You are on page 1of 88

EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION AND PERFORMANCE

WOORY AUTOMOTIVES INDIA PRIVATE LIMITED

A Project report submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the award of the degree
of

MASTER OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Submitted by

A. VICTOR

(Reg. No: 3510910874)

Submitted to

SRM SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

Under the guidance of

MR. K. SANKARA MOORTHY

Assistant professor

1
DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

SRM UNIVERSITY

MAY-2010

SRM SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT

SRM UNIVERSITY

SRM Nagar, Kattankulathur-603203

Phone: 044-27452270, 27417777, Fax: 044-27453903

E-hod@mba.srmuniv.ac.in, website: www.srmuniv.ac.in

______________________________________________________

BONAFIDE CERTIFICATE

2
Certified that this project report titled EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION AND PERFORMANCE
WOORY AUTOMOTIVES INDIA PRIVATE LIMITED is the bonafide work of A.VICTOR who
carried out the research under my supervision.

Certified further, that to the best of my knowledge the work reported here in does not form
part of any other Project report or dissertation on the basis of which a degree or award was
conferred on an earlier occasion on this or any other candidate.

PROJECT GUIDE DEAN

Mr. K. SANKARA MOORTHY DR. (Mrs.) JAYSHREE

EXTERNAL GUIDE

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

3
I would like to express my profound gratitude to our dean Dr.Mrs.Jayshree Suresh B.A, M.B.A,

PhD, who granted permission and encouraged me to take up a challenging project.

I would like to express my profound gratitude and gratefulness to my supervisor Mr.K.Sankara

Moorthy Assistant professor, SRM School of Management imparting his knowledge and excellent

guidance to complete this project.

I am indebted to Mr. Claudios Fernando (Director), Mr. P. Mohan Gandhi (Senior Manager-HR) and

Mr. Remo of Woory Automotives India Private limited for their valuable advice, vital inputs, and

remarkable guidance to complete this project.

I would be failing in my duty, if I do not express my heartfelt thanks to the employees of Woory

Automotives India Private limited for providing the primary data.

I finally express my gratitude and thanks to my family members and friends for their constant

support and encouragement.

4
DECLARATION

I hereby declared that the project work entitled EMPLOYEE MOTIVATION AND

PERFORMANCE WOORY AUTOMOTIVES INDIA PRIVATE LIMITED submitted to the SRM

University, Chennai in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the award of Master of Business

Administration is a record of original project done by me during the period of time in the SRM

University, Chennai under the guidance of Mr. K. Sankara Moorthy, Assistant professor in School

of Management, SRM University.

Place: Chennai

Date:

A,VICTOR

5
TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER CONTENTS PAGE NO

I INTRODUCTION

1. Introduction 1

1.1 Research Background 2

6
1.2 Research Problems 3

1.3 Review of Related Literature 4

1.4 Need and importance of study 5

1.5 Primary objective 5

1.5.1 Secondary objectives 5

1.6 Limitations 6

1.7 Cauterization 6

II BRIEF HISTORY OF WOORY COMPANY

2.1 Introduction 8

2.2 Woory India Plant 8

2.3 company History 9

2.3.1 Management Policy 10

2.3.2 Quality Policy 11

2.3.3 Customer Support Strategy 11

2.3.4 Philosophy 11

7
2.3.5 Company Vision 12

2.3.6 Organization 14

2.3.7 Woory Global Location 15

2.3.8 Global Customers 16

2.4 The Products Woory Company 18

MOTIVATION

III

3.1 Introduction 26

3.2 Managing Human Resources 26

3.3 Motivation 28

3.3.1 Motivation defined 28

3.3.2 Source of Motivation 30

3.3.3 Reason for Employees lack of Motivation in

todays world 31

3.4 Motivational Theories. 32

3.5 Motivating Individuals and Groups at Work 34

8
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

4. Introduction 36

4.1 Research Design 36

4.2 Research Method 36

IV 4.3 Questionnaire Design 37

4.4 Sampling Procedure 37

4.5 Pilot study and pre test 38

4.6 Method of data collection 38

4.6.1 Primary Data 38

4.6.2 Secondary Data 39

VI DATA ANALYSIS & INTERPRETATION 40-67

FINDING, SUGESTION AND CONCLUSION 66-71

9
VII

Bibliography 72

Appendix 73

LIST OF TABLES

Table No Table Title Page no

1A Mean Descriptive of Motivational Variables 45

1B One way ANOVAs on motivational Variable 46

1C Post Hoc Test on Motivational Variable 47

2A Group Statistics between Male and Female 48

2B Levenes Test for Equality of Variance 49

3A Mean Descriptive on Qualification 50

3B One way ANOVAs on Qualification 51

3C Post Hoc Test on Qualification 52

4A T-Test on Age Group 56

10
4B Levenes Test for Quality of Variance 56

5A Mean Descriptive on Department 57

5B One way ANOVAs on Department 58

5C Post Hoc Test on Department 60

6A Mean Descriptive on Salary 63

6B One way ANOVAs on Salary 64

6C Post hoc Test on Salary 66

LIST OF CHARTS

Chart No Chart Title Page no

1 Customers wise Sales Results 2009 17

2 Product wise Sales Results 2009 17

11
3 Sales over View 18

4 Customer Supporting Chain 25

5 Company Related Information 40

6 Working Condition 40

7 Compensation and benefit 41

8 Employees Relations 42

9 Training and Development 42

10 Relationship between HRD and Employees 43

11 Personal Development 44

12 Mean Working Condition for Age group 48

13A Mean working condition for qualification 54

13B Mean of Motivational level of the Employees 55

14A Mean of Company Related Information 59

14B Mean of Working condition for Qualification of various Department 59

14C Mean of motivation level of the Employees 59

15A Mean of Working Condition on Salary Group 65

15B Mean of Training and Development on Salary Group 65

12
13
1. Introduction

Motivating the workforce of an organization to work more effectively towards the

organizations goals is perhaps the most fundamental task of management. Organizations motivate

their workforce to perform effectively by offering them rewards for satisfactory performance and

perhaps punishing them for unsatisfactory performance. Over the past hundred years or so there has

been an evolution in the view of what the term rewards actually means in an organizational

context.

In the age of Scientific Management, forwarded by Frederick Winslow Taylor in the 1890s,

only monetary rewards were considered to be important to employees. This rather limited view of

employees needs and rewards gave way in the 1920s when a series of experiments at the Western

Electric Companys Hawthorne plant led to a new paradigm of worker motivation. The Hawthorne

experiments, as they came to be known, led to a view that saw employees motivated more by social

needs rather than by purely economic ones. This viewpoint, known as the Human Relations

Movement, attempted to identify and satisfy the social needs of the worker in the belief that a

satisfied worker worked harder than an unsatisfied worker. Rewards under the Human Relations

viewpoint, therefore, also included the relationships employees form with their fellow workers. It

was thus seen to be in the organizations interest to provide an environment that allows and

encourages social relationships to develop. Finally, the Human Resources Movement began to

concentrate more on the needs of the individual rather than the interactions within working groups.

