riser while a fixed constrained node will be  used  for  modeling  at  hangoff  position  and  at  connection  to  the  seabed. The stressfree  configuration  for  the  Arbitrary  Riser  system  configuration  (AR)  is  defined  by  the  input  and  can  be  seen  in  the  file  sima_inpmod  (RES  file).  Further  between  two  supernodes.We  use  a  Lazy  Wave  riser  configuration  in  this  project.  Furthermore. below:  SUPERNODE  : Branching points or nodes with specified boundary  conditions  LINE                        : Suspended  structure between two supernodes.  5 SEGMENT              : (Part of) line with uniform cross section properties and element length  ELEMENT               : Finite element unit 3 4 1 2 Element Figure 7. this configuration will be used as a basis for  calculation of structural forces and deformations in the finite element analysis.8. : System definition for the description of the layout configuration design of the Arbitrary  Riser system configuration (AR).  the  riser  system will be identified as a line which contains elements.    Hence.

1 Layout and Schematic Riser Configurations The riser design is an iterative and complicated process that may continue until all the design  requirements are optimum.    Time domain analysis is based on step by step numerical integration of the dynamic  equilibrium equations.  the  design  will  select  a  suitable  range  of  system  geometries  and  lengths  that  satisfy  the  design  criteria. Dynamic time domain analysis including eigen value analysis  In the second stage.Moreover.  In  this  stage.  system  geometry  and  length)  on  the  static  curvature  and  tension  will  be  investigated. tensions and clearance area should be  checked against the design limits. Static analyses  As  the  first  stage  of  the  modeling. the static effects of the vessel offset (based on far and near conditions) and  the current loading are investigated for different locations.  Beside.  Since the riser system design will be the focus in the combination of shallow water and harsh  environmental  conditions.   Static analysis comprises:   Equilibrium configuration   Parameter variations of tension or position parameters.  the  catenary  theory  will  also  be  implemented  to  reduce  the  computing  time  as  a  good  starting point.3.  However.  Moreover.e.  the  result  from  the  static  analysis  will  determine  the  acceptable  system  layout  for  the  riser.    Based  on  these  parameters.  the  challenges  from  this  condition  will  introduce  some  modifications in order to obtain a feasible riser configuration.    An  acceptable  system  layout  from  the  previous  stage  and  the  dynamic  loadings  will  be  considered  here. The  harsh  environmental  loading  will  also  give  impact  on  the  dynamic  riser  behavior.  The  analysis  will  combine  the  loads from the combination of waves and current. the dynamic analysis of the system will be performed to assess  the  global  dynamic  response.  the  effects  of  changing  the  design  parameters  (i. The results of  these analyses such as the dynamic curvatures.  7-18 .   Dynamic analysis comprises:   Eigenvalue analysis. the riser design will be modeled by using RIFLEX in two stages:  1. vessel positions and riser contents  in order to prove the acceptance condition based on the design criteria. natural frequencies and mode shapes   Response to harmonic motion and wave excitation   Response to irregular wave‐ and motion excitation  7. the configuration itself will govern the  pliancy requirement and the riser system should accommodate two extreme configurations.  the  external influence from the environmental condition.   The  main  challenges  that  will  be  faced  in  the  design  process  come  from  the  large  vessel  motion  and  vessel offset due to limited space between the FPSO and the seabed.  The  static  analysis  is  based  on  a  complete  non‐linear  formulation.3 Riser Analysis 7. current velocity and  direction   2.

  the  buoyancy  modules  will  create  the  riser  shape  desired  easier.    As  one  of  the  solutions  to  reduce  the  impact  of  the  vessel  motion  and  the  environmental  loading.  this riser configuration will not only represent a robust solution for the riser but also  be an economic design. : The riser configuration of the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field.  and Figure 7.  the  feasible  riser  configurations  for  6”  and  8”  production risers in the Western Isle field can be seen in Figure 7.  Besides  that. 9.  Furthermore.      Hence. 10. some modifications have been made as follows:   Heavy weight riser   By increasing the weight of the riser to reduce the free floating loads from the riser  makes the configuration more stable    A multiple buoyancy section at the hog bend position  By introducing a lazy wave with a multiple buoyancy section at the hog bend position. In the far case. the riser length must be long enough to avoid  an  over  stretching  that  would  result  in  an  unacceptable  tension. 9.  the  hog  bend position gives significant positive effects for the response of the riser system.    Segment 4 Segment 3 Segment 2 Segment 1   Figure 7.the far and the near conditions.  By  referring  to  the  design  parameters.  7-19 .  buoyancy  modules  are  used  to  reduce  the  overall  tension  at  the  upper  region  and  improve  the  curvature  at  the  lower  region.  while  in  the  near  case  the  riser length must be short enough to avoid over bending or clashing issues.

The  feasible  configuration  for  the  6”  production  riser  will  adopt  a  Lazy  Wave  riser  configuration with multiple buoyancy sections at the hog bend position.10. The detailed information about its cross section and the buoyancy module’s  cross section can be found in Appendix D.  7-20 .     As like the feasible configuration for the 6” production riser. The  tip of the hog bend will be put in range ‐130 m below the surface in order to minimize riser  pay load on the FPSO and to obtain good dynamic response of the riser system. The detailed information about its cross  section and the buoyancy module’s cross section can be found in Appendix D.   The hog bend position influences positive significantly the response of the riser system. The tip of the hog bend will be put at a  range ‐120 m below the surface.  The weight of the riser itself will also be heavy riser having  a length 320 m.  The upper buoyancy  modules are shown by segment 3 and the lower buoyancy modules are shown by segment 2  in Figure 7.  The  hog  bend  position  gives  significant  positive effects for the response of the riser system.9. 10.  Hence  the buoyancy modules will create the riser shape desired easier.  The weight  risers itself will be heavy having a length of 320 m.    The  upper  buoyancy  modules  are  shown  by  segment  3  and  the  lower  buoyancy  modules  are  shown  by  segment  2  in  Figure  7.   The upper buoyancy modules will help to reduce the overall tension at the upper region from  the vessel motion and environmental loading (the combination of waves and currents) while  the lower buoyancy modules will help to improve the curvature at the lower region. : The riser configuration of the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field. the 8” production riser will also  adopt  a  Lazy  Wave  riser  configuration  with  multiple  buoyancy  sections  at  the  hog  bend  position.    Segment 4 Segment 3 Segment 2 Segment 1   Figure 7.

Effective tension  The effective tensions for the 6”and 8” production risers can be seen in Figure 7.    7.58 kN.  the  length  of  riser.11.  the  riser  itself  should  always be in tension because compression along the riser should be avoided as it will cause  (birdcaging and) buckling which may affect the integrity of the riser adversely and reduce the  service life.10. The bending moment and the curvature of the riser will show the performance of  the  riser.  The smaller the bending radius.3. the greater is the material flexibility (as the radius of  curvature decreases. The  top  angle  positions  in  static  condition  are  less  than  15  deg  while  the  seabed  clearance  in  static condition are around 5 m to 15 m on the lowest point in the sag bend area.  the  curvature  of  the  riser will  show  the  capability  of  the  riser  to  be  bent until its limits without kinking or damaging it and it depends on its minimum bending  radius.  A.  The maximum effective tension for the 8” production riser is 155 kN while  the minimum will be 26.08 kN.  The  main  requirements  for  the  result  of  the  analysis  are  such  as  the  top  angle  position.  These results are quite good and any compression can be avoided.   The top angle position and seabed clearance can be seen in Figure 7.    The  static  forces  will  be  represented  by  the  effective  tension.   The other results such as the static forces. bending radius and seabed clearance and clashing.  The  maximum  effective  tension  for  the  6”  production  riser  is  180  kN  while  the  minimum will be 32.  Furthermore.  the  system  geometry  and  the  sizing  of  riser  and  ancillary  components  based  on  the  consideration  of  the  hang  off  location  and  the  location  for  the  touchdown point will be simulated in the static condition. and Figure 7.9.2 Static Condition The  purpose  of  the  static  analysis  is  to  determine  the  acceptable  system  layout  for  a  riser  based on the input parameters.The system design will be checked by static and dynamic analysis. the curvature increases).  and Figure 7.  The main design parameters are such as the choice of riser  configuration.  effective tension. bending moment and bending radius can be seen  below. In the static analysis only  the  static  riser  configuration  with  and  without  vessel  offset  will  be  considered  while  the  dynamic  analysis  of  the  entire  system  will  be  performed  by  combining  static  loads  with  dynamic environmental loads based on movements of the riser.  7-21 .12.  The  range  of  values  for  the  effective  tension  for  the  8”  production  riser  is  slightly  different.

  Figure 7.  7-22 . : The static effective tension for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field. 11.

 The MBR for a  6” riser is 1.  The results are quite good since they are still within  the allowable limit.5  (Figure 7.  in  the  static  condition.)    7-23 .15.02).  the  minimum  bending  radius  (MBR) of a riser should be same or less than that of the MBR at storage. : The static effective tension for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field.15.57 (1/1.76 m or in the terms  of curvature this will be 0.5 (1/2.   These  results  are  quite  good  since  the  curvatures  of  the  risers  are  less  than  0.14. Bending Moment and Curvature  The bending moments for the 6”and 8” production risers can be seen in Figure 7.  The maximum bending moment and curvature for the 6” and 8” production risers are  found in the hang off position.  and Figure 7. 12.76).16. and Figure 7.     Figure 7. and Figure 7.    B. while the curvatures for the 6”and 8” production risers can be seen  in Figure 7. The MBR for  a 8” riser is 2.13.   Based  on  the  design  criterion.02 m or in the terms  of curvature this will be 0.16.

 : The static bending moment for the  6” production riser for the Western Isle Field. 14. : The static bending moment for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field.      Figure 7. 13.   Figure 7.      7-24 .

 : The static curvatures for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field.  7-25 . : The static curvatures for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field. 15.   Figure 7.      Figure 7. 16.

  the  results  of  these  analyses  such  as  the  dynamic  tensions  and  curvatures  should be checked against the design limits.     The diagram of the displacement envelope curvatures for the 6”and 8” production risers can  be seen in Figure 7.  10.  Furthermore. : The displacement envelope curvature for the 6” production riser   for the Western Isle Field. 17.    and  Figure  7.          Figure 7.3 Dynamic Condition In the dynamic condition.    7-26 . and Figure 7.  the  feasible  riser  configurations  for  6”  and  8”  production  risers  in  the  Western  Isle  field  as  shown  in  Figure  7.18. The movements of a riser will be recorded in  the diagram showing the displacement envelope curvature.  During  the  dynamic  simulation.7. time domain dynamic analyses will be performed based on the final  static  configuration  in  order  to  calculate  the  global  dynamic  responses  of  the  system.    will  move  in  a  range in a response to hydrodynamic loading.  9.3.17.

20.     Figure 7.19.        7-27 .  These results are quite good and any compression can be avoided. : The displacement envelope curvature for the 8” production riser   for the Western Isle Field.  The other results such as the dynamic tensions and curvatures can be seen below. Effective tension  The effective tensions for the 6”and 8” production risers can be seen in Figure 7.94 kN.  and Figure 7.  A.  The  maximum  effective  tension  for  the  6”  production  riser  is  240  kN  while  the  minimum will be 23. 18.  The maximum effective tension for the 8” production riser is 220 kN while  the minimum will be 10 kN.  The  range  of  values  for  the  effective  tension  for  the  8”  production  riser  is  slightly  different.

 : The dynamic effective tension for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field.   Figure 7.    7-28 . 19.

 
Figure 7. 20. : The dynamic effective tension for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field. 
 
B. Bending Moment and Curvature 
The bending moments for the 6”and 8” production risers can be seen in Figure 7.21. 
and Figure 7.22. while the curvatures for the 6”and 8” production risers can be seen 
in Figure 7.23. and Figure 7.24. 
The  maximum  bending  moment  and  curvature  for  6”  and  8”  production  risers  are 
found in the hang off position.  The results are quite good since they are still within 
the allowable limit.  
Based on the design criterion, in the dynamic condition; the minimum bending radius 
(MBR) of a riser should be same or less than 1,5 times that of the MBR at storage. The 
MBR  for  a  6”  riser  is  1,76  m  or  in  terms  of  the  curvature  this  will  be  0,57  (1/1,76). 
Hence the limit MBR in the dynamic condition is 0,38. 
While, the MBR for a  8” riser is 2,02 m or in terms of the curvature this will be 0,5 
(1/2,02). Hence the limit MBR in the dynamic condition is 0,33. 
 These  results  are  quite  good  since  the  curvatures  of  the  risers  are  less  than  0,3 
(Figure 7.23. and Figure 7.24.) 

7-29

 
Figure 7. 21. : The dynamic bending moment for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field. 
 

 
Figure 7. 22. : The dynamic bending moment for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field. 
 
 

7-30

 
Figure 7. 23. : The dynamic curvatures for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field. 
 
 

 
Figure 7. 24. : The dynamic curvatures for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field. 
 
 

7-31

Chapter

8
1 Coupled Dynamic Analysis
M.S.c. Thesis
Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO, Moorings and Riser
Based on Numerical Simulation

This  chapter  will  present  a  single  complete  computer  model  that  includes  the  cylindrical 
floater, moorings and riser with use of SIMA. In principle, SIMA will combine two nonlinear 
numerical simulations, a SIMO and a RIFLEX analysis. In other words, the cylindrical floater 
and moorings model from SIMO will be combined with an AR (arbitrary riser) configuration 
from RIFLEX in time domain analysis. 
A set of accurate predictions of the response of the overall system will be obtained because 
the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  ensures  a  truly  integrated  system.  Not  only  the 
accurate prediction of the response of the overall system but also the individual responses of 
the  floater,  moorings  and  risers  are  obtained.  Hence,  the  accurate  prediction  of  the  floater 
motions  will  be  presented  here.  The  accurate  prediction  of  the  motions  of  the  cylindrical 
floater  will  refer  to  the  global  motion  response  for  the  total  motion  as  combinations  of  the 
low frequency motions (LF motions) and the wave frequency motions (WF motions) and will 
be  presented  here.  Further,  these  results  will  be  compared  to  the  results  from  the  global 
motion response for the total motion as found in Chapter 6 (Subchapter 6.3.2 points  A and 
B).  
Besides the accurate prediction of the motion of the cylindrical floater, the results from the 
riser analysis will also be presented here. In this chapter, the riser analysis will be performed 
by  using  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  in  time  domain  under  two  simulation 
schemes, static and dynamic conditions. As for the response of the floater, the results will be 
compared  to  the  results  from  the  decoupled  analysis  of  the  top  angle  (hang  off  position 
angle),  effective  tension,  bending  radius  and  seabed  clearance  in  Chapter  7  (Subchapters 
7.3.2 and 7.3.3).  
Furthermore,  this  chapter  will  also  give  a  description  of  the  analysis  program  that  will  be 
used, SIMA to give the perspective for the analysis.  
 
 
 

8-1

8.1 Modeling Concept by SIMA Marintek
As  the  final  step,  the  cylindrical  floater  S400,  12  mooring  lines  and  two  of  feasible  riser 
configurations  for  a  production  riser  with  6”  and  8”  diameter  will  be  modeled  as  one 
complete  model  which  is  required  in  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  to  obtain  a 
consistent  treatment  of  the  coupling  effect  between  the  cylindrical  FPSO  and  the  slender 
members. This method will generate the solution of the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis 
in  time  domain  using  a  non‐linear  integration  scheme  and  will  adopt  the  dynamic 
equilibrium equation of the spatially discredited system (Omberg, H. et al. (1997)).  
Further, The SIMA Marintek computer software will be used in this study because it has the 
capability  to  integrate  the  cylindrical  floater  S400,  moorings  and  riser  as  one  complete 
model. Here, a complete model of the floating offshore system will be modeled in one module 
of  The  SIMA  Marintek/the  RIFLEX  Coupled  model  (combination  software  for  RIFLEX  and 
SIMO  which  are  run  together).  In  other  words,  a  model  of  the  cylindrical  floater  S400  with 
moorings system as established from SIMO will be combined with a model of a feasible riser 
system from RIFLEX into a complete model in RIFLEX Coupled and are run together in a time 
domain analysis.  
The  SIMA  Marintek  software  is  developed  as  a  Joint  Industry  Project  by  MARINTEK  and 
Statoil.  
The SIMA Marintek is  a  powerful tool for  modeling  and analysis of tasks within the field of 
marine  technology.  Beside  it  has  the  capability  to  integrate  each  components  of  a  floating 
offshore system, The SIMA Marintek has also the capability to support several programs that 
will be used in this study such as RIFLEX and SIMO. Hence, the analysis can be accessed in a 
single file as done in the library data system of SIMA Marintek (Figure 8.1). 
In  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis,  the  complete  model  of  the  floating  offshore 
system  will  consist  of  three  principal  structural  components  such  as  the  cylindrical  floater, 
moorings  and  riser  responding  to  the  environmental  loading  due  to  wind,  waves  and 
currents. Moreover, a previous model of the cylindrical floater and the mooring system from 
Chapters 5 and 6 will be modeled as the body while a previous feasible riser configuration 
model  will  be  extracted  from  Chapter  7  to  be  modeled  as  an  AR  (arbitrary  riser 
configuration) system.  
Further information about how to model the system components can be found in Chapter 4.  
As an integrated dynamic system, the environmental forces on the floater induce the motions 
which will be introduced in a detailed Finite Element Model of the moorings and risers. The 
finite  element  model  has  been  used  to  describe  the  behavior  of  a  given  variable  internal  to 
the  element  in  terms  of  the  displacement  (or  other  generalized  co‐ordinates)  by  utilizing 
interpolation functions (van den Boom (1985)).  
Here,  two  different  types  of  elements  are  introduced  in  the  model,  a  3D  bar/cable  element 
where  the  bending  stiffness  is  negligible  and  a  3D  beam  element  to  include  the  bending 
stiffness.   
The  bar  element  presents  only  3  translational  DOF  per  node  and  do  not  provide  the 
rotational stiffness. Therefore, it will be a suitable model to represent the moorings. On the 
other  hand,  the  beam  element  will  incorporate  rotational  stiffness  and  it  will  be  a  suitable 
model to represent the flexible riser.  Moreover, the bar element is formulated using a “total 

8-2

Lagrangian  description”,  while  the  beam  element  formulation  uses  a  “co‐rotated  ghost 
reference  description”.  The  basic  theory  about  this  can  be  found  in  Chapter  2  based  on 
Marintek (2010) for “RIFLEX Theory Manual Finite Element Formulation”.  The procedure for 
the riser system model can be found in details in Marintek (2010) “RIFLEX User Manual Finite 
Element Formulation”. 
Since a Finite Element Model has been applied to slender members (moorings and risers), a 
dynamic analysis will be performed during the design because the dynamic behavior of the 
slender  members  strongly  increases  the  maximum  line  tensions  and  may  affect  the  low 
frequency motions of the moored structure by increasing the virtual stiffness and damping of 
the system.  
Moreover,  the  application  of  the  Finite  Element  Model  will  be  for  all  system  components, 
including  the  body  of  the  cylindrical  S400  floater.  The  FEM  model  of  the  cylindrical  S400 
floater (Hydro and Mass model) that originated from Wadam/HydroD will be taken as input. 
This input has been adopted from SIMO as a body model directly. In addition, the kinetic and 
radiation data will also be taken as inputs to obtain the forces that are acting on the hull. 
Since the model will be quite complex, a “master‐slave” approach will be used to connect the 
riser  and  the  frequency‐dependent  floater  and  moorings.  This  connection  will  be  placed  in 
the body section as a so called AR (arbitrary riser) Connection.     
Here,  the  environmental  loading  from  winds,  waves  and  currents  will  be  considered.  The 
study has also provided a set of wind, wave and current criteria associated with the extreme 
events. The criteria are considered to be independent, i.e. no account is taken of the effects of 
joint  probability.  The  study  will  be  based  on  the  return  period  combination  of  100  years 
waves and wind criteria and 10 years current criteria.  
The wind forces will be simulated in the time domain. The wind speed design for simulation 
will  be  taken  as  the  average  speed  occurring  for  a  period  of  1‐hour  duration  at  a  reference 
height, typically 30 ft (10m) above the mean still water level. NPD wind spectrum (ISO 19901­
1 (2005), wind spectrum) will be used. The wind loads will be simulated in time domain, no 
transverse gust and no admittance function will be used. 
The  study  will  analyze  the  wave  loads  by  using  irregular  waves.  The  irregular  waves  will 
have contributions in describing the real condition of the surface sea. The wave data will be 
based to the study from Physe Ltd (2010).  All‐year omni‐directional extreme significant wave 
heights have been assessed by using NNS (Northern North Sea) measured data set. The full 
NNS  measured  data  set  was  used  to  create  frequency  distributions  and  the  data  were 
extrapolated by applying a range of functional fits. Peaks Over Threshold (POT) analysis was 
also performed on the time series data, picking 40, 60 and 80 storms to determine the best 
fit. The EVA (Extreme Value Analysis) results for extreme significant wave heights are given 
in Table 8.1 below: 
 

8-3

Table 8.1. : The EVA Analysis Results for 100 Years Waves 

 
Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010) 

Where:  FT3 = Fisher‐Tippett distribution, Type 3, POT= Peaks Over Threshold (POT) (40, 60 and 80 storms) 

    CFE = Cumulative Frequency Extrapolation 

 
Further,  the  extreme  significant  wave  height  values  for  return  periods  of  100  years  were 
calculated  from  the  NNS  measured  data.  The  complete  NNS  data  set  was  extrapolated 
applying  both  a  10%  and  a  95%  Weibull  fit  to  each  data  set.  Hence,  a  100  year  significant 
wave height design value of 15.6 m is recommended for the Western Isles location. 
According to Physe Ltd (2010), the final recommendations for the waves at the Western Isles 
location are given Table 8.2. below: 
Table 8.2. : Extreme Wave Height and Associated Periods‐ Omnidirectional 

 
Reference: PhyseE Ltd (2010) 

Further, this waves criteria (Hs = 15,6m and Tp= 15,5s) will be modeled by the Torsethaugen 
Spectrum (Jonswap double peaked). It will be simulated for “3 hours +” build up time in the 
SIMA Marintek. 

8-4

  the  floating  offshore  system  will  be  modeled  for  two  conditions.  is  in  the  range  of  4‐5%  for  the  model  results  and  2‐3%  for  the  simulations”.    Further  the  floater’s  response  (floater  motions  and  the  horizontal  offset  values)  and  the  slender member’s response such as mooring line dynamic tensions as the mooring system’s  response  and  the  effective  tension  and  the  bending  moment  and  curvature  as  the  riser’s  system’s response will be presented in the next subchapters.The current criteria are based on the 10 years current criteria.    The  static  condition  stage  has  as  functions  to  obtain  a  static  equilibrium position and generate the initial condition for the dynamic simulation while the  dynamic  simulation  will  be  performed  in  the  dynamic  condition  in  order  to  calculate  the  responses of the system responding to the dynamic loading conditions. Construction and Certification”.  the  static  and  dynamic  conditions.  Moreover. in particular as we for the floater motion have that “the statistical variability.  Department  of  Energy  (1990)  for  “Offshore Installations: Guidance on Design. in terms  of  coefficient  of  variation. These results are presented as  time series which have  the maximum. (1998). The vertical current profile for  the  Western  Isles  will  be  calculated  from  Guidance  Notes.  it  requires  a  proper  simulation  length  to  obtain  a  steady  result.  Further.  The  calculation  parameters  for  each  condition  will  be  set  differently  depending  on  their  functions.   Since  the  analysis  has  been  performed  as  a  time  domain  analysis.    8-5 . Furthermore.  in  the  dynamic  condition  the  environmental  criteria  (the  wind. minimum and mean values. For the member tension “the variability is 3‐4% for the simulations”. the extreme values found from “3  hours +” simulations will represent a reasonable max expected value for the simulated time  series. According to Omberg et al. the  results  will be highlighted to the maximum or minimum values to show the deviation of each result.  waves  and  current  criteria)  has  been  simulated  for  ”3  hours +” build up time.

  Reference: Marintek. 2010  8-6 . 1 : Library data system of the SIMA Marintek.   Figure 8.

 the total frequency motions can  be seen in  Table 8.01 Heave ZG translation Total Motion ‐9.00 3.  Hence.66 ‐0.g.19 ‐9.3 below:  Table 8.30 0.17 1.07 Sway YG translation Total Motion ‐0.  The  resulting  analysis  for  the  floater  motions  and  the  horizontal  offset  values  will  be  presented in time series below:   8.e.  simultaneously  for  the  overall  system  as  well  as  the  individual  response of the floater.11 33.27 0.  the  floater  motions  in  the  time  domain.20   Further.63 0. moorings and risers.2 to Figure 8.3.35 Yaw ZG rotation Total Motion ‐7.61 0.  the  global  motion  response  of  the  cylindrical  S400 floater will be represented by the total frequency motions as combinations of the low  frequency motions (LF motions) and wave frequency motions (WF motions).8.00 Roll XL rotation Total Motion ‐1.87 0.26 0.2 The System Response in the Nonlinear-Coupled Dynamic Analysis The  main  reason  for  performing  a  coupled  dynamic  analysis  is  to  obtain  an  accurate  prediction  of  the  response.  motion  responses)  for  offshore  structure design. : The Summary of The Global Motion Response of The cylindrical S400 Floater in the  Nonlinear‐Coupled Dynamic Analysis  The Global Motion Response in Total Frequency Motions Std.7      8-7 .    Since  the  analysis  has  been  performed  in  the  time  domain  for  problem  solving.00 ‐0.  the  global  motion  response  for  the  total  motion  as  combinations  of  the  low  frequency  motions  (LF  motions)  and  wave  frequency  motions  (WF  motions)  can  be  found  from Figure 8.00 ‐4.  The summary of the global motion response i.27 Pitch YL rotation Total Motion 0. moorings  and  riser)  and  the  associated  structural  response  (e.  Channel Min Max Mean Dev.84 0. Surge XG translation Total Motion 32.1 Floater Motions In  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  . the estimation of the mean offset and the floater motions can be generated accurately  to quantify the coupling  effects between the floating  offshore  system (the  floater.  the  horizontal  offset  values  and  the  mooring  line  dynamic  tensions will be presented as time series results.61 0.05 ‐9.2.  The  accurate  prediction  of  the  response  for  the  overall  system  can  be  obtained  since  the  coupled  dynamic  analysis  ensures  a  truly  integrated  dynamic  interaction  between  the  components in the offshore floating system.50 32.15 0.

 The total global motion response. 3 : The total global motion response. 2 : The total global motion response. the total frequency motions for sway      Figure 8.     The total global motion response. the total frequency motions for surge    Figure 8. the total frequency motions for sway        8-8 . the total frequency motions for surge.

 the total frequency motions for roll    Figure 8. the total frequency motions for heave. 4 : The total global motion response.     The total global motion response.            8-9 . The total global motion response. 5 : The total global motion response. the total frequency motions for roll. the total frequency motions for heave    Figure 8.

 7 : The total global motion response. the total frequency motions for pitch    Figure 8. 6 : The total global motion response. the total frequency motions for yaw. the total frequency motions for yaw      Figure 8.     The total global motion response.  The total global motion response.          8-10 . the total frequency motions for pitch.

  it  may  affect  the  low  frequency  motions  specifically  and  also  the  total  frequency  global  motion  responses  of  the  moored  structure.00 ‐4.47 5.  this  system  uses  the  dynamic. Dev. this system uses the Quasi‐static design method  which  comprises  a  dynamic  motion  analysis  of  the  moored  structure  and  computations  of  mooring  line  tension  based  on  the  extreme  position  of  the  floater  and the static load‐excursion characteristics of the mooring system. The influence of the risers structure  In the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.03 1. Surge XG translation Total Motion 32.42 1.82 7.  Hence.30 0.4.00 ‐15.41 2.35 ‐9.19 ‐9.27 ‐5.61 0.02 4.84 0.50 32.  Further.50 5.  not  only  a  static  configuration  will  be  established with non linear elements but the effect of line dynamics on the platform  motion  will  be  included  in  the  simulation  such  as  the  additional  loads  from  the  mooring  system  and  the  hydrodynamic  damping  effects  from  the  relative  motion  between the line and the fluid. : The Summary of The Global Motion Response of the Cylindrical S400 Floater in the  Nonlinear‐Coupled Dynamic Analysis and the Station Keeping System Modeling results as found from  SIMO (Chapter 6)  The Global Motion Response in Total  The Global Motion Response in Total Frequency  Frequency Motions (nonlinear­coupled  Channel Motions (Chapter 6)  dynamic analysis)  Min Max Mean Std. moorings and riser as  an  offshore  floating  system  in  SIMA.48 ‐0. The different applications for the design modeling    In Chapter 6.   This  technique.35 Yaw ZG rotation Total Motion ‐7.55 Sway YG translation Total Motion ‐0.22 3.07 ‐22.78 Pitch YL rotation Total Motion 0.73 Heave ZG translation Total Motion ‐9.14 ‐0.82 Roll XL rotation Total Motion ‐1.  the  Finite  Element  Method  (FEM)  will  ensure  higher  contribution  from  the  nonlinear  dynamic  behavior  because  the  inertial  effects  between  the  line  and  the  fluid  are  also  included.63 0.  the  total  global  motion  responses  of  the  cylindrical  S400  for  the  total  frequency  motions in the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis are slightly different from the total global  motion  responses  of  the  cylindrical  S400  for  the  total  frequency  motions  as  found  by  the  SIMO results analysis in Chapter 6.80 0.17 1.11 33.09 ‐0.69 5.  the  total  frequency  global  motion  responses  for  the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis are caused by some reasons as follows:   1.Moreover.2. Further.20 ‐2.00 ‐0.  By  using  the  Finite  Element  Method  (FEM).37 3. Dev.87 0.66 ‐0.4 as follow:  Table 8.89 0.01 ‐8.26 0. the cylindrical S400 floater and 12 mooring lines are modeled in SIMO  as a station keeping system.15 0.   The difference of results analysis can be seen in Table 8.  Finite  Element Method (FEM) as design method.  On  the  other  hand.05 ‐9.27 0.00 1.08 ‐3. the overall behavior of the floater will be  influenced not only from the hydrodynamic behavior of the hull and moorings system  but  also  from  the  dynamic  behavior  of  the  risers  because  it  comprises  a  single  8-11 .61 0.73 8.31     Based  on  the  results  in  Table  8.  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  comprises  a  single  complete computer model that includes the cylindrical floater.00 3.     2. Min Max Mean Std.

  the  horizontal  representative  offset  value  for  the  cylindrical S400 floater has been found which maximum values around 22. The horizontal offset value has also tentatively been established for the riser system  design in Chapter 7.  Because.  Its  characteristics  are  based  on  the  mechanical  characteristics  of  the  riser  and  the  mean  current  forces  on  risers  may  affect  the  horizontal  restoring  force  of  the  system  which  then  influences  the  total  frequency global motion responses of the moored structure.  the  mooring  analysis has been performed in quasi‐ static model for ”3 hours +” build up time.    The detailed information can be found in Chapter 6. First.2.  Moreover.   In  terms  of  riser  system.  below.  the  representative  horizontal  offset  value  is  taken  as  a  conservative  value.      8. the horizontal offset values of the cylindrical S400 floater have been established  from numerical simulations in three ways:  1.  Moreover.  In terms of the moorings system.   2. the cylindrical S400 floater and feasible riser  configurations  (for  6”  and  8”  production  risers)  are  modeled  by  using  RIFLEX  in  a  decoupled  analysis.  In this simulation.82 m ~23  m. the cylindrical S400 floater and moorings  are  modeled  by  using  SIMO  in  a  time  domain  analysis. the horizontal offset values are  very important in the offshore  floating system design and should be estimated accurately.  In  this  chapter.  the  horizontal  offset  values  will  represented  two  extreme  riser  configurations. the representative horizontal offset values are derived from the total global  motion response (the total frequency motions for surge).  In this simulation.  this  value  will  not  only  represent  two  extreme  riser  configurations. the horizontal offset value has been established from the station keeping system  simulation in Chapter 6.  far  and  near  conditions. mooring system design is a trade‐off between making the  system compliant enough to avoid excessive forces on the floater and making it stiff enough  to avoid difficulties due to excessive offsets (Chakrabarti. (2005)). This can be seen in Figure  8.2 The Horizontal Offset Values The  horizontal  offset  values  of  the  offshore  floating  system  are  very  important  in  order  to  determine  the  global  performance  of  the  floater  structure  in  the  survival  or  operation  conditions.   In this study. complete computer model (the cylindrical floater.   In  the  analysis. moorings and riser) as an offshore  floating system.  the  simulation  has  been  performed  in  time  domain  analysis  for  ”3  hours  +”  build  up  time.8.  the  riser  system  has  used  two  heavy  weight  6”  and  8”  production  risers  for  study  in  the  arbitrary  riser  system.  Further.  the  far  and  near  conditions  but  it  also  should  accommodate  the  mean  and  low  8-12 .  Further. S.  From  this  simulation.  the  variations  of  a  representative  offset  value will strongly influence the final static configuration in riser system design.  These  values  will  influence  the  design  of  the  other  components  in  the  offshore  floating system such as the mooring system and the riser system.   Based on the reasons above.   In  this  chapter.  in  this  simulation  the  FEM  (Finite  Element Model) has been applied as the design method.

 From the empirical calculations.  the  accurate  prediction  of  the  response  simultaneously  for  the  overall  system  as  well  as  the  individual  response  components  (the  floater. the horizontal representative offset value  for  the  cylindrical  S400  floater  has  been  found  to  be  around  ±  25  m  as  the  static  offset.   In this analysis.        Figure 8.  the  horizontal  representative  offset  value  for  the  cylindrical  S400  floater  has  been  found  with  maximum value around 33 m. the simulation has been performed by a FEM (Finite Element Model)  for ”3 hours +” build up time. 8 : The total global motion response. Further.  above. frequency motions (LF) since we neglect these terms from the vessel motions in the  simulation.  moorings  and  risers)  including the estimation of the horizontal offset value can be gained accurately. the total frequency motions for surge from the station  keeping system modeling in SIMO (Chapter 6).  the  horizontal  offset  value  has  also  been  established  from  a  single  complete  computer model that includes the cylindrical floater S400. 12 mooring lines and two  6”  and  8”  of  feasible  riser  configurations  for  the  production  riser  as  the  nonlinear‐ coupled  dynamic  analysis  in  one  module  of  SIMA  Marintek/the  RIFLEX  Coupled  model (combination software for RIFLEX and SIMO which are run together).    3. Last.      Method 3 is the best way to predict the representative values for the horizontal offset of the  cylindrical floater S400.  From  this  simulation.  Hence.   8-13 . the representative horizontal offset values are  derived  from  the  total  global  motion  response  (the  total  frequency  motions  for  surge).   This analysis uses a consistent analytical approach which ensures a truly integrated dynamic  system  in  order  to  quantify  the  dynamic  interaction  between  the  vessel  and  the  slender  systems.  This  can  be  seen  in  Figure  8.2.

