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IJSTE - International Journal of Science Technology & Engineering | Volume 3 | Issue 09 | March 2017

ISSN (online): 2349-784X

A Study on Pervious Concrete using Pumice and


Electric Arc Air Cooled Blast Furnace Slag
Aggregates
Chitra Shijagurumayum Anushree Khare
PG Student PG Student
Department of Civil Engineering Department of Civil Engineering
KIIT University Bhubaneswar-751024, India KIIT University Bhubaneswar-751024, India

Saransa Sahoo
PG Student
Department of Civil Engineering
KIIT University Bhubaneswar-751024, India

Abstract
Pervious concrete can be made by incorporating different types of aggregates. In this paper, it is made using three types of coarse
aggregates i.e. conventional aggregate, pumice aggregate (light weight aggregate) and electric arc air cooled blast furnace slag
(heavy weight aggregate). The aggregate cement ratio was taken as 1:5. Compression test followed by split tensile and flexural
strength test were performed after curing the concrete for 28 days. The results arrived at suggest that it should be used in flat works
application.
Keywords: Electric Arc Air Cooled Blast Furnace Slag, Pumice Aggregate
________________________________________________________________________________________________________

I. INTRODUCTION

Pervious concrete are made using cement, coarse aggregate, admixtures, water and slight or no sand. It can be conveniently used
where the load applied would not be large. Some examples include footpath, greenhouses etc.

II. MIX PROPORTION

The water cement ratio was taken 0.35 and that of cement aggregate was taken as 1:5.

III. DETERMINATION OF COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH

Specimens of pervious concrete is taken and used for casting cubes 15 cm x 15 cm x 15 cm.
This concrete was emptied in the mould and properly tempered so that there are no voids. The moulds are demoulded after 24
hours and specimens are kept in water for curing. The aggregates largest nominal size should not exceed 20mm to 10 mm.

IV. DETERMINATION OF TENSILE STRENGTH

The specimen was of 150mm diameter and 300mm height cylinder was prepared. A split tensile strength test was performed for
all samples cured for 28 days as specified in ASTM C496. This test measures the tensile strength of a concrete sample by
compressing a cylinder through a line load applied along its length. A uniform tensile stress is created over the cylinder diameter
along the plane of loading. The maximum tensile stress occurs at the center of cylinder.

V. DETERMINATION OF FLEXURAL STRENGTH

Flexural strength is one measure of the tensile strength of concrete. It is measure of an unreinforced concrete beam or slab to resist
failure in bending. The flexural strength is expressed as modulus of rupture (MR) in psi (MPa) and it is obtained by standard test
methods ASTM C 78 (third point loading) or ASTM C 29 (centre-point loading).Flexural strength of conventional concrete is
about 10 - 20 percent of compressive strength depending on the type, size and volume of coarse aggregate used. According to Yu
Chen et al, (19) reported that flexural strength of pervious concrete may be more sensitive to change in porosity than compressive
strength. Specimens were tested in third point loading and calculated flexural strength.

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A Study on Pervious Concrete using Pumice and Electric Arc Air Cooled Blast Furnace Slag Aggregates
(IJSTE/ Volume 3 / Issue 09 / 016)

VI. RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS:

Compressive Strength
For compressive strength test cubes of measurements 150mm x 150mm x 150 mm were made for concrete. Vibration was given
to the moulds by utilizing the table vibrator. The top surface of the sample was levelled and wrapped up. Following 24 hours the
samples were demoulded and were exchanged to curing tank wherein they were permitted to cure for 7 days. Following 28 days
curing, these specimens were tried on computerized pressure testing machine according to I.S. 516-1959. The failure load was
observed and noted.
Table 1
Compressive Strength Test after 28 Days for Conventional aggregate
Weight (KG) Peak Load (KN) Peak Stress (MPa)
7.34 279.7 12.43
8.09 315.92 14.04
8.24 290.65 12.91
The average peak stress is 13.12MPa.
Table - 2
Compressive Strength after 28 Days for Electric arc air cooled blast furnace slag
Weight (KG) Peak Load (KN) Peak Stress (MPa)
8.16 348 15.46
7.92 375 16.644
8.03 398 17.773
The average peak stress is 16.62MPa.
Table - 3
Compressive Strength Test after 28 Days for Pumice
Weight (KG) Peak Load (KN) Peak Stress (MPa)
3.12 57.8 2.56
3.44 40.5 1.8
3.8 54.6 2.42
The average peak stress is 2.26MPa