The Human Resources Movement views the worker as being largely pre-motivated to perform to

the best of their abilities and it becomes the task of management to provide conditions whereby

workers can meet their own individual goals at the same time as meeting those of the organization.

14
Rewards under the Human Resources Movement therefore include a wide range of factors, such as

money, affiliation, achievement and performing a meaningful job.

1.1 Research Background

The world is going through an enormous change. Globalization of businesses is increasing

and information technologies are advancing. These major changes are reshaping our world

significantly, for better and for worse. They lead to changes in the way business is done, they way

employees behave and the way managers mange their employees. For companies to remain

successful, they are required to adapt to these changes. The changes that are reshaping the world

have altered the way organizations operate and have also led to changes in employee characteristics

(Robbins, 2000:21).

Although many theorists believe the changes in the world of work have brought advantages,

several believe that the changes have different and disparate impact on the employees. However, in

contrast with the traditional way of managing, where the structures and the systems were predefined,

the new work place seeks to balance whatever is important for the company and its strategies with

whatever is important for the individual employees regarding their life strategies.

Management in todays world is about management in times of rapid change. In todays

world, the biggest task of the human-resource manager is to motivate and retain employees.

Motivation is a companys life-blood. A well managed company can motivate and retain its

employees and hence has the following competitive advantages: reduced turnover, an increase in

productivity, reduced absenteeism, increased revenue and improved performance. However,

managers tend to assume that they know what the employees want from their work. This assumption

can lead mangers into making mistakes while trying to motivate their employees. This study is thus

15
an attempt to help mangers to understand the factors that motivate their employees to perform to the

best of their ability.

1.2 Research Problems

Motivated employees are needed in our rapidly changing work place. Motivated employees

help organization survive. Motivated employees are more productive. To be effective managers need

to understand what motivates employees within the context of the roles they perform. Of all the

functions a manager performs, motivating employees is arguably the most complex. This is due in

part, to the fact that what motivate employees changes constantly.

Motivation is not based on a particular theory and it does not advocate any particular

technique for application. The motivation research mainly understood employees mentality towards

the motivational packages of the organization and the energy it creates for employees to be engaged

in their work. The energy which the employees possess is often blocked in the work place, beyond

certain points. It is necessary to identify the various blocking factors of motivational system in the

organization. An organization could be considered effective only if the motivational features are

satisfactory according to the employees. An enterprise must committed to the assurance of

motivation in order retain the talents in its workforce.

The changing view of organizational rewards and employee motivation has led to a multitude

of theories of exactly how the job rewards influence the motivation and performance of employees.

Steers [1987] stated that a comprehensive theory of motivation at work must address itself to at

least three important sets of variables which constitute the work situation i.e. the characteristics of

the individual, the characteristics of the job and the characteristics of the work environment. These

three sets of variables, along with examples of each, are depicted in the following diagram.

16
Individual Characteristics Job Characteristics Work Environment
Interests Types of intrinsic rewards Characteristics
Attitudes Degree of autonomy Immediate work
Toward self Amount of direct environment
performance Peers
Toward job feedback
Supervisors
Toward aspects of Degree of variety in tasks
Organisational actions
work situation
Needs Reward practices
Security Systemwide rewards
Social Individual rewards
Achievement Organisational climate

1.3 Review of Related Literature

Employee motivation is influenced by the employee himself or herself, the management and

the environment. Motivating the employee is the managers job. It is therefore the managers job to

understand what motivates the employees. Based on Locke and Lathams integrated model of work

motivation, various theories of work, employee motivation will be discussed, including Maslows

need hierarchy, McClellands personality-based approach to employee motivation, Vrooms VIE

theory, Locke and Lathams goal theory, Banduras self-efficacy theory, Weiners attribution theory,

Herzbergs job characteristics model, the organizational commitment theory and Adams equity

theory. These theories attempt to explain employees behavior. They provide understanding to both

managers and employees of how to motivate others or become more involved in ones own

motivation (Drafke and Kossen, 2002:273). Greens belief system of motivation, Glanzs CARE

model for motivating employees, Lindners approach to understanding employee motivation, and

Nelsons ten ways to motivate todays employees are some newer approaches to employee

motivation.

17
1.4 Need and importance of study

The purpose of this study is to describe the importance of certain factors in motivating

employees, specifically, the study sought to describe the ranked importance following motivation

factors job security, sympathetic help with personnel problems, personal loyalty to employees,

interesting work, good working condition, tactful discipline, good wages, promotion and growth in

the organization, feeling of being one, and full appreciation of work done.

Motivation is employees tool. This study is one such attempt and therefore it is important as

it helps to develop and improve the motivation to bring in balance between the work and life which

helps the Woory Automotives India to achieve its goals and targets. This research mainly deals with

the employee satisfaction on motivational measures of the company.

1.5 Primary objective

To study the motivational level among the employees of Woory Automotives India Private

Limited

1.5.1 Secondary objectives

1. To study the socio demographic details of the employees

2. To study the role satisfaction of the respondents

3. To study the working conditions of the employees

4. To study the compensation and benefits given to the employees

5. To study the relations among the employees

6. To study relationship between human resource department and the respondents

18
1.6 Limitations

The study is limited to Woory Automotives India Private Limited only

The sample size is only 30 in number and the data collection is at random.

Some errors have occurred because of misinterpretation of the question as some of the

customers are poor in English.

Few employees filled their questionnaire in a hurry. So they could not be relied upon and

predominant of subjectivism.

The duration of the project is restricted to two months only. So it is not possible to get the

feedback from all employees.

The study was limited. Hence the findings cannot be generalized.

The details over a period of time will get invalid since there will be a drastic change in

employees behavior.

1.7 Chapterisation

The study has been interwoven within the framework of six chapters

Chapter-I

The first chapter deals with introduction, research background, research problems, theoretical
framework, needs, objectives and limitation.

Chapter-II

The second chapter consists of company profile.

Chapter-III

The third chapter comprises of introduction, managing human resources, motivation,


motivation defined, source of motivation, reasons for employees lack of motivation in todays
world, motivational theories and motivating individuals and groups at work.

19
Chapter-IV

The fourth chapter highlights research design, questionnaire design, pilot study and pre test,
sampling procedure and method of data collection.

Chapter-V

The fifth chapter analyze and interpretation of data

Chapter-VI

The Sixth chapter deals with the findings, suggestion and conclusion.

20
2.1 Introduction

Woory Industrial, established in 1989, have successfully launched its business into the North

American Market through dynamic marketing strategy; making a firm establishment in domestic as well as in

the overseas market. The company is striving to establish global leadership in the field of automotive supply

by expanding its horizon from Asia, Europe, and throughout the world

Vision of Woory in the 21st century is to become "World-class automotive supplier of the highest

quality goods and of the highest innovation that puts customer's needs at its utmost priority."