36     Table  8.85 57.15 2.22 10407.77 2.  The  mooring lines should always be in tension.59 8357.23 2686.02 1.79 8067.31 2220.47 2961. the maximum line tensions of slender members will be increased  due  to  the  dynamic  behavior  of  the  slender  members  and  may  affect  the  low  frequency  motions of the moored structure.41 45.85 1703.75 Mooring Line7 10073.3 The Nonlinear-Coupled Dynamic Analysis for Slender Members In  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis.67  for intact condition by using dynamic analysis (FEM) method.55 10581.96 45.77 Mooring Line8 10069.34 2211.   Since  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  will  be  performed  by  FEM  (Finite  Element  Model) as design method.32 8703.55 8691.66 45.22 Mooring Line2 1676.  The  resulting  analysis  for  6”  and  8”  production  risers  are  not  much  different  from  the  results  of  Chapter  7.30 Mooring Line10 1847.21 Mooring Line5 10235.46 10976.91 1.04 1. Further.36 2.47 10762.   8-14 .34 57.91 2.80 8153.85 10980. : The summary of mooring line dynamic tensions of the cylindrical S400 floater in the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis  Min Tension  Max Tension  Mean Tension  Line Tension  Design Safety  Channel kN kN kN Limit (% of MBL) Factor Mooring Line1 1675.5 below:   Table 8.21 Mooring Line4 1697.  two  different  types  of  elements  have  been  introduced to represent the moorings and the risers as the slender members in the offshore  floating  system.22 56. these forces should also be checked with  the  acceptance  criteria  for  tension  limits  for  the  ULS  (Ultimate  Limit  State)  based  on  ISO  19901­7 (2005).5  above  will  represent  the  range  of  tension  force  along  the  mooring  line.11 41.  the  resulting  analysis  for  the  mooring  line  dynamic  tensions  is  slightly  different  from  the  results  of  the  analysis  for  the  mooring  line  dynamic  tension in Chapter 6.  The  summary  of  the  mooring  line  dynamic  tensions  of  the  cylindrical  S400  floater  in  the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis can be seen in Table 8.14 2.21 2.46 2144.62 55.94 2684.75 Mooring Line9 2068.21 Mooring Line3 1693.  These  elements  will  be  modeled  in  FEM  (Finite  Element  Model).57 43.34 Mooring Line12 1130.5.  ISO  19901­7  (2005)  has  mentioned  that  the  acceptance  criteria  for  tension  forces  for  the  Ultimate Limit States (ULS) should have a specified minimum safety factor higher than 1.41 42.8.67 8232.23 2.  The  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  applies  the  FEM  (Finite  Element  Model)  as  design  method.39 Mooring Line11 1195.67 10854.21 8689.68 42.17 10363.47 2699.79 Mooring Line6 10405.  However.83 8706.54 45.39 1.41 2.  The  simulation will be performed in time domain for ”3 hours +” build up.45 10265.

 two feasible configurations of production risers. The MBR for a 6”  riser is 1. Static condition  The  purpose  of  the  static  analysis  is  to  re‐check  two  6”  and  8”  feasible  configurations  of  production  risers  from  Chapter  7.  In  the  static  analysis  only  the  static  riser  configuration  with  and  without  the  vessel  offset  and  the  dynamic  analysis  of  the  entire  system  will  be  performed  by  combining  the  static  loads  with  dynamic  environmental  loads  based on the movements of the riser.  and Figure 8.14.  bending  moment  and  curvatures  for static and dynamic condition will be presented below:  A.11.  and Figure 8.76 m or in the curvature terms will be 0.10.  in  the  static  condition.  The maximum effective tension for the 8” production riser is 155 kN while  the minimum will be 26.  2.  the  system  geometry  and  the  sizing  of  riser  and  ancillary components based on the consideration of the hang off location and the location of  the touchdown point will be simulated in the static condition.13.    The  main  design  parameters  are  such  as  the  choice  of  riser  configuration. Bending Moment and Curvature  The bending moments for the 6”and 8” production risers can be seen in Figure 8.  In the riser analysis. 6” and 8”.  These results are quite good and any compression can be avoided.)    8-15 .58 kN.   Based  on  the  design  criterion.02 m or in the curvature terms this will be 0.  The  main  results  of  the  analysis  such  as  effective  tension.12.   These results are quite good and the curvature of the risers are less than 0. and Figure 8.  The  maximum  effective  tension  for  the  6”  production  riser  is  180  kN  while  the  minimum will be 32.  1.  The maximum bending moment and curvature for the 6” and 8” production risers are  found in the hang off position.  the  criteria  above  are  met  for  the  mooring  system  design  for  the  cylindrical  S400  floater.  the  minimum  bending  radius  (MBR) of a riser should be the same or less than the MBR at storage.13. The MBR for a 8” riser   is 2.57 (1/1.9.5 (1/2.14.ISO 19901­7 (2005) has also mentioned the line tension limit for intact condition in dynamic  analysis (FEM) method. and Figure 8. Effective tension  The  effective  tensions  for  the  6”and  8”  production  risers  can  be  seen  in  Figure  8. while the curvature for the 6”and 8” production risers can be seen in  Figure 8.  the  length  of  riser.08 kN.02).   Hence.76). It should have the line tension limit of 60% of the Minimum Breaking  Load (MBL) of the mooring line component.  The  range  of  values  for  the  effective  tension  for  the  8”  production  riser  is  slightly  different. from Chapter  7  are  checked  by  static  and  dynamic  analysis.  The results are quite good and still within allowable  limit.5 (Figure  8.

 9 : The static effective tension for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.    8-16 .    Figure 8.

 10 : The static effective tension for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.   Figure 8.                          8-17 .

 11 : The static bending moment for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.    Figure 8.   Figure 8. 12 : The static bending moment for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.    8-18 .

 14 : The static curvatures for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.   Figure 8.    Figure 8. 13 : The static curvatures for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.    8-19 .

    8-20 .  The diagram of displacement envelope curvatures for 6”and 8” production risers can be seen  in Figure 8. time domain dynamic analyses will be performed based on the final  static  configuration  in  order  to  calculate  the  global  dynamic  responses  of  the  system.16. B. and Figure 8.15.  the  results  of  these  analyses  such  as  the  dynamic  tensions  and  curvatures  should be checked against the design limits. 15 : The displacement envelope curvature for the 6” production riser   for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.      Figure 8. Dynamic condition  In the dynamic condition.  Furthermore.

  The  range  of  values  for  the  effective  tension  for  the  8”  production  riser  is  slightly  different.    The other results such as such as the dynamic tensions and curvatures can be seen below.  The  maximum  effective  tension  for  the  6”  production  riser  is  230  kN  while  the  minimum will be 31.   Figure 8.    1.  and Figure 8.37 kN.17.18.  These results are quite good and any compression can be avoided. Effective tension  The effective tension for  the 6”and 8” production risers can be seen in Figure 8. 16 : The displacement envelope curvature for the 8” production riser   for the Western Isle Field in the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.  The maximum effective tension for the 8” production riser is 200 kN while  the minimum will be 24.9 kN.      8-21 .

      8-22 . 17 : The dynamic effective tension for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field in  the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.   Figure 8.

21.76 m or in the curvature terms this will be 0.   Figure 8. 18 : The dynamic effective tension for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in  the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.  and Figure 8. while the curvatures for the 6”and 8” production risers can be seen  in Figure 8.  While. the minimum bending radius  (MBR)  of  the  riser  should  be  the  same  or  less  than  1. Hence the limiting MBR in the dynamic condition is 0.5  (1/2.02).76).57  (1/1.   Based on the design criterion.19. in the dynamic condition. Bending Moment and Curvature  The bending moments for the 6”and 8” production risers can be seen in Figure 8.20.  8-23 .38. Hence the limiting MBR in the dynamic condition is 0.5  times  that  of  the  MBR  at  storage.  The maximum bending moments and curvatures for the 6” and 8” production risers  are occur in the hang off position.02  m  or  in  is  the  curvature  terms  will  be  0. and Figure 8.22.33. The MBR for the 6”riser  is 1.  The results are quite good since the result are still  in the allowable limit.  the  MBR  for  the  8”  riser  is  2.    2.

22. 20 : The dynamic bending moment for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in  the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.  These  results  are  quite  good  since  the  curvature  of  the  risers  are  less  than  0.)    Figure 8. and Figure 8.21.    8-24 .      Figure 8. 19 : The dynamic bending moment for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field in  the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.3  (Figure 8.

      Figure 8.    Figure 8. 22 : The dynamic curvatures for the 8” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.    8-25 . 21 : The dynamic curvatures for the 6” production riser for the Western Isle Field in the  nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis.

 The nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis requires  a complete model of the floating offshore system including the cylindrical S400 floater. the 12  mooring  lines  and  the  feasible  riser  configurations  for  the  6”  and  8”  production  risers.   Two  kind  of  analyses.  Furthermore. Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation 9.  Chapter  6  (the  mooring  system  analysis). 7 and 8) in order to solve the problems as close to the real  condition  as  possible  with  regard  to  the  non  linear  system  where  the  frequency  domain  analysis is no longer valid to be used.  A  “3  hours  +”  build  up  time  will  be  used  in  the  dynamic  condition  because  the  time  domain  requires  a  proper  simulation  length  to  have  a  steady result.  moorings and risers be taken into account. Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO.  It  also  has  a  purpose  to  introduce  a  consistent  analytical  approach  that  ensures  the  higher  dynamic  interaction  between  the  floater.  the  results  from  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  have  also  been  compared  to  the  separated  analyses  for  each  component  in  the  discussion  of  the  analysis  results. the frequency domain analysis has been adopted in the  hydrodynamic  analysis  of  the  cylindrical  S400  floater  (Chapter  5)  as  a  simple  iterative  technique to solve the linear equation of motions to obtain a set of frequency dependent RAO  (Response Amplitude Operator) while the time domain analysis has been implemented in the  remains chapters (Chapters 6. Moreover.  Chapter  5  (the  floater  analysis). The simulation has been conducted in two simulation  schemes.c.  Frequency domain and time domain analysis have been implemented to solve the equation of  motions in the simulations.  static  and  dynamic  conditions.  the  decoupled  analysis  and  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  have  been  presented  in  this  thesis  in  order  to  quantify  the  coupling  effects  between  each  components  in  an  offshore  floating  system.1 Conclusions The  hydrodynamic  interaction  effects  and  dynamic  responses  dominate  the  major  consideration in the design of floating structures.     9-1 .  Separated  analyses  for  each  component  can  be  found  in  several  chapters.S.  Chapter  7  (the  risers  system  analysis) while Chapter 8 presents a complete model of the floating offshore system. Chapter 9 1 Conclusions and Further Studies M.

  Further.  these  results  are  presented with respect to all 6 DOF (surge.  Two  loading  conditions  are  chosen  in  this  analysis. The mooring system for a cylindrical S400 floater adopts the spread mooring  system without using a thruster to stay in the desired position. The change of GM from the ballast to fully loaded condition is as follows: the  metacentre height in the ballast condition (  =7.08) is higher than the metacentre height in  the  fully  load  condition  (   =6.  the  analysis  is  only  based  on  the  wave  loads  acting  on  the  floater as the most important contributor to derive the response of motion of the floater. However. the distance between the keel and the buoyancy centre    will be higher.  two  models  (the  body  model  and  the  station  keeping  model)  are  required  and  the  quasi‐static  design  has  been  applied  as  the  design  method  in  the  mooring  system  analysis. Hence.  It  is  important  to  predict  the  non  linear  damping  effects  in  the  design  because  the  mean  drift  forces  can  generate  large  amplitude  resonant  motions.  regular  waves  and  irregular  waves  as  environmental  loads  have  been  simulated in two loading conditions. pitch and yaw) as the response  of  the  floater. It is the main reason why the stability of a cylindrical S400  floater becomes lower than its position in the ballast condition. the positions of the floater in static equilibrium where the forces  of gravity and buoyancy are equal and acting in opposite directions in line with one another.  Based on the analysis results.  are presented.  In  SIMO.  The  present  mooring system solution is based on a maximum offset radius of 75 m. sway.   Further. top chain segments.72m).   The  transfer  function  between  waves  and  responses  or  the  RAO  (Response  Amplitude  Operator) and the mean wave (drift) force are also generated from the wave excitation in the  hydrodynamic analysis.  Furthermore. heave. each line consists of fairlead.   From the stability analysis. Since the   is higher  than  . This implies that the  Sevan  Floater  maybe  located  at  any  position  within  a  radius  of  75m  from  its  defined  zero  position.26). It consists of 12 mooring lines  which  are  distributed  in  3  clusters.  9-2 .  all  of  the  results  in  the  hydrodynamic analysis and the rigid body model of cylindrical S400 floater have been used  to  perform  the  time  domain  simulation  which  includes  the  moorings  system  by  using  the  software program SIMO in Chapter 6.  this  mooring  system  has  been  analyzed  by  using  SIMO  in  time  domain  analysis.  Moreover.  Wadam  and  Postresp). The floater hydrodynamic analysis is performed by using the integrated software  program  Hydro  D  which  is  related  to  several  support  software  programs  (Prefem.The  cylindrical  floater  hydrodynamic  analysis  as  a  decoupled  analysis  can  be  found  in  Chapter 5.  ballast  loading condition (z = 16. the non linear damping effects are also presented in this analysis in order to quantify  the  low  frequency  damping  from  an  expansion  of  the  mean  drift  force. The loading conditions have been defined based on the  z‐coordinate  at  the  waterline. the centre of gravity     will also move up and the distance  between the keel K and the centre of gravity      will be also higher. the cylindrical S400 floater  has good stability  since  0.    Furthermore. The RAO represents as the first order wave forces while the second  order  wave  forces  are  described as  the  mean  wave  (drift)  forces. upper  polyester  segment  and  lower  polyester  segment. waves  and currents.  These  mooring  lines  will  be  made  from  combination  of  chain and polyester rope.32m) and fully load loading condition (z = 20. roll.   The mooring system is important to hold the offshore floating system against winds. the    will be lower.  Beside  the  RAO  (Response  Amplitude  Operator)  and  the  mean  wave  (drift)  force.  anchor  chain  and  anchor.  It  happens  because  the  keel  position  will  move  down  when the ballast tanks are full. Two  types  of  waves.

 This force has  been  expressed  by  the  mooring  tension  that  will  also  be  influenced  by  horizontal  offset  values.  It  has  there  been  mentioned  that  the  acceptance  criteria  for tension  forces  for the Ultimate Limit States (ULS) should have a specified minimum safety factor around 2.   The  results  from  the  static  condition  have  been  used  as  the  final  static  body  position  and  mooring  line  tensions  while  the  results  from  the  static  condition  are  time  series  of  second  order wave forces.   Besides  the  mooring  system.   By  using  the  quasi‐static  design  method.       From the analysis results. The main purpose of this analysis is to find a feasible single arbitrary  configuration  for  each  of  the  6”  and  8”  production  risers.  The  results  from  the  static  condition  are  derived  without  variation  of  the  environmental  loads  then  it  has  been  taken  into account in the dynamic condition.  mooring  analysis  are  carried  out  in  two  conditions.  an  offshore  floating  body  also  has  the  riser  system  as  can  be  modeled as slender members.   The aim of the moorings analysis has been to ensure that the mooring system has adequate  capacity to generate a non‐linear restoring force the station keeping function.  These  environmental  load  data  have  been  based  on  the  return  period  combinations  for  100  years  waves  and  wind  criteria  and  10  years  current  criteria at ballast loading position (z = 16. the mooring line dynamic tensions and the  response motions of the cylindrical S400 floater.  The  horizontal  offset  values  of  the  cylindrical  S400  floater  has  been  established  in  a  quasi‐  static  “3  hours  +”  build  up  time  simulation. From this analysis.0  for intact condition when using a quasi‐static design method.32m).0. the wave drift damping forces. the horizontal representative offset values for a cylindrical S400  floater have been found which having maximum value around 22.  static  and  dynamic  conditions.  Furthermore.  Further.  the  wave. The analysis for the riser system is first done as a decoupled  analysis in this study.  The  riser  system  analysis  in  Chapter  7  will  also  be  performed  in  time  domain  analysis  in  RIFLEX  for  two  simulation  9-3 .   In  order  to  calculate  the  mooring  tension  and  horizontal  offset  value. the response motion has been used  to define the horizontal offset of the cylindrical S400 floater. This not only for WF (Wave Frequency) mooring line tension  or LF (Low Frequency) mooring line tension but also for the combination of the LF and WF  mooring line tension. These  values will influence the design of the other components in the offshore floating system such  as moorings system and risers system.82 m ~23 m. Further.  the  moorings  tension  arising  due  to  the  floater  motions have been calculated.Hence.   The horizontal offset values of an offshore floating system are very important to determine  the global performance of the floater structure in the survival or operation conditions. it comprises the dynamic motion analysis of the moored structure and computations  of  mooring  line  tension  based  on  the  extreme  position  of  the  floater  and  the  static  load‐ excursion  characteristic  of  mooring  system. the maximum range of tension forces along the mooring lines are  found to meet  the criteria of the mooring system design for the cylindrical S400 floater and it  is  also  found  that  the  design  safety  factor  for  the  mooring  system  is  higher  than  2.  The  acceptance  criteria  for  tension  limits  for  the  ULS  (Ultimate  Limit  State)  are  based  on  ISO  19901­7  (2005).  wind  and  current  have  been  considered  in  the  analysis.  the  representative  horizontal  offset  values  are  derived  from  the  total  global  motion  response  (the  total  frequency  motions  for  surge).

58kN. The maximum tension for the 8” production riser is 155kN while  the minimum will be 26. static and dynamic conditions. The riser system design for the offshore Western  Isles  Field  has  real  challenges  since  it  is  located  in  relatively  shallow  water  condition  (~170m) and also a harsh environment.  The  maximum  effective  tension  for  the  6”  production  riser  is  180kN  while  the  minimum will be 32.  the  far  and  the  near  conditions. Furthermore.94kN. Harsh environmental loading will also give impact on  the dynamic riser behavior.  9-4 .  In  dealing  with  these challenges. Multiple buoyancies have functions to reduce the overall tension at  the upper region and improve the curvature at the lower region while a heavy riser has been  used  to  reduce  the  free  floating  loads  from  the  riser. effective tension.  The riser system design will be introduced with a multiple buoyancy at the hog bend position  and heavy weight riser.  the  top  angle  positions  are  less  than  15  deg  while  the  seabed  clearances are around 5 to 15 m at the lowest point in the sag bend area. The results for the  effective  tension  are  quite  good  and  any  compression  is  avoided.  The  riser  itself  should  always be in tension because compression along the riser should be avoided as it will cause  (birdcaging and) buckling which may affect the integrity of the riser adversely and reduce the  service  life. wind and current have been considered in  the  analysis.  Further. the external influence from the environmental condition. this riser system design will be checked by static and dynamic analysis.  The  maximum  effective  tension  for  the  6”  production riser is 240kN while the minimum will be 23. the wave.  A  Lazy  Wave  riser  configuration  has  been  chosen  with  some  modifications in order to have a riser system which has robust solution and economic design.  These  environmental  load  data  have  been    based  on  the  return  period  combinations for 100 years waves and wind criteria and 10 years current criteria at ballast  loading position (z = 16. bending radius and seabed clearance and  clashing.   The  main  parameters  are  such  as  the  choice  of  riser  configurations. Besides.08kN. The maximum tension for the  8” production riser is 220kN while the minimum will be 10kN. The main requirements for the result of the analysis  are such as the top angle position. The main challenges that will be faced in the design  process come from the relatively large vessel motions and vessel offset due to limited space  between the the FPSO and the seabed.   The effective tensions in the dynamic analysis for the 6” and 8” production risers are slightly  different  than  found  in  the  static  analysis.  This  makes  the  configuration  more  stable.32m).   The purpose of the static analysis has been to determine the acceptable system layout for the  riser based on the input parameters while the dynamic analysis has the purposes to calculate  the global dynamic responses of the system due to the environmental loadings based on the  final static configuration. the application of flexible riser (compliant riser) will be very suitable in this  offshore  floating  system. In the static  analysis  only  the  static  riser  configuration  with  or  without  vessel  offset  will  be  considered  while  the  dynamic  analysis  of  the  entire  system  will  be  performed  by  combining  the  static  loads with the dynamic environmental loads based on the movement of the riser.   From  the  static  analysis.  the configuration itself will govern the pliancy requirement and the riser system itself should  accommodate  two  extreme  configurations.conditions.  the  length  of  riser.  the  system geometry and the sizing of riser and ancillary components based on the consideration  of the hangoff and touchdown positions.

  The  smaller the bending radius. the greater is the material flexibility (as the radius of curvature  decreases. Floater motions  The global motion response of the cylindrical S400 floater is represented by the total  frequency motions as a combination of the low frequency motions (LF motions) and  the  wave  frequency  motions  (WF  motions).  static  and  dynamic  conditions. the curvature increases). mooring and risers have been obtained.  Furthermore.  The  SIMA  Marintek  computer  has  been  used  in  this  study  because  it  has  the  capability  to  integrate  the  cylindrical  S400  floater.  this  complete  model  simulated  the  static  and  dynamic  conditions  in  responding  to  environmental loading due to wind. The dynamic analysis has been simulated for “3 hours +” build up  time.     Following the separated analyses for each component in the previous chapters (Chapters 5.  a single complete computer model that included the cylindrical floater.  In  the  dynamic  condition.   Further.  the  curvature  of  the  riser  show  the  capability  of  the  riser  to  be  bent  until  its  limits  without  kinking  or  damaging. Moreover. the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis ensures  a truly integrated system.The  bending  moments  and  the  curvatures  of  the  riser  show  the  performance  of  the  riser.5s) for the wave and the NPD  Spectrum  for  the  wind  while  the  currents  have  been  based  on  the  current  profile  on  the  Western Isle Offshore field.6  and 7). The curvatures of the risers  are  less  than  0.  The  analysis  is  performed  in  time  domain  for  two  conditions.   From  the  static  analysis.32m). 3D bar/cable elements represent the mooring while 3D beam elements represent  the flexible riser.   The static equilibrium position and the initial condition for the dynamic simulation have been  generated  in  the  static  condition.  which  depends  on  its  minimum  bending  radius.3. As an integrated dynamic system.  Moreover. the environmental forces on the floater induce the  motions which have been introduced in a detail FEM (Finite Element Model) of the moorings  and risers. These environmental load data were  based on the return period combinations for 100 years waves and wind criteria and 10 years  current criteria at ballast loading position (z = 16. The environmental data were based  on the Jonswap double peaked spectrum (Hs=15.  moorings  and  risers  as  one  complete  model. The FEM model of the cylindrical S400 floater originated  from WADAM/HydroD. The summary of  the results between the decoupled analysis and the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis will  be presented as follow:  A.1 below:  9-5 .  the  results  for  bending  moment  and  the  curvature  for  6”  and  8”  production risers are found still to be within the allowable limit.  The  difference in the analysis results can be seen in Table 9.5  in  the  static  analysis  while  in  the  dynamic  analysis.  Not  only  the  accurate  prediction  of  the  responses  of  the  overall  system  but  also  the  individual responses of the floater.  the  total  global  motion  responses  of  the  cylindrical  S400  floater  in  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  are  slightly  different  from  the  total  global  motion  responses  of  the  cylindrical  S400  floater  for  the  total  frequency  motions  in  the  decoupled  dynamic  analysis.  the  curvatures  of  the  risers are less than 0.6m and Tp=15. Thus. waves and currents.  the  results  of  the  nonlinear‐ coupled dynamic analysis have been presented in time series as the responses of the system  due to the dynamic loading conditions. moorings and  risers  with use of SIMA has been introduced in Chapter 8 as a nonlinear‐coupled dynamic  analysis. the application of the FEM has not only been used for moorings  and risers but also for the floater.

Min Max Mean Std.27 ‐5.  Hence.55 Sway YG translation Total Motion ‐0.  moorings  and  risers  as  an  offshore  floating  system  in  SIMA  by  using  the  dynamic  FEM  (Finite  Element Model) as design method.42 1.27 0. These affect the low frequency motions  specifically  and  also  the  total  frequency  global  motion  responses  of  the  moored  structure.00 ‐0.61 0.35 ‐9.20 ‐2. the horizontal offset value can be established from the total frequency global  motions of the moored structure.82 Roll XL rotation Total Motion ‐1.30 0.   By  using  FEM.08 ‐3.82 7.  moorings  and  riser)  as  an  offshore  floating  system.  The  mechanical  characteristics  of  the  riser  and  the  mean  current  forces  on  the riser may affect the  horizontal restoring  force the system which then  influences  the total frequency global motions of the moored structure.84 0.73 8.50 5.69 5.37 3.14 ‐0. : The Summary of The Global Motion Response of A Cylindrical S400 Floater in the  Nonlinear‐Coupled Dynamic Analysis and the Station Keeping System Modeling results as found from  SIMO (Chapter 6)  The Global Motion Response in Total  The Global Motion Response in Total Frequency  Frequency Motions (nonlinear­coupled  Channel Motions (Chapter 6)  dynamic analysis)  Min Max Mean Std. It is clear that a cylindrical S400 floater could experience  significant  surge  motions  due  to  the  surge  excitation  from  the  second  order  force  such  as  the  mean  wave  (drift)  forces  and  slowly‐varying  forces  from  waves  or  currents.48 ‐0.35 Yaw ZG rotation Total Motion ‐7.47 5.      9-6 .17 1.07 ‐22. Table 9.  In  Chapter  6.50 32.22 3.63 0.   Further.  not  only  a  static  configuration  will  be  established  with  the  nonlinear  analysis model but the effect of line dynamics on the platform motion will be included  in  the  simulation.09 ‐0.89 0.1.00 1.05 ‐9.73 Heave ZG translation Total Motion ‐9.31     These  different  responses  are  generated  by  the  different  approaches  to  design  modelling.  the  cylindrical  S400  floater  and  12  mooring  lines  are  modelled  in  SIMO  as  a  station  keeping  system.  the  overall  behavior  of  the  floater  is  influenced  not  only  from  the  hydrodynamic  behavior  of  the  hull  and  mooring  system  but  also  from  the  dynamic  behavior  of  the  risers  because  this  analysis  comprises  a  single  complete  computer  model  (a  cylindrical  floater.03 1.   Another  reason  comes  from  the  influence  of  the  riser  structure.19 ‐9.87 0.26 0.  This  system  uses  the  Quasi‐static  design method while the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis (Chapter 8) comprises  a  single  complete  computer  model  that  includes  a  cylindrical  floater. Table 9. Surge XG translation Total Motion 32.15 0.41 2.00 3.01 ‐8.78 Pitch YL rotation Total Motion 0.61 0.11 33.02 4.1 shows that the horizontal representative  offset  value  for  the  cylindrical  S400  floater  has  been  found  with  a  maximum  value  around 33m in the nonlinear‐coupled dynamic analysis while the value is 23m in the  decoupled dynamic analysis.80 0.00 ‐4. Dev.  this  technique  ensures  that  the  higher  contributions  from  the nonlinear dynamic behavior are included.  In  the  nonlinear‐ coupled  dynamic  analysis.66 ‐0. Dev.00 ‐15.

34 Mooring Line 12 1130.06 46.47 10762.30 Mooring Line 10 1847. This system uses the Quasi‐static design method while the nonlinear‐ coupled dynamic analysis (Chapter 8) comprises a single complete computer model  that  includes  the  cylindrical  floater.52 1426.85 1703.21 8689.36 15.87 3791.21 2.85 10980.34 1607.21 Mooring Line 3 1693.91 1.95 3721.77 2.  moorings  and  risers  as  an  offshore  floating  system in SIMA by using the dynamic FEM (Finite Element Model) as design method.70 5. In Chapter 6.45 Mooring Line 6 763.00 Mooring line 2 1040.91 2.97 45.31 2220.81     These different results are generated by the different design modelling.77 Mooring Line 8 10069.99 2420.80 9547.  Table 9.40 1750.94 2684.   9-7 .18 Mooring Line 5 764.17 Mooring Line 12 1071.35 4003.37 15.89 6.37 Mooring Line 7 755.05 2.47 2691.34 57.79 8067.22 Mooring line 2 1676.79 Mooring Line 6 10405.62 55.55 8691.   By using FEM.32 8703.60 2.15 Mooring Line 4 1050.2.39 1.59 6.31 3001.11 41.96 45.66 45.01 9634.58 2.11 8822.04 1.34 5.34 2211.74 1586.81 1424.53 19.80 3530.8 4.47 2699.07 3059.27 8967.41 2.54 45.23 2.55 10581.41 Mooring Line 10 1061.82 2521.06 1724.  the  cylindrical  S400  floater  and  12  mooring  lines  are  modelled in  SIMO  as  a  station  keeping system.87 5.46 2144.28 50.14 2.88 49.02 1.75 Mooring Line 9 2068.85 57.36   The Decoupled Analysis for  Station Keeping System Modeling  (Chapter 6) Line Tension Limit  Design Safety  Channel Min tension kN Max tension kN Mean tension kN (% of MBL) Factor Mooring Line 1 1035.15 2.68 42.61 5.83 8706.67 8232.21 Mooring Line 4 1697. Mooring line dynamic tension   Mooring  line  dynamic  tensions  in  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  are  still  within  the  allowable  limit  although  the  safety  factors  are  slightly  different  from  the  mooring  line  dynamic  tensions  in  the  decoupled  dynamic  analysis  (as  found  from  Chapter 6).57 43.67 10854.87 1418.33 5.36 2.41 45.22 56.61 19.19 2440. B.71 2535.36 19.17 10363. the line tensions of the slender members (moorings) will be increased  due to the dynamic behavior of the slender members.27 20.48 3581.08 Mooring Line 8 754.2 below.   The differences in the analysis results can be seen in Table 9.59 8357.03 Mooring Line 9 1060.83 2.29 Mooring Line 11 1068.84 3824.32 18.45 10265.75 Mooring Line 7 10073. : The Summary of Mooring Line Dynamic Tensions in The Nonlinear‐Coupled Dynamic  Analysis and Mooring Line Dynamic Tensions Results as Found from SIMO (Chapter 6)  The in the Nonlinear­Coupled Dynamic Analysis for  Station Keeping System Modeling  (Chapter 8) Line Tension Limit  Design Safety  Channel Min tension kN Max tension kN Mean tension kN (% of MBL) Factor Mooring Line 1 1675.39 Mooring Line 11 1195.80 8153.22 10407.18 1418.23 2686.46 10976.10 18.02 Mooring Line 3 1048.41 42.21 Mooring Line 5 10235.

The acceptance criteria for tension limits in the ULS (Ultimate Limit State) as based  on ISO19901­7 (2005) should have a specified minimum safety factor higher than 1. the maximum effective tension for the 6” production riser is  230 kN while the minimum will be 31.  The  main  design  parameters.  such  as  the  choice  of  riser  configuration.58 kN.   The effective tension in the decoupled analysis:  In  the  static  condition.  these  results  are  not  much  different in the static and dynamic analysis.37 kN and the maximum effective tension for  the 8” production riser is 200 kN while the minimum will be 24.08 kN and the maximum effective tension for  the 8” production riser is 155 kN while the minimum will be 26. these results are still shown to  be within allowable limits for all main requirements. the system geometry and the sizing of riser and ancillary component  will  be  in  same  parameter  for  both  of  the  analyses.                   9-8 .   The  results  from  the  analyses  for  the  effective  tensions  are  quite  good  since  any  compression can be avoided.      In the dynamic condition.  Not  only  these  parameters  but  also the position of hang off and touchdown will be put in the same locations. Riser analysis  In  this  analysis.  two  feasible  riser  production  riser  configurations  of  6”  and  8”  are  checked  by  the  nonlinear‐coupled  dynamic  analysis  and  the  decoupled  dynamic  analysis.9 kN.  the  length of riser. The seabed clearance is around  5‐15 m on the lowest point in the sag bend area for both analyses.08 kN and the maximum effective tension for  the 8” production riser is 155 kN while the minimum will be 26.58 kN.  the  maximum  effective  tension  for  the  6”  production  riser  is  180 kN while the minimum will be 32.      The effective tension in the nonlinear­coupled dynamic analysis:  In  the  static  condition.   The  main  requirements  for  the  results  of  the  analysis  such  as  top  angle  position.  effective  tension.  After  the  results  are  compared.  the  maximum  effective  tension  for  the  6”  production  riser  is  180 kN while the minimum will be 32.67  for intact condition by using dynamic analysis FEM method while it should be higher  than 2.  bending  radius  and  seabed  clearance  and  clashing  are  compared  between  these  analyses.      In the dynamic condition. the maximum effective tension for the 6” production riser is  240 kN while the minimum will be 23.94 kN and the maximum effective tension for  the 8” production riser is 220 kN while the minimum will be 10 kN.   C.   The top angle positions in the static condition for both analyses are less than 15 deg  while in the dynamic condition are less than 45 deg.0 for the intact condition by using the Quasi‐static method. Moreover.

     Sensitivity analyses  Sensitivity analyses for different wave periods and vessel headings should have been  performed  to  check  the  effect  of  variations  in  the  FSU’s  motion  characteristics.  Sensitivity analyses of the variation of the mass in the ancillary components such as  the ballast modules and the buoyancy modules should also be performed.9.                                        9-9 .2 Further Studies Further studies are needed to improve the offshore floating design:   Additional limit states design analysis  The analysis should be performed not only in ULS (Ultimate Limit State) but also in  other limit states designs such as ALS (Accidental Limit State) and FLS (Fatigue Limit  State).

 28‐46  Chakrabarti. October 2010.  Volume 1.  and  Yo  Ho. Offshore Technology Conference. S.  Australia. Brasil  Chaudhury. D. (2005): “Handbook of Offshore Engineering”.  edited  by  Young  C  Kim. Oxford.   Cummins.  Elsevier. Houston. D.  W. Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO. USA.  Oxford.. Recommended Practice 2RD First Edition. edited by Subrata Chakrabarti. Texas. A.  R  and  Larsen. C. Singapore.D. Section 24 Offshore Structure.  Braestrup.  Bai..W.  (1962):  “The  impulse  response  function  and  ship  motions”. May 1‐4. Offshore Technology Conference. The open mechanics journal. No.  Construction  and Certification”. Lang.  . USA. UK. 2.  Department  of  Energy  (1990):  “Offshore  Installations:  Guidance  on  Design. UK. Report 1661. C. World Scientific Publishing Co.  Qiang  (2005):  “Subsea  Pipelines  and  Risers”.  (2008):  “Challenges  for  a  Total  System  Analysis  on  Deepwater  Floating  Systems”..  Det  Norske  Veritas  (2010):  “Global  Performance  Analysis  of  Deepwater  Floating  Structures”.  Chakrabarti.. 12084‐MS.  Kidlington.  Yong  and  Bai.  June.  Connaire.   Chandwani.. david taylor Model Basin. Houston. 2008. Recommended Practice. Texas. Ltd.  Departement  of  the Navy. University of Brasil. December 8‐9. USA. Washington. Mikael W et al (2005): “Design and Installation of Marine Pipelines”.  S. D.  (2010):  “Handbook  of  Coastal  and  Ocean  Engineering”.  Riser  and  Moorings”. May 5‐8. DNV‐RP‐F205..  I  (1997):  “Design  of  Flexible  Risers”. American Petroleum Institute.  S.  C. Rio de Janeiro.  (2000):”Coupled  Dynamic  Analysis  of  Platforms.  G. Document: ADIL‐DWI‐DV‐ BOD‐0001. MCS (2003) : “Closely‐Moored Floating Bodies in a  Production and Offloading Facility – Requirement for and Application of a Coupled Analysis  Capability”. Galvin.S. Blackwell. Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation   API  (1998):  “Design  of  Risers  for  Floating  Production  Systems  (FPSs)  and  Tension‐Leg  Platforms (TLPs)”.  Workshop  on  Subsea  Pipelines. Elsevier. 15378‐MS.  Dana  Petroleum  (E&P)  Limited  (2011):  “Western  Isles  Development  Project  Basis  of  Design”.c.   Chakrabarti. 1 References M. Pte. October 1962.

  D.  OTC  10809. Texas. M.  Det  Norske  Veritas  (2001):  “Dynamic  Risers”.). Offshore Technology Conference.  (MacDermott  Intl.  B..  Offshore  Standard..  S.  OTC  10809.  Hoffmam.  Faltinsen.shipmotions.  May  3‐6.  Hung. Proc. May 26‐31.  Y. London Centre for Marine Technology.  and  Nielsen..  J.  A. and Massie. OTC 6724.Houston.  Karunakaran.  Houston.  M..  International  Standard  (2005):  “Petroleum  and  natural  gas  industries  —  Specific  requirements  for  offshore  structures  ‐  Part  7:  Station  keeping  systems  for  floating  offshore  structures and mobile offshore units”.  .  and  Larsen.  Stavanger.  Offshore  Technology  Conference. pp. J. Texas.  Det Norske Veritas (2004): “Position Mooring”. Vol. Cambridge University  Press. (Delft University course material).  University  of  Stavanger. Conf. D.  Hanoge.  Ismail. A.. O. Norway. A.)  and  Chandwani. Switzerland.  R.. F. O.Det Norske Veritas (2008): “Sesam User Manual for Wadam – Wave Analysis by Diffraction  and Morison Theory”. DNV (1999): ”Efficient Integrated Analysis methods for  Deepwater  Platforms”.). (1990): “Sea Loads on Ships and Offshore Structures”. USA‐Australia.Houston. USA.Houston. Texas. (1988): “The Formulation of Mean Drift Forces and Moments  for Floating Bodies”.. 3. Texas. Stavanger. J..  Journée.  Offshore  Technology  Conference. E.  Løken.  Kim.  Inc.  R..  D. First Edition. W.  O.  International  Standard  (2005):  “Petroleum  and  natural  gas  industries  —  Specific  requirements  for  offshore  structures  ‐  Part  1:  Metocean  design  and  operating  considerations”.  Engseth.  3‐6  May.OTC  20578.  (Zentech)  (1991):  “The  Design  of  Flexible  Marine  Riser  in  Deep  and  Shallow ware”. Switzerland.  (Wellstream  Corp. M..  T.  M. USA.  C. ISO 19901‐1. E..  3‐6  May. W. University College London.nl.  Offshore  Technology  Conference..  DNV‐OS‐F201.M. Tapir. on Behaviour of Offshore Structures (BOSS).. Sødahl.  P. S.H.  (HMC  Offshore  Corp.  and  Kim. 1357‐ 1371. Japan. and Taylor R.  (1988):  “Efficient  Method  for  Analysis  of  Flexible  Risers”.  N..  University  of  Stavanger.  (2010):  “Pipeline  and  Riser  Compendium”. Offshore Standard. ISBN 1‐880653‐58‐3. (Technip) and Luppi. (University College Galway) (1988): “Comparison of Dynamic Response  of  Alternate  Flexible  Riser  Product”. J.  OTC  5796.   Gudmestad. of the Int.  Bech... (2001): “Offshore Hydromechanics”. DNV‐OS‐E301.  January  2001. M. Hagen. Norway. USA. Geneva.  (2010):  Marine  Technology  and  Design  Compendium. UK. Seal Engineering SA (2010): “Challenges of Flexible  Riser  System  in  Shallow  Waters”. Geneva..  (Marine  Computation  Services)  and  McNamara.. Kitakyushu. http://www.  (2002):”  Hull/Mooring/Riser  Coupled  Dynamic  Analysis  of  a  Tanker‐based  Turret‐Moored  FPSO  in  Deepwater”.  A. Delft  University of Technology.. USA. 6‐9 May. Trondheim. N.  O’Brien. Norway. Høvik.  International  Offshore  and  Polar  Engineering Conference. October  2004. Norway  Karve..  K.

