Nicolette Call

Lincoln Case

ED 424

Pre-Assessment Reflection

The pre-assessment did not go as planned today. We put questions based on digital and analog
clocks, as well as a couple of questions on elapsed time. The students breezed through the assessment
saying it was too easy. While the assessment was too easy for our groups, it gave Kelsey and I some
good information. For starters, we realized that our groups are more advanced than we originally
thought they were. This information led us to change our lesson plans and try to incorporate more
difficult concepts and more independent practices. In our next lesson, we decided to have the children
work together to come up with answers to questions so they have experience teaching each other. This
will help Kelsey and I see who really understands the concepts, and who is piggy backing off of their
classmates. Something else we noticed during our pre-assessment is how talkative our groups are.
Throughout the worksheet, they were talking to each other about their home lives. They would become
distracting to one another and Kelsey and I had to continuously remind them to stay on task. After a
group of boys finished the assessment, they became even louder and more talkative, even when we
asked them to whisper so the others could finish their assessment. This informed us that we would need
to set expectations and be consistent with them throughout our lessons, as well as improve our
classroom management skills and apply differentiation for those students who are disruptive, as well as
those who are slower with completing their work.
Nicolette Call

Lincoln Case

ED 424

Post-Assessment Reflection

The post-assessment was extremely informative. We altered it from our pre-test, since it was
too easy for the students. On the post-test, we added more difficult elapsed time questions, as well as
some questions about mass and volume. We were able to compare our post-test to some of the other
worksheets we used throughout our lessons to make up for the unreliable pre-assessment. Something
we learned throughout our lessons and assessments is that a few of the students in our groups would
say they understood, but would ask their peers what a question meant on the worksheet. The post-
assessment showed that the students are still having some issues with elapsed time. They know how to
do it when we show them on the analog clocks and give them a word problem, but on the assessment
there were two clocks, one with a start time and one with an end time, and the students kept saying
they didn’t know how to do it, or asking each other what the question meant. They also said it was
confusing because they didn’t know if the clocks were in a.m. or p.m. Something else we learned
through the assessment is how important it is to have the children in the right environment. The
talkative boys were able to focus better because we made sure they weren’t sitting together to take the
post-assessment. This way we received accurate representation of where the students were because
they weren’t asking each other for the answers. This post-assessment showed the students understand
volume and mass better than we thought they would after only one lesson, and that they could still use
some practice on the elapsed time, especially when it involves larger spaces of time.

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