With its motto of "customer centered management", "establishing fair values" and "respect of mankind".

The company is committed to customer's satisfaction through its continuous innovation in the development

and manufacture of automotive supply for global automotive industry. It hopes to build a partnership of trust

and of sincerity with customer, and makes every effort to satisfy the consumers. The brief history of the

company growth and developments in India as follows.

2.2 WOORY India Plant

Established April 19, 2004

Company Name WOORY Automotive India

Operating Manager Sung Won Cho

Director Manager Claoudious Fernandeos

Products Field Coil Assembly


HVAC Actuators

Cooling Fan Resistors

Heater Blower

PTC Pre Heater


Heater Control Assembly

21
Employee 320

Share Capital USD $ 947,697

Property Size 108,458 SF

Building Size 12,454 SF

Address Plot No- A1B, M.M.D.A Industrial Complex, Kilakaranai Village, Maraimalai
Nagar- Township, Chengalpattu -Taluk, Kancheepuram-District, India
Pin:- 603 209

Contacts T: 011 91 44 4740 4451 / F: 011 91 44 4740 4454

Woory Automotives India Private limited plant in India

2.3 Company History

1989 02 Woory Industrial Co ltd Established in Korea.

2004 05 Woory India Company Registered

2004 12 Woory India Plant Production Established

2005 07 First Supplies to Visteon India from Woory India

2006 01 Completed TS 16949 Audit at Woory India

22
2006 04 Started Actuator supplies to Visteon India

2006 07 Started supplies of Plastic components to Hanil Lear

2007 04 First Supply to Subros Limited from Woory India

2007 07 Started Supplies of 5 products including control head to

Visteon for new Hyundai PA project (i10)

2007 09 Won Actuator Business from Sanden vikas for Micro Bus project 2008

02 Successfully completed 100 PPM and SQ Mark Audit of Hyundai India 2008

05 Completed Line set up of Export actuators for Behr US

2008 06 PB project Control Head ,Pre heater line Production established

2008 07 Started Actuators Export to Behr US

2008 08 PO Received for VW Actuator from Behr India

2009 01 Installed PCB Manufacturing Facility

2009 06 Won HLLD Business form TATA Motors

2009 10 Certified by TUV for TS 16949

2010 01 Started Supplies to VISTEON India for the FORD ( B517 ) Figo Program

2010 02 Started Glove Box Lamp Export To ASSAN HANIL Turkey for PBT

Program

2010 05 Started Supplies of the Actuator to VALEO France for the P2 Program

2.3.1 Management Policy

Woory Automotives India Private Limited is committed to manufacture Superior

Automobile Products with high level of precision, innovativeness having ZERO Defects at

competitive prices. To achieve this we have state of the art facilities, and a qualified and well

trained work force, who are highly dedicated to satisfy the Customers NEEDS and DEMANDS.

23
2.3.2 Quality Policy

Woory Automotives India Private Limited is committed to provide the highest quality

Automobile Products to its customers by:

Consistently meeting or exceeding customers expectations for product quality and

performance;

Timely delivery of products and services to meet customers requirements;

Continuously improving processes, and systems;

Ensuring personnel are properly trained so that they are better equipped to serve customers.

2.3.3 Customer Support Strategy

Best quality at world class costs and Zero Defects

Proactive identification of issues and quick resolution

On time delivery

Improvement throughout entire supplier chain value stream

Open and honest communication

Act proactively to exceed customers requirement and share any new idea with customer

Positive program managing by leading Customer

On site Safe launch supporting by Resident Engineer

24 Hrs Contact Customer Satisfaction Engineer

2.3.4 Philosophy

The company is guided by well set of philosophy, which is the secret to its successes. It instills in the

minds of its employees the philosophy of customer focus, value creation and respect for human. The

following diagram will explain the company Philosophy.

24
Human resource is the most
Customer is the partner to grow Worth of company is the ability to
important property and the
with company keep enhancing itself.
potential power for growth.

Company should create the highest


technology and service
Company is regarded as itself a All employees are to become the
unceasingly for improving
body which gives happiness to creative resources who lead the
company's worth.
customers, shareholders and future with positive and innovative
employees by providing high philosophy on the basic motto of
quality products and good after creativity, sincerity and harmony
sales services

2.3.5 Company Vision

25
Business

To establish the highest competitive stature in domestic and in global market through our quality of produc

services.

Welfare / Culture

To cultivate competent employees with global vision by rewarding their ability and their accomplishment.

Environment

To realize customer oriented management by establishing process (system) based on ethics and principle and thr

awareness reformation.

26
2.3.6 Organization

27
2.3.7 Woory Global Location

28
2.3.8 Global Customers

29
2.4 Customers Wise Sales Results - 2009

Visteon, 64.26%

ACTUAL
SALES
Rs 50.1 Core
10 Million Doowon, 17.34%
USD

Others, 5.28%
Subros, 3.11% Inzi Control ,
Behr India, 3.44%
6.57%

Figure 1

Product Wise Sales results - 2009

Control Head,
59.15%

ACTUAL
SALES
Field coil, 16.10%
Rs: 50.1 Core
10 Million USD Actuator Dom,
11.15%
Others, 2.92% Actuator Exp,
Resistors, 1.14% Air filter, 5.60% 3.94%

Figure 2

30
Sales Overview

120
Actual
100 100.00
Rs in Core

80

60
57.82

41.82 50.1
40

20 23.06
11.17
0 1.80
2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2012

Figure 3

1.5 The Products Woory Company

Woory Industrial Company Ltd. is a Korea-based developer and manufacturer of automobile

parts. The Company's main products include heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC)

actuators, heater control assemblies and clutch coil assemblies for cars. It also provides other car

parts such as resistors, positive temperature coefficient (PTC) heaters, power modules and headlight

leveling devices.