   Newman. Fylling.  H.  (1969):  “Introduction  to  the  Mechanics  of  a  Continuous  Medium”.  Netherlands.  Volume  I‐A. Trondheim. Trondheim. (1975): “Low‐Frequency Phenomena Associated with Vessels Moored at Sea.  SINTEF. Trondheim.  Ormberg. Trondheim.  .  .Machado.  SM Document Id: 54850‐DAN‐J‐RA‐0001  Pinkster.  Symp. F.  Marintek (2007): “Marintek Report: Mimosa 5. N–7491 Trondheim.  Delft.6. Norway  Newman.  Int. H.Box  4125 Valentinlyst NO‐7450. (1963): “First‐ and Second‐Order Forces on a Cylinder Submerged Under a Free  Surface. E..  Cambridge. H. 451‐72.  Ormberg.  Offshore  Technology.O. ISBN 82‐90240‐14‐7. December.  M. Norway. Latin America Oils Show.  (1998):  “Coupled  Analysis  of  Floater  Motion  and  Moorings  Dynamics  for  a  Turret‐Moored  Ship”.  Mollestad. New York. Norway..  Norway. A.  and  Larsen.   Malvern.  (1983):  "Techniques  for  Static  and  Dynamic  Solution  for  Nonlinear  Finite  Element Problems".  (1980):  “Dynamic  Production  Riser  on  Enchova  Field  Offshore Brazil”.  rev:  1”.. SINTEF. Brazil.  SINTEF.55‐67.Box  4125  Valentinlyst NO‐7450. Lysaker. P. D. N. J. pp.. (1986): “Marine Hydrodynamics”.  (1998)  :  ”Efficient  Analysis  of  Mooring  System  using De‐coupled and Coupled Analysis”.. N. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Ship.  (1998). London: Mechanical Engineering Publications Ltd.  Ogilvie.... ed. Res. Price.  and  Steinkjer  O.Box  4125 Valentinlyst NO‐7450.  8th  International  Conference  on  the  Behaviour  of  Off‐Shore  Structure  (BOSS’97).  J.O. Norway. OMAE 1998‐0351. J.  E. 3.  L.  Marintek  (2010):  “RIFLEX  ‐  User  Manual  Finite  Element  Formulation”. K. Norwegian  University Of Science And Technology.. Department Of Structural Engineering. I. Rio de Janeiro.  Prentice‐ Hall.  Society of Petroleum Engineers  ournal.O. Norway.   Marintek  (2010):  “RIFLEX  ‐  Theory  Manual  Finite  Element  Formulation”.  Omberg.  P.. G.  pp.  E.     PhysE Ltd (2005): “HSE Research Report 392: Wave mapping in UK waters”  PhysE  Ltd  (2010):  “Metocean  Criteria  for  Western  Isles  (UK  Block  210/24)”. R.  H. 4. Slowly Varying Forces on Vessel in Irregular Waves.  SINTEF. J.  R‐393‐10  F2.7 – User’s Documentation”. 16.  NORSOK Standard (2007): “Actions and Actions Effects – N003”. 487‐94. USA.  P. Standard Norway.  Maruo. (1997): ” Coupled Analysis of Vessel  Motions  and  Mooring  and  Riser  System  Dynamics”.  OMAE  1997. Offshore Brazil Conference.  In Proc. Dynamics of Marine Vehicles and Structures in Waves.  N. J.  Vol  20.  Z. (1974): “Second Order.  Sødahl. (1960): “The Drift of a Body Floating in waves”.  Marintek  (2008):  “SIMO  ‐  Theory  Manual  Version  3. T. Larsen.O.  P. N.  L. 182‐6. and Sødahl..  . Bishop  & W. 1‐10..  and  Dumay.Box  4125 Valentinlyst NO‐7450.  K.  Appl  Ocean  Res. Fluid Mech.

  Offshore  Technology  Conference. STF80 A048052.  and  van  Oortmerssen.  (1977):  Computation  of  the  First‐  and  Second– Order  Wave  Forces  on  Oscillating  Bodies  in  Regular  Waves.  E. Maritime Research  Institute Netherlands‐Wageningen. Texas. (2005): ”Dynamic Behaviour of Mooring Lines”.  G. University of Bristol.navy. 2002:   http://web.   Wichers.  Sclavounos..  (2004):  “Simplified  double  peak  spectral  model  for  ocean  waves”.  R. March  1987. Berkeley. (1987): “The vertical wave drift forces on floating bodies”.  A. USA. OTC 4813.  Remseth.  H. 54850‐SMA‐X‐XX‐####  Ship Hydrostatics... J.mil/~me/tsse/NavArchWeb/1/module7/basics. Houston.                . 54850‐SMA‐J‐RA‐0010. Division  of  Structural  Mechanics.  Second  Int.  K. J.  The  Norwegian  Institute  of  Technology..  Numerical  Ship  Hydrodynamics.  SINTEF.  M.  pp. H. N.  University  of  Trondheim. Elsevier Science Publisher B.  Berkeley:  University Extension Publication.  Van den Boom.Pinkster.  Salvesen.. D.  136‐56..nps. Trondheim.  J.  Sevan  Marine  (2011):  “Western  Isles  Development  Project  (WIDP)  FPSO  ‐  FEED  Study  ‐ Riser Analysis Report”. Amsterdams..  ed.  J.  Sevan  Marine  (2011):  “Western  Isles  Development  Project  (WIDP)  FPSO  ‐  FEED  Study  ‐ Mooring Analysis Report”.  In  Proc.htm#  Torsethaugen.  Wehausen  &  N. May 7‐9.. University of California..  W..  (1984):  “On  the  Low‐Frequency  Hydrodynamic  Damping  Forces  Acting  on  Offshore  moored  Vessel”.  V. SINTEF Fisheries and Aquaculture. (1978): “Nonlinear Static and Dynamic Analysis of Space Structures”. 2nd  International Workshop on Water Waves and Floating Bodies.  and  Huijsmans..  Norway.  J. USA.  Conf. Netherlands. S.V. P.

Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO.c.S. Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation A. Appendix A 1 Response Amplitude Operator (RAO) M. Response Amplitude Operator for Surge (0-90°)                                 A-1 .

            A-2 .

          A-3 .

                                                A-4 .

B. Response Amplitude Operator for Sway (0-90°)         A-5 .

          A-6 .

                                                A-7 .

                                                  A-8 .

Response Amplitude Operator for Heave (0-90°)         A-9 .C.

        A-10 .

        A-11 .

                                                  A-12 .

D. Response Amplitude Operator for Roll (0-90°)                           A-13 .

          A-14 .

        A-15 .

                                                  A-16 .

E. Response Amplitude Operator for Pitch (0-90°)           A-17 .

          A-18 .

                                                                  A-19 .

                                                  A-20 .

F. Response Amplitude Operator for Yaw (0-90°)                         A-21 .

          A-22 .

                                                                  A-23 .

                              A-24 .

Wave Drift Force for Surge (0-90°)                                         B-1 . Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation A. Appendix B 1 Wave Drift Force M. Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO.S.c.

                              B-2 .

                                                                  B-3 .

                                                B-4 .

Wave Drift Force for Sway (0-90°)                                                                 B-5 .B.

            B-6 .

                                                                  B-7 .

                      B-8 .

Appendix C 1 System Description SIMO M. Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation '************************************************************  SYSTEM DESCRIPTION SIMO  '************************************************************  'txsys.11    25.c. Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO.0  '**************************************************   ENVIRONMENT DATA SPECIFICATION  '**************************************************       Env.0  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   WAVE DIRECTION PARAMETERS  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  '  wadir1   expo1   ndir1    180       4       11  '************************************************************  CURRENT  SPECIFICATION  '************************************************************  ' Chcurr     L_extern   Cu        0  ' Ncur    1  ' Curvel  Curdir  Curlev    0.0     1.81  1. 3 lines        'LENUNI TIMUNI MASUNI GRAV  RHOW  RHOA   m      s      Mg     9.S.6     180    ‐100  '************************************************************  WIND SPECIFICATION  '************************************************************  ' CHWI   Wi  'iwitype     5  'widir   zref  alphwi winref gamma(dummy) fri   180    10.       .00125  'DEPTH  DIRSLO   SLOPE      170.002  '************************************************************  BODY DATA SPECIFICATION  '************************************************************  'CHBDY  s400  C-1 .0   14.   . Conditions   ‐‐‐‐‐‐oo‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  '************************************************************   IRREGULAR WAVE SPECIFICATION  '************************************************************  '  CHIRWA   Wa  '  IWASP1    IWADR1    IWASP2   IWADR2        24       1       0       0  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   WAVE SPECTRUM WIND  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  '  siwahe   tpeak       10.025 0.

000     0.000     1.000      0. 2 lines      'dli1       dli2       dli3       dli4       dli5       dli6   9.000    0.000      0.000     0.000      0.00000      0.000      0.000  '============================================================  LINEAR DAMPING  '============================================================  'txdmpl.00000      0.000          0.000     0.33  '============================================================  QUADRATIC CURRENT COEFFICIENTS  '============================================================  'txc2co.000e3     0.000     1.000    0.500e4     0. 2 lines      'nc2dir  ic2sym  istrip    rltot      rlori     7       2       0        0.00e‐4     0.000      0.000         0.000     0.000      0.000      0.000      0.000      0.500e6    '============================================================  QUADRATIC DAMPING  '============================================================  'txdmpl.000     0.3703E+05  0.000      0.7069E+05 0.000     0.000     ‐.000   ‐.000      0.'txbdy.00000      0.5312E+08  0.000      0.000      0.000      0.000     3.90e‐02    0.000     0.000    0.000      0.000      0.000     2.000      0.90e‐02   0.000      0.000      0.000      0.1563E+06  0.000      0.400e4    0.500e4     0.000      0.000     3.000     0. 2 lines   Simplified   wave ‐ current interaction  ' icof    1  ' nwadd    2  ' wdper wd11 wd12    13    0.000    0.000      0.000      0.000      0.000      0.000     4.000      0.000     1.5312E+08  0.000      0.000     0.000    1.000      0.00e‐4     0.000      1.000         0.000      0.000      0.33    16    0.000      0.000     0. 2 lines      'xcog    ycog    zcog    0.20e‐02    0.000     0.00000      0.880  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   MASS COEFFICIENTS  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  '   rm        rixx       riyx       riyy       rizx       rizy       rizz   0.00000  '============================================================  BODY MASS DATA  '============================================================  'txmass.000      0.000    0.6329E+06  0.000      0.000         0. 3 lines  txbdy  txbdy  txbdy  'IBDTYP             2  '============================================================  BODY LOCATION DATA  '============================================================  '  Xglob        Yglob        Zglob        Phi          Theta         Psi    0.000     4.000    0.6329E+06  0.3703E+05  0.000    9.6343E+06  0.20e‐2    0.000      0.33  0.000      0.000      0.000     0.000     0.000     0.3421E+08  0.00e‐4     0. 2 lines      'dqi1        dqi2       dqi3       dqi4       dqi5       dqi6   1.00000      0.000     0.000    2.000    0.3421E+08  0.000      0.7238E+08  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   ADDED MASS ZERO  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  '  amz1       amz2       amz3       amz4       amz5       amz6   0.000      0.6343E+06  0.000      0.000      0.000    0.000    0.         0.000      0.  ' dir      dof1     dof2     dof3    dof4      dof5     dof6     0        500       0         0       0     ‐4000        0          15        483     129         0    1035     ‐3864        0    30        433     250         0    2000     ‐3464        0    45        354     354         0    2828     ‐2828        0  C-2 .500e6  '============================================================   WAVE DRIFT DAMPING  '============================================================  'txwadd.33  0.000      0.000     4.400e4     0.000      0.000      0.000      0.

00     21.       10.000    0.00     0.000     0.00     0.000      0.000      0.0000        16        75.00  ‐20.00  ‐15.0000        11        50.000      0.27     15.0000        19        90.68     0.000      0.00  ‐10.000      0.000      0.000      0.000      0.35     1.000      0.00   ‐5.000      0.0000         9        40.71     0.000      0.0000        18        85.209440         2       0.0000         4        15.285599  C-3 .000      0.00     90      0.000      0.251327         7       0.00     45      0.59     0.17     0.60     0.35     0.3864E+05  0.00       30      1.0000        14        65.00       15      1.000      0.241661         6       0.0000        13        60.00  ' dir      dof1     dof2     dof3    dof4      dof5     dof6      0      1.00  ‐21.4441E+07  0.0000         8        35.30     0.000     0.0000        12        55.30     0.35     0.80     18.86     0.68     1.60      0.000      0.224399         4       0.59     20.000      0.000      0.95     0.00000         2        5.71     10. 2 lines      'istmod     1  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   STIFFNESS REFERENCE  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  '  refx      refy       refz      rphi      rtheta      rpsi    0.0000  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   WAVE FREQUENCIES MOTION TRANSFER FUNCTIONS  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'imofre   mofre         1       0.0000         5        20.0000         7        30.00     75      0.27     0.000      0.000    0.0000        10        45.000      0. 2 lines      'nwidir   iwisym     wiarea       zcoef      7      2          2000.000  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   LINEAR STIFFNESS MATRIX  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'kmati1     kmati2     kmati3     kmati4     kmati5     kmati6    0.000      0.261799         8       0.4441E+07  0.80     0.216662         3       0.000      0.0000        15        70.000    0.00     1.000      0. 2 lines      'nmodir   nmofre   imosym    itypin        19      26       2       2  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   WAVE DIRECTIONS MOTION TRANSFER FUNCTIONS  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'imodir   modir         1        0.000  '============================================================  FIRST ORDER MOTION TRANSFER FUNCTION  '============================================================  'txmo1.000      0.35     0.86      5.000      0.000    0.00  '============================================================  HYDROSTATIC STIFFNESS DATA  '============================================================  'txstif.00  ‐18.00000         3        10.000      0.000      0.  60        250     433         0    3464     ‐2000        0    75        129     483         0    3864     ‐1035        0    90          0     500         0    4000         0        0        '============================================================  WIND FORCE COEFFICIENTS  '============================================================  'txwico.000    0.000      0.000      0.273182         9       0.000     0.00     60      0.00    0.000      0.17     0.0000         6        25.232711         5       0.0000        17        80.95     0.

3941             ‐69.79         2      12          1.5010             ‐76.416             ‐86.3926             ‐69.20         2       2          1.45         2       9          1.485             ‐87.10         2      24         0.28         2       3          1.02         2      16         0.7955             ‐84.2762             ‐56.6742             ‐83.1253E‐01         ‐72.448799        18       0.163             ‐87.22         2      25         0.381             ‐86.2752             ‐56.020             ‐87.18         2      21         0.98         2       5          1.10         1      24         0.54         1      15         0.309             ‐86.053             ‐87.149             ‐87.04720        25        1.22         3       4          1.9290             ‐87.80         2      13         0.80         3      13         0.5950             ‐81.8318             ‐85.62         1      10          1.63         1      20         0.28         1       3          1.22         1       4          1.73         3      11          1.9749             ‐87.8350             ‐85.117             ‐87.8708E‐01          21.40         2      26         0.269             ‐87.98         3       5          1.45         1       9          1.586             ‐87.418879        17       0.360             ‐86.643             ‐87.299199        11       0.376             ‐86.42         2      23         0.22         1      25         0.433             ‐86.201             ‐87.18         1      21         0.20         1       2          1.215             ‐87.330694        13       0.4991             ‐76.562             ‐87.8831             ‐87.349066        14       0.40         1      26         0.54         2      15         0.73         1      11          1.77         3       6          1.74  C-4 .167             ‐87.14159  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  SURGE MOTION TRANSFER FUNCTION  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'idir      ifreq      ampl     phase         1       1          1.9638             ‐87.502             ‐87.28         3       3          1.74         2      14         0.7458             ‐84.93         3       7          1.02         1      16         0.45         3       9          1.698132        23       0.89         2      17         0.571199        21       0.      10       0.73         2      11          1.069             ‐87.008             ‐87.21         1       8          1.62         1      19         0.9325             ‐87.628319        22       0.62         2      19         0.21         2       8          1.580             ‐87.62         2       1          1.89         2      18         0.024             ‐87.100             ‐87.20         3       2          1.79         1      12          1.785398        24        1.5927             ‐81.80         1      13         0.77         1       6          1.329             ‐86.1257E‐01         ‐72.89         1      18         0.392699        16       0.81         1      22         0.7429             ‐84.3187E‐03         ‐38.7925             ‐84.065             ‐87.3199E‐03         ‐38.57080        26        3.42         1      23         0.523599        20       0.77         2       6          1.81         2      22         0.274             ‐87.8797             ‐87.22         2       4          1.6767             ‐83.89         1      17         0.220             ‐87.324             ‐86.62         3       1          1.74         1      14         0.62         3      10          1.62         2      10          1.9786             ‐87.669             ‐87.63         2      20         0.438             ‐86.662             ‐87.255             ‐87.314159        12       0.113             ‐87.98         1       5          1.8741E‐01          21.93         2       7          1.483322        19       0.21         3       8          1.93         1       7          1.369599        15       0.79         3      12          1.508             ‐87.

283             ‐86.89         3      18         0.54         6      15         0.146             ‐87.303             ‐86.89         5      18         0.21         4       8          1.77         6       6          1.9887             ‐87.20         6       2          1.9184             ‐87.89         4      17         0.417             ‐87.63         6      20         0.80         4      13         0.437             ‐87.7834             ‐84.1238E‐01         ‐72.89         4      18         0.3806             ‐69.3151E‐03         ‐38.28         4       3          1.80         5      13         0.058             ‐87.62         5      10          1.45         6       9          1.005             ‐87.2596             ‐56.3703             ‐69.22         5       4          1.81         4      22         0.8452             ‐87.18         5      21         0.18         4      21         0.8443E‐01          21.73         6      11         0.7846             ‐85.389             ‐86.2668             ‐56.93         6       7          1.45         5       9          1.28         5       3          1.512             ‐87.4934             ‐76.77         4       6          1.21         5       8          1.9008             ‐87.7475             ‐84.74         5      14         0.5859             ‐81.8298             ‐87.204             ‐86.4708             ‐76.42         3      23         0.7684             ‐84.7008             ‐84.5392             ‐81.74         4      14         0.8869             ‐87.612             ‐87.197             ‐87.18         3      21         0.79         5      12         0.20         4       2          1.       3      14         0.568             ‐87.54         3      15         0.89         6      17         0.02         3      16         0.3881             ‐69.033             ‐87.490             ‐87.7210             ‐84.79         4      12         0.22         5      25         0.8697             ‐87.54         5      15         0.2720             ‐56.79         6      12         0.8530             ‐87.6359             ‐83.93         5       7          1.249             ‐86.62         6      19         0.77         5       6          1.10         4      24         0.89         5      17         0.98         6       5          1.8214E‐01          21.7204             ‐84.6759             ‐84.1215E‐01         ‐72.231             ‐87.8223             ‐85.1182E‐01         ‐72.02         5      16         0.62         6      10          1.050             ‐87.097             ‐87.4541             ‐76.63         3      20         0.89         6      18         0.98         5       5          1.89         3      17         0.9692             ‐87.21         6       8          1.93         4       7          1.9453             ‐87.80         6      13         0.351             ‐86.62         4      10          1.532             ‐87.8003             ‐87.62         4       1          1.105             ‐87.62         6       1          1.127             ‐87.74         6      14         0.63         4      20         0.5747             ‐81.40         5      26         0.98         4       5          1.22         4       4          1.298             ‐86.3006E‐03         ‐38.3090E‐03         ‐38.8763             ‐87.6133             ‐83.178             ‐87.40         4      26         0.62         3      19         0.62         4      19         0.22         6       4          1.18         6      21         0.012             ‐87.7344             ‐84.367             ‐87.81         5      22         0.73         5      11          1.62         5      19         0.40         3      26         0.5591             ‐81.20         5       2          1.4839             ‐76.7567             ‐85.155             ‐87.10         3      24         0.28         6       3          1.42         5      23         0.6537             ‐83.81  C-5 .54         4      15         0.457             ‐87.02         4      16         0.6665             ‐83.63         5      20         0.81         3      22         0.8065             ‐85.9618             ‐87.62         5       1          1.22         4      25         0.9277             ‐87.9196             ‐87.079             ‐87.334             ‐86.252             ‐86.10         5      24         0.8608E‐01          21.45         4       9          1.73         4      11          1.42         4      23         0.02         6      16         0.22         3      25         0.

89         8      17         0.45         9       9         0.5713             ‐84.89         8      18         0.8940             ‐87.235             ‐87.42         6      23         0.088             ‐86.20        10       2          1.044             ‐87.4339             ‐76.4104             ‐76.9150             ‐87.10         8      24         0.80         9      13         0.42         9      23         0.62         9      19         0.22         9      25         0.54         9      15         0.80         7      13         0.6889             ‐84.7234             ‐87.7231             ‐85.8016             ‐87.102             ‐86.28         8       3          1.22         7      25         0.98         7       5          1.1030E‐01         ‐72.77         8       6          1.3413             ‐69.62         7      10         0.299             ‐87.151             ‐86.2451E‐03         ‐38.2621E‐03         ‐38.21         8       8         0.2900E‐03         ‐38.28         9       3          1.20         7       2          1.02         7      16         0.9674             ‐87.6459             ‐84.98         9       5          1.81         7      22         0.121             ‐87.6696E‐01          21.81         9      22         0.63         7      20         0.22  C-6 .178             ‐86.89         9      17         0.8557             ‐87.6516             ‐84.42         7      23         0.81         8      22         0.8475             ‐87.2771E‐03         ‐38.445             ‐87.77         9       6          1.9261             ‐87.18         9      21         0.131             ‐86.306             ‐87.10         9      24         0.22         8       4          1.056             ‐87.74         7      14         0.7648             ‐87.196             ‐86.98         8       5          1.62         9       1          1.8076             ‐87.3019             ‐69.62         8       1          1.21         7       8          1.2263             ‐56.10         6      24         0.73         9      11         0.4874             ‐81.54         8      15         0.367             ‐87.20         9       2          1.8760             ‐87.62         8      10         0.40         8      26         0.6765             ‐87.7570E‐01          21.2116             ‐56.93         8       7          1.7144             ‐87.02         9      16         0.62         8      19         0.104             ‐87.6840             ‐85.8864             ‐87.74         9      14         0.7922E‐01          21.22         6      25         0.1140E‐01         ‐72.7841             ‐87.7160E‐01          21.40         9      26         0.6094             ‐84.45         7       9          1.40         7      26         0.74         8      14         0.7497             ‐87.42         8      23         0.79         8      12         0.8192             ‐87.62        10       1          1.79         7      12         0.21         9       8         0.18         7      21         0.9560             ‐87.22         8      25         0.5544             ‐83.2392             ‐56.180             ‐87.374             ‐87.011             ‐87.5153             ‐81.3838             ‐76.5184             ‐83.80         8      13         0.1089E‐01         ‐72.5861             ‐83.9761             ‐87.63         9      20         0.3571             ‐69.28        10       3          1.62         7       1          1.058             ‐86.22         9       4          1.9991             ‐87.20         8       2          1.18         8      21         0.018             ‐86.45         8       9         0.89         7      17         0.245             ‐86.62         7      19         0.63         8      20         0.10         7      24         0.93         9       7         0.7639             ‐87.6109             ‐84.9632E‐02         ‐72.155             ‐87.9343             ‐87.79         9      12         0.6396             ‐85.73         8      11         0.73         7      11         0.2503             ‐56.3228             ‐69.215             ‐87.62         9      10         0.066             ‐87.89         9      18         0.77         7       6          1.28         7       3          1.       6      22         0.40         6      26         0.89         7      18         0.8385             ‐87.54         7      15         0.22         7       4          1.93         7       7          1.4558             ‐81.02         8      16         0.278             ‐87.

5871             ‐87.45        12       9         0.8877             ‐86.62        11      10         0.22        13       4         0.6594             ‐87.82        11      22         0.89        11      17         0.8249             ‐86.1775             ‐56.02        11      16         0.6181E‐01          21.40        11      26         0.1953             ‐56.6244             ‐87.9244             ‐86.7930             ‐87.10        12      24         0.21        11       8         0.62        13       1         0.9693             ‐87.20        11       2          1.54        12      15         0.7502             ‐87.93        13       7         0.79  C-7 .4794             ‐84.4207             ‐81.4563             ‐84.62        12       1         0.5273             ‐84.89        11      18         0.7238             ‐87.019             ‐87.18        11      21         0.45        11       9         0.9010             ‐87.1835E‐03         ‐38.073             ‐87.63        12      20         0.77        10       6         0.20        13       2         0.98        11       5         0.02        12      16         0.79        10      12         0.98        10       5         0.42        12      23         0.2260             ‐69.9097             ‐87.5676             ‐87.73        12      11         0.2533             ‐69.2786             ‐69.5014E‐01          21.8541             ‐86.1584             ‐56.22        11      25         0.5904             ‐85.10        11      24         0.7540             ‐87.5367             ‐85.40        12      26         0.6134             ‐87.4278             ‐84.42        10      23         0.3413             ‐81.62        12      10         0.62        11       1          1.3543             ‐76.7191             ‐86.77        12       6         0.5618E‐01          21.017             ‐86.62        11      19         0.74        11      14         0.      10       4          1.21        13       8         0.3882             ‐83.62        12      19         0.28        12       3         0.54        10      15         0.5613             ‐87.7562             ‐87.98        12       5         0.5625             ‐84.7309             ‐87.9765             ‐86.7840             ‐87.8082E‐02         ‐72.9396             ‐86.22        10      25         0.54        11      15         0.42        11      23         0.7899             ‐87.18        12      21         0.93        11       7         0.89        10      18         0.81        10      22         0.22        12       4         0.98        13       5         0.18        10      21         0.3220             ‐76.4789             ‐85.6920             ‐87.21        10       8         0.22        12      25         0.6644             ‐86.5835             ‐87.89        12      18         0.89        12      17         0.6290             ‐87.73        10      11         0.62        10      19         0.6905             ‐86.63        11      20         0.8624             ‐87.6579             ‐87.5585             ‐87.6407             ‐87.40        10      26         0.7622             ‐86.5065             ‐87.80        12      13         0.5994             ‐87.28        11       3         0.8344             ‐87.8891E‐02         ‐72.79        12      12         0.74        10      14         0.8649             ‐87.5113             ‐84.02        10      16         0.73        13      11         0.6694             ‐87.77        11       6         0.80        11      13         0.7921             ‐86.4350             ‐83.77        13       6         0.63        10      20         0.2874             ‐76.6098             ‐87.20        12       2         0.5347             ‐87.2057E‐03         ‐38.6874             ‐87.73        11      11         0.8252             ‐87.5349             ‐87.89        10      17         0.9572             ‐87.3824             ‐81.8191             ‐87.45        10       9         0.93        12       7         0.74        12      14         0.62        10      10         0.21        12       8         0.62        13      10         0.6996             ‐87.93        10       7         0.22        11       4         0.80        10      13         0.6371             ‐87.28        13       3         0.45        13       9         0.81        12      22         0.7212E‐02         ‐72.79        11      12         0.10        10      24         0.2262E‐03         ‐38.4785             ‐83.7180             ‐87.

7053             ‐87.62        15      10         0.20        14       2         0.3157             ‐87.93        14       7         0.5616             ‐86.2551             ‐84.02        14      16         0.18        15      21         0.2649             ‐87.63        15      20         0.1352E‐03         ‐38.3501             ‐87.1970             ‐69.80        13      13         0.3020             ‐87.3820             ‐87.3347             ‐87.2117             ‐76.2035             ‐81.89        16      18         0.74        13      14         0.4358             ‐87.45        15       9         0.62        13      19         0.81        13      22         0.02        13      16         0.62        16      19         0.1930             ‐84.4932             ‐87.62        14      19         0.1600E‐03         ‐38.3152             ‐84.4415             ‐87.2856             ‐85.21        15       8         0.98        14       5         0.4136             ‐87.2315             ‐83.54        14      15         0.28        15       3         0.28        16       3         0.5157             ‐87.54        13      15         0.89        14      18         0.3529             ‐85.79        16      12         0.3574             ‐86.1381             ‐56.4300E‐02         ‐72.4893             ‐87.1665             ‐69.4723             ‐86.3362             ‐84.2161             ‐85.21        16       8         0.73        16      11         0.      13      12         0.98        15       5         0.3439             ‐86.74        16      14         0.45        14       9         0.3992             ‐87.3657             ‐87.81        14      22         0.98        16       5         0.1348             ‐69.89        16      17         0.6703             ‐87.62        14       1         0.18        13      21         0.2975             ‐81.6078             ‐86.2505             ‐76.4663             ‐87.5118             ‐87.18        14      21         0.80        14      13         0.63        13      20         0.5836             ‐86.5155             ‐87.63  C-8 .22        14      25         0.6373             ‐87.62        15      19         0.4171             ‐87.5425             ‐87.42        15      23         0.4175             ‐85.77        15       6         0.62        16      10         0.2414             ‐87.9447E‐01         ‐56.45        16       9         0.2990E‐01          21.80        16      13         0.02        16      16         0.4919             ‐86.28        14       3         0.22        15       4         0.79        15      12         0.73        14      11         0.4326             ‐87.3384             ‐83.77        16       6         0.5708             ‐87.1094E‐03         ‐38.62        16       1         0.89        14      17         0.89        13      17         0.63        14      20         0.2768             ‐87.93        15       7         0.20        15       2         0.22        16       4         0.79        14      12         0.2860             ‐83.77        14       6         0.80        15      13         0.10        13      24         0.40        13      26         0.1167             ‐56.81        15      22         0.89        15      17         0.4370E‐01          21.2059             ‐84.5385             ‐87.40        14      26         0.3941             ‐87.3903             ‐87.3021             ‐87.4519             ‐87.42        14      23         0.3694E‐01          21.3298             ‐87.2721             ‐84.93        16       7         0.3978             ‐84.54        15      15         0.10        14      24         0.2533             ‐87.3732             ‐87.5314E‐02         ‐72.4319             ‐87.4545             ‐86.42        13      23         0.20        16       2         0.2891             ‐87.74        15      14         0.54        16      15         0.74        14      14         0.21        14       8         0.22        14       4         0.4721             ‐87.3722             ‐86.4105             ‐87.1714             ‐76.10        15      24         0.73        15      11         0.6287E‐02         ‐72.3729             ‐84.2286             ‐87.02        15      16         0.22        13      25         0.22        15      25         0.1752             ‐83.40        15      26         0.89        13      18         0.62        14      10         0.89        15      18         0.2514             ‐81.62        15       1         0.3189             ‐87.

72        19       3         0.89        17      18         0.81        16      22         0.2898             ‐87.2407E‐01         ‐56.79        19       8         0.1959E‐19         141.60        19      26         0.82        19      21         0.7696E‐01         ‐87.1158             ‐86.21        18       8         0.1111             ‐87.      16      20         0.1314             ‐87.1699             ‐87.74        18      14         0.10        18      24         0.5556E‐04         ‐38.22        17       4         0.5898E‐01         ‐83.8136E‐16          93.26        19      14         0.45        18       9         0.1022E‐15          92.6268E‐16          92.1777             ‐87.22        18       4         0.1382             ‐87.3643E‐16          98.46        19      15         0.2027             ‐87.1533             ‐87.2213             ‐87.45        17       9         0.8128E‐01         ‐87.54        17      15         0.1020             ‐69.10        16      24         0.62        17      19         0.1063             ‐87.4796E‐01         ‐56.9320E‐01         ‐87.8529E‐01         ‐87.62        17       1         0.38  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  C-9 .38        19      10         0.79        18      12         0.82        18      22         0.1204             ‐86.1518E‐01          21.1540             ‐81.21        17       8         0.20        19      13         0.7468E‐16          92.8806E‐16          93.2618             ‐87.78        19       4         0.18        18      21         0.6933E‐01         ‐84.18        17      21         0.5352E‐17        ‐158.1017             ‐87.42        16      23         0.5992E‐16          92.7277E‐01         ‐85.2262E‐01          21.78        19      25         0.98        19      16         0.93        17       7         0.62        18      10         0.2183E‐02         ‐72.2497             ‐86.1175             ‐83.1295             ‐84.7146E‐16          92.5185E‐01         ‐81.20        17       2         0.40        16      26         0.5407E‐16          92.1450             ‐85.22        18      25         0.90        19      24         0.1381             ‐84.73        17      11         0.2788E‐04         ‐38.80        17      13         0.6840E‐16          92.63        18      20         0.82        17      22         0.18        19      22         0.4144E‐16          96.80        19       2         0.5113E‐16          94.1619             ‐87.77        17       6         0.22        16      25         0.7802E‐16          92.58        19      23         0.07        19       7         0.89        18      17         0.1454             ‐87.98        17       5         0.3068E‐16         103.7618E‐02          21.9736E‐01         ‐87.38        19      19         0.37        19      20         0.1033             ‐81.89        18      18         0.42        18      23         0.28        17       3         0.2754             ‐87.77        18       6         0.1297             ‐76.62        17      10         0.11        19      18         0.6843E‐01         ‐69.5710E‐16          92.02        18      16         0.9233E‐16          92.8281E‐04         ‐38.63        17      20         0.20        18       2         0.1253             ‐86.55        19       9         0.89        17      17         0.74        17      14         0.62        18       1         0.4367E‐01         ‐76.40        17      26         0.4871E‐16          95.73        18      11         0.8921E‐01         ‐87.80        18      13         0.22        17      25         0.6500E‐01         ‐84.42        17      23         0.7699E‐18         107.10        17      24         0.98        18       5         0.28        18       3         0.3254E‐02         ‐72.62        18      19         0.2398             ‐86.21        19      12         0.6548E‐16          92.1691E‐16         123.2307             ‐86.02        19       5         0.9712E‐16          92.1940             ‐87.2413E‐16         110.23        19       6         0.54        18      15         0.3434E‐01         ‐69.79        17      12         0.8700E‐01         ‐76.4567E‐16          95.40        18      26         0.27        19      11         0.11        19      17         0.18        16      21         0.8456E‐16          93.02        17      16         0.7149E‐01         ‐56.1096E‐02         ‐72.1857             ‐87.93        18       7         0.62        19       1         0.2118             ‐87.