Fig. 1: Compressive Strength in 28 Days of All Aggregates

Flexural Strength Test


Flexural strength also known as modulus of rupture, bend strength or fracture strength, a mechanical parameter for brittle material,
is defined as a materials ability to resist deformation under load.
Table - 4
Flexural strength after 28 days for conventional aggregate
Cement Aggregate Ratio Flexural Strength in Mpa
1:5 4.76
1:5 3.6
1:5 4
The average flexural strength is 4.12MPa.
Table - 5
Flexural strength after 28 days for electric arc air cooled blast furnace slag
Cement Aggregate Ratio Flexural Strength in Mpa
1:5 4.5
1:5 5
1:5 4

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A Study on Pervious Concrete using Pumice and Electric Arc Air Cooled Blast Furnace Slag Aggregates
(IJSTE/ Volume 3 / Issue 09 / 016)

The average flexural strength is 4.5MPa


Table - 6
Flexural strength after 28 days for pumice aggregate
Cement Aggregate Ratio Flexural Strength in Mpa
1:5 0.5
1:5 1
1:5 1.4
The average flexural strength is 0.96MPa

Fig. 2: Flexural Strength of All Aggregates in 28 Days

Split Tensile Strength


The tensile strength is one of the basic and important properties of the concrete. The concrete is not usually expected to resist the
direct tension because of its low tensile strength and brittle nature.
Table - 7
Split tensile strength after 28 days for conventional aggregate
Weight (KG) Peak Load (KN) Peak Stress (MPa)
10.54 150 2.11
9.81 170 2.40
10.7 130 1.84
The average of tensile strength is 2.11MPa
Table - 8
Split tensile strength after 28 days for electric arc air cooled blast furnace slag
Weight (KG) Peak Load (KN) Peak Stress (MPa)
11.11 160 2.26
10.81 150 2.11
10.92 130 1.85
The average of tensile strength is 2.073MPa
Table - 9
Split tensile strength after 28 days for pumice aggregate
Weight (KG) Peak Load (KN) Peak Stress (MPa)
5.23 60 0.84
5.67 40 0.56
5.8 50 0.707
The average of tensile strength is 0.702MPa.

Fig. 3: Split Tensile Strength of All Aggregates

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A Study on Pervious Concrete using Pumice and Electric Arc Air Cooled Blast Furnace Slag Aggregates
(IJSTE/ Volume 3 / Issue 09 / 016)

VII. CONCLUSION

Compressive strength of conventional pervious concrete, air cooled blast furnace slag concrete and pumice concrete in 28 days
was obtained 15.84MPa, 18.75MPa and 2.81MPa respectively.
Compressive strength of normal conventional pervious concrete is relatively lower than blast furnace slag pervious concrete
Flexural strength of conventional pervious concrete, air cooled blast furnace slag concrete and pumice concrete was obtained
4.48MPa, 4.91MPa and 1.2MPa respectively.
Split tensile strength of conventional pervious concrete, air cooled blast furnace slag concrete and pumice concrete was
obtained 2.26MPa, 2.33MPa and 0.88MPa respectively
Compressive strength of light weight pumice pervious concrete is very low due to which it cannot be used for pavement
purpose.
By using blast furnace slag we get to utilise an industrial waste and at the same time we also get higher compressive strengths
than normal pervious concrete.

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