31
Product Power Module
Experience 5years
Type PWM, LPM, MPM, POWER, TR
Capacity 1.5 Mil/Year
Current Volume 0.8 Mil/Year
Customer DELPHI, HCC< SDAAC, MODINE
Application GM, HYUNDAI, SGM

32
Product Clutch Coil
Experience 12years
Type Epoxy Molding, Injection Molding, Stacking
Capacity 6 Mil/Year
Current Volume 4.5 Mil/Year
Customer VISTEON, HCC
Application HYUNDAI, FORD

Product Sensors
Experience 8years
Type INCAR SENSOR, EVAP SENSOR, THERMOCON
Capacity 1 Mil/Year
Current Volume 0.7 Mil/Year
Customer DELPHI, HCC, AIR INTERNATIONAL
Application TOYOTA, HYUNDAI, KIA, FORD

33
Product Fuel Sender
Experience 17years
Type Ceramic Resistor Type
Capacity 1 Mil/Year
Current Volume 1 Mil/Year
Customer INERGY, LG CHEMICAL, MOBIS
Application HYUNDAI, KIA, RENAULT-SAMSUNG

Product Blower Resistor


Experience 5years
Type Film Resistor type, PTC Type, PTC Type
Capacity 1 Mil/Year
Current Volume 0.5 Mil/Year
Customer MODINE
Application HYUNDAI

34
Product Control Head
Experience 12years
Type ATC, Manual - Electrical Cable / Vacuum
Capacity 2 Mil/Year
Current Volume 1.8 Mil/Year
Customer DELPHI, HCC, DCX, MOBIS, MODINE, DCC
Application GM, HYUNDAI, KIA, SGM, DCX

Product HVAC Actuator


Experience 12years
Type Smart, Feedback, Dumb, Pulse count
Capacity 12 Mil/Year
Current Volume 10 Mil/Year
Customer DELPHI, HCC, VISTEON, BEHR, MODINE
Application GM, FORD, HYUNDAI, TOYOTA

35
Product Injection Molding
Experience 9years
Type IN-MOLD PARTS, PRINTING PARTS
Capacity 0.5 Mil/Year
Current Volume 0.3 Mil/Year
Customer HYUNDAI AUTONET
Application KIA

Product Cooling Fan Resistor


Experience 7years
Type Coil Resistor Type, PTC Type
Capacity 1 Mil/Year
Current Volume 0.5 Mil/Year
Customer HCC, MODINE, DCC
Application HYUNDAI, KIA

PTC Heater
36
Condenser Fan / Radiator Fan

37
Figure: 4

38
3.1 Introduction

Motivation is a psychological process that gives behavior purpose and a direction

predisposition to behave in a purposive manner to achieve specific, unmet needs an internal drive to

satisfy unsatisfied need and the will to achieve. Motivation is operationally defined as the inner

force that drives individuals and groups to accomplish personnel and organizational goals.

The job of manager in the work place is to get things done through employees. To do this, the

manager should be able to motivate employees. In spite of enormous research basic as well as

applied, the subject of motivation is not clearly understood and more often than not poorly practiced.

To understand motivation one must understand human nature itself. And there lies problem.

Human nature can be very simple, yet very complex too. An understanding and appreciation

of this is a prerequisite to effective employee motivation in the work place and therefore effective

management and leadership.

3.2 Managing Human Resources

Human resource management is the use of several activities to ensure that human resources

are managed effectively for the benefit of the individual, society and the business (Schuler,

1998:122). Managing human resources effectively has become a fundamental for companies in

todays business world. Human resources management positively affects lower-level employees

through: improved productivity, improved quality of their work life, increased companys legal

compliance, gained competitive advantages and assured workforce.

Businesses today have entered a new era in the relationship between the companies

themselves and their employees. The companies can no longer see their employees as either their
39
loyal family members or as easily replaceable company resources. In this new era, employees need

to be respected and like to be treated as valuable human capital, as even more important than the

companys financial capital. Employees are now becoming the main source of a companys

competitive advantage. Therefore, how a company treats its employees increasingly determines

whether a company is going to thrive or even to survive (Lawler, 2003:3). As Lawler says, in the

twenty-first century, treating people right is not an option; it is a necessity. In other words, the way

a company manages its workforce determines its ability to establish and maintain a competitive

advantage over other companies.

In the present competitive job market, the only differentiator between competitors is the

quality of the people working in the organization (Whiteley, 2002:24). To retain and develop an

organizations human resources in order to gain competitive advantage is one of the core themes in

human resources literature. A well-managed company can retain and motivate its employees and

hence has the following advantages, reduced turnover, increased productivity, reduced absenteeism,

increased revenue and improved performance.

Companies need to attract and retain talented employees therefore understanding what

motivates employees has become an essential requirement for todays managers. As Hughes

(2003:3) states in Women in Business: Theres often a single element that differentiates companies

with cohesive teams from those suffering high rates of dissatisfaction and turnover. That key factor

is motivation an important aspect of successful management that can both maximize productivity

and foster a positive corporate culture.

40
3.3 Motivation

Motivation in terms like motives needs wants drives desires wishes incentives. Motivation

we have to examine three term motive, motivating, and motivation and their relationship.

Motive

A motive is an inner state that energizes activities or mores and that directs behavior to words

goal

Motivating

Motivating is a term which implies that one person in the organization engage in action by

ensuring that channel to satisfy the motive becomes available and accessible to the individual in

addition to channelizing the strong motives in direction that is satisfying to both organization and

employees

Motivation

It is energizer of action motivating is the channelization and activation of motives motivation

is work behavior itself motivation is complex process

3.3.1 Motivation defined

Everyone has motives that are inspired by certain factors that encourage the desire to enhance

performance (Kressler, 2003:1). Motive literally means the mainspring and the rationale behind any

action. The Word motivation is derived from the Latin word movere, which means to move.

Motivation has been defined as: an internal drive to satisfy an unsatisfied need (Higgins

1994:2) a predisposition to behave in a purposeful manner to achieve specific, unmet needs; the

41
psychological forces that determine the direction of a persons behavior in an organization, a

persons level of effort, and a persons level of persistence in the fact of obstacles; the force an

individual has that accounts for the direction, level and persistence of his or her effort expended at

work (Schernerhorn et al., 2003:102) and the processes that account for an individuals intensity and

persistence of effort toward attaining a goal. The concept of motivation overlaps with the concept of

morale, meaning the extent to which the employee feels positive or negative about his or her work

(Gary, 2004:123). The level of motivation varies between individuals and within individuals at

different times and in different situation.

Definitions

Motivation is process of stimulating people to action to accomplish desired goals.

- Scott

Motivation can also be de fined as the cognitive decision making process through which the

individual chooses described out comes and sets in motion inaction appropriate to their achievement.

- Edward Tolman

Motivation is process that starts with psychological or physiological deficiency or need that

activities behavior a drive that is aimed good incentive.

- Fredluthan

Motivation is ability to initiate and maintain intended behavior and engage from it when

necessary can be embedded even there is no rational reason that should prevent the individual from

performing.

- Kuhl

42
3.3.2 Source of Motivation

All motivation ultimately comes from within a person, In other words, all motivation is self-

motivation. Freemantly (2001:53) interviewed one of the team leaders at a medical care insurance

who said, I am self-motivated.. I find it stimulating when I am doing new things I have never

done before. I like to use my brain. I dislike doing the same things day in and day out; repetitive

work. The CEO of Finlay Commercial Real Estate Company in South Africa, Linette Finlay, points

out that motivation comes when the employees are able to see the purpose and reason for the

direction in which the company is heading and can recognize their roles in the business process.

Freemantle emphasizes that people are already motivated. However, differences exist

because we are motivated more or less as a result of the ups and downs in life and what we

encounter in the world that is beyond our control. Furthermore, if a person is de-motivated, it is

because that a persons mind chooses to be de-motivated whether consciously or subconsciously.