2898             ‐87.5898E‐01         ‐83.80         1      13         0.98         1       5         0.1857             ‐87.6136E‐16         ‐76.93         2       7         0.1761E‐15         ‐86.6933E‐01         ‐84.5556E‐04         ‐38.22         1       4         0.89         1      17         0.62         1      10         0.10         3      24         0.02         2      16         0.1070E‐16          21.2307             ‐86.62         2      19         0.1017             ‐87.10         1      24         0.93         1       7         0.77         1       6         0.62         3      19         0.1096E‐02         ‐72.42         3      23         0.4367E‐01         ‐76.02         1      16         0.3383E‐16         ‐56.62         4       1         0.2788E‐04         ‐38.1198E‐15         ‐87.22         4       4         0.2044E‐15         ‐87.9320E‐01         ‐87.89         2      17         0.7286E‐16         ‐81.1253             ‐86.2213             ‐87.8128E‐01         ‐87.98         2       5         0.82         2      22         0.22         2      25         0.1619             ‐87.74         2      14         0.21         2       8         0.80         2      13         0.98         4       5         0.54         2      15         0.77         2       6         0.45         3       9         0.1142E‐15         ‐87.2027             ‐87.40         2      26         0.42         1      23         0.1429E‐15         ‐87.1691E‐15         ‐86.73         2      11         0.79         1      12         0.22         2       4         0.9133E‐16         ‐84.74         1      14         0.79         3      12         0.1310E‐15         ‐87.20         2       2         0.4826E‐16         ‐69.1175             ‐83.79         2      12         0.2497             ‐86.9742E‐16         ‐84.74         3      14         0.6500E‐01         ‐84.73         1      11         0.1382             ‐87.1533             ‐87.62         3       1         0.1111             ‐87.2618             ‐87.8921E‐01         ‐87.63         2      20         0.1295             ‐84.1023E‐15         ‐85.1204             ‐86.89         2      18         0.77  C-10 .7277E‐01         ‐85.22         3      25         0.1777             ‐87.3434E‐01         ‐69.1450             ‐85.18         2      21         0.54         1      15         0.20         4       2         0.2183E‐02         ‐72.1940             ‐87.62         2       1         0.89         3      18         0.93         3       7         0.82         1      22         0.3903             ‐87.1368E‐15         ‐87.62         3      10         0.54         3      15         0.7618E‐02          21.89         3      17         0.98         3       5         0.02         3      16         0.1942E‐15         ‐87.3918E‐19         ‐38.1033             ‐81.2398             ‐86.20         3       2         0.1254E‐15         ‐87.21         3       8         0.7696E‐01         ‐87.62         2      10         0.3722             ‐86.1494E‐15         ‐87.1699             ‐87.8529E‐01         ‐87.1540E‐17         ‐72.89         1      18         0.63         1      20         0.1381             ‐84.82         3      22         0.10         2      24         0.1081E‐15         ‐87.80         3      13         0.63         3      20         0.3574             ‐86.8700E‐01         ‐76.2407E‐01         ‐56.9736E‐01         ‐87.4319             ‐87.45         1       9         0.1314             ‐87.45         2       9         0.4105             ‐87.20         1       2         0.1518E‐01          21.1063             ‐87.1158             ‐86.18         1      21         0.22         1      25         0.62         1      19         0.1454             ‐87.28         4       3         0.28         1       3         0.18         3      21         0.2118             ‐87.4796E‐01         ‐56.28         3       3         0.5185E‐01         ‐81.1560E‐15         ‐87.42         2      23         0.1847E‐15         ‐87.21         1       8         0.8288E‐16         ‐83.22         3       4         0.40         3      26         0.77         3       6         0.2754             ‐87.SWAY MOTION TRANSFER FUNCTION  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'idir      ifreq      ampl     phase         1       1         0.1627E‐15         ‐86.6843E‐01         ‐69.28         2       3         0.40         1      26         0.73         3      11         0.

73         6      11         0.4932             ‐87.5425             ‐87.62         6       1         0.5835             ‐87.45         6       9         0.02         4      16         0.3992             ‐87.77         7       6         0.2649             ‐87.2891             ‐87.89         6      17         0.7149E‐01         ‐56.5314E‐02         ‐72.1665             ‐69.6644             ‐86.4326             ‐87.1930             ‐84.93         4       7         0.98         5       5         0.74         6      14         0.5155             ‐87.62         5       1         0.2286             ‐87.3020             ‐87.3941             ‐87.77         6       6         0.5157             ‐87.1167             ‐56.81         6      22         0.5585             ‐87.62         4      19         0.81         4      22         0.5347             ‐87.       4       6         0.6905             ‐86.21         7       8         0.98         6       5         0.21         6       8         0.2721             ‐84.93         5       7         0.5616             ‐86.54         6      15         0.1297             ‐76.20         5       2         0.54         5      15         0.18         4      21         0.73         7      11         0.2514             ‐81.7191             ‐86.80         4      13         0.9447E‐01         ‐56.1752             ‐83.77         5       6         0.40         4      26         0.4545             ‐86.79         6      12         0.45         7       9         0.4519             ‐87.2414             ‐87.02         5      16         0.1540             ‐81.80         6      13         0.8281E‐04         ‐38.1352E‐03         ‐38.89         4      18         0.2262E‐01          21.62         4      10         0.21         4       8         0.62         7       1         0.62         5      19         0.74         5      14         0.63         4      20         0.42         6      23         0.20         6       2         0.45         5       9         0.10         5      24         0.45         4       9         0.3362             ‐84.3657             ‐87.79         4      12         0.2035             ‐81.63         6      20         0.62         6      10         0.73         5      11         0.02         6      16         0.89         4      17         0.3157             ‐87.73         4      11         0.62         5      10         0.3189             ‐87.3347             ‐87.62         7      10         0.42         4      23         0.2059             ‐84.4723             ‐86.3529             ‐85.22         4      25         0.22         7       4         0.20         7       2         0.2990E‐01          21.89         5      18         0.1094E‐03         ‐38.80         7      13         0.98         7       5         0.2533             ‐87.21         5       8         0.2856             ‐85.6371             ‐87.7930             ‐87.3694E‐01          21.10         6      24         0.7540             ‐87.79         5      12         0.1348             ‐69.4300E‐02         ‐72.80         5      13         0.5836             ‐86.1714             ‐76.3021             ‐87.2117             ‐76.4893             ‐87.4171             ‐87.22         5       4         0.4358             ‐87.5708             ‐87.1020             ‐69.3501             ‐87.3152             ‐84.7053             ‐87.3820             ‐87.28         5       3         0.4721             ‐87.18         5      21         0.3254E‐02         ‐72.6373             ‐87.2860             ‐83.2315             ‐83.3298             ‐87.6098             ‐87.93         7       7         0.2161             ‐85.40         6      26         0.3439             ‐86.89         5      17         0.81         5      22         0.4919             ‐86.62         6      19         0.28         7       3         0.5385             ‐87.18         6      21         0.22         5      25         0.22         6       4         0.22         6      25         0.63         5      20         0.93         6       7         0.4136             ‐87.40         5      26         0.54         4      15         0.6703             ‐87.2768             ‐87.74  C-11 .79         7      12         0.28         6       3         0.5118             ‐87.6078             ‐86.8344             ‐87.74         4      14         0.42         5      23         0.2551             ‐84.10         4      24         0.3732             ‐87.89         6      18         0.

89         9      18         0.81         7      22         0.6996             ‐87.2975             ‐81.22         8       4         0.1970             ‐69.54         7      15         0.40         9      26         0.4563             ‐84.9693             ‐87.79        10      12         0.019             ‐87.89         8      17         0.79         8      12         0.22        10       4          1.4794             ‐84.10         9      24         0.3978             ‐84.18         8      21         0.74         9      14         0.9244             ‐86.20         9       2          1.42         7      23         0.54        10      15         0.80         9      13         0.22         7      25         0.89        10      18         0.073             ‐87.2260             ‐69.6874             ‐87.77         8       6         0.7899             ‐87.89         7      17         0.5904             ‐85.7840             ‐87.22         8      25         0.20        10       2          1.6290             ‐87.5113             ‐84.02         8      16         0.9572             ‐87.45        10       9         0.20         8       2         0.89         7      18         0.4175             ‐85.98         8       5         0.4278             ‐84.62        10       1          1.98         9       5         0.8649             ‐87.7180             ‐87.74        10      14         0.73         8      11         0.1584             ‐56.6407             ‐87.02        10      16         0.5014E‐01          21.5349             ‐87.066             ‐87.10         7      24         0.017             ‐86.5994             ‐87.2505             ‐76.45         9       9         0.62         7      19         0.2874             ‐76.02         9      16         0.63        10      20         0.21        10       8         0.77         9       6         0.81         8      22         0.5676             ‐87.7921             ‐86.1600E‐03         ‐38.4663             ‐87.8252             ‐87.18         9      21         0.54         9      15         0.63         8      20         0.22         9       4         0.45         8       9         0.74         8      14         0.79         9      12         0.28         8       3         0.3729             ‐84.4415             ‐87.80        10      13         0.18         7      21         0.8191             ‐87.40         7      26         0.9010             ‐87.6244             ‐87.4789             ‐85.6920             ‐87.80         8      13         0.5273             ‐84.93         9       7         0.7562             ‐87.3882             ‐83.63         7      20         0.7622             ‐86.7502             ‐87.3413             ‐81.8624             ‐87.93         8       7         0.6694             ‐87.5367             ‐85.3543             ‐76.98        10       5         0.6594             ‐87.89        10      17         0.4370E‐01          21.5625             ‐84.18        10      21         0.62        10      10         0.6287E‐02         ‐72.2533             ‐69.8082E‐02         ‐72.62         8      19         0.3220             ‐76.81  C-12 .9097             ‐87.7309             ‐87.40         8      26         0.62         8      10         0.89         8      18         0.54         8      15         0.6579             ‐87.4207             ‐81.62        10      19         0.42         8      23         0.180             ‐87.21         9       8         0.62         9      10         0.9765             ‐86.121             ‐87.7212E‐02         ‐72.10         8      24         0.5618E‐01          21.4350             ‐83.3824             ‐81.82         9      22         0.7238             ‐87.       7      14         0.89         9      17         0.4785             ‐83.28        10       3          1.9396             ‐86.5871             ‐87.02         7      16         0.21         8       8         0.1381             ‐56.8877             ‐86.62         9       1          1.2057E‐03         ‐38.73         9      11         0.42         9      23         0.5065             ‐87.93        10       7         0.63         9      20         0.73        10      11         0.6134             ‐87.62         9      19         0.22         9      25         0.3384             ‐83.28         9       3         0.1835E‐03         ‐38.77        10       6         0.1775             ‐56.8249             ‐86.8541             ‐86.62         8       1         0.5613             ‐87.

306             ‐87.62        12      10         0.4104             ‐76.6094             ‐84.79        11      12         0.7570E‐01          21.63        12      20         0.73        11      11         0.3019             ‐69.22        12       4          1.62        12       1          1.73        13      11         0.81        11      22         0.73        12      11         0.74        13      14         0.62        13      10         0.21        13       8          1.8940             ‐87.6459             ‐84.2621E‐03         ‐38.63        11      20         0.80        12      13         0.3413             ‐69.8557             ‐87.62        12      19         0.74        12      14         0.22        13       4          1.9261             ‐87.367             ‐87.81        12      22         0.6181E‐01          21.54        12      15         0.62        11      19         0.2392             ‐56.40        10      26         0.22        13      25         0.42        10      23         0.02        13      16         0.28        13       3          1.93        12       7          1.3838             ‐76.4339             ‐76.6889             ‐84.79        13      12         0.62        13      19         0.9991             ‐87.28        14       3          1.6516             ‐84.178             ‐86.6109             ‐84.20        12       2          1.28        12       3          1.5861             ‐83.1953             ‐56.5184             ‐83.89        13      17         0.98        11       5          1.5544             ‐83.40        13      26         0.93        13       7          1.7234             ‐87.5713             ‐84.22        11       4          1.21        12       8         0.056             ‐87.62        11      10         0.21        11       8         0.4558             ‐81.7841             ‐87.2262E‐03         ‐38.7144             ‐87.374             ‐87.7648             ‐87.8076             ‐87.5153             ‐81.512             ‐87.7639             ‐87.18        13      21         0.018             ‐86.62        14       1          1.437             ‐87.20        11       2          1.9150             ‐87.9632E‐02         ‐72.89        13      18         0.7231             ‐85.45        13       9          1.278             ‐87.1030E‐01         ‐72.89        11      18         0.89        12      17         0.20        13       2          1.80        13      13         0.8760             ‐87.102             ‐86.45        12       9         0.22        11      25         0.42        12      23         0.151             ‐86.74        11      14         0.98        12       5          1.98        13       5          1.62        13       1          1.20        14       2          1.245             ‐86.6696E‐01          21.2263             ‐56.235             ‐87.18        12      21         0.9761             ‐87.6840             ‐85.8192             ‐87.088             ‐86.18        11      21         0.044             ‐87.215             ‐87.54        13      15         0.10        12      24         0.367             ‐87.2771E‐03         ‐38.104             ‐87.9674             ‐87.      10      22         0.131             ‐86.6765             ‐87.22        12      25         0.9343             ‐87.4874             ‐81.40        11      26         0.155             ‐87.89        12      18         0.22        10      25         0.1089E‐01         ‐72.63        13      20         0.8864             ‐87.6396             ‐85.77        13       6          1.79        12      12         0.7160E‐01          21.45        11       9         0.8891E‐02         ‐72.77        12       6          1.93        11       7         0.9560             ‐87.7497             ‐87.3228             ‐69.8385             ‐87.2116             ‐56.02        12      16         0.2786             ‐69.10        13      24         0.2451E‐03         ‐38.058             ‐86.8016             ‐87.77        11       6          1.89        11      17         0.62        11       1          1.196             ‐86.42        13      23         0.28        11       3          1.80        11      13         0.445             ‐87.299             ‐87.10        10      24         0.02        11      16         0.8475             ‐87.54        11      15         0.40        12      26         0.42        11      23         0.10        11      24         0.22  C-13 .81        13      22         0.011             ‐87.

9453             ‐87.18        15      21         0.3006E‐03         ‐38.18        14      21         0.149             ‐87.155             ‐87.6359             ‐83.303             ‐86.249             ‐86.45        16       9          1.3090E‐03         ‐38.127             ‐87.40        16      26         0.77        15       6          1.5392             ‐81.612             ‐87.73        14      11         0.3703             ‐69.097             ‐87.98        17       5          1.98        15       5          1.22        15      25         0.10        16      24         0.7846             ‐85.283             ‐86.568             ‐87.22        15       4          1.4708             ‐76.012             ‐87.457             ‐87.98        14       5          1.8298             ‐87.9692             ‐87.3806             ‐69.2503             ‐56.63        15      20         0.231             ‐87.98        16       5          1.4839             ‐76.89        15      17         0.255             ‐87.62        14      10          1.8530             ‐87.146             ‐87.40        15      26         0.8214E‐01          21.02        15      16         0.22        14      25         0.02        14      16         0.8065             ‐85.105             ‐87.21        14       8          1.62        16      10          1.7684             ‐84.02        16      16         0.7204             ‐84.204             ‐86.45        15       9          1.22        16      25         0.89        16      18         0.298             ‐86.1140E‐01         ‐72.42        14      23         0.334             ‐86.562             ‐87.079             ‐87.8869             ‐87.62        15      10          1.80        14      13         0.1182E‐01         ‐72.80        15      13         0.7922E‐01          21.178             ‐87.9196             ‐87.20        17       2          1.351             ‐86.1215E‐01         ‐72.417             ‐87.058             ‐87.79  C-14 .22        17       4          1.389             ‐86.050             ‐87.77        14       6          1.9887             ‐87.643             ‐87.100             ‐87.9008             ‐87.5591             ‐81.2900E‐03         ‐38.9277             ‐87.18        16      21         0.7475             ‐84.79        15      12         0.20        16       2          1.89        15      18         0.81        15      22         0.62        15      19         0.62        16       1          1.73        17      11          1.10        15      24         0.7008             ‐84.490             ‐87.62        14      19         0.54        15      15         0.40        14      26         0.45        17       9          1.6133             ‐83.54        14      15         0.89        14      18         0.74        15      14         0.42        15      23         0.252             ‐86.485             ‐87.2596             ‐56.73        15      11          1.201             ‐87.2668             ‐56.93        17       7          1.62        17      10          1.62        17       1          1.45        14       9          1.033             ‐87.42        16      23         0.309             ‐86.5747             ‐81.6537             ‐83.62        15       1          1.005             ‐87.89        14      17         0.73        16      11          1.7210             ‐84.63        16      20         0.74        14      14         0.4541             ‐76.8003             ‐87.7567             ‐85.3571             ‐69.416             ‐86.93        15       7          1.053             ‐87.28        17       3          1.22        16       4          1.54        16      15         0.93        16       7          1.81        14      22         0.      14       4          1.197             ‐87.77        17       6          1.360             ‐86.9618             ‐87.8452             ‐87.21        17       8          1.8763             ‐87.21        15       8          1.8443E‐01          21.74        16      14         0.21        16       8          1.28        16       3          1.10        14      24         0.93        14       7          1.532             ‐87.6759             ‐84.81        16      22         0.79        14      12         0.63        14      20         0.89        16      17         0.28        15       3          1.62        16      19         0.80        16      13         0.20        15       2          1.79        16      12         0.77        16       6          1.

62        18       1          1.62        19      10          1.93        18       7          1.054              ‐0.020             ‐87.79        19      12          1.8741E‐01          21.81        19      22         0.6767             ‐83.80        17      13         0.220             ‐87.47         1       7          1.89        18      18         0.9184             ‐87.113             ‐87.8831             ‐87.8797             ‐87.      17      12          1.6665             ‐83.62        18      10          1.63        17      20         0.7955             ‐84.89        18      17         0.63        19      20         0.1257E‐01         ‐72.40        19      26         0.580             ‐87.74        17      14         0.67         1      14          1.008             ‐87.508             ‐87.024             ‐87.02        18      16         0.77        19       6          1.89        19      18         0.9290             ‐87.5859             ‐81.22        17      25         0.74        18      14         0.8708E‐01          21.18        19      21         0.8350             ‐85.9786             ‐87.035              ‐0.288              ‐5.9325             ‐87.064              ‐0.028              ‐0.94         1      12          1.9638             ‐87.16         1      13          1.1253E‐01         ‐72.669             ‐87.54        17      15         0.42        18      23         0.8223             ‐85.6742             ‐83.21        19       8          1.077              ‐0.7925             ‐84.7344             ‐84.22         1       3          1.155              ‐1.28        18       3          1.24         1      15          1.215             ‐87.2762             ‐56.3926             ‐69.74        19      14         0.20        19       2          1.031              ‐0.80        19      13         0.10        18      24         0.662             ‐87.89        19      17         0.54  C-15 .3199E‐03         ‐38.5950             ‐81.163             ‐87.19         1       2          1.02        19      16         0.7458             ‐84.518             ‐23.02        17      16         0.8697             ‐87.54        19      15         0.433             ‐86.7834             ‐84.329             ‐86.22        18       4          1.62  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  HEAVE MOTION TRANSFER FUNCTION  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'idir      ifreq      ampl     phase         1       1          1.98        18       5          1.9749             ‐87.5927             ‐81.069             ‐87.324             ‐86.28        19       3          1.22        19      25         0.45        19       9          1.269             ‐87.89        17      18         0.89        17      17         0.376             ‐86.21        18       8          1.8318             ‐85.73        19      11          1.81        18      22         0.3151E‐03         ‐38.065             ‐87.3941             ‐69.120              ‐1.26         1       4          1.4934             ‐76.73        18      11          1.18        17      21         0.381             ‐86.2720             ‐56.42        17      23         0.5010             ‐76.79        18      12          1.10        17      24         0.62        18      19         0.10        19      24         0.167             ‐87.81        17      22         0.502             ‐87.274             ‐87.18        18      21         0.41         1       6          1.4991             ‐76.208              ‐3.40        18      26         0.45        18       9          1.1238E‐01         ‐72.2752             ‐56.20        18       2          1.54         1       8          1.63        18      20         0.3881             ‐69.80        18      13         0.33         1       5          1.98        19       5          1.22        19       4          1.77        18       6          1.405             ‐11.586             ‐87.62        19       1          1.67         1       9          1.22        18      25         0.93        19       7          1.40        17      26         0.42        19      23         0.8608E‐01          21.095              ‐0.62        17      19         0.62        19      19         0.3187E‐03         ‐38.7429             ‐84.040              ‐0.90         1      10          1.54        18      15         0.046              ‐0.28         1      11          1.117             ‐87.438             ‐86.

41         2       6          1.98         3      24         0.028              ‐0.095              ‐0.054              ‐0.98         1      24         0.1050             ‐92.2714E‐01         ‐48.47         3       7          1.064              ‐0.73         4      22         0.95         4      21         0.73         3      22         0.086             ‐71.208              ‐3.33         4      20         0.54         3      16          1.24         4      15          1.155              ‐1.94         4      12          1.22         2       3          1.80         2      26         0.36         2      25         0.3003E‐01          61.02         2      17          1.077              ‐0.451             ‐45.046              ‐0.077              ‐0.031              ‐0.028              ‐0.16         2      13          1.3003E‐01          61.4434E‐01          92.36         3      25         0.19         4       2          1.33         2      20         0.288              ‐5.1232E‐05         173.1232E‐05         173.36         1      25         0.095              ‐0.94         3      12          1.1050             ‐92.2757            ‐101.19         3       2          1.98  C-16 .94         2      12          1.54         2       8          1.26         2       4          1.031              ‐0.28         3      18         0.064              ‐0.086             ‐71.405             ‐11.1050             ‐92.67         3      14          1.1050             ‐92.26         3       1          1.41         4       6          1.518             ‐23.4434E‐01          92.67         2      14          1.90         4      10          1.02         1      17          1.73         2      22         0.28         4      11          1.67         4       9          1.54         3       8          1.33         4       5          1.67         2       9          1.035              ‐0.       1      16          1.33         2       5          1.73         1      22         0.120              ‐1.451             ‐45.54         4       8          1.2714E‐01         ‐48.2714E‐01         ‐48.80         1      26         0.4434E‐01          92.19         2       2          1.28         1      18         0.67         3       9          1.16         3      13          1.040              ‐0.28         2      18         0.22         4       3          1.6098             ‐93.2757            ‐101.405             ‐11.33         1      20         0.98         2      24         0.8410E‐03         105.028              ‐0.26         4       1          1.54         2      16          1.47         2       7          1.16         4      13          1.26         4       4          1.086             ‐71.2714E‐01         ‐48.02         4      17          1.040              ‐0.15         2      19         0.6098             ‐93.054              ‐0.405             ‐11.120              ‐1.95         3      21         0.031              ‐0.064              ‐0.80         3      26         0.1488E‐01         172.155              ‐1.26         2       1          1.120              ‐1.28         3      11          1.90         2      10          1.8410E‐03         105.518             ‐23.6098             ‐93.6098             ‐93.155              ‐1.13         1      23         0.33         3       5          1.2757            ‐101.13         2      23         0.095              ‐0.02         3      17          1.1488E‐01         172.208              ‐3.41         3       6          1.24         2      15          1.90         3      10          1.15         1      19         0.26         3       4          1.95         1      21         0.208              ‐3.4434E‐01          92.451             ‐45.288              ‐5.1232E‐05         173.8410E‐03         105.1488E‐01         172.054              ‐0.33         3      20         0.288              ‐5.040              ‐0.47         4       7          1.15         3      19         0.451             ‐45.13         4      23         0.077              ‐0.22         3       3          1.046              ‐0.13         3      23         0.035              ‐0.24         3      15          1.95         2      21         0.67         4      14          1.3003E‐01          61.2757            ‐101.15         4      19         0.28         4      18         0.086             ‐71.3003E‐01          61.035              ‐0.28         2      11          1.54         4      16          1.046              ‐0.518             ‐23.

73         7      22         0.24         5      15          1.54         5      16          1.41         5       6          1.67         7      14          1.040              ‐0.086             ‐71.6098             ‐93.1232E‐05         173.046              ‐0.054              ‐0.208              ‐3.33         7       5          1.2757            ‐101.16         5      13          1.4434E‐01          92.80         6      26         0.22         7       3          1.41         6       6          1.22         5       3          1.288              ‐5.1050             ‐92.15         6      19         0.046              ‐0.54         5       8          1.2714E‐01         ‐48.80         5      26         0.1232E‐05         173.6098             ‐93.077              ‐0.035              ‐0.028              ‐0.13         5      23         0.518             ‐23.064              ‐0.8410E‐03         105.064              ‐0.040              ‐0.73         6      22         0.22         8       3          1.90         6      10          1.2757            ‐101.80         4      26         0.26         8       1          1.98         7      24         0.035              ‐0.47         5       7          1.1050             ‐92.26         6       1          1.077              ‐0.451             ‐45.077              ‐0.54         7      16          1.8410E‐03         105.33         6      20         0.02         6      17          1.26         7       1          1.1488E‐01         172.94         6      12          1.4434E‐01          92.98         6      24         0.028              ‐0.451             ‐45.24         7      15          1.02         7      17          1.41  C-17 .73         5      22         0.       4      24         0.15         7      19         0.47         7       7          1.94         5      12          1.13         6      23         0.54         7       8          1.95         5      21         0.155              ‐1.67         7       9          1.1050             ‐92.155              ‐1.47         6       7          1.4434E‐01          92.031              ‐0.28         7      18         0.8410E‐03         105.2757            ‐101.26         8       4          1.095              ‐0.208              ‐3.086             ‐71.33         5      20         0.046              ‐0.120              ‐1.98         5      24         0.26         6       4          1.28         5      18         0.451             ‐45.288              ‐5.035              ‐0.040              ‐0.208              ‐3.031              ‐0.67         6       9          1.028              ‐0.95         7      21         0.054              ‐0.19         7       2          1.94         7      12          1.28         6      11          1.6098             ‐93.3003E‐01          61.054              ‐0.13         7      23         0.15         5      19         0.120              ‐1.28         7      11          1.26         7       4          1.405             ‐11.8410E‐03         105.035              ‐0.028              ‐0.16         6      13          1.155              ‐1.26         5       4          1.19         8       2          1.67         6      14          1.90         7      10          1.046              ‐0.28         5      11          1.36         5      25         0.26         5       1          1.22         6       3          1.41         7       6          1.095              ‐0.405             ‐11.120              ‐1.16         7      13          1.3003E‐01          61.040              ‐0.095              ‐0.67         5       9          1.02         5      17          1.031              ‐0.33         6       5          1.33         7      20         0.19         6       2          1.3003E‐01          61.1488E‐01         172.518             ‐23.405             ‐11.54         6       8          1.36         4      25         0.80         7      26         0.288              ‐5.086             ‐71.67         5      14          1.36         6      25         0.54         6      16          1.518             ‐23.95         6      21         0.19         5       2          1.1488E‐01         172.1232E‐05         173.33         8       5          1.36         7      25         0.33         5       5          1.24         6      15          1.90         5      10          1.064              ‐0.28         6      18         0.031              ‐0.1488E‐01         172.2714E‐01         ‐48.2714E‐01         ‐48.1232E‐05         173.

67         8      14          1.16         9      13          1.451             ‐45.028              ‐0.208              ‐3.208              ‐3.26         9       1          1.15        10      19         0.095              ‐0.98         8      24         0.90        10      10          1.       8       6          1.33        10      20         0.26        10       1          1.028              ‐0.90         9      10          1.077              ‐0.67        10      14          1.4434E‐01          92.054              ‐0.19        11       2          1.54        10       8          1.28        10      11          1.1050             ‐92.95        10      21         0.94        11      12          1.41        11       6          1.208              ‐3.1050             ‐92.046              ‐0.94        10      12          1.031              ‐0.040              ‐0.95         8      21         0.28         8      11          1.086             ‐71.077              ‐0.3003E‐01          61.054              ‐0.518             ‐23.36        10      25         0.064              ‐0.6098             ‐93.2714E‐01         ‐48.031              ‐0.1232E‐05         173.54         9      16          1.095              ‐0.33        10       5          1.80         8      26         0.1488E‐01         172.1488E‐01         172.67  C-18 .6098             ‐93.031              ‐0.90         8      10          1.064              ‐0.15         8      19         0.028              ‐0.4434E‐01          92.1488E‐01         172.2757            ‐101.67        10       9          1.13         9      23         0.8410E‐03         105.405             ‐11.90        11      10          1.16        11      13          1.02        10      17          1.035              ‐0.36         8      25         0.33        11       5          1.8410E‐03         105.3003E‐01          61.2714E‐01         ‐48.208              ‐3.2714E‐01         ‐48.19        10       2          1.47         9       7          1.28         8      18         0.54         9       8          1.67         9       9          1.24         8      15          1.518             ‐23.077              ‐0.28        10      18         0.1050             ‐92.518             ‐23.046              ‐0.040              ‐0.33         9       5          1.80        10      26         0.02         8      17          1.33         8      20         0.54        11       8          1.80         9      26         0.15         9      19         0.67         9      14          1.54        10      16          1.155              ‐1.16         8      13          1.6098             ‐93.054              ‐0.040              ‐0.28        11      11          1.086             ‐71.288              ‐5.288              ‐5.47         8       7          1.41        10       6          1.26         9       4          1.095              ‐0.120              ‐1.095              ‐0.47        11       7          1.2757            ‐101.94         9      12          1.47        10       7          1.405             ‐11.8410E‐03         105.26        10       4          1.02         9      17          1.120              ‐1.73        10      22         0.1232E‐05         173.22        11       3          1.36         9      25         0.086             ‐71.94         8      12          1.035              ‐0.73         9      22         0.98        10      24         0.046              ‐0.22        10       3          1.1232E‐05         173.33         9      20         0.2757            ‐101.28         9      11          1.41         9       6          1.451             ‐45.13        10      23         0.98         9      24         0.22         9       3          1.54         8       8          1.155              ‐1.064              ‐0.16        10      13          1.155              ‐1.67         8       9          1.054              ‐0.13         8      23         0.4434E‐01          92.035              ‐0.24         9      15          1.288              ‐5.077              ‐0.95         9      21         0.288              ‐5.064              ‐0.24        10      15          1.3003E‐01          61.54         8      16          1.120              ‐1.26        11       4          1.19         9       2          1.451             ‐45.73         8      22         0.67        11       9          1.28         9      18         0.155              ‐1.26        11       1          1.120              ‐1.405             ‐11.

1232E‐05         173.2714E‐01         ‐48.54        13       8          1.031              ‐0.33        11      20         0.15        14      19         0.095              ‐0.24        13      15          1.518             ‐23.077              ‐0.02        12      17          1.054              ‐0.67        12       9          1.94        13      12          1.086             ‐71.064              ‐0.064              ‐0.67        14       9          1.73        11      22         0.02        13      17          1.064              ‐0.33        14      20         0.33        12      20         0.1050             ‐92.90        14      10          1.405             ‐11.36        11      25         0.15        13      19         0.2714E‐01         ‐48.33        14       5          1.2757            ‐101.36        12      25         0.031              ‐0.33        13       5          1.28        13      11          1.1050             ‐92.02        11      17          1.3003E‐01          61.73  C-19 .046              ‐0.8410E‐03         105.54        12      16          1.2757            ‐101.19        14       2          1.518             ‐23.19        13       2          1.90        13      10          1.26        13       4          1.94        12      12          1.086             ‐71.451             ‐45.16        13      13          1.      11      14          1.28        14      18         0.16        12      13          1.36        13      25         0.24        14      15          1.288              ‐5.67        13      14          1.28        11      18         0.031              ‐0.208              ‐3.086             ‐71.1232E‐05         173.80        13      26         0.288              ‐5.405             ‐11.035              ‐0.33        12       5          1.028              ‐0.22        13       3          1.1232E‐05         173.33        13      20         0.80        11      26         0.095              ‐0.120              ‐1.040              ‐0.6098             ‐93.98        12      24         0.67        12      14          1.28        14      11          1.6098             ‐93.73        12      22         0.47        14       7          1.1050             ‐92.405             ‐11.077              ‐0.035              ‐0.73        13      22         0.3003E‐01          61.6098             ‐93.451             ‐45.54        14       8          1.26        14       4          1.046              ‐0.80        12      26         0.3003E‐01          61.120              ‐1.054              ‐0.13        13      23         0.13        12      23         0.13        11      23         0.405             ‐11.67        13       9          1.24        12      15          1.4434E‐01          92.155              ‐1.22        12       3          1.41        12       6          1.451             ‐45.54        11      16          1.095              ‐0.54        14      16          1.8410E‐03         105.288              ‐5.518             ‐23.16        14      13          1.040              ‐0.15        12      19         0.28        13      18         0.040              ‐0.98        13      24         0.028              ‐0.208              ‐3.086             ‐71.47        12       7          1.1488E‐01         172.98        11      24         0.8410E‐03         105.1050             ‐92.077              ‐0.2714E‐01         ‐48.02        14      17          1.26        14       1          1.22        14       3          1.4434E‐01          92.155              ‐1.67        14      14          1.95        12      21         0.95        13      21         0.28        12      11          1.120              ‐1.94        14      12          1.2757            ‐101.90        12      10          1.2757            ‐101.046              ‐0.6098             ‐93.54        12       8          1.208              ‐3.518             ‐23.155              ‐1.95        14      21         0.41        14       6          1.2714E‐01         ‐48.054              ‐0.47        13       7          1.035              ‐0.451             ‐45.54        13      16          1.26        12       1          1.15        11      19         0.26        12       4          1.1488E‐01         172.4434E‐01          92.26        13       1          1.41        13       6          1.95        11      21         0.028              ‐0.19        12       2          1.24        11      15          1.1488E‐01         172.28        12      18         0.

95        15      21         0.031              ‐0.028              ‐0.405             ‐11.064              ‐0.451             ‐45.33        16      20         0.95        17      21         0.98        15      24         0.94        17      12          1.155              ‐1.8410E‐03         105.1232E‐05         173.405             ‐11.3003E‐01          61.26        18       1          1.086             ‐71.33        16       5          1.028              ‐0.19        17       2          1.02        16      17          1.288              ‐5.1488E‐01         172.36        16      25         0.2757            ‐101.24        16      15          1.208              ‐3.54        15       8          1.90        16      10          1.19        15       2          1.90        15      10          1.077              ‐0.077              ‐0.120              ‐1.054              ‐0.405             ‐11.26        16       4          1.73        17      22         0.28        17      18         0.035              ‐0.80        15      26         0.028              ‐0.2714E‐01         ‐48.36        14      25         0.16        16      13          1.1232E‐05         173.67        16      14          1.95        16      21         0.47        15       7          1.13        16      23         0.095              ‐0.120              ‐1.518             ‐23.4434E‐01          92.24        15      15          1.26        17       1          1.6098             ‐93.288              ‐5.2757            ‐101.086             ‐71.98        17      24         0.046              ‐0.24        17      15          1.4434E‐01          92.2714E‐01         ‐48.077              ‐0.155              ‐1.54        15      16          1.1488E‐01         172.1488E‐01         172.1232E‐05         173.36        15      25         0.1050             ‐92.518             ‐23.47        17       7          1.208              ‐3.6098             ‐93.120              ‐1.13        17      23         0.095              ‐0.80        16      26         0.73        15      22         0.086             ‐71.031              ‐0.031              ‐0.046              ‐0.288              ‐5.155              ‐1.13        15      23         0.54        17      16          1.054              ‐0.41        17       6          1.26        15       1          1.54        16       8          1.26  C-20 .26        15       4          1.15        17      19         0.67        15       9          1.80        14      26         0.035              ‐0.33        15       5          1.1232E‐05         173.33        17       5          1.035              ‐0.02        17      17          1.040              ‐0.28        16      18         0.028              ‐0.2714E‐01         ‐48.28        15      18         0.15        16      19         0.33        17      20         0.8410E‐03         105.80        17      26         0.54        16      16          1.67        15      14          1.28        16      11          1.98        16      24         0.15        15      19         0.26        17       4          1.040              ‐0.33        15      20         0.451             ‐45.98        14      24         0.3003E‐01          61.22        15       3          1.8410E‐03         105.67        16       9          1.22        16       3          1.054              ‐0.064              ‐0.2757            ‐101.22        17       3          1.208              ‐3.4434E‐01          92.3003E‐01          61.13        14      23         0.19        18       2          1.94        15      12          1.54        17       8          1.41        16       6          1.1488E‐01         172.1050             ‐92.046              ‐0.19        16       2          1.6098             ‐93.36        17      25         0.064              ‐0.02        15      17          1.28        17      11          1.26        16       1          1.22        18       3          1.1050             ‐92.73        16      22         0.518             ‐23.040              ‐0.035              ‐0.      14      22         0.16        15      13          1.67        17       9          1.095              ‐0.451             ‐45.47        16       7          1.41        15       6          1.4434E‐01          92.90        17      10          1.8410E‐03         105.3003E‐01          61.28        15      11          1.16        17      13          1.031              ‐0.67        17      14          1.94        16      12          1.

67        18       9          1.98        18      24         0.1070E‐02        ‐112.73        19      22         0.67         1       9         0.77         1       2         0.095              ‐0.16        19      13          1.26  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  ROLL MOTION TRANSFER FUNCTION  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'idir      ifreq      ampl     phase         1       1         0.1050             ‐92.38         1       7         0.54        18       8          1.26        19       4          1.1322E‐17        ‐116.92         1      17         0.6960E‐18        ‐113.2335E‐18          23.120              ‐1.26        19       1          1.93         2       5         0.040              ‐0.086             ‐71.15        18      19         0.73         1       6         0.8410E‐03         105.2714E‐01         ‐48.62         1      14         0.54        19       8          1.1102E‐17         ‐95.54        18      16          1.86         2       3         0.6098             ‐93.22        19       3          1.031              ‐0.9163E‐03        ‐101.38         2       1         0.064              ‐0.054              ‐0.80        18      26         0.60         1      15         0.5871E‐18        ‐118.046              ‐0.7621E‐18        ‐172.80        19      26         0.69         1      19         0.1232E‐05         173.5424E‐03        ‐172.02        19      17          1.405             ‐11.47        18       7          1.064              ‐0.49         1      11         0.36        19      25         0.28        19      11          1.1197E‐19         ‐72.086             ‐71.41        18       6          1.67        19      14          1.16        18      13          1.155              ‐1.33        18      20         0.028              ‐0.7840E‐03         ‐95.035              ‐0.077              ‐0.54        19      16          1.13        18      23         0.8410E‐03         105.3003E‐01          61.77         2       2         0.208              ‐3.1637E‐17        ‐129.054              ‐0.28        18      11          1.47        19       7          1.95        19      21         0.24        19      15          1.208              ‐3.518             ‐23.1057E‐02        ‐151.93         1       5         0.1288E‐17        ‐101.7486E‐18         ‐86.5176E‐18         ‐66.288              ‐5.1050             ‐92.1232E‐05         173.63         1      13         0.9892E‐18        ‐105.451             ‐45.      18       4          1.451             ‐45.94        18      12          1.67        19       9          1.28        18      18         0.02        18      17          1.040              ‐0.35         1      24         0.4434E‐01          92.1241E‐17        ‐123.67        18      14          1.44         1      26         0.1504E‐17        ‐112.55         1       4         0.4734E‐18        ‐151.73        18      22         0.06         1      25         0.97         1      20         0.3003E‐01          61.518             ‐23.13        19      23         0.80         1      16         0.1030E‐17        ‐116.1101E‐17        ‐168.27         1      12         0.077              ‐0.1486E‐17        ‐151.7836E‐03        ‐168.2757            ‐101.4672E‐18        ‐137.98        19      24         0.90        18      10          1.65  C-21 .90        19      10          1.2757            ‐101.24        18      15          1.9812E‐18         ‐99.6098             ‐93.36        18      25         0.16         1      18         0.1270E‐24        ‐107.4434E‐01          92.17         1      23         0.95        18      21         0.33        19       5          1.046              ‐0.33        19      20         0.87         1      21         0.15        19      19         0.67         1      22         0.1165E‐02        ‐129.38         2       7         0.5109E‐18        ‐126.33        18       5          1.288              ‐5.095              ‐0.86         1       3         0.94        19      12          1.8584E‐18        ‐110.65         1       8         0.28        19      18         0.405             ‐11.55         2       4         0.120              ‐1.41        19       6          1.19        19       2          1.93         1      10         0.2714E‐01         ‐48.1488E‐01         172.1488E‐01         172.155              ‐1.5602E‐18        ‐165.9105E‐18         ‐94.73         2       6         0.1104E‐17        ‐110.

17         2      23         0.1640E‐02        ‐118.1582E‐02         ‐86.92         3      17         0.4934E‐03          23.2333E‐02        ‐110.2176E‐02        ‐116.86         5       3         0.16         4      18         0.1471E‐02        ‐113.80         2      16         0.73         5       6         0.6713E‐03        ‐151.80         3      16         0.1874E‐02        ‐116.8517E‐05         ‐72.3459E‐02        ‐129.65         5       8         0.49         5      11         0.77         5       2         0.1924E‐02         ‐94.1001E‐02        ‐151.38         5       1         0.62         2      14         0.80  C-22 .3369E‐03        ‐151.73         3       6         0.06         4      25         0.65         3       8         0.3084E‐02        ‐110.3325E‐03        ‐137.1184E‐02        ‐165.1291E‐02         ‐94.9406E‐03        ‐116.60         4      15         0.97         3      20         0.67         4       9         0.86         3       3         0.86         4       3         0.87         4      21         0.6480E‐03         ‐94.38         4       1         0.27         5      12         0.1081E‐02        ‐172.97         2      20         0.69         2      19         0.7339E‐03         ‐66.2128E‐02        ‐172.1427E‐02        ‐126.1322E‐02        ‐151.6109E‐03        ‐110.93         3       5         0.17         3      23         0.65         4       8         0.2107E‐02        ‐151.1814E‐02        ‐110.8325E‐03        ‐118.2685E‐09        ‐107.77         4       2         0.9868E‐03        ‐113.60         5      15         0.1562E‐02         ‐95.2133E‐02        ‐112.1611E‐02        ‐172.69         4      19         0.67         2       9         0.49         2      11         0.3179E‐02        ‐112.38         3       1         0.1094E‐02         ‐66.27         3      12         0.93         2      10         0.1561E‐02        ‐168.1826E‐02        ‐101.38         4       7         0.2321E‐02        ‐129.67         3       9         0.2793E‐02        ‐116.1760E‐02        ‐123.87         3      21         0.27         2      12         0.67         5       9         0.1662E‐03          23.1241E‐02        ‐118.73         4       6         0.62         3      14         0.3684E‐03         ‐66.62         4      14         0.1080E‐02        ‐126.63         5      13         0.1460E‐02        ‐116.3636E‐03        ‐126.55         3       4         0.87         2      21         0.6625E‐03        ‐137.63         3      13         0.69         3      19         0.35         4      24         0.2397E‐02        ‐110.55         4       4         0.7040E‐03        ‐105.93         3      10         0.67         2      22         0.2327E‐02        ‐168.97         4      20         0.44         3      26         0.7244E‐03        ‐126.1697E‐04         ‐72.7944E‐03        ‐165.4953E‐03        ‐113.55         5       4         0.1566E‐02        ‐110.80         4      16         0.44         4      26         0.93         4      10         0.1565E‐02        ‐165.4178E‐03        ‐118.1403E‐02        ‐105.4201E‐02        ‐112.1391E‐02         ‐99.44         2      26         0.       2       8         0.77         3       2         0.93         4       5         0.17         4      23         0.9874E‐03        ‐137.4571E‐02        ‐129.06         3      25         0.35         2      24         0.92         2      17         0.27         4      12         0.49         4      11         0.7858E‐03        ‐110.06         2      25         0.60         3      15         0.2091E‐02        ‐105.93         5       5         0.4149E‐02        ‐151.5327E‐03         ‐86.1801E‐09        ‐107.2328E‐02         ‐95.2074E‐02         ‐99.38         3       7         0.1061E‐02         ‐86.6983E‐03         ‐99.16         3      18         0.1305E‐02        ‐137.62         5      14         0.7328E‐03        ‐116.49         3      11         0.60         2      15         0.67         4      22         0.1217E‐02        ‐110.93         5      10         0.8835E‐03        ‐123.63         4      13         0.3310E‐03          23.3075E‐02        ‐168.3987E‐03        ‐165.9040E‐10        ‐107.1944E‐02        ‐113.16         2      18         0.92         4      17         0.3076E‐02         ‐95.63         2      13         0.3140E‐02        ‐151.35         3      24         0.38         5       7         0.3596E‐02        ‐101.67         3      22         0.2721E‐02        ‐101.2624E‐02        ‐123.2529E‐04         ‐72.

17         7      23         0.38         7       7         0.38         7       1         0.4886E‐04         ‐72.63         7      13         0.93         7      10         0.4204E‐02        ‐116.49         6      11         0.06         7      25         0.3056E‐02         ‐86.38         8       7         0.4020E‐02        ‐110.49         7      11         0.69         8      19         0.67         8       9         0.1907E‐02        ‐137.69         7      19         0.2287E‐02        ‐165.2750E‐02        ‐118.60         7      15         0.2026E‐02        ‐118.2113E‐02         ‐66.6520E‐03          23.2583E‐02         ‐86.16         7      18         0.3414E‐02        ‐105.92         7      17         0.4633E‐02        ‐105.62         6      14         0.4497E‐02         ‐95.55         7       4         0.3505E‐02        ‐110.1933E‐02        ‐151.5186E‐09        ‐107.5396E‐02        ‐116.5257E‐02        ‐101.3569E‐02        ‐172.87         7      21         0.3260E‐02        ‐113.63         6      13         0.06         5      25         0.6682E‐02        ‐129.06         6      25         0.3467E‐02        ‐123.38         6       7         0.16         6      18         0.80         8      16         0.93         7       5         0.86         6       3         0.6959E‐02        ‐151.97         7      20         0.92         8      17         0.2740E‐02         ‐99.2841E‐02        ‐113.87         6      21         0.44         7      26         0.97         6      20         0.60         8      15         0.2424E‐02         ‐66.86         8       3         0.6066E‐02        ‐151.49         8      11         0.2091E‐02         ‐86.17         5      23         0.93         6      10         0.3800E‐02        ‐168.87         8      21         0.2543E‐02         ‐94.2763E‐02        ‐105.67         5      22         0.73         7       6         0.60         6      15         0.69         6      19         0.3506E‐02         ‐86.16         8      18         0.44         5      26         0.17         8      23         0.62         8      14         0.97         5      20         0.5814E‐02        ‐123.93         8       5         0.63         8      13         0.92         5      17         0.69         5      19         0.3142E‐02         ‐94.67         6       9         0.67         8      22         0.44         6      26         0.97         8      20         0.77         8       2         0.5127E‐02        ‐151.2188E‐02        ‐137.65         8       8         0.2217E‐02        ‐151.93         6       5         0.4823E‐02        ‐116.35  C-23 .1612E‐02        ‐137.3810E‐02        ‐110.80         7      16         0.4443E‐02        ‐101.7045E‐02        ‐112.16         5      18         0.17         6      23         0.3801E‐02         ‐95.2086E‐02        ‐126.2876E‐02        ‐116.3717E‐02         ‐94.73         6       6         0.67         7      22         0.77         7       2         0.4130E‐04         ‐72.1446E‐02         ‐66.27         7      12         0.5157E‐02        ‐168.5159E‐02         ‐95.6190E‐02        ‐116.2624E‐02        ‐165.4039E‐02        ‐105.2962E‐02        ‐110.27         6      12         0.55         8       4         0.5190E‐02        ‐112.1634E‐02        ‐151.38         6       1         0.80         6      16         0.3554E‐02        ‐116.4561E‐02        ‐116.65         7       8         0.4383E‐09        ‐107.2630E‐02        ‐172.2402E‐02        ‐113.       5      16         0.2397E‐02        ‐118.3342E‐04         ‐72.73         8       6         0.27         8      12         0.93         8      10         0.7665E‐02        ‐129.92         6      17         0.62         7      14         0.35         5      24         0.5648E‐02        ‐129.4508E‐02        ‐110.87         5      21         0.4264E‐02         ‐94.65         6       8         0.3111E‐02        ‐172.35         6      24         0.9532E‐03          23.3691E‐02        ‐116.4495E‐02        ‐168.77         6       2         0.67         7       9         0.67         6      22         0.35         7      24         0.3386E‐02         ‐99.55         6       4         0.1763E‐02        ‐126.38         8       1         0.6141E‐02        ‐112.1933E‐02        ‐165.3547E‐09        ‐107.4284E‐02        ‐123.4006E‐02         ‐99.8057E‐03          23.2393E‐02        ‐126.6030E‐02        ‐101.4596E‐02         ‐99.1786E‐02         ‐66.5068E‐02        ‐123.86         7       3         0.5171E‐02        ‐110.

97        11      20         0.67        10      22         0.93        11       5         0.2698E‐02        ‐137.93         9       5         0.5150E‐02         ‐99.5192E‐02        ‐105.16        11      18         0.65        11       8         0.92         9      17         0.86        12       3         0.44        11      26         0.67         9       9         0.6890E‐02         ‐95.9408E‐02        ‐112.38        11       7         0.2950E‐02        ‐126.44         9      26         0.73         9       6         0.2452E‐02        ‐137.7168E‐02        ‐123.7368E‐02         ‐95.2681E‐02        ‐126.4767E‐02        ‐172.27         9      12         0.1006E‐01        ‐112.86         9       3         0.62        10      14         0.60        10      15         0.80         9      16         0.5666E‐02         ‐99.77         9       2         0.3196E‐02        ‐126.4018E‐02        ‐113.35         9      24         0.38        11       1         0.5946E‐02        ‐116.1225E‐02          23.97        10      20         0.7946E‐09        ‐107.4506E‐02        ‐110.44        10      26         0.1095E‐01        ‐129.4353E‐02        ‐113.55        11       4         0.4682E‐02         ‐86.7486E‐04         ‐72.1460E‐02          23.87        11      21         0.55         9       4         0.3673E‐02        ‐118.93        12       5         0.3390E‐02        ‐118.69        10      19         0.93        10       5         0.97         9      20         0.80        11      16         0.27        11      12         0.6758E‐02        ‐101.6516E‐02        ‐123.2989E‐02         ‐66.86        10       3         0.16        10      18         0.3238E‐02         ‐66.1093E‐02          23.80        10      16         0.6441E‐02        ‐116.4779E‐02         ‐94.67        11       9         0.8685E‐02        ‐112.67        11      22         0.55        10       4         0.6907E‐02        ‐110.6937E‐02        ‐116.73        10       6         0.8054E‐02        ‐101.63         9      13         0.87         9      21         0.5605E‐04         ‐72.77        11       2         0.6360E‐02         ‐95.6282E‐04         ‐72.49         9      11         0.49        11      11         0.3082E‐02        ‐118.3929E‐02         ‐86.44         8      26         0.93        11      10         0.38        10       1         0.5405E‐02        ‐116.69         9      19         0.       8      24         0.3653E‐02        ‐113.6358E‐02        ‐168.17         9      23         0.63        10      13         0.92        11      17         0.8578E‐02        ‐151.38        12       1         0.49        10      11         0.7434E‐02        ‐101.5949E‐09        ‐107.17        11      23         0.5370E‐02        ‐110.8612E‐02        ‐101.7895E‐02        ‐112.86        11       3         0.5695E‐02         ‐94.16         9      18         0.5782E‐02         ‐95.6188E‐02        ‐105.6887E‐02        ‐168.8590E‐02        ‐129.55        12       4         0.3504E‐02        ‐165.06         9      25         0.35        10      24         0.17        10      23         0.67         9      22         0.5712E‐02        ‐105.2717E‐02         ‐66.60        11      15         0.7798E‐02        ‐151.87        10      21         0.62        11      14         0.7765E‐02        ‐123.4956E‐02        ‐110.6667E‐09        ‐107.6910E‐04         ‐72.9938E‐02        ‐151.60         9      15         0.2940E‐02        ‐165.5795E‐02        ‐110.06        10      25         0.2734E‐02        ‐151.9293E‐02        ‐151.27        10      12         0.6375E‐02        ‐110.67        10       9         0.38         9       7         0.73        11       6         0.5779E‐02        ‐168.77        12       2         0.69        11      19         0.6138E‐02         ‐99.7631E‐02        ‐116.3235E‐02        ‐165.63        11      13         0.73  C-24 .06         8      25         0.93         9      10         0.92        10      17         0.06        11      25         0.2922E‐02        ‐137.7334E‐09        ‐107.77        10       2         0.5257E‐02         ‐94.4000E‐02        ‐172.4400E‐02        ‐172.62         9      14         0.35        11      24         0.4322E‐02         ‐86.93        10      10         0.9450E‐02        ‐129.65         9       8         0.38         9       1         0.1348E‐02          23.65        10       8         0.1024E‐01        ‐129.2485E‐02        ‐151.38        10       7         0.8267E‐02        ‐116.2961E‐02        ‐151.

77        15       2         0.7621E‐02        ‐116.38        15       1         0.9346E‐02        ‐116.8005E‐04         ‐72.3504E‐02        ‐151.7365E‐02        ‐168.3831E‐02         ‐66.60        12      15         0.7385E‐02        ‐110.6738E‐02         ‐94.65        12       8         0.65        13       8         0.7321E‐02        ‐105.69        13      19         0.      12       6         0.38        14       7         0.62        13      14         0.1728E‐02          23.8983E‐09        ‐107.97        13      20         0.3348E‐02        ‐151.3304E‐02        ‐137.38        15       7         0.6996E‐02        ‐105.93        13      10         0.8779E‐02        ‐123.4299E‐02        ‐165.06        13      25         0.86        14       3         0.55        14       4         0.92        14      17         0.8463E‐04         ‐72.5540E‐02         ‐86.1256E‐01        ‐129.44        12      26         0.3585E‐02        ‐137.38        12       7         0.77        13       2         0.8452E‐02         ‐95.5742E‐02        ‐110.17        14      23         0.93        12      10         0.1064E‐01        ‐112.16        14      18         0.93        14      10         0.4655E‐02        ‐113.3633E‐02        ‐151.06        12      25         0.4146E‐02        ‐165.49        13      11         0.77        14       2         0.49        15      11         0.1157E‐01        ‐129.4345E‐02        ‐118.9400E‐09        ‐107.97        12      20         0.93        13       5         0.8857E‐04         ‐72.67        12      22         0.7808E‐02        ‐110.3920E‐02        ‐126.69        14      19         0.1100E‐01        ‐151.55        13       4         0.7790E‐02         ‐95.6090E‐02         ‐94.67        14       9         0.9529E‐02        ‐101.8149E‐02        ‐168.62  C-25 .93        15       5         0.60        14      15         0.5389E‐02        ‐172.1562E‐02          23.80        12      16         0.49        12      11         0.8171E‐02        ‐110.8303E‐02        ‐123.35        12      24         0.7262E‐02         ‐99.4505E‐02        ‐118.87        12      21         0.8449E‐02        ‐168.55        15       4         0.7786E‐02        ‐168.67        13      22         0.3125E‐02        ‐137.97        14      20         0.38        13       1         0.63        15      13         0.67        13       9         0.92        12      17         0.1154E‐01        ‐112.9880E‐02        ‐101.44        13      26         0.6439E‐02         ‐94.44        14      26         0.86        13       3         0.63        14      13         0.1211E‐01        ‐129.27        12      12         0.63        12      13         0.6888E‐02        ‐116.86        15       3         0.5150E‐02        ‐113.3417E‐02        ‐126.5640E‐02        ‐172.17        13      23         0.6939E‐02         ‐99.16        12      18         0.06        14      25         0.65        15       8         0.3613E‐02        ‐126.67        14      22         0.7282E‐02        ‐116.3927E‐02        ‐118.80        13      16         0.27        14      12         0.69        12      19         0.8841E‐02        ‐116.8496E‐09        ‐107.3747E‐02        ‐165.16        13      18         0.93        15      10         0.60        13      15         0.27        13      12         0.5007E‐02         ‐86.5848E‐02        ‐172.9187E‐02        ‐123.5097E‐02        ‐172.73        14       6         0.5340E‐02        ‐113.4152E‐02        ‐118.38        14       1         0.62        12      14         0.87        14      21         0.1651E‐02          23.6563E‐02         ‐99.3458E‐02        ‐137.87        13      21         0.35        14      24         0.35        13      24         0.27        15      12         0.65        14       8         0.17        12      23         0.93        14       5         0.73        15       6         0.1051E‐01        ‐151.62        14      14         0.6070E‐02        ‐110.5294E‐02         ‐86.1113E‐01        ‐112.92        13      17         0.67        12       9         0.67        15       9         0.8152E‐02         ‐95.3660E‐02         ‐66.3781E‐02        ‐126.73        13       6         0.49        14      11         0.3167E‐02        ‐151.4922E‐02        ‐113.9105E‐02        ‐101.38        13       7         0.6617E‐02        ‐105.6353E‐02        ‐110.9781E‐02        ‐116.1140E‐01        ‐151.3462E‐02         ‐66.80        14      16         0.3962E‐02        ‐165.63        13      13         0.

7406E‐02         ‐94.93        16       5         0.35        15      24         0.65        16       8         0.1010E‐01        ‐123.86        17       3         0.97        16      20         0.7529E‐02         ‐99.62        17      14         0.93        18       5         0.27        18      12         0.1841E‐02          23.67        16       9         0.35        16      24         0.1172E‐01        ‐151.4721E‐02        ‐118.8854E‐02        ‐168.8688E‐02         ‐95.4108E‐02        ‐126.92        18      17         0.67        17      22         0.1209E‐01        ‐151.8961E‐02         ‐95.73        16       6         0.6983E‐02        ‐110.65        17       8         0.9183E‐04         ‐72.67  C-26 .63        17      13         0.8879E‐02        ‐110.1331E‐01        ‐129.16        16      18         0.38        16       7         0.38        17       7         0.8472E‐02        ‐110.69        16      19         0.1075E‐01        ‐116.7955E‐02        ‐105.8047E‐02        ‐105.06        15      25         0.8685E‐02        ‐168.60        17      15         0.17        17      23         0.6771E‐02        ‐110.4776E‐02        ‐118.1063E‐01        ‐116.06        17      25         0.62        18      14         0.87        15      21         0.80        17      16         0.8376E‐02        ‐116.5597E‐02        ‐113.4505E‐02        ‐165.1186E‐01        ‐112.49        16      11         0.77        18       2         0.55        16       4         0.8709E‐02        ‐110.3851E‐02        ‐151.63        16      13         0.5661E‐02        ‐113.69        15      19         0.60        15      15         0.38        17       1         0.77        17       2         0.87        17      21         0.1224E‐01        ‐112.86        16       3         0.7982E‐02         ‐99.73        17       6         0.27        17      12         0.93        17       5         0.1291E‐01        ‐129.6986E‐02         ‐94.7803E‐02        ‐105.62        16      14         0.80        15      16         0.4029E‐02        ‐126.60        18      15         0.1210E‐01        ‐112.06        16      25         0.69        17      19         0.38        18       7         0.1047E‐01        ‐101.3807E‐02        ‐151.44        15      26         0.4557E‐02        ‐165.55        18       4         0.67        18       9         0.16        15      18         0.44        17      26         0.8281E‐02        ‐116.6128E‐02        ‐172.97        17      20         0.9791E‐02        ‐123.49        18      11         0.65        18       8         0.16        17      18         0.17        16      23         0.17        15      23         0.27        16      12         0.9624E‐04         ‐72.6199E‐02        ‐172.8122E‐02        ‐116.6020E‐02         ‐86.87        16      21         0.3972E‐02         ‐66.80        18      16         0.67        15      22         0.3800E‐02        ‐137.5489E‐02        ‐113.63        18      13         0.      15      14         0.35        17      24         0.67        16      22         0.80        16      16         0.1042E‐01        ‐116.7901E‐02        ‐116.1035E‐01        ‐101.8982E‐02        ‐110.9440E‐04         ‐72.4631E‐02        ‐118.4083E‐02         ‐66.97        15      20         0.60        16      15         0.55        17       4         0.93        18      10         0.7181E‐02         ‐94.6011E‐02        ‐172.4162E‐02         ‐66.38        18       1         0.1016E‐01        ‐101.4419E‐02        ‐165.49        17      11         0.3757E‐02        ‐137.1316E‐01        ‐129.1021E‐08        ‐107.92        16      17         0.92        15      17         0.38        16       1         0.1877E‐02          23.3685E‐02        ‐137.9983E‐02        ‐123.8957E‐02        ‐168.92        17      17         0.6587E‐02        ‐110.69        18      19         0.5744E‐02         ‐86.44        16      26         0.67        17       9         0.3734E‐02        ‐151.87        18      21         0.1002E‐08        ‐107.9525E‐02        ‐123.93        16      10         0.7739E‐02         ‐99.5904E‐02         ‐86.7322E‐02         ‐94.9747E‐09        ‐107.6903E‐02        ‐110.1014E‐01        ‐116.93        17      10         0.97        18      20         0.86        18       3         0.7591E‐02        ‐105.8858E‐02         ‐95.7891E‐02         ‐99.73        18       6         0.1195E‐01        ‐151.4156E‐02        ‐126.16        18      18         0.1791E‐02          23.77        16       2         0.

80        19      16         0.1033E‐08        ‐107.62        19      14         0.07         1       5         0.33         1      22         0.1213E‐01        ‐151.93        19       5         0.5683E‐02          66.77        19       2         0.9773E‐04         107.4156E‐02          53.35        18      24         0.62         2       1         0.37         2      13         0.4557E‐02          14.20         2      16         0.8078E‐02          74.1228E‐01        ‐112.7009E‐02        ‐110.4210E‐02         113.1899E‐02        ‐156.38        19       1         0.7982E‐02          80.33         1       9         0.16        19      18         0.23         1       2         0.1899E‐02          23.65         2      24         0.6112E‐02          93.35        19      24         0.5683E‐02        ‐113.40         2      15         0.9735E‐04         107.1336E‐01          50.8991E‐02        ‐168.14         2       3         0.8995E‐02         ‐95.3815E‐02        ‐137.20         1      16         0.83         1      23         0.84         1      18         0.56         1      26         0.1010E‐01          56.31         1      19         0.8408E‐02          63.8982E‐02          69.7435E‐02          85.1079E‐01        ‐116.1213E‐01          28.67        19      22         0.08         2      17         0.23         2       2         0.6223E‐02        ‐172.1075E‐01          63.5661E‐02          66.49        19      11         0.1906E‐02        ‐156.07         2       5         0.6112E‐02         ‐86.6223E‐02           7.1014E‐01          56.3800E‐02          42.38         2      14         0.86        19       3         0.4172E‐02          53.27         1       6         0.94         1      25         0.37         1      13         0.13         1      21         0.4227E‐02         113.44        19      26         0.38         1      14         0.27         2       6         0.6089E‐02          93.87        19      21         0.8012E‐02         ‐99.8047E‐02          74.9016E‐02          69.13         2      21         0.6983E‐02          69.1051E‐01        ‐101.1209E‐01          28.3866E‐02          28.07         2      10         0.03         2      20         0.93        19      10         0.38        19       7         0.6089E‐02         ‐86.60        19      15         0.3851E‐02          28.4210E‐02         ‐66.67        19       9         0.4794E‐02          61.14         1       3         0.33         2       9         0.4776E‐02          61.27        19      12         0.3815E‐02          42.65         1      24         0.17        19      23         0.9773E‐04         ‐72.97        19      20         0.33         2      22         0.73        19       6         0.8995E‐02          84.08         1      17         0.94         2      25         0.62         2       7         0.92        19      17         0.4575E‐02          14.1079E‐01          63.1224E‐01          67.31         2      19         0.45         2       4         0.17        18      23         0.8957E‐02          11.8078E‐02        ‐105.38  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  PITCH MOTION TRANSFER FUNCTION  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'idir      ifreq      ampl     phase         1       1         0.03         1      20         0.8376E‐02          63.40         1      15         0.4575E‐02        ‐165.9016E‐02        ‐110.8961E‐02          84.44        18      26         0.73         1      12         0.51         1      11         0.1037E‐08          72.55        19       4         0.3866E‐02        ‐151.1331E‐01          50.7406E‐02          85.1047E‐01          78.4172E‐02        ‐126.1037E‐08        ‐107.45         1       4         0.      18      22         0.73         2      12         0.6199E‐02           7.8991E‐02          11.62         1       7         0.06        19      25         0.8012E‐02          80.35         2       8         0.1906E‐02          23.9735E‐04         ‐72.7009E‐02          69.65        19       8         0.4227E‐02         ‐66.1051E‐01          78.51         2      11         0.35         1       8         0.8408E‐02        ‐116.06        18      25         0.7435E‐02         ‐94.1336E‐01        ‐129.83         2      23         0.07         1      10         0.4794E‐02        ‐118.84         2      18         0.63        19      13         0.69        19      19         0.1228E‐01          67.1014E‐01        ‐123.56  C-27 .

6128E‐02           7.62         4       7         0.       2      26         0.9529E‐02          78.1316E‐01          50.1042E‐01          63.1210E‐01          67.7891E‐02          80.94         4      25         0.4721E‐02          61.9791E‐02          56.4505E‐02          61.56         5      26         0.45         3       4         0.51         4      11         0.84         5      18         0.33         3      22         0.23         5       2         0.8685E‐02          11.4162E‐02         113.1035E‐01          78.56         4      26         0.7591E‐02          74.8152E‐02          84.27         4       6         0.1841E‐02        ‐156.51         3      11         0.33         3       9         0.8854E‐02          11.37         3      13         0.8281E‐02          63.13         4      21         0.31         4      19         0.62         5       1         0.5744E‐02          93.27         6       6         0.94         5      25         0.8709E‐02          69.8858E‐02          84.62         5       7         0.07         4       5         0.8149E‐02          11.40         5      15         0.7955E‐02          74.7803E‐02          74.14         3       3         0.33         4      22         0.3734E‐02          28.03         4      20         0.5489E‐02          66.07         4      10         0.7739E‐02          80.03         3      20         0.1002E‐08          72.62         6       7         0.73         4      12         0.6011E‐02           7.07         3      10         0.83         3      23         0.37         4      13         0.1113E‐01          67.20         4      16         0.07         3       5         0.1186E‐01          67.23         4       2         0.4631E‐02          61.31         3      19         0.62         4       1         0.9183E‐04         107.4299E‐02          14.6020E‐02          93.13         3      21         0.07         5       5         0.94         3      25         0.23         3       2         0.6771E‐02          69.40         3      15         0.83         4      23         0.1033E‐08          72.33         5      22         0.20         3      16         0.62         3       7         0.7322E‐02          85.3585E‐02          42.73         3      12         0.7181E‐02          85.1063E‐01          63.33         4       9         0.62         3       1         0.9983E‐02          56.1211E‐01          50.9624E‐04         107.1016E‐01          78.6587E‐02          69.5640E‐02           7.38         5      14         0.6903E‐02          69.83         5      23         0.3807E‐02          28.35  C-28 .08         3      17         0.8879E‐02          69.7529E‐02          80.40         4      15         0.27         3       6         0.3757E‐02          42.37         5      13         0.45         5       4         0.03         5      20         0.8688E‐02          84.20         5      16         0.1877E‐02        ‐156.3972E‐02         113.3920E‐02          53.5597E‐02          66.31         5      19         0.9525E‐02          56.35         5       8         0.1291E‐01          50.1154E‐01          67.1195E‐01          28.4083E‐02         113.5904E‐02          93.9880E‐02          78.08         4      17         0.6986E‐02          85.8449E‐02          11.84         4      18         0.1172E‐01          28.84         3      18         0.1256E‐01          50.4419E‐02          14.4029E‐02          53.13         5      21         0.4108E‐02          53.27         5       6         0.14         5       3         0.73         5      12         0.9440E‐04         107.65         5      24         0.23         6       2         0.45         4       4         0.8122E‐02          63.08         5      17         0.33         5       9         0.8452E‐02          84.14         4       3         0.38         4      14         0.51         5      11         0.1021E‐08          72.07         6       5         0.62         6       1         0.5848E‐02           7.9747E‐09          72.65         4      24         0.5340E‐02          66.56         3      26         0.07         5      10         0.14         6       3         0.8472E‐02          69.1014E‐01          63.1791E‐02        ‐156.3633E‐02          28.45         6       4         0.4505E‐02          14.38         3      14         0.35         3       8         0.65         3      24         0.7901E‐02          63.1100E‐01          28.3685E‐02          42.1140E‐01          28.35         4       8         0.

7365E‐02          11.94         6      25         0.1064E‐01          67.6070E‐02          69.9187E‐02          56.03         8      20         0.62         7       7         0.94         8      25         0.08         7      17         0.23         7       2         0.6907E‐02          69.4922E‐02          66.8983E‐09          72.7385E‐02          69.83         6      23         0.8612E‐02          78.1095E‐01          50.62         9       7         0.       6       8         0.33         8       9         0.7368E‐02          84.3613E‐02          53.45         9       4         0.07         7      10         0.3673E‐02          61.07         8      10         0.6563E‐02          80.9105E‐02          78.3781E‐02          53.2961E‐02          28.33         8      22         0.62         7       1         0.4146E‐02          14.38         7      14         0.23         8       2         0.07         8       5         0.3504E‐02          28.7786E‐02          11.38         8      14         0.65         8      24         0.3458E‐02          42.37         7      13         0.27         8       6         0.4353E‐02          66.9408E‐02          67.6888E‐02          63.33         7      22         0.5370E‐02          69.9400E‐09          72.73         9      12         0.6738E‐02          85.2922E‐02          42.14         8       3         0.83         7      23         0.8171E‐02          69.4152E‐02          61.3927E‐02          61.37         8      13         0.07         9       5         0.94         7      25         0.3196E‐02          53.6939E‐02          80.8303E‐02          56.20         8      16         0.73         7      12         0.9293E‐02          28.31         6      19         0.38         9      14         0.8005E‐04         107.65         7      24         0.6439E‐02          85.1006E‐01          67.7282E‐02          63.13         7      21         0.7621E‐02          63.37         6      13         0.1562E‐02        ‐156.31         8      19         0.5097E‐02           7.51         9      11         0.4655E‐02          66.8841E‐02          63.07         6      10         0.6617E‐02          74.83         8      23         0.4767E‐02           7.51         6      11         0.23         9       2         0.40         9      15         0.9938E‐02          28.3167E‐02          28.6996E‐02          74.8779E‐02          56.45         8       4         0.51         8      11         0.56         7      26         0.5150E‐02          66.1024E‐01          50.31         7      19         0.33         7       9         0.40         6      15         0.84         8      18         0.3304E‐02          42.73         8      12         0.13         6      21         0.7790E‐02          84.6887E‐02          11.40         7      15         0.5294E‐02          93.03         7      20         0.33         6       9         0.8054E‐02          78.14         9       3         0.35         8       8         0.1728E‐02        ‐156.7321E‐02          74.5540E‐02          93.6090E‐02          85.27         9       6         0.07         9      10         0.56         8      26         0.56         6      26         0.5389E‐02           7.4345E‐02          61.13         8      21         0.1157E‐01          50.9346E‐02          63.84         7      18         0.62         8       7         0.33         6      22         0.3962E‐02          14.3348E‐02          28.3831E‐02         113.45         7       4         0.20  C-29 .3462E‐02         113.7808E‐02          69.1051E‐01          28.14         7       3         0.5007E‐02          93.3747E‐02          14.3504E‐02          14.62         9       1         0.84         6      18         0.20         7      16         0.07         7       5         0.65         6      24         0.40         8      15         0.62         8       1         0.08         6      17         0.33         9       9         0.51         7      11         0.35         7       8         0.8857E‐04         107.35         9       8         0.6890E‐02          84.7262E‐02          80.6353E‐02          69.27         7       6         0.03         6      20         0.5742E‐02          69.37         9      13         0.9781E‐02          63.8496E‐09          72.8463E‐04         107.20         6      16         0.08         8      17         0.73         6      12         0.1651E‐02        ‐156.3417E‐02          53.38         6      14         0.3125E‐02          42.3660E‐02         113.

       9      16         0.2950E‐02          53.83        11      23         0.20        10      16         0.4400E‐02           7.7765E‐02          56.3238E‐02         113.13         9      21         0.5712E‐02          74.2424E‐02         113.07        12      10         0.2452E‐02          42.56        10      26         0.4000E‐02           7.03        12      20         0.13        12      21         0.08        10      17         0.3390E‐02          61.3082E‐02          61.8267E‐02          63.7334E‐09          72.5782E‐02          84.4322E‐02          93.23        11       2         0.2734E‐02          28.27        12       6         0.40        12      15         0.4020E‐02          69.83        10      23         0.2485E‐02          28.07        11       5         0.37        11      13         0.07        12       5         0.6030E‐02          78.20        11      16         0.5159E‐02          84.2217E‐02          28.51        12      11         0.40        10      15         0.5666E‐02          80.4264E‐02          85.6910E‐04         107.6282E‐04         107.5795E‐02          69.37        12      13         0.40        11      15         0.7895E‐02          67.62        10       1         0.33        10      22         0.37        10      13         0.7045E‐02          67.33        12      22         0.2188E‐02          42.73        10      12         0.5171E‐02          69.65        10      24         0.35        10       8         0.38        10      14         0.7434E‐02          78.3260E‐02          66.4956E‐02          69.33        10       9         0.45        10       4         0.4633E‐02          74.27        11       6         0.65  C-30 .7631E‐02          63.62        10       7         0.2698E‐02          42.5257E‐02          85.03        10      20         0.33         9      22         0.8590E‐02          50.08        11      17         0.65        11      24         0.2681E‐02          53.5192E‐02          74.6360E‐02          84.7486E‐04         107.31        12      19         0.84        10      18         0.33        12       9         0.62        12       7         0.3235E‐02          14.2624E‐02          14.1348E‐02        ‐156.14        12       3         0.4506E‐02          69.6758E‐02          78.5946E‐02          63.62        12       1         0.2750E‐02          61.3653E‐02          66.03         9      20         0.6959E‐02          28.2940E‐02          14.6190E‐02          63.31        10      19         0.20        12      16         0.6188E‐02          74.03        11      20         0.45        12       4         0.23        12       2         0.5150E‐02          80.5814E‐02          56.7665E‐02          50.84         9      18         0.08         9      17         0.5695E‐02          85.83         9      23         0.3506E‐02          93.4596E‐02          80.6441E‐02          63.8578E‐02          28.31        11      19         0.35        11       8         0.33        11       9         0.84        12      18         0.08        12      17         0.7946E‐09          72.56         9      26         0.62        11       7         0.07        10      10         0.2989E‐02         113.6375E‐02          69.65         9      24         0.31         9      19         0.6138E‐02          80.8685E‐02          67.94        11      25         0.4779E‐02          85.4823E‐02          63.27        10       6         0.2393E‐02          53.1460E‐02        ‐156.6937E‐02          63.83        12      23         0.6516E‐02          56.07        10       5         0.13        11      21         0.3929E‐02          93.13        10      21         0.94         9      25         0.5405E‐02          63.4682E‐02          93.14        10       3         0.6667E‐09          72.35        12       8         0.07        11      10         0.23        10       2         0.51        10      11         0.9450E‐02          50.94        10      25         0.6358E‐02          11.2717E‐02         113.51        11      11         0.38        11      14         0.4018E‐02          66.73        12      12         0.5157E‐02          11.62        11       1         0.14        11       3         0.7168E‐02          56.56        11      26         0.5779E‐02          11.84        11      18         0.45        11       4         0.3569E‐02           7.1225E‐02        ‐156.7798E‐02          28.33        11      22         0.73        11      12         0.38        12      14         0.