Motivation is therefore about what a person wants and about his emotional state, which drives him in

the direction of achieving what he wants.

Source of motivation can be intrinsic or extrinsic. Intrinsically motivated behavior is

behavior that is performed for ones own sake and extrinsically motivated behavior is performed to

acquire rewards or to avoid punishment. A manager can thus try to stimulate the employees intrinsic

motivation, but cannot create the intrinsic motivation for that employee. This implies that, for

example, a manager should rather try to find out what factors will drive the employee to smile at the

customer, than simply tell the employee to smile at the customer.

43
3.3.3 Reason for Employees lack of Motivation in todays world

Managers today complain that their employees are no longer motivated to work. However, it

is often the managers and organizational practices that are the problem, not the employees. When

there is a lack of motivation, the problem usually lies in one of the following areas: poor selection,

unclear goals, an inadequate performance-appraisal system, unsatisfactory reward system or the

managers inability to communicate the appraisal and reward systems to the employees properly

(Robbins, 2003:36)

A lack of motivation occurs when the employees see a weakness in one of three

relationships. The first of these is the relationships between the employees effort and their

performance. Manager must make sure that the employees believe that if they exert maximum effort

in performing their jobs, it will be recognized it their performance appraisal. However, in most

cases, the employees do not believe that their efforts will be recognized. If this is the case, it could

lead to a lack of motivation.

Secondly, the relationship between the employees performance and organization rewards is

important. Managers must make sure that the employees believe that if they get a performance

appraisal, it will lead to organizational rewards. Many employees see this relationship as weak

because the organization does not give rewards just on their performance, so there is a lack of

motivation.

The third important relationship is the one between the rewards received and the rewards

desired. The managers must know whether the rewards the employees receive are the ones they

desire. Some employees might want a promotion but instead get a pay rise or vice versa. Sometime

the managers assume that all employees want the same reward and so fail to notice the motivational

effects of individualizing rewards. If this is the case, employees motivation is likely to suffer.
44
Thus to keep employees motivate, managers must strengthen these three relationships. If any

or all of these three relationships are weak, the employees efforts are likely to suffer. When these

relationships are strong, the employees tend to be motivated, so the company is likely to gain

competitive advantages through human resources.

Motivation needs to be long lasting and reinforced by rewards and praise. Motivation needs

to be maintained by mangers to ensure a high level of performance and productivity and to create a

working environment where employees will have positive attitudes, commitment towards their work

and most importantly, the belief that they are not only valued but of crucial interest to the company.

3.4 Motivational Theories.

The theories of motivation attempt to explain peoples behavior. They provide understanding

to both the managers and the employees of how to motivate others; how others are trying to motivate

a person and how that person can engage more in his or her own motivation effort and others efforts

in trying to motivate him or her (Drafke and Kossen, 2002:273)

The topics of motivation and satisfaction have been studied by industrial-organizational

psychologists for several decades, but progress has been slow for several reasons. Firstly, work

motivation and satisfaction have been considered to be relatively independent. However, it has been

found that the related theories have only focused on specific aspects. Lastly, both motivation and

satisfaction are highly complicated (Locke and Latham 1990:3)

Interest in studying work motivation was stimulated in large part by the Hawthorne studies

conducted by Frederick Taylor in the late 1930s. These studies investigated the effect of working

conditions on employee productivity. The finding in these studies was that employees are not

45
motivated by money only and that employee behavior is linked to their attitudes. After the

publication of Hawthorne studies results, the needs and motivation of employees became the

primary focus of mangers and researchers.

The concepts of motivation were developed mostly in the 1950s. Several new models of

work motivation emerged, which collectively has been referred to as content theories. They all aim

to identify factors associated with motivation. Theories developed in this era are Maslows need

hierarchy theory and McClellands theory of needs, which was firstly introduced by Murray. While

Maslow and McClelland focused on the role of individual differences in motivation, Herzbergs

hygiene theory studied how work activities and the nature of the job can influence motivation and

performance. Subsequently, Hackman and Oldham have extended the research to job design,

motivation and job performance, while others focus on task-based intrinsic and extrinsic factors in

work motivation (Steers et all., 2004:381)

In the beginning of the 1960s a new approach to work motivation, called process theory

emerged. It focused on the processes underlying work motivation. Process theorists see work

motivation from a dynamic point of view and search for causal relationships related to human

behavior in the workplace. Central to process theory is a series of cognitive theories that attempt to

understand the thought processes that people have when determining how to behave in the

workplace. The best known of the cognitive theories is probably the expectancy theory derived from

the early work of Lewin and Tolman. Vroom presented the first systematic formulation of

expectancy theory. Porter and Lawler then expanded Vrooms work to recognize the importance of

individual differences and linked job effort to job performance. A number of significant cognitive

theories, each with its own focus, have been developed since the 1960s, for example Adams equity

theory (Steers et al., 2004:382).

46
Goal-setting theory also emerged in the late 1960s. Research showed that goal specificity,

goal difficulty and goal commitment are closely related to task performance. Locke and Latham also

proposed a formal theory of goal setting. Finally, leading researchers such as Bandura developed

significant theories focusing on the role of social cognition and self efficacy on behavior and job

performance. All of these theories, however, have limitations and shortcomings. Some are still

useful, while some are not applicable in todays world.

3.5 Motivating Individuals and Groups at Work

Work motivation theorists examine the factors that energies direct and sustain work related

behavior. They aim to understand which conditions encourage people to invest energy in their work,

which the activities people like to focus their efforts on and the factors that make people persist with

their efforts over time. This has resulted in the development of various work motivation models.

These models focus mainly on individuals needs, their own independent goals and expectations or

their personal desired outcomes. They are used to understand the processes underlying the behavior

of the individual as separate agents. However, employees are not driven by personal considerations

only. Employees nowadays work more in teams than they did before, which involves supporting

each other to achieve common goals instead of focusing on personal achievement. Employee

motivation is adapted to the needs, goals, expectations and rewards of the team or the organization

where the employees work (Ellemers et al., 2004:460) As Ellemers mention, As organization

continue to move toward group-based systems, research on motivation within groups is increasingly

important.

The proportion of people working in teams has steadily increased in the past few decades.

Team work may offer opportunities for job enrichment, give autonomy to employees, decrease the
47
workload of supervisors and enhanced performance on difficult or complicated tasks. However,

there are also disadvantages to employees working in teams. People tend to exert less effort when

performing a collective task than when they perform the same task individually. This phenomenon is

called the Ringelmann effect or social loafing and is presumably because of loss of motivation.

Solutions for social loafing involve making the work situation less social by treating the team

members as individuals. This can be done by making each team members contribution identifiable

or by helping the individuals to see how their contribution to the team can offer them personal

valued outcomes.