1640E‐02          61.1907E‐02          42.      12      24         0.35        15       8         0.33        15       9         0.3414E‐02          74.5190E‐02          67.3596E‐02          78.3076E‐02          84.73        13      12         0.2113E‐02         113.3075E‐02          11.14        15       3         0.56        13      26         0.3547E‐09          72.03        15      20         0.4571E‐02          50.20        15      16         0.27        14       6         0.03        14      20         0.62        15       7         0.13        15      21         0.2740E‐02          80.4284E‐02          56.5068E‐02          56.73        14      12         0.2091E‐02          93.27  C-31 .2962E‐02          69.13        13      21         0.5396E‐02          63.1322E‐02          28.1786E‐02         113.2583E‐02          93.40        14      15         0.56        12      26         0.4006E‐02          80.07        15      10         0.08        14      17         0.65        15      24         0.2026E‐02          61.1565E‐02          14.62        14       7         0.1933E‐02          28.8057E‐03        ‐156.27        15       6         0.37        15      13         0.5949E‐09          72.37        14      13         0.1093E‐02        ‐156.1763E‐02          53.27        13       6         0.20        13      16         0.4497E‐02          84.3111E‐02           7.4149E‐02          28.2397E‐02          61.07        14       5         0.13        14      21         0.65        13      24         0.07        13      10         0.62        14       1         0.3800E‐02          11.5127E‐02          28.2543E‐02          85.23        16       2         0.84        15      18         0.94        15      25         0.2128E‐02           7.83        14      23         0.62        13       7         0.1612E‐02          42.73        15      12         0.3179E‐02          67.1446E‐02         113.23        15       2         0.08        15      17         0.3505E‐02          69.6141E‐02          67.56        15      26         0.20        14      16         0.3056E‐02          93.2630E‐02           7.45        14       4         0.38        13      14         0.5648E‐02          50.3717E‐02          85.33        13       9         0.65        14      24         0.14        14       3         0.3386E‐02          80.3810E‐02          69.23        13       2         0.84        14      18         0.4443E‐02          78.1427E‐02          53.31        14      19         0.1933E‐02          14.3459E‐02          50.5257E‐02          78.84        13      18         0.2763E‐02          74.4561E‐02          63.14        16       3         0.51        13      11         0.03        13      20         0.3691E‐02          63.35        14       8         0.3801E‐02          84.33        13      22         0.1634E‐02          28.45        13       4         0.51        15      11         0.3084E‐02          69.40        15      15         0.2841E‐02          66.33        14      22         0.4130E‐04         107.1944E‐02          66.07        13       5         0.4495E‐02          11.94        14      25         0.2287E‐02          14.56        14      26         0.45        16       4         0.38        14      14         0.51        14      11         0.4508E‐02          69.23        14       2         0.4201E‐02          67.4204E‐02          63.07        16       5         0.94        13      25         0.2397E‐02          69.6682E‐02          50.62        15       1         0.2086E‐02          53.07        14      10         0.35        13       8         0.1305E‐02          42.5186E‐09          72.3140E‐02          28.62        16       1         0.31        13      19         0.33        14       9         0.2402E‐02          66.5605E‐04         107.6066E‐02          28.14        13       3         0.45        15       4         0.38        15      14         0.4886E‐04         107.07        15       5         0.4039E‐02          74.4383E‐09          72.9532E‐03        ‐156.2721E‐02          78.3467E‐02          56.94        12      25         0.08        13      17         0.37        13      13         0.2328E‐02          84.62        13       1         0.2876E‐02          63.40        13      15         0.3554E‐02          63.33        15      22         0.6520E‐03        ‐156.83        13      23         0.3342E‐04         107.31        15      19         0.3142E‐02          85.83        15      23         0.

1460E‐02          63.2554E‐18        ‐126.07        17      10         0.1070E‐02          67.4934E‐03        ‐156.40        18      15         0.56        18      26         0.27        17       6         0.62        18       7         0.2107E‐02          28.1471E‐02          66.20        16      16         0.2133E‐02          67.2176E‐02          63.62        18       1         0.5424E‐03           7.1391E‐02          80.73        19       6         0.65        18      24         0.23        18       2         0.2793E‐02          63.5327E‐03          93.2624E‐02          56.2074E‐02          80.20        17      16         0.38        17      14         0.9040E‐10          72.65        17      24         0.31        18      19         0.2321E‐02          50.1081E‐02           7.1061E‐02          93.7339E‐03         113.83        17      23         0.1814E‐02          69.56        16      26         0.1184E‐02          14.62        19       1         0.08        17      17         0.23        17       2         0.40        16      15         0.45        18       4         0.1924E‐02          85.83        18      23         0.56        17      26         0.38        16      14         0.3325E‐03          42.7328E‐03          63.1561E‐02          11.9406E‐03          63.84        17      18         0.62        17       7         0.31        17      19         0.1057E‐02          28.14        18       3         0.7040E‐03          74.1582E‐02          93.2333E‐02          69.3310E‐03        ‐156.51        16      11         0.1662E‐03        ‐156.1611E‐02           7.45        17       4         0.73        16      12         0.6713E‐03          28.73        18      12         0.20        18      16         0.6625E‐03          42.33        18      22         0.9163E‐03          78.51        18      11         0.14        17       3         0.77        19       2         0.6983E‐03          80.1080E‐02          53.94        16      25         0.1094E‐02         113.08        18      17         0.1826E‐02          78.37        18      13         0.67        19       9         0.2801E‐18        ‐165.33        16      22         0.1165E‐02          50.1566E‐02          69.33        18       9         0.3369E‐03          28.1801E‐09          72.08        16      17         0.6109E‐03          69.07        18       5         0.07        17       5         0.8835E‐03          56.03        18      20         0.33        17      22         0.65        19       8         0.03        16      20         0.3480E‐18        ‐113.13        16      21         0.38        18      14         0.8183E‐18        ‐129.37        17      13         0.31        16      19         0.2091E‐02          74.93        19      10         0.2327E‐02          11.7520E‐18        ‐112.7944E‐03          14.1241E‐02          61.1874E‐02          63.49        19      11         0.1001E‐02          28.7244E‐03          53.35        17       8         0.1697E‐04         107.37        16      13         0.2529E‐04         107.7836E‐03          11.03        17      20         0.4178E‐03          61.65        16      24         0.3636E‐03          53.6438E‐18        ‐101.84        16      18         0.9868E‐03          66.4953E‐03          66.1217E‐02          69.5505E‐18        ‐168.8325E‐03          61.33        17       9         0.94        17      25         0.62        16       7         0.1291E‐02          85.93        19       5         0.1403E‐02          74.84        18      18         0.3810E‐18        ‐172.5508E‐18         ‐95.62        17       1         0.07        16      10         0.86        19       3         0.1760E‐02          56.3987E‐03          14.6480E‐03          85.7429E‐18        ‐151.8517E‐05         107.63        19      13         0.27        19      12         0.55        19       4         0.9874E‐03          42.83        16      23         0.2367E‐18        ‐151.33        16       9         0.3684E‐03         113.13        18      21         0.40        17      15         0.35        18       8         0.07        18      10         0.73        17      12         0.62  C-32 .2336E‐18        ‐137.13        17      21         0.94        18      25         0.      16       6         0.7858E‐03          69.38        19       7         0.35        16       8         0.7840E‐03          84.2685E‐09          72.51        17      11         0.2936E‐18        ‐118.1562E‐02          84.27        18       6         0.

000               0.000               0.00         1      17          0.000               0.00         2      23          0.000               0.6351E‐25        ‐107.00         1      23          0.000               0.5149E‐18        ‐116.000               0.000               0.00         1      20          0.000               0.00         2       2          0.00         3      16          0.000               0.4946E‐18        ‐105.6608E‐18        ‐116.00         3      14          0.00         2      17          0.00         1      26          0.      19      14         0.000               0.000               0.00         3      15          0.000               0.69        19      19         0.00         2      19          0.000               0.000               0.00         2      24          0.00         1       5          0.00         3       1          0.2588E‐18         ‐66.00         1      24          0.00         2       7          0.35        19      24         0.000               0.60        19      15         0.00         1      12          0.00         1       8          0.00         3      11          0.4552E‐18         ‐94.1167E‐18          23.000               0.000               0.00         2      10          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         2       9          0.00         3      17          0.00         1      16          0.000               0.00         3       5          0.000               0.000               0.00         3       6          0.00         2      13          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         2       6          0.000               0.000               0.00         2      20          0.00         3       8          0.87        19      21         0.000               0.00  C-33 .00         2      21          0.00         1       2          0.67        19      22         0.16        19      18         0.000               0.00         3       2          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         2      12          0.00         1      18          0.00         1      19          0.000               0.38  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  YAW MOTION TRANSFER FUNCTION  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'idir      ifreq      ampl     phase         1       1          0.000               0.97        19      20         0.000               0.00         3      10          0.000               0.00         1       7          0.4906E‐18         ‐99.00         2      25          0.000               0.00         2       5          0.00         2      22          0.000               0.00         1       3          0.4292E‐18        ‐110.00         1       9          0.000               0.000               0.00         1      13          0.000               0.00         1      21          0.00         2       1          0.00         1      10          0.00         1      15          0.00         3      13          0.80        19      16         0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         3       4          0.00         3      12          0.00         2      16          0.000               0.00         3       9          0.00         2      18          0.000               0.92        19      17         0.000               0.5521E‐18        ‐110.000               0.00         2       3          0.06        19      25         0.000               0.000               0.00         1      22          0.000               0.00         1       6          0.000               0.44        19      26         0.00         2      15          0.00         2       4          0.000               0.00         2      11          0.6207E‐18        ‐123.00         1       4          0.000               0.00         1      14          0.00         2      26          0.00         1      25          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.17        19      23         0.00         1      11          0.3743E‐18         ‐86.000               0.000               0.00         2      14          0.000               0.00         3       3          0.000               0.5984E‐20         ‐72.00         3       7          0.00         2       8          0.

000               0.000               0.000               0.00         4       6          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         5      25          0.000               0.000               0.00         4      19          0.00         4      17          0.000               0.00         3      22          0.00         4       3          0.000               0.00         5       8          0.00         4       2          0.00         4      15          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         4       7          0.00         5       5          0.00         6      11          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         5      22          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         3      23          0.00         4      10          0.00         3      21          0.00         5      23          0.000               0.000               0.00         5      13          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         5      20          0.00         4      14          0.000               0.00         3      20          0.00         5      17          0.00         6      18          0.000               0.00         5       7          0.00         6      16          0.000               0.00         5      11          0.00         5       4          0.00         4      18          0.00         3      26          0.00         5      15          0.00         4      25          0.00         4       5          0.00         4       4          0.00         4      13          0.000               0.00         6      17          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         4       9          0.000               0.00  C-34 .00         5       3          0.000               0.00         6      23          0.00         6      20          0.000               0.00         5      14          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         6       7          0.000               0.000               0.00         6      10          0.00         5      24          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         6       5          0.00         4      20          0.00         3      24          0.00         6      12          0.00         4      11          0.000               0.000               0.00         5      26          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         6      25          0.000               0.000               0.00         6      19          0.00         6       6          0.000               0.00         6       2          0.000               0.00         6       9          0.000               0.00         6      15          0.000               0.000               0.00         5      10          0.00         4      12          0.00         6      24          0.000               0.00         3      25          0.000               0.00         5      18          0.000               0.00         6      22          0.00         4      23          0.00         6       4          0.000               0.000               0.00         5       2          0.00         5       9          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         4      21          0.000               0.00         3      19          0.000               0.00         6      13          0.000               0.       3      18          0.00         4      16          0.000               0.00         4      22          0.00         5       6          0.00         5      16          0.00         6       1          0.00         6      21          0.000               0.00         5      12          0.000               0.000               0.00         5       1          0.000               0.000               0.00         4      24          0.00         6       3          0.00         6      14          0.000               0.00         5      19          0.000               0.00         4      26          0.000               0.000               0.00         6       8          0.000               0.000               0.00         5      21          0.00         4       1          0.000               0.000               0.00         4       8          0.000               0.000               0.

000               0.000               0.000               0.00         8      24          0.000               0.000               0.00         9      18          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         7      21          0.000               0.000               0.00         9      23          0.000               0.00         9      14          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         7      11          0.00         8      15          0.000               0.000               0.00         8       5          0.000               0.00         7       9          0.00         9      21          0.00         8      11          0.00         8      20          0.00         7      20          0.00         7       5          0.000               0.000               0.00         9      15          0.000               0.000               0.00         8       6          0.000               0.00         7       4          0.00         9      17          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         9      25          0.00         9       1          0.00         7       7          0.000               0.00         9      19          0.000               0.00         9      10          0.00         7      19          0.000               0.00         9       4          0.000               0.00         9      24          0.00         7      15          0.00         7      25          0.00         7      24          0.00         9       9          0.00         8      12          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         9       8          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         9      12          0.00         8      26          0.00         9       2          0.000               0.000               0.00         7       2          0.00         7      14          0.00         8       9          0.00         9      22          0.       6      26          0.000               0.000               0.00         7      26          0.000               0.00         9      11          0.000               0.00        10       3          0.000               0.00         8      16          0.000               0.00         8      17          0.000               0.00         8      13          0.00        10       2          0.000               0.000               0.00         8      10          0.000               0.000               0.00        10       5          0.00        10       4          0.00         8       1          0.00         8      22          0.000               0.00         7      23          0.00         7       6          0.00         7      18          0.00         8       7          0.000               0.00         7       1          0.00         9       6          0.00         8       3          0.00         8      21          0.000               0.00         7      16          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         7      22          0.00         8       8          0.000               0.00         7       3          0.00         8      14          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        10       1          0.000               0.00         9       3          0.00         7       8          0.00         9       7          0.000               0.00  C-35 .000               0.00         8      23          0.00         8      18          0.00         8       4          0.00         9      20          0.000               0.00         7      12          0.00         7      13          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        10       7          0.00         9      26          0.00         9      13          0.000               0.00         7      10          0.000               0.00         8      19          0.00         9      16          0.00         8       2          0.00        10       6          0.00         8      25          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00         7      17          0.00         9       5          0.

00        11      16          0.00        12      26          0.00        12       5          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        12      19          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        11      12          0.00        13       4          0.00        13      14          0.00        12      13          0.00        11       6          0.000               0.00        11       1          0.000               0.00        11       4          0.00        13       9          0.00        12      14          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        12       7          0.00        11      15          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        10       9          0.000               0.000               0.00        11      23          0.00        12       2          0.00        12      20          0.000               0.00        13      13          0.00        12      17          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        11      20          0.00        10      23          0.00        13      12          0.000               0.00        12       4          0.00        12      12          0.000               0.00        10      21          0.000               0.00        12      18          0.00        11       8          0.000               0.00        13      11          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        11      13          0.00        13      10          0.00        12      16          0.00        12      10          0.00        11      18          0.000               0.00        11      14          0.00        12       3          0.000               0.00        12      21          0.00        10      16          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        11      25          0.00        12       1          0.000               0.000               0.00        10      12          0.000               0.000               0.00        10      26          0.00        10      19          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        10      17          0.000               0.00  C-36 .00        12       6          0.00        11       2          0.00        12      11          0.00        12      22          0.00        12      23          0.00        11      24          0.00        13       7          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        12       9          0.000               0.00        12      24          0.00        13       6          0.00        12      15          0.00        13       2          0.00        11       3          0.000               0.00        11      17          0.000               0.00        12       8          0.00        13       8          0.00        11      21          0.000               0.00        10      15          0.00        10      22          0.00        10      10          0.00        10      14          0.      10       8          0.000               0.00        13       5          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        11       9          0.00        11      26          0.00        10      18          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        13       1          0.00        11      19          0.00        13      15          0.000               0.00        13       3          0.00        10      20          0.000               0.00        11      22          0.000               0.000               0.00        11       5          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        10      24          0.000               0.000               0.00        10      11          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        11       7          0.000               0.00        10      13          0.000               0.00        10      25          0.00        11      11          0.000               0.000               0.00        12      25          0.00        11      10          0.000               0.

00        14       3          0.00        15      14          0.000               0.00        14      22          0.00        15      18          0.000               0.000               0.00        14      20          0.000               0.000               0.00        16       4          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        13      20          0.00        15      24          0.000               0.00        15       7          0.00        16      17          0.000               0.000               0.00        15      17          0.00        14       8          0.00        16      19          0.000               0.00        14       5          0.00        14      12          0.00        13      25          0.000               0.00        13      24          0.00        14      26          0.000               0.00        14      16          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        15      22          0.000               0.00        14       7          0.000               0.00        16      20          0.00        16       7          0.000               0.000               0.00        16       5          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        16      18          0.00        16      21          0.00        15       9          0.000               0.00        15      19          0.      13      16          0.000               0.00        16      14          0.00        15       6          0.000               0.00        16      23          0.000               0.00        15      21          0.000               0.00        13      22          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        15       8          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        16      16          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        15       4          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        14      11          0.000               0.00        14      23          0.00        16      10          0.000               0.000               0.00        14      10          0.000               0.00        14      21          0.00        15       3          0.000               0.00        14       1          0.000               0.000               0.00        13      21          0.00        16      22          0.00        15      26          0.000               0.00        16       8          0.000               0.00        13      23          0.00        15      16          0.000               0.00        16      11          0.00        16       1          0.00        14       9          0.00        13      19          0.000               0.00        14      15          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        14      24          0.000               0.00        13      26          0.00        14      17          0.00  C-37 .000               0.000               0.000               0.00        14       2          0.000               0.00        16      15          0.00        14      14          0.000               0.000               0.00        15       5          0.000               0.00        14      18          0.000               0.00        14      13          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        15       2          0.000               0.000               0.00        15      12          0.000               0.00        16      12          0.00        16       2          0.00        15      23          0.000               0.000               0.00        14      19          0.00        15      25          0.00        15       1          0.00        14       6          0.00        16       9          0.00        15      20          0.000               0.00        15      10          0.00        16       6          0.000               0.00        15      13          0.000               0.000               0.00        13      17          0.00        16      13          0.00        13      18          0.000               0.000               0.00        14      25          0.00        16       3          0.00        14       4          0.00        15      15          0.00        15      11          0.000               0.000               0.

00        18      11          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        19      12          0.00        18      24          0.000               0.00        18      20          0.00        17       2          0.00        19      13          0.00        19      24          0.00        17      23          0.00        17       4          0.00        19       7          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        19      25          0.00        17      14          0.000               0.00        19      15          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        19       4          0. 2 lines    C-38 .000               0.000               0.00        17       8          0.000               0.000               0.00        17       7          0.00        19      26          0.000               0.00        17       1          0.00        19       5          0.00        18      10          0.00        16      25          0.000               0.000               0.00        17      19          0.00        19       3          0.000               0.00        19       1          0.000               0.00        19       6          0.000               0.000               0.00        19      19          0.00        19      23          0.000               0.00        19       9          0.00        18      25          0.00        17      26          0.00        18      12          0.00        19      20          0.00        17      18          0.      16      24          0.000               0.00        17      24          0.000               0.00        18      26          0.00        18      14          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        17       6          0.00        17      16          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        18       1          0.000               0.00        19      18          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        16      26          0.000               0.00        17      15          0.000               0.00        17      22          0.000               0.00        18       9          0.000               0.000               0.00        17      17          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        19      17          0.000               0.00        19      22          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        18      22          0.000               0.00        17       9          0.000               0.00        18      19          0.000               0.00        19      14          0.00  '============================================================  SECOND ORDER WAVE DRIFT  '============================================================  'txwadr.000               0.00        19       2          0.000               0.00        17      20          0.00        17      12          0.000               0.00        17       5          0.00        18       2          0.00        17      11          0.000               0.00        18       7          0.00        17       3          0.000               0.00        17      25          0.000               0.00        18       6          0.00        19      11          0.00        19       8          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        18      23          0.00        19      21          0.00        18      13          0.000               0.00        18       5          0.00        18      17          0.000               0.00        18      15          0.000               0.000               0.00        17      13          0.000               0.00        18      21          0.000               0.00        18       4          0.00        19      10          0.00        18       8          0.00        18       3          0.00        17      10          0.000               0.000               0.000               0.00        18      16          0.000               0.00        18      18          0.000               0.00        19      16          0.000               0.000               0.00        17      21          0.000               0.000               0.

577         1       5          1.836         1      12          7.0000  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   WAVE FREQUENCIES DRIFT COEFFICIENTS  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'ifofre   fofre         1       0.224399         4       0.18         1      14          27.369599        15       0.0000         7        30.448799        18       0.645         1       6          1.47         1      15          61.216662         3       0.512         1      11          4.698132        23       0.0000        13        60.0000        10        45.0000         9        40.7         1      26          183.0000        18        85.52         1      19          65.0000         5        20.209440         2       0.620         1       3          1.0000        11        50.763         1      10          3.285599        10       0.251327         7       0.  'nfodir   nfofre   ifosym    itypin        19      26       2  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐   WAVE DIRECTIONS DRIFT COEFFICIENTS  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'ifodir   fodir         1        0.432         1      13          13.0000        16        75.0000        17        80.8         1      18          83.241661         6       0.0000         6        25.261799         8       0.0000         8        35.5         1      17          113.232711         5       0.00000         2        5.00000         3        10.299199        11       0.314159        12       0.643         1       2          1.8         1      25          226.392699        16       0.14159  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  SURGE WAVE DRIFT COEFFICIENTS  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'idir      ifreq      ampl         1       1          1.000         1       8          2.0000        15        70.7         1      24          238.628319        22       0.330694        13       0.0000        14        65.57080        26        3.16         1      16          106.39         1      20          75.303         1       9          2.0000        19        90.273182         9       0.0000         4        15.1         1      23          254.785398        24        1.790         1       7          2.571199        21       0.0000        12        55.9         1      22          225.483322        19       0.89         1      21          128.591         1       4          1.04720        25        1.523599        20       0.3  C-39 .418879        17       0.349066        14       0.

294         2       9          2.3         2      18          83.404         2      13          13.6         4       1          1.9         2      25          225.37         2      15          60.614         2       3          1.16         4      20          73.753         2      10          3.523         4       5          1.24         3      16          104.546         5       6          1.637         2       2          1.969         3       8          2.639         2       6          1.587         4       2          1.596         3       3          1.498         2      11          4.932         4       8          2.08         4      16          102.553         3       5          1.537         4       4          1.620         3       6          1.458         3      11          4.30         4      21          124.8         4      17          109.319         3      13          12.8         2      26          182.762         3       7          1.544         5       2          1.669         4      10          3.8         3      17          112.5         4      23          246.       2       1          1.8         3      24          235.589         4       6          1.0         4      26          177.763         3      12          7.225         4       9          2.14         2      20          75.21         2      19          65.571         2       5          1.618         3       2          1.0         2      17          113.392         4      11          4.565         4       3          1.671         4      12          7.879         5       8          2.13         2      14          27.682         5       7          1.9         3      22          221.268         3       9          2.179         4      13          12.818         2      12          7.9         4      18          80.3         2      23          253.729         4       7          1.721         3      10          3.26         3      19          64.98         3      14          27.0         4      24          230.4         2      22          224.6         3       1          1.992         2       8          2.5         4      22          217.495         5       4          1.482         5       5          1.68         4      19          63.2         3      25          223.0         3      18          82.585         2       4          1.05         3      15          60.53         4      15          59.164  C-40 .7         3      23          250.7         4      25          219.39         3      20          74.73         3      21          126.1         5       1          1.60         2      21          128.783         2       7          1.523         5       3          1.73         4      14          26.567         3       4          1.2         3      26          180.93         2      16          106.7         2      24          237.

0         5      26          172.469         6       3          1.366         7       5          1.327         8       3          1.48         6      17          103.1         5      22          211.4         6      25          205.44         5      20          71.303         8       4          1.4         6      26          166.378         7       4          1.8         8       1          1.292         8       5          1.78         6      21          116.31         5      21          121.95         6      14          24.300         5      11          4.188         7      12          6.491         6       6          1.20  C-41 .887         8       9          2.90         6      15          55.346         8       2          1.       5       9          2.53         7      18          72.087         6       9          2.8         6      24          216.812         6       8          2.50         8      15          50.504         6      10          3.466         8       7          1.42         7      14          23.638         8       8          1.48         5      16          100.81         5      15          57.622         6       7          1.63         7      20          65.43         6      16          96.79         7      15          52.3         6       1          1.041         7      11          4.97         7      16          92.8         7      25          196.49         5      19          61.429         6       5          1.736         6      13          11.33         7      19          56.425         7       6          1.596         5      10          3.80         8      14          22.3         7      26          158.348         8       6          1.732         7       8          1.263         8      10          2.962         8      12          6.088         8      13          10.1         6      18          75.0         6      23          230.550         7       7          1.4         5      25          213.995         7       9          2.0         7      23          220.39         5      14          25.383         6      12          6.2         7       1          1.10         8      16          87.489         6       2          1.0         5      17          106.26         6      20          68.545         5      12          6.403         7       3          1.877         8      11          3.72         7      21          111.9         5      18          78.8         6      22          204.3         5      24          224.984         5      13          12.183         6      11          4.19         7      17          98.6         7      22          195.6         5      23          239.436         7      13          11.70         6      19          59.393         7      10          3.442         6       4          1.423         7       2          1.6         7      24          206.

023        11       4          1.4         8      23          208.705         9      12          5.42        10      15          43.06        10      19          46.16         9      18          63.2         9       1          1.117         9      10          2.777        11      13          8.56         8      20          62.42         8      19          53.776        11      10          2.6         8      22          184.04         9      15          46.4        10       1          1.2        10      23          180.03        11      20          48.6         9      26          140.480        11       9          1.042        11       3          1.1        10      24          168.255        10      13          9.25        10      16          75.09         9      20          58.10         9      14          21.764         9       9          2.146        10       3          1.014        11       5          1.056        11       2          1.219         9       4          1.693         9      13          10.690         9      11          3.72         9      22          172.23        10      20          53.115        10       5          1.629        10       9          1.208         9       5          1.6         8      25          185.43        11      17          73.7        11      23          163.109        11      12          4.9         9      25          173.7         8      26          150.474        11      14          17.3        10      26          129.85         9      16          81.057        11       6          1.241         9       3          1.260         9       6          1.7        11      24          153.45        10      18          59.5  C-42 .265        10       7          1.483        10      11          3.125        10       4          1.98         9      19          50.13        11      18          53.32        11      16          68.6         8      24          195.163        10       6          1.13        10      22          159.16         8      21          105.6        11       1          1.1         9      24          182.162        10       2          1.420        10      12          5.55         9      17          87.20         8      18          68.322        10      14          19.66        11      15          39.257        11      11          3.84        11      22          144.954        10      10          2.371         9       7          1.13         9      21          98.532         9       8          1.414        10       8          1.       8      17          93.66        10      21          91.69        11      19          42.28        10      17          80.9        10      25          160.150        11       7          1.259         9       2          1.78        11      21          82.285        11       8          1.5         9      23          195.

0        12      26          105.6665        14       5         0.30        14      19          27.76        13      19          32.5620        15       2         0.3        13      24          119.1        12      23          146.94        13      21          64.61        14      15          25.48        15       1         0.74        13      15          30.152        13       9          1.26        12      18          47.3        13      26          91.15        14      23          107.5441        15       4         0.6        13      23          127.23        13      17          56.9124        12       4         0.80        14      26          77.0        12      25          130.8451        14       8         0.418        13      12          3.08        12      16          61.9426        12       2         0.7        11      26          117.7885        13       5         0.89        13      18          41.85        14      16          44.8217        13       2         0.8102        13       3         0.69        13      20          37.5542        15       3         0.9        14      25          95.321        12       9          1.67        14       1         0.7563        14       7         0.9734        14       9          1.53        12      21          73.141        14      13          5.6723        14       4         0.6945        14       2         0.6953        14       6         0.014        12      11          2.562        12      14          15.592        13      14          13.2        13       1         0.026        12       7          1.92        12      22          129.716        13      13          6.585        12      10          2.8948        13       7         0.44        13      22          112.044        14      12          3.774        12      12          4.07        14      21          54.484        14      11          2.168        14      10          1.9436        12       6          1.5394        15       5         0.6121  C-43 .263        12      13          7.571        14      14          11.58        13      16          53.06        12      17          65.9294        12       3         0.9045        12       5         0.756        13      11          2.76        12      15          35.63        14      20          32.4        13      25          113.99        14      17          48.      11      25          145.147        12       8          1.7954        13       4         0.8        12       1         0.6        14      24          100.9998        13       8          1.91        12      19          37.8226        13       6         0.6848        14       3         0.5627        15       6         0.382        13      10          1.08        14      18          35.1        12      24          137.46        14      22          95.50        12      20          43.

1743        18       8         0.50        17      19          11.412        16      14          7.2762        17       4         0.7151        16      10         0.1434        18       6         0.96        15      21          44.45        17       1         0.4215        18      12         0.4798        17      10         0.1386        18       4         0.91        16      24          61.8398        17      12          1.55        16      17          29.3472        17       8         0.45        16      18          21.27        16      23          65.2857        17       6         0.      15       7         0.18        17      21          22.6839        15       8         0.394  C-44 .64        16      21          33.924        16      13          3.1560        18       7         0.252        16      12          1.110        16      15          15.36        15      20          25.10        17      23          44.00        15      23          87.08        15      22          77.67        15      25          77.6477        18      13          1.1412        18       3         0.49        17      17          19.35        16      22          58.7877        15       9         0.4082        16       5         0.4117        16       4         0.1374        18       5         0.542        15      13          4.3061        18      11         0.67        16      26          47.770        17      15          10.76        17      18          14.80        16      25          58.4253        16       2         0.83        16      16          27.57        15      19          22.92        16      20          19.47        17      25          39.291        17      13          2.36        17      26          31.9450        15      10          1.35        17      20          13.9089        16      11          1.1432        18       2         0.289        17      14          4.3108        17       7         0.84        18       1         0.4194        16       3         0.3999        17       9         0.396        15      15          20.2814        17       3         0.53        15      26          62.4258        16       6         0.38        17      22          39.2408        18      10         0.6098        17      11         0.654        15      12          2.201        15      11          1.91        15      18          28.71        16       1         0.149        18      14          2.22        17      24          41.4632        16       7         0.5176        16       8         0.62        17      16          18.41        15      17          38.509        15      14          9.2738        17       5         0.92        15      16          36.2854        17       2         0.62        16      19          16.2007        18       9         0.10        15      24          81.5961        16       9         0.

3384E‐15         1      10         0.7490E‐14         1      16         0.2150E‐15        19      11        ‐0.1931E‐15         1       5         0.280        18      19          5.1224E‐15        19       8        ‐0.1948E‐15         1       4         0.9102E‐15         1      13         0.6967E‐14        19      18        ‐0.2408         2      10         0.9922E‐16        19       3        ‐0.1007E‐15        19       6        ‐0.2961E‐15        19      12        ‐0.1614E‐14         1      14         0.3364E‐14         1      15         0.1743         2       8         0.4647E‐14        19      21        ‐0.20        18      24          20.1578E‐13         1      22         0.23        18      22          19.2924E‐13         1      25         0.1006E‐15        19       2        ‐0.149         2      14          2.1410E‐15        19       9        ‐0.331        18      16          9.2821E‐15         1       9         0.4215         2      12         0.3745E‐14        19      16        ‐0.9294E‐14         1      21         0.5114E‐14        19      19        ‐0.9741E‐16        19       4        ‐0.2776E‐13         1      26         0.1412         2       3         0.614        18      21          11.8007E‐14         1      20         0.916        18      18          7.2245E‐13         2       1         0.76        18      26          15.81        18      25          19.1560         2       7         0.1682E‐14        19      15        ‐0.278        18      17          9.1304E‐13         1      17         0.916         2      18          7.2012E‐15         1       2         0.1123E‐13  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  SWAY WAVE DRIFT COEFFICIENTS  '‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐  'idir      ifreq      ampl         1       1         0.4551E‐15        19      13        ‐0.1692E‐15        19      10        ‐0.6518E‐14        19      17        ‐0.1386         2       4         0.4004E‐14        19      20        ‐0.4300E‐15         1      11         0.      18      15          5.98        19       1        ‐0.2449E‐15         1       8         0.1096E‐15        19       7        ‐0.7891E‐14        19      22        ‐0.3061         2      11         0.9656E‐16        19       5        ‐0.62        18      23          22.280  C-45 .1379E‐13        19      23        ‐0.1388E‐13        19      26        ‐0.1984E‐15         1       3         0.2007         2       9         0.1374         2       5         0.1023E‐13         1      19         0.8072E‐15        19      14        ‐0.2192E‐15         1       7         0.278         2      17          9.1434         2       6         0.6477         2      13          1.394         2      15          5.2757E‐13         1      23         0.699        18      20          6.3119E‐13         1      24         0.331         2      16          9.1432         2       2         0.1393E‐13         1      18         0.1462E‐13        19      25        ‐0.1559E‐13        19      24        ‐0.2015E‐15         1       6         0.5923E‐15         1      12         0.

2857         3       6         0.20         2      24          20.98         3       1         0.92         5      16          36.4253         4       2         0.4194         4       3         0.22         3      24          41.67         5      25          77.76         2      26          15.5627         5       6         0.57         5      19          22.00         5      23          87.08         5      22          77.252         4      12          1.4258         4       6         0.5176         4       8         0.5542         5       3         0.35         4      22          58.36         3      26          31.35         3      20          13.64         4      21          33.542         5      13          4.81         2      25          19.71  C-46 .654         5      12          2.924         4      13          3.201         5      11          1.4117         4       4         0.45         4      18          21.91         5      18          28.4798         3      10         0.412         4      14          7.5620         5       2         0.3999         3       9         0.27         4      23          65.6098         3      11         0.84         4       1         0.5441         5       4         0.614         2      21          11.36         5      20          25.7877         5       9         0.62         3      16          18.7151         4      10         0.6839         5       8         0.2854         3       2         0.509         5      14          9.83         4      16          27.67         4      26          47.10         3      23          44.62         2      23          22.2762         3       4         0.55         4      17          29.2814         3       3         0.6121         5       7         0.110         4      15          15.289         3      14          4.38         3      22          39.4082         4       5         0.3108         3       7         0.291         3      13          2.770         3      15          10.699         2      20          6.50         3      19          11.53         5      26          62.41         5      17          38.10         5      24          81.80         4      25          58.47         3      25          39.       2      19          5.76         3      18          14.396         5      15          20.8398         3      12          1.5961         4       9         0.18         3      21          22.5394         5       5         0.92         4      20          19.9450         5      10          1.62         4      19          16.49         3      17          19.3472         3       8         0.96         5      21          44.9089         4      11          1.4632         4       7         0.23         2      22          19.91         4      24          61.2738         3       5         0.45         5       1         0.

8451         6       8         0.4         7      25          113.08         6      18          35.26         8      18          47.23         7      17          56.3         7      26          91.06         8      17          65.6665         6       5         0.2         9       1          1.58         7      16          53.6945         6       2         0.44         7      22          112.67         8       1         0.1         8      24          137.76         7      19          32.9045         8       5         0.147         8       8          1.9124         8       4         0.0         8      26          105.023         9       4          1.321         8       9          1.571         6      14          11.30         6      19          27.89         7      18          41.6953         6       6         0.6848         6       3         0.026         8       7          1.9294         8       3         0.716         7      13          6.7885         7       5         0.61         6      15          25.756         7      11          2.9426         8       2         0.92         8      22          129.99         6      17          48.7954         7       4         0.9         6      25          95.8226         7       6         0.057         9       6          1.76         8      15          35.6         6      24          100.63         6      20          32.152         7       9          1.15         6      23          107.9998         7       8          1.46         6      22          95.056         9       2          1.480  C-47 .585         8      10          2.562         8      14          15.044         6      12          3.150         9       7          1.8948         7       7         0.285         9       8          1.1         8      23          146.94         7      21          64.08         8      16          61.69         7      20          37.85         6      16          44.9734         6       9          1.418         7      12          3.53         8      21          73.141         6      13          5.014         8      11          2.3         7      24          119.48         7       1         0.6723         6       4         0.91         8      19          37.6         7      23          127.042         9       3          1.       6       1         0.07         6      21          54.592         7      14          13.74         7      15          30.014         9       5          1.8102         7       3         0.9436         8       6          1.168         6      10          1.50         8      20          43.263         8      13          7.0         8      25          130.7563         6       7         0.8217         7       2         0.80         6      26          77.484         6      11          2.774         8      12          4.382         7      10          1.

       9       9          1.776 
       9      10          2.257 
       9      11          3.109 
       9      12          4.777 
       9      13          8.474 
       9      14          17.66 
       9      15          39.32 
       9      16          68.43 
       9      17          73.13 
       9      18          53.69 
       9      19          42.03 
       9      20          48.78 
       9      21          82.84 
       9      22          144.7 
       9      23          163.7 
       9      24          153.5 
       9      25          145.7 
       9      26          117.8 
      10       1          1.162 
      10       2          1.146 
      10       3          1.125 
      10       4          1.115 
      10       5          1.163 
      10       6          1.265 
      10       7          1.414 
      10       8          1.629 
      10       9          1.954 
      10      10          2.483 
      10      11          3.420 
      10      12          5.255 
      10      13          9.322 
      10      14          19.42 
      10      15          43.25 
      10      16          75.28 
      10      17          80.45 
      10      18          59.06 
      10      19          46.23 
      10      20          53.66 
      10      21          91.13 
      10      22          159.2 
      10      23          180.1 
      10      24          168.9 
      10      25          160.3 
      10      26          129.6 
      11       1          1.259 
      11       2          1.241 
      11       3          1.219 
      11       4          1.208 
      11       5          1.260 
      11       6          1.371 
      11       7          1.532 
      11       8          1.764 
      11       9          2.117 
      11      10          2.690 
      11      11          3.705 
      11      12          5.693 
      11      13          10.10 
      11      14          21.04 
      11      15          46.85 
      11      16          81.55 
      11      17          87.16 
      11      18          63.98 
      11      19          50.09 
      11      20          58.13 
      11      21          98.72 
      11      22          172.5 
      11      23          195.1 
      11      24          182.9 
      11      25          173.6 
      11      26          140.4 
      12       1          1.346 
      12       2          1.327 
      12       3          1.303 
      12       4          1.292 
      12       5          1.348 
      12       6          1.466 
      12       7          1.638 
      12       8          1.887 
      12       9          2.263 
      12      10          2.877 
      12      11          3.962 
      12      12          6.088 
      12      13          10.80 
      12      14          22.50 
      12      15          50.10 
      12      16          87.20 

C-48

      12      17          93.20 
      12      18          68.42 
      12      19          53.56 
      12      20          62.16 
      12      21          105.6 
      12      22          184.4 
      12      23          208.6 
      12      24          195.6 
      12      25          185.7 
      12      26          150.2 
      13       1          1.423 
      13       2          1.403 
      13       3          1.378 
      13       4          1.366 
      13       5          1.425 
      13       6          1.550 
      13       7          1.732 
      13       8          1.995 
      13       9          2.393 
      13      10          3.041 
      13      11          4.188 
      13      12          6.436 
      13      13          11.42 
      13      14          23.79 
      13      15          52.97 
      13      16          92.19 
      13      17          98.53 
      13      18          72.33 
      13      19          56.63 
      13      20          65.72 
      13      21          111.6 
      13      22          195.0 
      13      23          220.6 
      13      24          206.8 
      13      25          196.3 
      13      26          158.8 
      14       1          1.489 
      14       2          1.469 
      14       3          1.442 
      14       4          1.429 
      14       5          1.491 
      14       6          1.622 
      14       7          1.812 
      14       8          2.087 
      14       9          2.504 
      14      10          3.183 
      14      11          4.383 
      14      12          6.736 
      14      13          11.95 
      14      14          24.90 
      14      15          55.43 
      14      16          96.48 
      14      17          103.1 
      14      18          75.70 
      14      19          59.26 
      14      20          68.78 
      14      21          116.8 
      14      22          204.0 
      14      23          230.8 
      14      24          216.4 
      14      25          205.4 
      14      26          166.2 
      15       1          1.544 
      15       2          1.523 
      15       3          1.495 
      15       4          1.482 
      15       5          1.546 
      15       6          1.682 
      15       7          1.879 
      15       8          2.164 
      15       9          2.596 
      15      10          3.300 
      15      11          4.545 
      15      12          6.984 
      15      13          12.39 
      15      14          25.81 
      15      15          57.48 
      15      16          100.0 
      15      17          106.9 
      15      18          78.49 
      15      19          61.44 
      15      20          71.31 
      15      21          121.1 
      15      22          211.6 
      15      23          239.3 
      15      24          224.4 

C-49

      15      25          213.0 
      15      26          172.3 
      16       1          1.587 
      16       2          1.565 
      16       3          1.537 
      16       4          1.523 
      16       5          1.589 
      16       6          1.729 
      16       7          1.932 
      16       8          2.225 
      16       9          2.669 
      16      10          3.392 
      16      11          4.671 
      16      12          7.179 
      16      13          12.73 
      16      14          26.53 
      16      15          59.08 
      16      16          102.8 
      16      17          109.9 
      16      18          80.68 
      16      19          63.16 
      16      20          73.30 
      16      21          124.5 
      16      22          217.5 
      16      23          246.0 
      16      24          230.7 
      16      25          219.0 
      16      26          177.1 
      17       1          1.618 
      17       2          1.596 
      17       3          1.567 
      17       4          1.553 
      17       5          1.620 
      17       6          1.762 
      17       7          1.969 
      17       8          2.268 
      17       9          2.721 
      17      10          3.458 
      17      11          4.763 
      17      12          7.319 
      17      13          12.98 
      17      14          27.05 
      17      15          60.24 
      17      16          104.8 
      17      17          112.0 
      17      18          82.26 
      17      19          64.39 
      17      20          74.73 
      17      21          126.9 
      17      22          221.7 
      17      23          250.8 
      17      24          235.2 
      17      25          223.2 
      17      26          180.6 
      18       1          1.637 
      18       2          1.614 
      18       3          1.585 
      18       4          1.571 
      18       5          1.639 
      18       6          1.783 
      18       7          1.992 
      18       8          2.294 
      18       9          2.753 
      18      10          3.498 
      18      11          4.818 
      18      12          7.404 
      18      13          13.13 
      18      14          27.37 
      18      15          60.93 
      18      16          106.0 
      18      17          113.3 
      18      18          83.21 
      18      19          65.14 
      18      20          75.60 
      18      21          128.4 
      18      22          224.3 
      18      23          253.7 
      18      24          237.9 
      18      25          225.8 
      18      26          182.6 
      19       1          1.643 
      19       2          1.620 
      19       3          1.591 
      19       4          1.577 
      19       5          1.645 
      19       6          1.790 

C-50

      19       7          2.000 
      19       8          2.303 
      19       9          2.763 
      19      10          3.512 
      19      11          4.836 
      19      12          7.432 
      19      13          13.18 
      19      14          27.47 
      19      15          61.16 
      19      16          106.5 
      19      17          113.8 
      19      18          83.52 
      19      19          65.39 
      19      20          75.89 
      19      21          128.9 
      19      22          225.1 
      19      23          254.7 
      19      24          238.8 
      19      25          226.7 
      19      26          183.3 
'‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ 
YAW WAVE DRIFT COEFFICIENTS 
'‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ 
'idir      ifreq      ampl 
       1       1          0.000 
       1       2          0.000 
       1       3          0.000 
       1       4          0.000 
       1       5          0.000 
       1       6          0.000 
       1       7          0.000 
       1       8          0.000 
       1       9          0.000 
       1      10          0.000 
       1      11          0.000 
       1      12          0.000 
       1      13          0.000 
       1      14          0.000 
       1      15          0.000 
       1      16          0.000 
       1      17          0.000 
       1      18          0.000 
       1      19          0.000 
       1      20          0.000 
       1      21          0.000 
       1      22          0.000 
       1      23          0.000 
       1      24          0.000 
       1      25          0.000 
       1      26          0.000 
       2       1          0.000 
       2       2          0.000 
       2       3          0.000 
       2       4          0.000 
       2       5          0.000 
       2       6          0.000 
       2       7          0.000 
       2       8          0.000 
       2       9          0.000 
       2      10          0.000 
       2      11          0.000 
       2      12          0.000 
       2      13          0.000 
       2      14          0.000 
       2      15          0.000 
       2      16          0.000 
       2      17          0.000 
       2      18          0.000 
       2      19          0.000 
       2      20          0.000 
       2      21          0.000 
       2      22          0.000 
       2      23          0.000 
       2      24          0.000 
       2      25          0.000 
       2      26          0.000 
       3       1          0.000 
       3       2          0.000 
       3       3          0.000 
       3       4          0.000 
       3       5          0.000 
       3       6          0.000 
       3       7          0.000 
       3       8          0.000 
       3       9          0.000 
       3      10          0.000 

C-51

       3      11          0.000 
       3      12          0.000 
       3      13          0.000 
       3      14          0.000 
       3      15          0.000 
       3      16          0.000 
       3      17          0.000 
       3      18          0.000 
       3      19          0.000 
       3      20          0.000 
       3      21          0.000 
       3      22          0.000 
       3      23          0.000 
       3      24          0.000 
       3      25          0.000 
       3      26          0.000 
       4       1          0.000 
       4       2          0.000 
       4       3          0.000 
       4       4          0.000 
       4       5          0.000 
       4       6          0.000 
       4       7          0.000 
       4       8          0.000 
       4       9          0.000 
       4      10          0.000 
       4      11          0.000 
       4      12          0.000 
       4      13          0.000 
       4      14          0.000 
       4      15          0.000 
       4      16          0.000 
       4      17          0.000 
       4      18          0.000 
       4      19          0.000 
       4      20          0.000 
       4      21          0.000 
       4      22          0.000 
       4      23          0.000 
       4      24          0.000 
       4      25          0.000 
       4      26          0.000 
       5       1          0.000 
       5       2          0.000 
       5       3          0.000 
       5       4          0.000 
       5       5          0.000 
       5       6          0.000 
       5       7          0.000 
       5       8          0.000 
       5       9          0.000 
       5      10          0.000 
       5      11          0.000 
       5      12          0.000 
       5      13          0.000 
       5      14          0.000 
       5      15          0.000 
       5      16          0.000 
       5      17          0.000 
       5      18          0.000 
       5      19          0.000 
       5      20          0.000 
       5      21          0.000 
       5      22          0.000 
       5      23          0.000 
       5      24          0.000 
       5      25          0.000 
       5      26          0.000 
       6       1          0.000 
       6       2          0.000 
       6       3          0.000 
       6       4          0.000 
       6       5          0.000 
       6       6          0.000 
       6       7          0.000 
       6       8          0.000 
       6       9          0.000 
       6      10          0.000 
       6      11          0.000 
       6      12          0.000 
       6      13          0.000 
       6      14          0.000 
       6      15          0.000 
       6      16          0.000 
       6      17          0.000 
       6      18          0.000 

C-52

       6      19          0.000 
       6      20          0.000 
       6      21          0.000 
       6      22          0.000 
       6      23          0.000 
       6      24          0.000 
       6      25          0.000 
       6      26          0.000 
       7       1          0.000 
       7       2          0.000 
       7       3          0.000 
       7       4          0.000 
       7       5          0.000 
       7       6          0.000 
       7       7          0.000 
       7       8          0.000 
       7       9          0.000 
       7      10          0.000 
       7      11          0.000 
       7      12          0.000 
       7      13          0.000 
       7      14          0.000 
       7      15          0.000 
       7      16          0.000 
       7      17          0.000 
       7      18          0.000 
       7      19          0.000 
       7      20          0.000 
       7      21          0.000 
       7      22          0.000 
       7      23          0.000 
       7      24          0.000 
       7      25          0.000 
       7      26          0.000 
       8       1          0.000 
       8       2          0.000 
       8       3          0.000 
       8       4          0.000 
       8       5          0.000 
       8       6          0.000 
       8       7          0.000 
       8       8          0.000 
       8       9          0.000 
       8      10          0.000 
       8      11          0.000 
       8      12          0.000 
       8      13          0.000 
       8      14          0.000 
       8      15          0.000 
       8      16          0.000 
       8      17          0.000 
       8      18          0.000 
       8      19          0.000 
       8      20          0.000 
       8      21          0.000 
       8      22          0.000 
       8      23          0.000 
       8      24          0.000 
       8      25          0.000 
       8      26          0.000 
       9       1          0.000 
       9       2          0.000 
       9       3          0.000 
       9       4          0.000 
       9       5          0.000 
       9       6          0.000 
       9       7          0.000 
       9       8          0.000 
       9       9          0.000 
       9      10          0.000 
       9      11          0.000 
       9      12          0.000 
       9      13          0.000 
       9      14          0.000 
       9      15          0.000 
       9      16          0.000 
       9      17          0.000 
       9      18          0.000 
       9      19          0.000 
       9      20          0.000 
       9      21          0.000 
       9      22          0.000 
       9      23          0.000 
       9      24          0.000 
       9      25          0.000 
       9      26          0.000 

C-53

      10       1          0.000 
      10       2          0.000 
      10       3          0.000 
      10       4          0.000 
      10       5          0.000 
      10       6          0.000 
      10       7          0.000 
      10       8          0.000 
      10       9          0.000 
      10      10          0.000 
      10      11          0.000 
      10      12          0.000 
      10      13          0.000 
      10      14          0.000 
      10      15          0.000 
      10      16          0.000 
      10      17          0.000 
      10      18          0.000 
      10      19          0.000 
      10      20          0.000 
      10      21          0.000 
      10      22          0.000 
      10      23          0.000 
      10      24          0.000 
      10      25          0.000 
      10      26          0.000 
      11       1          0.000 
      11       2          0.000 
      11       3          0.000 
      11       4          0.000 
      11       5          0.000 
      11       6          0.000 
      11       7          0.000 
      11       8          0.000 
      11       9          0.000 
      11      10          0.000 
      11      11          0.000 
      11      12          0.000 
      11      13          0.000 
      11      14          0.000 
      11      15          0.000 
      11      16          0.000 
      11      17          0.000 
      11      18          0.000 
      11      19          0.000 
      11      20          0.000 
      11      21          0.000 
      11      22          0.000 
      11      23          0.000 
      11      24          0.000 
      11      25          0.000 
      11      26          0.000 
      12       1          0.000 
      12       2          0.000 
      12       3          0.000 
      12       4          0.000 
      12       5          0.000 
      12       6          0.000 
      12       7          0.000 
      12       8          0.000 
      12       9          0.000 
      12      10          0.000 
      12      11          0.000 
      12      12          0.000 
      12      13          0.000 
      12      14          0.000 
      12      15          0.000 
      12      16          0.000 
      12      17          0.000 
      12      18          0.000 
      12      19          0.000 
      12      20          0.000 
      12      21          0.000 
      12      22          0.000 
      12      23          0.000 
      12      24          0.000 
      12      25          0.000 
      12      26          0.000 
      13       1          0.000 
      13       2          0.000 
      13       3          0.000 
      13       4          0.000 
      13       5          0.000 
      13       6          0.000 
      13       7          0.000 
      13       8          0.000 

C-54

000        13      19          0.000        13      20          0.000        15       7          0.000        14      13          0.000        14      18          0.000        16      12          0.000        16      15          0.000        14      21          0.000        14      23          0.000        15      13          0.000        14       4          0.000        15      24          0.000        15       9          0.000        15      18          0.000        15      23          0.000        14       5          0.000        15       3          0.000        13      24          0.000        15       1          0.000        16       1          0.000        16      11          0.000        15      26          0.000        15      15          0.000        14      20          0.000        13      15          0.      13       9          0.000        15      16          0.000        13      13          0.000        16      16          0.000        13      10          0.000        15      10          0.000        15       5          0.000        16       5          0.000        14       1          0.000        14      14          0.000        16       6          0.000        16       4          0.000        14      25          0.000        14       8          0.000        15       4          0.000        14      26          0.000        13      26          0.000        15      11          0.000        14      16          0.000        14       6          0.000        14       9          0.000        15      17          0.000  C-55 .000        16       3          0.000        14       7          0.000        15       6          0.000        15      25          0.000        16       9          0.000        15       8          0.000        15      21          0.000        15       2          0.000        14      24          0.000        15      20          0.000        13      17          0.000        14      15          0.000        13      12          0.000        16       2          0.000        16      14          0.000        13      11          0.000        15      14          0.000        15      19          0.000        14       3          0.000        15      22          0.000        13      25          0.000        14      22          0.000        14      12          0.000        13      18          0.000        13      22          0.000        13      23          0.000        14      11          0.000        16      13          0.000        14      19          0.000        16       8          0.000        14      17          0.000        16      10          0.000        15      12          0.000        13      16          0.000        14      10          0.000        13      21          0.000        14       2          0.000        16       7          0.000        13      14          0.

000        16      26          0.000        17       1          0.000        18      16          0.000        19       2          0.000        17      26          0.000        18       6          0.000        18       5          0.000        19       9          0.000        18      19          0.000        17      24          0.000        18       9          0.000        19      15          0.000        19      16          0.000        18      15          0.000        17      21          0.000        19      13          0.000        18      25          0.000        19      14          0.000        16      19          0.000        17       6          0.000        17       8          0.000        18       3          0.000        18      18          0.000        17      10          0.000        18      10          0.000        18      24          0.000        19       4          0.000        17      23          0.000        19      18          0.000        17       4          0.000        17      16          0.000        19       7          0.000        18       1          0.000        17      19          0.000        17      11          0.000        19       3          0.000        19      23          0.000        17       5          0.000        18      23          0.000        17      25          0.000        17      14          0.000        17       9          0.000        18      12          0.000        16      25          0.000        17      12          0.000        19      21          0.000        17      15          0.000        17      20          0.000        18      17          0.000        16      22          0.000        17       2          0.000        18       7          0.000        17      17          0.000        16      20          0.000        19      22          0.000        19      20          0.000        19      24          0.000        18      13          0.000        18       2          0.000        19       1          0.000        17       3          0.000  C-56 .000        18       8          0.000        16      21          0.000        19      12          0.000        19      10          0.000        19      17          0.000        16      18          0.000        18       4          0.000        16      23          0.000        18      26          0.      16      17          0.000        17      22          0.000        19       8          0.000        17       7          0.000        19       6          0.000        18      21          0.000        18      22          0.000        18      14          0.000        18      20          0.000        16      24          0.000        19      19          0.000        17      13          0.000        17      18          0.000        18      11          0.000        19      11          0.000        19       5          0.

0    .0     1750. S ( S‐E ) '  '==================='   LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro        5       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z     ‐31.0      ‐9.   6000.2       ‐18.      19      25          0.   6000.2       ‐18.   LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro        2       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z     31.   6000.0     1750.0      ‐9.0     1750.0    .   6000.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch    342.2       ‐18.000  ' =========================  POSITIONING SYSTEM DATA  ' =========================   12 mooring   lines  ' =======   CATENARY SYSTEM DATA  '  '==================='  ' Cluster 1.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch    198.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch    330.0    .0    .00000E+00  '  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.2       ‐18.0     1750.0      ‐9.0    .0      ‐9.00000E+00  '  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch    340.2       ‐18.0      ‐9.00000E+00  '  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.   LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro        6       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z     ‐31.  '==================='  ' Cluster 2.0     1750.   6000.0    .0      ‐9.   LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro        7       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z     ‐31.00000E+00  '  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch    210.0     1750.0    .00000E+00  '  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.0     1750.0      ‐9.   6000.   LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro        8       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z     ‐31.  N (N‐E) '  '==================='   LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro        1       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z     31.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch    212.0      ‐9.0     1750.   LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro        4       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z     31.0    .   6000.2       ‐18.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch    200.00000E+00  C-57 .00000E+00  '  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch    328.2       ‐18.000        19      26          0.   LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro        3       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z     31.2       ‐18.00000E+00  '  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.

       2   0.0        36.0        36.  '==================='  ' Cluster 3   West '  '==================='    LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro        9       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z      0.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch     85.00000E+00  '  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.0     1500.5    0.   LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro       11       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z      0.5    0.155  0.00000E+00  '  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.  '  LINE CHARACTERISTICS DATA  '  lichar   type   npth   nptv   vrange       1       2      50     5       25.56     0.0      ‐9.5    0.0     1500.    0.56     0.   6000.     ‐160.    0     2      5      0     30      0     125.   6000.       5   0.0      ‐9.0      ‐9.    0.0    .155  0.    0.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch     83.87E07    1.27   1.   LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro       12       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z      0.    4.714    0.260  0.000   ‐1.   6000.260  0.87E07    1.155  0.    0.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch     97.    0.46E08    2.0    .46E08    2.   15000.   6000.27   1.0     1500.5    0.    0.   0.714    0.  '  nseg   ibotco   slope   zglb    tmax   thmin      5        1      0.    4.35   '  dir   preten   xwinch     95.   LINE DATA  '  iline   lichar  imeth   iwirun  icpro        10       1       1       0       1  '  x           y        z      0.       3   0.0    .87   2.    0     2      3      0      1      0       5.0    .   25.       4   0.00000E+00  '  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.    0     2      4      0     40      0     700.46E08    1.87   2.0        36.  '************************************************************  END  '************************************************************  C-58 .  '  iseg   ityp   nel   ibuoy   sleng  fric  nea   itynea      1      0     20      0      50.    0     2      2      0     30      0     400.0      ‐9.   6000.00000E+00  '  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.0        36.    0     2  '  iseg   dia     emod   emfac   uwia   watfac  cdn   cdl       1   0.'  ifail  ftime  btens       0      0.5    0.00   2.0     1500.    0.

0000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 -170.8100000 1.0000000 33.0000000 5.0000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 33.0000000 0.5000000 5.0000000 'FREE NODES D-1 .0000000 'snod-id ipos ix iy iz irx iry irz chcoo chupro node4 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 GLOBAL NO 'x0 y0 z0 x1 y1 z1 rot dir 0.c.0000000 '********************************************************************** NEW SINGLE RISER '********************************************************************** 'atyps idris AR ARSYS '********************************************************************** ARBITRARY SYSTEM AR '********************************************************************** 'nsnod nlin nsnfix nves nricon nspr nack 4 2 4 1 0 0 0 'ibtang zbot ibot3d 0 -1000.0000000 -170.S.9 '********************************************************************** '---------------------------------------------------------------------- UNIT NAMES SPECIFICATION '---------------------------------------------------------------------- 'ut ul um uf grav gcons s m Mg kN 9.0000000 220.0000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 -170.0000000 -16. Thesis Coupled Dynamic Analysis of Cylindrical FPSO.0000000 0.0000000 0.7.0000000 -16.0000000 0.0000000 5.0000000 220.0000000 0.3200000 84.0000000 -170.0000000 0 'B 6.3200000 84.0000000 'snod-id ipos ix iy iz irx iry irz chcoo chupro node2 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 GLOBAL NO 'x0 y0 z0 x1 y1 z1 rot dir 0. Appendix D 1 RIFLEX DECOUPLED INPUT M.0000000 0. SIMA INPMOD RIFLEX (INP)    '********************************************************************** INPMOD IDENTIFICATION TEXT 3. Moorings and Riser Based on Numerical Simulation A.5: LINE TOPOLOGY DEFINITION 'lineid lintyp-id snod1-id snod2-id line1 ltyp1 node1 node2 line2 ltyp2 node3 node4 'FIXED NODES 'snod-id ipos ix iy iz irx iry irz chcoo chupro node1 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 GLOBAL NO 'x0 y0 z0 x1 y1 z1 rot dir 270.0000000 'snod-id ipos ix iy iz irx iry irz chcoo chupro node3 0 1 1 1 1 1 1 GLOBAL NO 'x0 y0 z0 x1 y1 z1 rot dir 270.5000000 0.

0000000 1 'tb ycurmx 1000000.0000000 0.0000000 'iea iej igt ipress imf harpar 1 1 1 0 0 0.0000000 0 cs2 0 0 50 50.0000000 3 5 40.0000000 'iea iej igt ipress imf harpar 1 1 1 0 0 0.0000000 0.2000000 0.0000000 3 5 30.0000000 'cqx cqy cax cay clx cly icode 0.0000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 1 'tb ycurmx 1000000.0000000 0 '********************************************************************** NEW COMPONENT CRS1 '********************************************************************** 'cmptyp-id temp alpha beta cs1 20.0000000 'ea 500000.0600000e-02 0.0000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 'ams ae ai rgyr 0.1600000 0.10 Line and segment specification '********************************************************************** NEW LINE DATA '********************************************************************** 'lintyp-id nseg ncmpty2 flutyp ltyp1 4 0 fluid1 'crstyp ncmpty1 exwtyp nelseg slgth nstrps nstrpd slgth0 isoity cs1 0 0 50 25.0000000 3 5 25.0000000 'B.0000000 0 cs6 0 0 10 40.'ives idwftr xg yg zg dirx 1 su36 0.0000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 'ams ae ai rgyr 0.9360000e-02 0.0000000 0.0000000 0 cs4 0 0 50 200.0000000 'ejy mf 33.0000000 3 5 25.2000000 0.0000000 0.1000000 0.3000000 5.2000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 0.4000000 '********************************************************************** NEW COMPONENT CRS1 '********************************************************************** 'cmptyp-id temp alpha beta cs2 20.0000000 0.0000000 D-2 .0000000 0.4000000 '********************************************************************** NEW COMPONENT CRS1 '********************************************************************** 'cmptyp-id temp alpha beta cs3 20.0000000 'ea 500000.1450000 5.0000000 'gtminus 5000.0000000 0 cs5 0 0 50 55.0000000 0 cs1 0 0 50 215.0000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 3 5 50.0000000 'ejy mf 33.9360000e-02 0.2500000 1.0000000 0 '********************************************************************** NEW LINE DATA '********************************************************************** 'lintyp-id nseg ncmpty2 flutyp ltyp2 4 0 fluid1 'crstyp ncmpty1 exwtyp nelseg slgth nstrps nstrpd slgth0 isoity cs4 0 0 50 25.0000000 3 5 55.0000000 0 cs3 0 0 10 30.0000000 'ejy mf 37.0000000 3 5 215.0000000 'ams ae ai rgyr 0.2000000 0.0600000e-02 1.2000000 0.0000000 'ea 500000.0000000 'cqx cqy cax cay clx cly icode 0.0000000 0.0000000 3 5 200.0000000 0.2500000 0.0000000 'gtminus 5000.0000000 'iea iej igt ipress imf harpar 1 1 1 0 0 0.

0000000 'iea iej igt ipress imf harpar 1 1 1 0 0 0.0000000 0.0000000 1 'tb ycurmx 1000000.0000000 0.0000000 'gtminus 5000.6300000e-02 0.0000000 'cqx cqy cax cay clx cly icode 0.0000000 0.2500000 0.2000000 0.0000000 'ams ae ai rgyr 0.0000000 0.6300000e-02 0.0000000 'ea 500000.0000000 0.0000000 1 '********************************************************************** SUPPORT VESSEL IDENTIFICATION '********************************************************************** D-3 .4000000 '********************************************************************** NEW COMPONENT CRS1 '********************************************************************** 'cmptyp-id temp alpha beta cs4 20.0000000 1 'tb ycurmx 1000000.2000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 'ams ae ai rgyr 0.0000000 'ea 500000.2500000 7.0000000 'ejy mf 33.3000000 7.0000000 1 'tb ycurmx 1000000.0000000 'iea iej igt ipress imf harpar 1 1 1 0 0 0.0000000 0.0000000 'cqx cqy cax cay clx cly icode 0.0000000 'gtminus 5000.'gtminus 5000.4130000e-02 0.0000000 'gtminus 5000.2000000 0.4000000 '********************************************************************** NEW COMPONENT CRS1 '********************************************************************** 'cmptyp-id temp alpha beta cs6 20.0000000 0.0000000 'cqx cqy cax cay clx cly icode 0.0000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 0.2000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 1 'tb ycurmx 1000000.0000000 0.0000000 'iea iej igt ipress imf harpar 1 1 1 0 0 0.0000000 0.0000000 'ams ae ai rgyr 0.0000000 'cqx cqy cax cay clx cly icode 0.6300000e-02 3.0000000 'ea 500000.0000000 0.2500000 0.2000000 0.4000000 '********************************************************************** NEW COMPONENT FLUID '********************************************************************** 'cmptyp-id fluid1 'rhoi vveli pressi dpress idir 0.0000000 'ejy mf 37.0000000 0.1500000 7.2000000 0.1000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 0.0000000 0.8000000 0.0000000 0.2500000 0.0000000 0.0000000 0.1600000 0.4000000 '********************************************************************** NEW COMPONENT CRS1 '********************************************************************** 'cmptyp-id temp alpha beta cs5 20.0000000 0.0000000 0.2000000 0.0000000 'ejy mf 40.

0000000 12 55.3141590 12 0.0000000 13 60.3306940 13 0.0000000 9 40.2416610 6 0.5708000 26 3.0000000 4 15.2991990 11 0.6283190 22 0.2800000 1 3 1.2094400 2 0.3926990 16 0.0000000 16 75.7853980 24 1.2327110 5 0.2000000 1 2 1.0000000 2 5.0000000 6 25.1415900 '---------------------------------------------------------------------- HFTRANSFER FUNCTION SURGE '---------------------------------------------------------------------- 'idir ifreq amplitude phase[deg] 1 1 1.0000000 15 70.3810000 -86.2617990 8 0.2513270 7 0.0000000 14 65.0000000 7 30.4487990 18 0.0000000 18 85.2243990 4 0.4833220 19 0.5080000 -87.0000000 3 10.6981320 23 0.3695990 15 0.4188790 17 0.5711990 21 0.2731820 9 0.5860000 -87.4380000 -86.2855990 10 0.7700000 D-4 .0000000 5 20.0000000 19 90.6690000 -87.9800000 1 5 1.0000000 8 35.0000000 '---------------------------------------------------------------------- HFTRANSFER CONTROL DATA '---------------------------------------------------------------------- 'ndhftr nwhftr isymhf itypin 19 26 2 2 '---------------------------------------------------------------------- WAVE DIRECTIONS '---------------------------------------------------------------------- 'ihead head 1 0.2200000 1 4 1.0000000 11 50.0000000 '---------------------------------------------------------------------- WAVE FREQUENCIES '---------------------------------------------------------------------- 'ifreq whftr 1 0.2166620 3 0.3490660 14 0.0000000 10 45.0000000 17 80.0472000 25 1.'idhftr su36 '---------------------------------------------------------------------- HFTRANSFER REFERENCE POSITION '---------------------------------------------------------------------- 'zg 0.5235990 20 0.

9638000 -87.7300000 1 11 1.2200000 3 25 1.7410000e-02 21.7080000e-02 21.7834000 -84.8900000 2 18 0.3600000 -86.1630000 -87.1990000e-04 -38.2570000e-02 -72.2530000e-02 -72.2200000 3 4 1.6300000 3 20 0.1 6 1.7300000 3 11 1.0650000 -87.0240000 -87.2752000 -56.8223000 -85.9800000 2 5 1.6742000 -83.8100000 3 22 0.2100000 1 8 1.3881000 -69.6200000 2 1 1.6200000 1 19 0.9325000 -87.7458000 -84.6200000 2 10 1.8900000 1 17 0.2200000 -87.6200000 2 19 0.6430000 -87.6300000 2 20 0.8697000 -87.7700000 2 6 1.6200000 3 10 1.5950000 -81.2000000 3 2 1.4500000 1 9 1.5400000 2 15 0.6120000 -87.7900000 2 12 1.8900000 3 17 0.4850000 -87.3760000 -86.2100000 3 8 1.0080000 -87.5927000 -81.4000000 3 26 3.1000000 3 24 8.8797000 -87.4000000 2 26 3.8000000 3 13 0.1170000 -87.1000000 -87.9290000 -87.2100000 2 8 1.7925000 -84.5020000 -87.4000000 1 26 3.4330000 -86.7700000 3 6 1.9749000 -87.5620000 -87.8318000 -85.3941000 -69.1870000e-04 -38.4500000 2 9 1.0530000 -87.1490000 -87.6620000 -87.3290000 -86.7400000 2 14 0.2200000 2 4 1.6200000 4 1 1.4991000 -76.5010000 -76.8350000 -85.7300000 2 11 1.5800000 -87.1130000 -87.6665000 -83.4200000 2 23 0.4934000 -76.0200000 1 16 0.1670000 -87.9300000 1 7 1.6300000 1 20 0.2000000 D-5 .4160000 -86.1800000 3 21 0.5400000 1 15 0.2690000 -87.7900000 3 12 1.6767000 -83.0690000 -87.1000000 1 24 8.6200000 1 10 1.2762000 -56.3926000 -69.0200000 -87.9300000 2 7 1.7400000 3 14 0.7400000 1 14 0.2800000 3 3 1.7955000 -84.2380000e-02 -72.8000000 2 13 0.8900000 3 18 0.2550000 -87.7344000 -84.4200000 3 23 0.1000000 2 24 8.6080000e-02 21.8831000 -87.1800000 1 21 0.1800000 2 21 0.9800000 3 5 1.6200000 3 19 0.3240000 -86.2010000 -87.2800000 2 3 1.2200000 2 25 1.6200000 3 1 1.5400000 3 15 0.2200000 1 25 1.3090000 -86.9300000 3 7 1.8100000 2 22 0.9184000 -87.7429000 -84.8100000 1 22 0.5859000 -81.4200000 1 23 0.2150000 -87.2740000 -87.1510000e-04 -38.8900000 1 18 0.8000000 1 13 0.0200000 2 16 0.8900000 2 17 0.2000000 2 2 1.0200000 3 16 0.9786000 -87.4500000 3 9 1.7900000 1 12 1.2720000 -56.

5591000 -81.7300000 5 11 1.6300000 5 20 0.7475000 -84.4839000 -76.8900000 6 18 0.4200000 5 23 0.2200000 5 4 1.8900000 5 17 0.6359000 -83.8000000 5 13 0.9800000 6 5 1.2596000 -56.4000000 4 26 3.2000000 5 2 1.7900000 5 12 0.0050000 -87.6200000 6 1 1.1800000 4 21 0.8763000 -87.0060000e-04 -38.4900000 -87.7400000 6 14 0.7700000 5 6 1.2100000 5 8 1.2520000 -86.5680000 -87.3703000 -69.5400000 5 15 0.8900000 6 17 0.9800000 5 5 1.9300000 6 7 1.6300000 6 20 0.8298000 -87.5392000 -81.1000000 4 24 8.4430000e-02 21.1780000 -87.8900000 5 18 0.6200000 5 10 1.0970000 -87.7400000 5 14 0.8000000 4 13 0.3890000 -86.2200000 6 4 1.1460000 -87.9692000 -87.2800000 4 3 1.2200000 4 25 1.2503000 -56.2000000 6 2 1.4500000 5 9 1.5320000 -87.5400000 4 15 0.2040000 -86.4570000 -87.9800000 4 5 1.2800000 5 3 1.8869000 -87.9277000 -87.2200000 5 25 1.4370000 -87.6200000 6 19 0.6200000 4 10 1.9618000 -87.2980000 -86.6200000 5 1 1.8100000 5 22 0.3670000 -87.9887000 -87.5120000 -87.3340000 -86.0200000 4 16 0.0200000 6 16 0.6537000 -83.0500000 -87.6133000 -83.1550000 -87.3510000 -86.4170000 -87.5400000 6 15 0.7700000 4 6 1.1970000 -87.0900000e-04 -38.7846000 -85.3571000 -69.1270000 -87.9453000 -87.8452000 -87.7684000 -84.9008000 -87.7300000 4 11 1.7900000 4 12 0.7300000 6 11 0.6200000 4 19 0.8530000 -87.7204000 -84.1050000 -87.4000000 5 26 3.4708000 -76.2490000 -86.0200000 5 16 0.7210000 -84.7567000 -85.0120000 -87.2830000 -86.4500000 6 9 1.8100000 6 22 0.8000000 6 13 0.8003000 -87.8100000 4 22 0.2150000e-02 -72.0580000 -87.3806000 -69.1000000 5 24 8.2310000 -87.6200000 6 10 1.7700000 6 6 1.9300000 5 7 1.6200000 5 19 0.7008000 -84.0330000 -87.2668000 -56.2100000 6 8 1.2200000 4 4 1.4 2 1.2140000e-02 21.4500000 4 9 1.4541000 -76.3030000 -86.9300000 4 7 1.9196000 -87.7400000 4 14 0.7900000 6 12 0.6759000 -84.8900000 4 18 0.2800000 6 3 1.4200000 4 23 0.8900000 4 17 0.1000000 D-6 .8065000 -85.5747000 -81.0790000 -87.6300000 4 20 0.4200000 6 23 0.2100000 4 8 1.1820000e-02 -72.1800000 6 21 0.1800000 5 21 0.