48
4. Introduction

Motivated employees are needed in our rapidly changing work place. Motivated employees

help organization survive. Motivated employees are more productive. To be effective managers need

to understand what motivates employees within the context of the roles they perform. Of all the

functions a manager performs, motivating employees is arguably the most complex. This is due in

part, to the fact that what motivate employees changes constantly. So in order to achieve the

objective of the project, a pre planned strategic path is designed. A detailed plan is developed so as

to carry out the project objectives. A structured questionnaire is used for obtaining the responses.

4.1 Research Design

The research undertaken in this study is descriptive in nature. The main purpose of

descriptive research is the description of state of affairs, as it exists at present. The main

characteristic of this method is that the researcher has no control over variables; he can only report

what has happened or what is happening. The study attempts to describe the socio demographic

characteristics of the respondents and also to describe their motivational level.

4.2 Research Method

The research method used is survey method. This was chosen because it facilitates a

systematic gathering of data from the respondents. This method also helps in understanding some

behavioral aspects of the population being surveyed. The instrument used for the research is a

structured questionnaire. The survey was taken in the form of an interview schedule.

49
4.3 Questionnaire Design

The questionnaire used for primary data collection was structured and undersigned in nature.

The questionnaire consists of open ended and closed ended questions and multiple choice questions.

Proper care was taken to restrict the number of questions but at the same time they were designed to

cover the scope and range of the project.

The research was conducted in Chennai only. The respondents were personally interviewed

and the level of understanding was found. Then the necessary alterations were made to answer for

the questions. The respondents were only the employees of Woory Automotives India Private

Limited.

4.4 Sampling Procedure

Sampling

The researcher has adopted Convenient Sampling. The researcher studied only the employees

of Woory Automotives India Private Limited. The researcher collected data from the employees

selected at random.

Sampling size

In order to achieve the objective of the study the sampling size was 30 only. The respondents

were only the employees of Woory Automotives India Private Limited.

50
4.5 Pilot study and pre test

Pilot study

Pilot study is to find the feasibility of the research. The researcher had done his pilot study

before the research at Woory Automotives India Private Limited at Maraimalai Nagar and found that

to conduct a research is feasible.

Pre test

Pretesting is a trial test to find out the Effectiveness of the Research questionnaire. After the

pre-test the researcher had not made any modifications in the questionnaire since the respondents

were able to understand all the questions and felt that the questionnaire had covered the required

areas of the research. The questions mostly covered all areas about job motivation. The researcher

had done his pre test with 7 respondents at Woory Automotives India Private Limited.

4.6 Method of data collection

The questionnaire contains two parts. The first part contains questions pertaining

Demographic features the second part is related to motivation which has six dimensions namely

Industry related information, Working condition, Compensation and benefits.

4.6.1 Primary Data

The primary data were collected for the study. The questionnaire was administered in Woory

Automotives India Private Limited. The data were collected from the respondents directly. The
51
purpose of the survey was clearly informed to the respondents and all steps were taken to avoid the

possibility of any bias while filling this questionnaire.

4.6.2 Secondary Data

The Secondary data are the data which is collected already by someone else and which have

already been passed through the statistical process. It is collected from company records, websites,

library, and articles, etc.

52
Data analysis & Interpretation

Company related information (Chart-5)

25

20

15
23
10

5 5 2 0 0
0
Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad

The above chart indicates the company related information. Of the 30 sample analyzed 23

respondents of the view that the company is very good, 5 respondents of the view is that the

company is good, 2 of the opinion is that the company is satisfactory and no one of them gave the

opinion that the company is bad or very bad. The data analysis indicates the company is one of the

best companies providing adequate facilities, job security, proper making use of skills and abilities

of the employees and giving good career growth and right amount of works to the employees. This

makes the employees interesting to work in the company.

Working Condition (Chart 6)

24
25
20
15
10
4
5 2
0 0
0

53
The analysis indicates that the working condition of the company is par excellence. The

above chart indicates that the overall respondents 24 of them states that the working condition is

very good, 4 indicates good, 2 indicate satisfactory and there is no bad or very bad in the working

condition of the company. The company is kept very clean. The ventilation and lighting facilities are

incorporated with modern technology. The company management is providing necessary resources

to the employees to perform the work. The company gives freedom for the employees to take

decision in their work. There is not much work pressure in the company.

Compensation and benefits (Chart 7)

14
12
10
8
13 12
6
4
2 4
1 0
0
Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad

The data analysis points out that the compensation and benefits are overall better, giving edge to 13

very good and 12 well. However there are 4 viewed that this segmentation gives only satisfaction.

When compare with the salary of similar companies, most of them with the knowledge that their

company gives better salary then the company in and around. As per incentives provided by the

company most of the female workers opted for attendance bonus and males employees preferred

overtime benefit and some night shift allowance. The allowances and social security provided by the

company is very good.


54
Employees Relation (Chart 8)

25

20

15
24
10

5
6

0 0 0 0
Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad

The above chart is a sign of employee relation with the management and with themselves. It is

excellence. There are 24 of the view that the relation is very good and 6 of them with good. There is

no satisfactory, bad or very bad. Many are of the opinion that the supervisor approaches is very good

and they accept the suggestion and new ideas of the employees and reward them with appreciation

for the suggestions and ideas given by them. The management shows very much understanding in

the problems of the employees. They have cordial relation among their colleagues.

Training and Development (Chart 9)

30 26
25
20
15
10
5 4

0 0
0
0

55
The company gives excellence training to their employees. Every new comer is initiated in

the company with proper training. They are placed under supervisor to make sure that they learn the

art of the company work. The above chart shows that out of 30 respondents, 26 of the judgment that

the company gives very good training and development for the employees and just 4 of the judgment

that the company gives good training. There is no satisfactory, bad or very bad.

Relationship between Human Resource Department and Employees (Chart 10)

25 21

20

15

8
10

5 1
0 0
0
Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad

The relationship between Human Resource Department (HRD) and Employee in Woory

Automotives India Private Limited is highly appreciable. A well knitted net work is created by the

company to create association between the employees and the management through its human

resource department. The department addressees the problems and needs of the employees

frequently and solve them as early as possible. The HR manager makes frequent visit the place of

work and mingles with the employees to know their problems and gives them proper guidance and

counseling. Not only the company problems are addressed but also personal problems of the

employees are given guidance and counseling. Paternal caring of the top management of the

company also gives encouragement to the employees. The above chart shows that total of 30

56
respondents over all 21 of the respondents of the judgment that the company HRD is very good, 8 of

them good, 1 person satisfactory and there is no bad or very bad.

Personal Development (Chart 11)

28
30

25

20

15

10

5 2
0 0 0
0
Very Good Good Satisfactory Bad Very Bad

Overall Motivation Level of the Respondents, a dimension of employee motivation is very high. The

above chart depicts that 28 respondents out of 30 says that the motivation level of the employees is

very high and only 2 have accepted good. There is no satisfactory, bad or very bad. The employees

are happy and satisfied in the company and definitely will not shift to another company with the

given pay, benefit, compensation and incentives that the present company offers.