9300000 7 7 1.9150000 -87.4339000 -76.0180000 -86.3413000 -69.2200000 6 25 1.6516000 -84.9220000e-02 21.7900000 9 12 0.8000000 9 13 0.5400000 7 15 0.6200000 9 19 0.4874000 -81.7841000 -87.8940000 -87.7700000 8 6 1.9261000 -87.7700000 9 6 1.7234000 -87.6094000 -84.0880000 -86.6 24 7.4200000 8 23 0.1020000 -86.7400000 8 14 0.6200000 7 1 1.8100000 8 22 0.3740000 -87.8864000 -87.1780000 -86.6200000 9 10 0.8475000 -87.8385000 -87.7900000 8 12 0.2200000 8 25 1.2100000 8 8 0.5153000 -81.9300000 8 7 1.8760000 -87.4450000 -87.1040000 -87.5861000 -83.9800000 9 5 1.2200000 8 4 1.2200000 9 4 1.7400000 7 14 0.6210000e-04 -38.9761000 -87.7300000 8 11 0.8000000 8 13 0.1310000 -86.9343000 -87.5400000 9 15 0.0200000 8 16 0.7497000 -87.4000000 8 26 2.8900000 9 17 0.7300000 7 11 0.0200000 9 16 0.8900000 9 18 0.6396000 -85.5184000 -83.6109000 -84.5544000 -83.1800000 7 21 0.9300000 9 7 0.2200000 7 4 1.5400000 8 15 0.4104000 -76.2800000 7 3 1.6889000 -84.6765000 -87.9000000e-04 -38.6200000 7 10 0.8900000 8 18 0.3228000 -69.1550000 -87.0300000e-02 -72.6200000 8 1 1.8076000 -87.7300000 9 11 0.1400000e-02 -72.3670000 -87.7144000 -87.6200000 8 19 0.7648000 -87.2100000 9 8 0.1510000 -86.8016000 -87.1000000 7 24 7.2780000 -87.6300000 8 20 0.8900000 7 18 0.0440000 -87.7400000 9 14 0.4000000 7 26 2.2150000 -87.8192000 -87.6840000 -85.2450000 -86.0890000e-02 -72.2000000 8 2 1.9800000 7 5 1.4000000 6 26 2.4200000 7 23 0.2100000 7 8 1.8557000 -87.5700000e-02 21.1600000e-02 21.7231000 -85.6200000 9 1 1.4500000 8 9 0.0110000 -87.9560000 -87.6200000 8 10 0.9991000 -87.9800000 8 5 1.3060000 -87.7700000 7 6 1.2263000 -56.2350000 -87.0200000 7 16 0.7710000e-04 -38.7639000 -87.4500000 7 9 1.1960000 -86.2000000 9 2 1.2800000 9 3 1.8000000 7 13 0.9674000 -87.5713000 -84.8900000 7 17 0.2200000 7 25 1.2000000 7 2 1.1000000 8 24 7.6200000 7 19 0.1800000 8 21 0.8900000 8 17 0.6300000 D-7 .0580000 -86.4500000 9 9 0.7900000 7 12 0.6300000 7 20 0.2392000 -56.2990000 -87.2800000 8 3 1.0560000 -87.8100000 7 22 0.6459000 -84.

6200000 12 10 0.6200000 10 10 0.9097000 -87.6200000 12 1 0.4200000 10 23 0.1210000 -87.2100000 11 8 0.1953000 -56.0190000 -87.0730000 -87.0200000 D-8 .0660000 -87.3019000 -69.2116000 -56.1000000 11 24 5.9693000 -87.6244000 -87.5871000 -87.0820000e-03 -72.4200000 11 23 0.1800000 10 21 0.8541000 -86.6920000 -87.7502000 -87.7622000 -86.5625000 -84.6200000 11 19 0.2000000 11 2 1.3543000 -76.2533000 -69.4000000 10 26 2.7238000 -87.6180000e-02 21.2200000 11 4 0.6300000 11 20 0.9800000 10 5 0.2200000 10 25 8.6407000 -87.6579000 -87.8900000 10 17 0.5065000 -87.9300000 10 7 0.2800000 10 3 1.6200000 10 1 1.6594000 -87.8191000 -87.2786000 -69.2200000 9 25 9.2100000 12 8 0.7921000 -86.1800000 9 21 0.4500000 11 9 0.6320000e-03 -72.8000000 10 13 0.8624000 -87.4500000 10 9 0.4558000 -81.6996000 -87.5613000 -87.4500000 12 9 0.7400000 11 14 0.8649000 -87.8249000 -86.4785000 -83.9800000 12 5 0.0570000e-04 -38.8000000 12 13 0.7400000 12 14 0.4200000 9 23 0.5400000 12 15 0.8000000 11 13 0.2800000 12 3 0.7300000 12 11 0.6200000 11 10 0.7700000 10 6 0.4510000e-04 -38.7900000 12 12 0.1775000 -56.6960000e-02 21.9244000 -86.5400000 11 15 0.8900000 10 18 0.6290000 -87.1000000 10 24 6.4000000 11 26 2.7300000 11 11 0.7400000 10 14 0.1810000e-02 21.1800000 11 21 0.7700000 11 6 0.8200000 11 22 0.5349000 -87.5400000 10 15 0.2100000 10 8 0.0170000 -86.2200000 12 4 0.5676000 -87.4794000 -84.0200000 10 16 0.0200000 11 16 0.6134000 -87.9300000 12 7 0.7700000 12 6 0.2620000e-04 -38.2800000 11 3 0.7562000 -87.6874000 -87.5113000 -84.9572000 -87.9396000 -86.7899000 -87.7900000 11 12 0.7309000 -87.7300000 10 11 0.9800000 11 5 0.8252000 -87.8900000 11 17 0.4350000 -83.1800000 -87.2000000 10 2 1.9 20 0.7840000 -87.6200000 11 1 1.8910000e-03 -72.3838000 -76.5367000 -85.8100000 10 22 0.4207000 -81.6694000 -87.9300000 11 7 0.8877000 -86.5273000 -84.1000000 9 24 6.8900000 11 18 0.9010000 -87.4000000 9 26 2.7180000 -87.9765000 -86.2000000 12 2 0.6300000 10 20 0.3824000 -81.8100000 9 22 0.3220000 -76.7900000 10 12 0.5994000 -87.2200000 11 25 8.5904000 -85.2200000 10 4 1.6200000 10 19 0.

6200000 13 10 0.6940000e-02 21.6644000 -86.6200000 15 10 0.5347000 -87.6300000 12 20 0.4000000 13 26 1.8900000 12 17 0.6098000 -87.2800000 13 3 0.5708000 -87.8000000 13 13 0.6371000 -87.4358000 -87.4932000 -87.6200000 13 1 0.2874000 -76.4500000 13 9 0.2870000e-03 -72.1800000 12 21 0.4175000 -85.9300000 13 7 0.8100000 13 22 0.5118000 -87.6200000 14 10 0.0140000e-02 21.1000000 12 24 5.4000000 14 26 1.9800000 15 5 0.2975000 -81.6000000e-04 -38.5400000 14 15 0.2100000 15 8 0.8900000 14 18 0.6200000 12 19 0.2120000e-03 -72.8900000 14 17 0.8900000 13 17 0.8100000 14 22 0.8000000 14 13 0.4200000 13 23 0.3152000 -84.9300000 15 7 0.7700000 14 6 0.2200000 14 25 5.4545000 -86.7900000 14 12 0.9300000 14 7 0.4136000 -87.7700000 13 6 0.1000000 13 24 4.2800000 15 3 0.2100000 14 8 0.1584000 -56.2860000 -83.6200000 13 19 0.2000000 13 2 0.4721000 -87.3820000 -87.7930000 -87.2200000 13 25 6.7400000 13 14 0.4723000 -86.4000000 12 26 1.2100000 13 8 0.6078000 -86.5385000 -87.8900000 13 18 0.7053000 -87.3882000 -83.9800000 13 5 0.1665000 -69.8344000 -87.6703000 -87.7300000 15 11 0.7300000 14 11 0.3732000 -87.2200000 14 4 0.2505000 -76.4563000 -84.3941000 -87.4663000 -87.3657000 -87.2200000 12 25 7.3729000 -84.5157000 -87.3992000 -87.2260000 -69.5155000 -87.4415000 -87.7540000 -87.2200000 13 4 0.4278000 -84.7191000 -86.3384000 -83.1800000 13 21 0.4893000 -87.4500000 14 9 0.2800000 14 3 0.3529000 -85.8100000 12 22 0.1970000 -69.6905000 -86.4500000 15 9 0.9800000 14 5 0.6200000 14 19 0.2000000 15 2 0.4519000 -87.4789000 -85.3140000e-03 -72.7300000 13 11 0.2000000 14 2 0.0200000 14 16 0.5836000 -86.3520000e-04 -38.1381000 -56.3700000e-02 21.3413000 -81.2200000 15 4 0.6200000 15 1 0.0200000 13 16 0.12 16 0.8900000 12 18 0.7400000 14 14 0.6200000 14 1 0.5835000 -87.1167000 -56.2514000 -81.4200000 14 23 0.6300000 14 20 0.3362000 -84.1000000 14 24 3.5400000 13 15 0.7700000 15 6 0.7900000 13 12 0.2117000 -76.3978000 -84.6373000 -87.4919000 -86.1800000 14 21 0.8350000e-04 -38.4171000 -87.5585000 -87.7900000 D-9 .4200000 12 23 0.4326000 -87.5425000 -87.6300000 13 20 0.5616000 -86.

1533000 -87.8900000 15 18 0.0200000 17 16 0.6200000 17 1 0.2000000 17 2 0.7400000 17 14 0.2497000 -86.7960000e-02 -56.5560000e-05 -38.1020000 -69.1800000 16 21 0.7300000 17 11 0.2891000 -87.2810000e-05 -38.9300000 16 7 0.4000000 15 26 1.8900000 17 18 0.1777000 -87.8000000 15 13 0.2100000 D-10 .2000000 16 2 0.7000000e-02 -76.0200000 16 16 0.1000000 15 24 2.1382000 -87.8000000 16 13 0.2800000 17 3 0.2754000 -87.1297000 -76.3722000 -86.7700000 16 6 0.1699000 -87.2649000 -87.2618000 -87.3574000 -86.7900000 17 12 0.3298000 -87.4200000 16 23 7.2027000 -87.1857000 -87.8100000 15 22 0.1381000 -84.7700000 18 6 0.2000000 18 2 0.3439000 -86.8100000 16 22 0.9800000 16 5 0.2200000 17 25 2.1940000 -87.6200000 16 10 0.2035000 -81.2118000 -87.1348000 -69.0940000e-04 -38.2856000 -85.6200000 16 19 0.3347000 -87.2213000 -87.8200000 17 22 6.2161000 -85.4200000 15 23 9.8900000 15 17 0.1450000 -85.5400000 16 15 0.1314000 -87.1830000e-03 -72.2800000 16 3 0.2286000 -87.4105000 -87.1111000 -87.1800000 15 21 0.2800000 18 3 0.6300000 16 20 0.6300000 15 20 0.2533000 -87.2540000e-03 -72.3021000 -87.9800000 18 5 0.3020000 -87.1000000 17 24 1.1295000 -84.4470000e-02 -56.3189000 -87.7900000 16 12 0.1619000 -87.5400000 17 15 0.2898000 -87.1175000 -83.1714000 -76.2398000 -86.1033000 -81.1253000 -86.0200000 15 16 0.8900000 16 17 0.3000000e-03 -72.3903000 -87.8430000e-02 -69.4500000 16 9 0.9800000 17 5 0.2768000 -87.7400000 15 14 0.1930000 -84.1158000 -86.5180000e-02 21.1000000 16 24 2.4000000 17 26 5.1204000 -86.2100000 16 8 0.2721000 -84.6200000 17 19 0.2059000 -84.4000000 16 26 8.8900000 16 18 0.2414000 -87.2200000 16 25 3.2551000 -84.4200000 17 23 4.1800000 17 21 8.6200000 16 1 0.1540000 -81.2200000 17 4 0.8000000 17 13 0.8900000 17 17 0.1752000 -83.2200000 16 4 0.2307000 -86.9300000 18 7 0.2200000 15 25 4.6200000 15 19 0.2100000 17 8 0.15 12 0.3501000 -87.2315000 -83.9300000 17 7 0.6200000 18 1 0.6200000 17 10 0.4500000 17 9 0.5400000 15 15 0.2200000 18 4 0.7400000 16 14 0.9900000e-02 21.1454000 -87.7700000 17 6 0.1490000e-02 -56.3157000 -87.2620000e-02 21.7300000 16 11 0.4319000 -87.6300000 17 20 0.

0230000e-16 -85.7360000e-02 -87.8200000 19 21 3.3670000e-02 -76.6910000e-17 123.1100000 19 17 4.2000000 19 13 5.8000000 1 13 1.9210000e-02 -87.8900000 18 17 6.5500000 19 9 7.1800000 1 21 6.8200000 1 22 4.1000000 18 24 7.1000000 1 24 1.1360000e-17 93.8000000 19 2 9.9420000e-16 -87.2880000e-17 -83.8900000 1 17 9.8710000e-17 95.6430000e-17 98.7420000e-17 -84.7700000 1 6 1.7900000 1 12 1.0220000e-16 92.3520000e-18 -158.9920000e-17 92.7800000 19 4 8.2100000 19 12 6.6000000 19 26 1.2540000e-16 -87.2680000e-17 92.8060000e-17 93.2330000e-17 92.4560000e-17 93.2000000 1 2 1.0440000e-16 -87.5800000 19 23 1.7900000 19 8 7.0700000 19 7 7.2770000e-02 -85.7400000 18 14 8.8400000e-17 92.3830000e-17 -56.3700000 19 20 3.5000000e-02 -84.4070000e-02 -56.9000000 19 24 5.0200000 18 16 7.4200000 18 23 2.1330000e-17 -84.2200000 1 4 1.4290000e-16 -87.7200000 19 3 9.5400000 18 15 7.4500000 1 9 1.1130000e-17 94.8020000e-17 92.2200000 18 25 1.2300000 19 6 8.3800000 '---------------------------------------------------------------------- HFTRANSFER FUNCTION SWAY '---------------------------------------------------------------------- 'idir ifreq amplitude phase[deg] 1 1 2.0200000 19 5 8.8980000e-02 -83.6200000 18 10 9.4200000 1 23 3.7100000e-17 92.9590000e-20 141.5400000e-18 -72.6180000e-03 21.7300000 18 11 9.7300000 1 11 1.7900000 18 12 8.5670000e-17 95.9800000 19 16 5.2700000 19 11 6.6960000e-02 -87.5480000e-17 92.4500000 18 9 0.2860000e-17 -81.9300000 1 7 1.4000000 D-11 .7610000e-16 -86.6200000 1 19 8.1420000e-16 -87.2200000 1 25 1.1800000 18 21 4.4070000e-17 92.4130000e-17 110.7800000 19 25 7.3680000e-16 -87.1440000e-17 96.1280000e-02 -87.1063000 -87.3100000e-16 -87.9800000 1 5 1.6200000 18 19 5.0200000 1 16 1.1017000 -87.6300000 18 20 5.2800000 1 3 1.2600000 19 14 5.3800000 19 10 6.4000000 18 26 2.6990000e-19 107. 18 8 0.9330000e-02 -84.6910000e-16 -86.6200000 1 10 1.5600000e-16 -87.4680000e-17 92.8470000e-16 -87.2100000 1 8 1.8000000 18 13 8.1360000e-17 -76.5290000e-02 -87.0700000e-17 21.8900000 18 18 6.6200000 19 1 1.0960000e-03 -72.6270000e-16 -86.7880000e-05 -38.6300000 1 20 7.7120000e-17 92.4600000 19 15 5.0680000e-17 103.0810000e-16 -87.1460000e-17 92.1800000 19 22 2.8200000 18 22 3.8260000e-17 -69.4940000e-16 -87.3800000 19 19 4.3200000e-02 -87.1980000e-16 -87.1100000 19 18 4.4340000e-02 -69.1850000e-02 -81.8900000 1 18 9.5400000 1 15 1.7400000 1 14 1.

6300000 3 20 0.1857000 -87.1450000 -85.2200000 2 25 1.2213000 -87.6200000 3 19 0.9300000 3 7 0.1017000 -87.6200000 2 1 0.1000000 3 24 1.1752000 -83.1063000 -87.2754000 -87.2200000 3 25 2.4319000 -87.1830000e-03 -72.0200000 4 16 0.6200000 3 1 0.2000000 3 2 0.9800000 2 5 0.7360000e-02 -87.1619000 -87.1800000 3 21 8.8200000 3 22 6.8900000 4 18 0.2649000 -87.1033000 -81.3157000 -87.3722000 -86.6200000 3 10 0.2768000 -87.6200000 2 19 5.2027000 -87.7700000 4 6 0.8900000 2 18 6.2000000 2 2 0.5400000 2 15 7.1533000 -87.1175000 -83.3298000 -87.6960000e-02 -87.2800000 3 3 0.7700000 3 6 0.2059000 -84.5400000 4 15 0.7300000 4 11 0.9210000e-02 -87.5180000e-02 21.1314000 -87.1000000 2 24 7.1382000 -87.2100000 4 8 0.2770000e-02 -85.5290000e-02 -87.5560000e-05 -38.0200000 3 16 0.6300000 4 20 0.8200000 2 22 3.1381000 -84.7880000e-05 -38.3200000e-02 -87.1930000 -84.2161000 -85.4500000 4 9 0.3021000 -87.4105000 -87.2000000 4 2 0.7400000 4 14 0.9330000e-02 -84.2800000 4 3 0.1777000 -87.1850000e-02 -81.9800000 4 5 0.7000000e-02 -76.2398000 -86.6200000 4 19 0.1204000 -86.8900000 2 17 6.1800000 4 21 0.8000000 4 13 0.4200000 2 23 2.8900000 4 17 0.4500000 3 9 0.2414000 -87.2286000 -87.2100000 3 8 0.6300000 2 20 5.2618000 -87.2898000 -87.1295000 -84.7400000 2 14 8.2891000 -87.9300000 2 7 0.7900000 3 12 0.2497000 -86.5000000e-02 -84.1454000 -87.1158000 -86.2200000 4 4 0.8100000 D-12 .1111000 -87.3439000 -86.2800000 2 3 0.7900000 4 12 0.1800000 2 21 4.4000000 3 26 5.4070000e-02 -56.3903000 -87.1699000 -87.6200000 2 10 9.8000000 3 13 0.2533000 -87.7900000 2 12 8.4200000 3 23 4.1540000 -81.6200000 4 10 0.7700000 2 6 0.1 26 3.9800000 3 5 0.2100000 2 8 0.8900000 3 18 0.6200000 4 1 0.4340000e-02 -69.1297000 -76.7300000 3 11 0.3670000e-02 -76.3574000 -86.6180000e-03 21.4500000 2 9 0.8900000 3 17 0.7960000e-02 -56.8430000e-02 -69.0200000 2 16 7.1940000 -87.0960000e-03 -72.2200000 2 4 0.7400000 3 14 0.9180000e-20 -38.8000000 2 13 8.8980000e-02 -83.2200000 3 4 0.7300000 2 11 9.9300000 4 7 0.4000000 2 26 2.2307000 -86.5400000 3 15 0.2118000 -87.1280000e-02 -87.1253000 -86.

3820000 -87.7400000 5 14 0.7300000 7 11 0.6200000 5 1 0.8900000 6 17 0.1800000 6 21 0.3140000e-03 -72.4171000 -87.5155000 -87.8000000 5 13 0.2800000 6 3 0.3020000 -87.6200000 6 19 0.9800000 7 5 0.3941000 -87.5400000 5 15 0.6200000 7 1 0.5616000 -86.3362000 -84.6200000 6 10 0.4519000 -87.1020000 -69.2035000 -81.4500000 7 9 0.9800000 5 5 0.2000000 7 2 0.6200000 6 1 0.6940000e-02 21.1000000 5 24 2.7700000 5 6 0.2000000 6 2 0.2800000 7 3 0.2000000 5 2 0.2100000 6 8 0.6300000 5 20 0.4000000 5 26 1.2200000 7 4 0.2800000 5 3 0.6905000 -86.5425000 -87.1348000 -69.8000000 7 13 0.3000000e-03 -72.2514000 -81.8900000 5 18 0.4 22 0.2551000 -84.6078000 -86.7300000 5 11 0.2856000 -85.2810000e-05 -38.4000000 4 26 8.4500000 5 9 0.6644000 -86.8900000 5 17 0.8900000 D-13 .3347000 -87.9900000e-02 21.7900000 6 12 0.2200000 6 25 5.4326000 -87.4358000 -87.5385000 -87.4200000 4 23 7.4200000 5 23 9.9300000 5 7 0.2721000 -84.9300000 7 7 0.3529000 -85.1800000 5 21 0.5157000 -87.3520000e-04 -38.5347000 -87.3657000 -87.4136000 -87.2100000 7 8 0.7700000 6 6 0.3978000 -84.7053000 -87.5836000 -86.8344000 -87.7400000 7 14 0.8900000 6 18 0.4932000 -87.2315000 -83.8100000 5 22 0.7900000 7 12 0.4545000 -86.5585000 -87.5400000 7 15 0.1714000 -76.5400000 6 15 0.8000000 6 13 0.2117000 -76.6200000 7 10 0.6373000 -87.7930000 -87.4721000 -87.4723000 -86.6200000 5 10 0.1665000 -69.4000000 6 26 1.9300000 6 7 0.1167000 -56.8900000 7 17 0.5708000 -87.1000000 6 24 3.2200000 4 25 3.2620000e-02 21.5835000 -87.1490000e-02 -56.3992000 -87.3732000 -87.0940000e-04 -38.2200000 5 25 4.0200000 5 16 0.7540000 -87.7191000 -86.6200000 5 19 0.2100000 5 8 0.3152000 -84.0200000 6 16 0.6098000 -87.2200000 6 4 0.2200000 5 4 0.4663000 -87.7300000 6 11 0.7900000 5 12 0.8100000 6 22 0.4415000 -87.4175000 -85.4919000 -86.2540000e-03 -72.2860000 -83.6371000 -87.4200000 6 23 0.9800000 6 5 0.7400000 6 14 0.4500000 6 9 0.4470000e-02 -56.0200000 7 16 0.4893000 -87.6300000 6 20 0.6703000 -87.1000000 4 24 2.3189000 -87.7700000 7 6 0.5118000 -87.3501000 -87.

3882000 -83.7921000 -86.1800000 -87.5676000 -87.4278000 -84.4789000 -85.4000000 8 26 1.0660000 -87.2800000 9 3 0.2870000e-03 -72.8350000e-04 -38.5113000 -84.7400000 9 14 0.6300000 7 20 0.6200000 9 1 1.6290000 -87.6300000 9 20 0.7238000 -87.4563000 -84.3384000 -83.1970000 -69.2120000e-03 -72.2200000 8 4 0.4200000 8 23 0.4000000 9 26 2.1000000 9 24 5.3729000 -84.1800000 8 21 0.2100000 9 8 0.2200000 8 25 7.4350000 -83.9800000 8 5 0.2200000 10 4 1.8000000 10 13 0.6200000 9 19 0.5400000 8 15 0.8100000 8 22 0.7900000 8 12 0.6200000 8 10 0.7400000 8 14 0.5613000 -87.1210000 -87.7300000 9 11 0.4200000 7 23 0.0570000e-04 -38.7309000 -87.2505000 -76.9572000 -87.9300000 9 7 0.7300000 10 11 0.7900000 10 12 0.6200000 10 10 0.8100000 7 22 0.0170000 -86.4000000 7 26 1.8649000 -87.3700000e-02 21.6200000 7 19 0.0200000 9 16 0.1000000 8 24 5.2100000 10 8 0.8000000 8 13 0.0820000e-03 -72.4500000 9 9 0.9693000 -87.5349000 -87.6579000 -87.8900000 9 18 0.7502000 -87.9800000 9 5 0.1000000 7 24 4.8900000 8 18 0.2874000 -76.6134000 -87.8200000 9 22 0.6200000 10 1 1.2000000 8 2 0.9010000 -87.7840000 -87.7700000 9 6 0.2975000 -81.5400000 9 15 0.6300000 8 20 0.8191000 -87.1800000 9 21 0.2200000 7 25 6.5994000 -87.6180000e-02 21.6200000 9 10 0.9244000 -86.0730000 -87.7899000 -87.1800000 7 21 0.6996000 -87.2800000 10 3 1.7180000 -87.6200000 8 1 0.8541000 -86.4794000 -84.7400000 D-14 .3220000 -76.1775000 -56.1381000 -56.4500000 10 9 0.2800000 8 3 0.2200000 9 4 0.9300000 10 7 0.9097000 -87.3824000 -81.0140000e-02 21.7622000 -86.9396000 -86.2260000 -69.3413000 -81.7700000 8 6 0.7300000 8 11 0.7700000 10 6 0.6874000 -87.1584000 -56.6920000 -87.0200000 8 16 0.8000000 9 13 0.9765000 -86.8624000 -87.8249000 -86.6694000 -87.5871000 -87.7562000 -87.8900000 8 17 0.9800000 10 5 0.2200000 9 25 8.6000000e-04 -38.4500000 8 9 0.8900000 9 17 0.2100000 8 8 0.0190000 -87.2533000 -69.4200000 9 23 0.6200000 8 19 0.7 18 0.6407000 -87.8252000 -87.5065000 -87.2000000 9 2 1.8877000 -86.2000000 10 2 1.5367000 -85.7900000 9 12 0.9300000 8 7 0.

3019000 -69.2150000 -87.10 14 0.8900000 10 18 0.8760000 -87.2800000 12 3 1.6840000 -85.0880000 -86.4200000 11 23 0.5400000 10 15 0.7400000 12 14 0.9761000 -87.3060000 -87.5273000 -84.6210000e-04 -38.1000000 11 24 6.1310000 -86.2200000 12 4 1.9343000 -87.4200000 12 23 0.2350000 -87.7300000 12 11 0.2116000 -56.1550000 -87.8100000 10 22 0.8385000 -87.5184000 -83.8100000 11 22 0.1800000 12 21 0.7700000 13 6 1.0110000 -87.2000000 13 2 1.7841000 -87.2200000 13 4 1.7234000 -87.8900000 11 18 0.3670000 -87.7497000 -87.9800000 13 5 1.4558000 -81.6300000 10 20 0.1000000 10 24 6.1960000 -86.6200000 12 19 0.5625000 -84.1800000 10 21 0.2450000 -86.4000000 11 26 2.1810000e-02 21.9150000 -87.8900000 12 17 0.9800000 11 5 1.6109000 -84.3543000 -76.5544000 -83.6200000 12 1 1.2786000 -69.6960000e-02 21.3838000 -76.4500000 11 9 0.9991000 -87.8910000e-03 -72.4000000 10 26 2.1800000 11 21 0.4785000 -83.2990000 -87.4874000 -81.6200000 11 1 1.2780000 -87.2100000 12 8 0.8557000 -87.3740000 -87.4200000 10 23 0.3228000 -69.1953000 -56.1000000 12 24 7.4510000e-04 -38.0580000 -86.0440000 -87.4500000 13 9 1.6200000 13 1 1.0200000 12 16 0.2620000e-04 -38.4207000 -81.8900000 12 18 0.8000000 11 13 0.9300000 13 7 1.6300000 11 20 0.2800000 13 3 1.9300000 12 7 1.4450000 -87.6200000 11 10 0.8900000 11 17 0.2800000 11 3 1.7900000 12 12 0.2000000 11 2 1.6300000 12 20 0.7144000 -87.2100000 13 8 1.6200000 11 19 0.7639000 -87.2000000 12 2 1.1510000 -86.0300000e-02 -72.6200000 10 19 0.2200000 12 25 1.5400000 11 15 0.5713000 -84.0180000 -86.6396000 -85.5904000 -85.1040000 -87.9800000 12 5 1.8100000 12 22 0.6244000 -87.2200000 11 25 9.6765000 -87.7300000 11 11 0.6320000e-03 -72.8940000 -87.9560000 -87.8192000 -87.4104000 -76.8016000 -87.6594000 -87.0200000 11 16 0.6094000 -84.1780000 -86.6200000 12 10 0.2200000 10 25 8.7900000 11 12 0.4000000 12 26 2.8000000 12 13 0.0560000 -87.8900000 10 17 0.6516000 -84.1020000 -86.2200000 11 4 1.7700000 11 6 1.1600000e-02 21.7400000 11 14 0.5400000 12 15 0.7700000 12 6 1.4500000 12 9 0.0200000 10 16 0.2263000 -56.2100000 11 8 0.6200000 D-15 .9300000 11 7 0.

4170000 -87.8000000 14 13 0.3510000 -86.8475000 -87.9300000 14 7 1.9300000 15 7 1.8900000 15 17 0.0200000 14 16 0.1000000 14 24 7.6200000 15 1 1.8003000 -87.8900000 14 17 0.1050000 -87.6359000 -83.6120000 -87.0970000 -87.3890000 -86.5680000 -87.7900000 15 12 0.0200000 13 16 0.8452000 -87.6300000 13 20 0.4200000 15 23 0.4339000 -76.13 10 0.4708000 -76.5591000 -81.8100000 13 22 0.1800000 13 21 0.9196000 -87.7700000 D-16 .8100000 15 22 0.7210000 -84.9674000 -87.7300000 15 11 1.4000000 13 26 2.9277000 -87.6889000 -84.2800000 14 3 1.3340000 -86.2200000 16 4 1.5400000 14 15 0.2100000 15 8 1.7567000 -85.8900000 13 18 0.9800000 16 5 1.2520000 -86.3413000 -69.1400000e-02 -72.1550000 -87.0500000 -87.4200000 14 23 0.5120000 -87.1800000 14 21 0.8100000 14 22 0.5700000e-02 21.5320000 -87.5400000 15 15 0.8864000 -87.2040000 -86.0120000 -87.4000000 14 26 2.0200000 15 16 0.1970000 -87.2140000e-02 21.6200000 15 19 0.7648000 -87.0580000 -87.7900000 14 12 0.2000000 15 2 1.2800000 15 3 1.5153000 -81.8000000 13 13 0.4570000 -87.7900000 13 12 0.8900000 14 18 0.2000000 16 2 1.2200000 14 4 1.9800000 14 5 1.7475000 -84.1800000 15 21 0.8900000 13 17 0.1820000e-02 -72.6459000 -84.1000000 15 24 8.6200000 14 1 1.2503000 -56.4000000 15 26 3.7300000 13 11 0.9220000e-02 21.2200000 13 25 1.7700000 14 6 1.5861000 -83.3670000 -87.6200000 14 19 0.8298000 -87.0050000 -87.9692000 -87.7400000 13 14 0.6300000 14 20 0.8076000 -87.6200000 16 1 1.3703000 -69.6759000 -84.8900000 15 18 0.4500000 15 9 1.3030000 -86.7300000 14 11 0.4900000 -87.7700000 15 6 1.2200000 15 4 1.8869000 -87.2596000 -56.2490000 -86.4200000 13 23 0.6200000 15 10 1.2200000 15 25 1.4541000 -76.6200000 14 10 1.3571000 -69.7846000 -85.4370000 -87.2800000 16 3 1.8000000 15 13 0.9618000 -87.1460000 -87.7008000 -84.2980000 -86.7231000 -85.4500000 14 9 1.2392000 -56.6200000 13 19 0.7710000e-04 -38.2200000 14 25 1.9800000 15 5 1.0890000e-02 -72.7400000 14 14 0.7400000 15 14 0.6133000 -83.2100000 14 8 1.0060000e-04 -38.5392000 -81.9000000e-04 -38.6300000 15 20 0.5400000 13 15 0.2000000 14 2 1.9261000 -87.1000000 13 24 7.8763000 -87.

8797000 -87.9290000 -87.8900000 17 18 0.2150000e-02 -72.5400000 17 15 0.9800000 17 5 1.3600000 -86.1000000 -87.6300000 18 20 0.3926000 -69.5747000 -81.6200000 16 19 0.9300000 18 7 1.9300000 16 7 1.1800000 16 21 0.1800000 17 21 0.5400000 16 15 0.0200000 -87.6620000 -87.8065000 -85.8530000 -87.7400000 16 14 0.5800000 -87.6200000 16 10 1.8900000 16 18 0.7834000 -84.2800000 17 3 1.8223000 -85.7300000 18 11 1.4000000 18 26 3.1000000 17 24 8.8697000 -87.6300000 16 20 0.1630000 -87.6742000 -83.9453000 -87.7300000 16 11 1.9887000 -87.4850000 -87.4500000 16 9 1.2830000 -86.7344000 -84.2380000e-02 -72.4330000 -86.7684000 -84.6200000 17 19 0.7900000 18 12 1.4500000 18 9 1.2100000 17 8 1.5927000 -81.2200000 18 4 1.9008000 -87.2010000 -87.0080000 -87.3240000 -86.9638000 -87.7300000 17 11 1.4200000 16 23 0.7925000 -84.0200000 16 16 0.2752000 -56.7400000 17 14 0.7429000 -84.2550000 -87.6665000 -83.9184000 -87.0200000 17 16 0.8900000 18 18 0.7900000 17 12 1.2310000 -87.7900000 16 12 0.16 6 1.6200000 17 10 1.7080000e-02 21.1270000 -87.2530000e-02 -72.0790000 -87.9749000 -87.3881000 -69.1870000e-04 -38.8100000 18 22 0.6537000 -83.0330000 -87.4000000 17 26 3.1490000 -87.8900000 18 17 0.4200000 17 23 0.2200000 17 4 1.4160000 -86.6200000 18 10 1.4839000 -76.2000000 17 2 1.7204000 -84.2200000 16 25 1.1510000e-04 -38.8100000 17 22 0.6200000 17 1 1.4000000 16 26 3.0900000e-04 -38.6200000 18 19 0.6430000 -87.2200000 17 25 1.8000000 16 13 0.6200000 18 1 1.2100000 16 8 1.6080000e-02 21.4991000 -76.5020000 -87.4430000e-02 21.8318000 -85.3806000 -69.4934000 -76.2800000 18 3 1.2668000 -56.1000000 18 24 8.3090000 -86.6300000 17 20 0.4500000 17 9 1.1000000 16 24 8.8900000 17 17 0.1780000 -87.8000000 18 13 0.7400000 18 14 0.2720000 -56.2150000 -87.5400000 18 15 0.1800000 18 21 0.8100000 16 22 0.8000000 17 13 0.0650000 -87.0200000 18 16 0.9800000 18 5 1.9300000 17 7 1.4200000 18 23 0.0530000 -87.3760000 -86.8900000 16 17 0.7700000 17 6 1.1130000 -87.6200000 19 1 1.2100000 18 8 1.2000000 D-17 .2000000 18 2 1.2690000 -87.7700000 18 6 1.2200000 18 25 1.5620000 -87.6690000 -87.5859000 -81.

6200000 19 19 0.1300000 1 23 4.2080000 -3.0240000 -87.2080000 -3.1170000 -87.5180000 -23.0770000 -0.5400000 1 8 1. 19 2 1.0770000 -0.2800000 19 3 1.6300000 19 20 0.2200000 19 4 1.3300000 1 20 0.0540000 -0.0690000 -87.0310000 -0.1670000 -87.6700000 1 9 1.2757000 -101.1900000 1 2 1.0310000 -0.1600000 1 13 1.8831000 -87.9400000 1 12 1.7900000 19 12 1.2400000 1 15 1.4700000 1 7 1.2200000 2 3 1.9500000 1 21 2.2570000e-02 -72.4340000e-02 92.2600000 2 4 1.2200000 1 3 1.4500000 19 9 1.2880000 -5.7458000 -84.9800000 1 24 1.6700000 1 14 1.0860000 -71.1200000 -1.0350000 -0.0950000 -0.1050000 -92.1000000 19 24 8.2762000 -56.6098000 -93.5400000 2 8 1.7955000 -84.4380000 -86.8350000 -85.2880000 -5.9325000 -87.2400000 2 15 1.1500000 1 19 0.2757000 -101.0460000 -0.4510000 -45.9400000 2 12 1.2200000 19 25 1.2800000 1 18 0.9000000 1 10 1.3810000 -86.3600000 1 25 8.5860000 -87.8000000 19 13 0.1200000 -1.2600000 1 4 1.3300000 1 5 1.7410000e-02 21.0200000 1 17 1.5180000 -23.0640000 -0.4050000 -11.9300000 19 7 1.9000000 2 10 1.0860000 -71.0950000 -0.0400000 -0.0200000 2 17 1.0030000e-02 61.6700000 2 9 1.0460000 -0.8900000 19 18 0.6767000 -83.5400000 1 16 1.3300000 2 5 1.5010000 -76.5400000 2 16 1.0200000 19 16 0.9800000 19 5 1.5950000 -81.1990000e-04 -38.9786000 -87.7140000e-02 -48.2600000 2 1 1.2800000 2 11 1.1550000 -1.0280000 -0.7300000 19 11 1.4700000 2 7 1.1900000 2 2 1.7700000 19 6 1.4200000 19 23 0.1550000 -1.6098000 -93.4000000 19 26 3.8000000 1 26 1.1600000 2 13 1.6200000 19 10 1.2320000e-06 173.0640000 -0.1800000 19 21 0.7300000 1 22 3.2740000 -87.5080000 -87.4050000 -11.0540000 -0.2800000 1 11 1.1500000 2 19 0.2100000 19