57
Mean Descriptive of Motivational variables

N Mean Std. Deviation

Company 20 - 30
Related 18 4.7302 .25877
Information
30 - 40 9 4.6667 .24744
40 - 50 3 4.7619 .08248
Total 30 4.7143 .24022
Working 20 - 30
18 4.7269 .20373
Conditions
30 - 40 9 4.7685 .12345
40 - 50 3 5.0000 .00000
Total 30 4.7667 .18749
Compensation 20 - 30
18 4.24 .245
and Benefits
30 - 40 9 4.29 .226
40 - 50 3 4.24 .297
Total 30 4.25 .236
Employee 20 - 30
18 4.75 .297
Relations
30 - 40 9 4.89 .132
40 - 50 3 4.75 .250
Total 30 4.79 .255
Training and 20 - 30
18 4.85 .205
Development
30 - 40 9 4.89 .167
40 - 50 3 4.89 .192
Total 30 4.87 .188
Relationship 20 - 30
between HRD & 18 4.66 .217
Employees
30 - 40 9 4.72 .167
40 - 50 3 4.67 .167
Total 30 4.68 .195
Motivation level 20 - 30
of the 18 4.97 .077
employees
30 - 40 9 4.89 .105
40 - 50 3 4.87 .115
Total 30 4.93 .096
Table 1-A

When we analysis the age groups view with one way ANOVAs test we found that there is no

significant value i.e., less than table value 0.05 (Table 1-B). All the age groups of the opinion that

Company Related Information, Working Conditions, Compensation and Benefits, Employee

Relations Training and Development, Relationship between HRD & Employees and Motivation

level of the employees are very good.


58
One way ANOVA on Motivational variables
Sum of
Squares df Mean Square F Sig.
Company Related Between Groups .032 2 .016 .261 .772
Information Within Groups 1.642 27 .061
Total 1.673 29
Working Conditions Between Groups .192 2 .096 3.130 .060
Within Groups .828 27 .031
Total 1.019 29
Compensation and Between Groups .014 2 .007 .120 .887
Benefits Within Groups 1.605 27 .059
Total
1.620 29

Employee Relations Between Groups .122 2 .061 .930 .407


Within Groups 1.764 27 .065
Total 1.885 29
Training and Between Groups .010 2 .005 .132 .877
Development Within Groups 1.012 27 .037
Total 1.022 29
Relationship between Between Groups .026 2 .013 .320 .729
HRD & Employees Within Groups 1.082 27 .040
Total 1.107 29
Motivation level of the Between Groups .051 2 .026 3.201 .057
employees Within Groups .216 27 .008
Total .267 29

Table 1 -B

But when we compare the degree of opinion between the age group with the test of Post Hoc Tests

or Multiple comparisons we found that there are significant between the age between 20-30 and 40-

50 in company working condition. The significant value is .048, which is less than the table value

i.e., 0.05 (highlighted in table 1-C). This clearly says the opinion of age between 20-30 and 40-50 is

not the same in working condition of the company. The mean performance (table 1a) of age between

20-30 and 40-50 are 4.7269 and 5.0000 respectively. The age group of 40-50 has better opinion of

the working condition of the company than age group 20-30. It is depicted it the chart 1-A.

59
Post Hoc Tests Multiple Comparisons Tukey HSD (Motivational variables)
Mean
Dependent Difference (I-
Variable (I) Age (J) Age J) Std. Error Sig.

Company 20 - 30 30 - 40
Related .0635 .10067 .805
Information
40 - 50 -.0317 .15377 .977
30 - 40 20 - 30 -.0635 .10067 .805
40 - 50 -.0952 .16439 .832
40 - 50 20 - 30 .0317 .15377 .977
30 - 40 .0952 .16439 .832
Working 20 - 30 30 - 40
-.0417 .07147 .830
Conditions
40 - 50 -.2731(*) .10918 .048
30 - 40 20 - 30 .0417 .07147 .830
40 - 50 -.2315 .11671 .136
40 - 50 20 - 30 .2731(*) .10918 .048
30 - 40 .2315 .11671 .136
Compensation 20 - 30 30 - 40
-.05 .100 .882
and Benefits
40 - 50 .00 .152 1.000
30 - 40 20 - 30 .05 .100 .882
40 - 50 .05 .163 .954
40 - 50 20 - 30 .00 .152 1.000
30 - 40 -.05 .163 .954
Employee 20 - 30 30 - 40
-.14 .104 .391
Relations
40 - 50 .00 .159 1.000
30 - 40 20 - 30 .14 .104 .391
40 - 50 .14 .170 .697
40 - 50 20 - 30 .00 .159 1.000
30 - 40 -.14 .170 .697
Training and 20 - 30 30 - 40
-.04 .079 .887
Development
40 - 50 -.04 .121 .950
30 - 40 20 - 30 .04 .079 .887
40 - 50 .00 .129 1.000
40 - 50 20 - 30 .04 .121 .950
30 - 40 .00 .129 1.000
Relationship 20 - 30 30 - 40
between HRD -.06 .082 .710
& Employees
40 - 50 -.01 .125 .997
30 - 40 20 - 30 .06 .082 .710
40 - 50 .06 .133 .909
40 - 50 20 - 30 .01 .125 .997
30 - 40 -.06 .133 .909
Motivation 20 - 30 30 - 40
level of the .08 .036 .102
employees
40 - 50 .10 .056 .190
30 - 40 20 - 30 -.08 .036 .102
40 - 50 .02 .060 .926
40 - 50 20 - 30 -.10 .056 .190
30 - 40 -.02 .060 .926

Table 1- c
* The mean difference is significant at the .05 level.

60
5.1

5.0

Chart 12
4.9

4.8

4.7
20 - 30 30 - 40 40 - 50

Age

Group Statistics between Male and Female

Std. Error
Gender N Mean Std. Deviation Mean
Company Related Male 23 4.7826 .21044 .04388
Information Female 7 4.4898 .19961 .07545
Working Male 23 4.7971 .17913 .03735
Conditions Female 7 4.6667 .19245 .07274
Compensation Male 23 4.29 .236 .049
and Benafits Female 7 4.14 .218 .082
Employee Male 23 4.82 .229 .048
Relations Female 7 4.71 .336 .127
Training and Male 23 4.88 .191 .040
Development Female 7 4.81 .178 .067
Relationship Male 23 4.74 .158 .033
between HRD & Female
Employees 7 4.48 .178 .067
Motivation level of Male 23 4.93 .097 .020
the employees Female 7 4.94 .098 .037

Table 2- A

When we compare male and female of their opinion about five factors, that is Company Related

Information, Working Conditions, Compensation and Benefits, Employee Relations Training and

61
Development, Relationship between HRD and Employees and Motivation level of the employees,

there are significant between male and female in company related information and Relationship

between HRD and employees. The significant value is .003 and .001 respectively (Table 2 B). This

is clearly says the opinion of male and female are not same. The mean performances of male and

female are 4.7826 and 4.4898 for company relate information and 4.74 and 4.48 (Table 2 A) for

Relationship between HRD and employees respectively. From this value females are showing less

motivation than their counter part males who are giving good response about motivation in matters

of company related information and Relationship between HRD and employees.

Independent Samples Test on Male and Female


Levene's Test for
Equality of Variances

F Sig. t df Sig. (2-tailed)


Company Related Equal variances
.016 .899 3.259 28 .003
Information assumed
Equal variances not
3.355 10.421 .007
assumed
Working Conditions Equal variances
.054 .819 1.660 28 .108
assumed
Equal variances not
1.595 9.403 .144
assumed
Compensation and Equal variances
1.011 .323 1.425 28 .165
Benafits assumed
Equal variances not
1.488 10.660 .166
assumed
Employee Relations Equal variances
1.635 .212 .914 28 .368
assumed
Equal variances not
.743 7.768 .479
assumed
Training and Equal variances
.003 .958 .917 28 .367
Development assumed
Equal variances not
.953 10.574 .362
assumed
Relationship Equal variances
between HRD & assumed .014 .908 3.756 28 .001
Employees
Equal variances not
3.509 9.054 .007
assumed
Motivation level of Equal variances
.418 .523 -.295 28 .770
the employees assumed
Equal variances not
-.295 9.940 .774
assumed

Table 2- B

62
Mean Descriptive on Qualification

N Mean Std. Deviation

Company Related Plus Two


14 4.7347 .27369
Information
Diploma 6 4.6905 .22887
Under Graduate 8 4.6786 .23844
Post Graduate 2 4.7857 .10102
Total 30 4.7143 .24022
Working Conditions Plus Two 14 4.8214 .08559
Diploma 6 4.5694 .28585
Under Graduate 8 4.7604 .13684
Post Graduate 2 5.0000 .00000
Total 30 4.7667 .18749
Compensation and Plus Two
14 4.27 .268
Benafits
Diploma 6 4.24 .195
Under Graduate 8 4.23 .215
Post Graduate 2 4.29 .404
Total 30 4.25 .236
Employee Relations Plus Two 14 4.77 .285
Diploma 6 4.79 .332
Under Graduate 8 4.84 .129
Post Graduate 2 4.75 .354
Total 30 4.79 .255
Training and Plus Two
14 4.88 .166
Development
Diploma 6 4.78 .272
Under Graduate 8 4.92 .154
Post Graduate 2 4.83 .236
Total
30 4.87 .188

Relationship between Plus Two


14 4.71 .190
HRD & Employees
Diploma 6 4.56 .228
Under Graduate 8 4.69 .188
Post Graduate 2 4.75 .118
Total 30 4.68 .195
Motivation level of the Plus Two
14 5.00 .000
employees
Diploma 6 4.87 .103
Under Graduate 8 4.88 .104
Post Graduate 2 4.90 .141
Total 30 4.93 .096

Table 3- A

63
ONEWAY ANOVA on Qualification

Sum of
Squares df Mean Square F Sig.
Company Related Between Groups .030 3 .010 .156 .925
Information Within Groups 1.644 26 .063
Total 1.673 29
Working Conditions Between Groups .385 3 .128 5.250 .006
Within Groups .635 26 .024
Total 1.019 29
Compensation and Between Groups .009 3 .003 .049 .985
Benafits Within Groups 1.611 26 .062
Total
1.620 29

Employee Relations Between Groups .033 3 .011 .155 .926


Within Groups 1.852 26 .071
Total 1.885 29
Training and Between Groups .072 3 .024 .661 .583
Development Within Groups .950 26 .037
Total 1.022 29
Relationship between Between Groups .119 3 .040 1.048 .388
HRD & Employees Within Groups .988 26 .038
Total 1.107 29
Motivation level of the Between Groups .118 3 .039 6.914 .001
employees Within Groups .148 26 .006
Total .267 29

Table 3- B

We are using ANOVA, when we compare more than two variables. In this we analysis the

motivation level of people who are of different qualification like Plus Two, Diploma, Under

Graduate and Post Graduate. There is significant different exist in the company in matters of

working condition and motivation level of the employees. The significant value is .006 and .001

respectively (Table 3-B). The mean value of Plus Two categories shows that the working condition

and motivation of the employees is the highest with value of 4.8214 and 5.000 respectively. Whereas

the mean value of the diploma holders is least among the categories of qualification, with value of

4.5694 and 4.87 (Table 3- A) respectively compare with other groups. It is clearly shown in the multi

comparisons table 3-C below.

64
Post Hoc Tests : Multiple Comparisons : Tukey HSD on Qualification Table (3- C)
Mean
Difference
Dependent Variable (I) Gualification (J) Gualification (I-J) Std. Error Sig.

Company Related Plus Two Diploma


.0442 .12269 .984
Information
Under Graduate .0561 .11144 .957
Post Graduate -.0510 .19007 .993
Diploma Plus Two -.0442 .12269 .984
Under Graduate .0119 .13580 1.000
Post Graduate -.0952 .20530 .966
Under Graduate Plus Two -.0561 .11144 .957
Diploma -.0119 .13580 1.000
Post Graduate -.1071 .19878 .949
Post Graduate Plus Two .0510 .19007 .993
Diploma .0952 .20530 .966
Under Graduate .1071 .19878 .949
Working Conditions Plus Two Diploma .2520(*) .07625 .014
Under Graduate .0610 .06926 .815
Post Graduate -.1786 .11812 .445
Diploma Plus Two -.2520(*) .07625 .014
Under Graduate -.1910 .08439 .133
Post Graduate -.4306(*) .12759 .012
Under Graduate Plus Two -.0610 .06926 .815
Diploma .1910 .08439 .133
Post Graduate -.2396 .12354 .237
Post Graduate Plus Two .1786 .11812 .445
Diploma .4306(*) .12759 .012
Under Graduate .2396 .12354 .237
Compensation and Plus Two Diploma
.03 .121 .996
Benefits
Under Graduate .03 .110 .990
Post Graduate -.02 .188 1.000
Diploma Plus Two -.03 .121 .996
Under Graduate .01 .134 1.000
Post Graduate -.05 .203 .995
Under Graduate Plus Two -.03 .110 .990
Diploma -.01 .134 1.000
Post Graduate -.05 .197 .993
Post Graduate Plus Two .02 .188 1.000
Diploma .05 .203 .995
Under Graduate .05 .197 .993
Employee Relations Plus Two Diploma -.02 .130 .998
Under Graduate -.08 .118 .918
Post Graduate .02 .202 1.000
Diploma Plus Two .02 .130 .998
Under Graduate -.05 .144 .983
Post Graduate .04 .218 .997
Under Graduate Plus Two .08 .118 .918
Diploma .05 .144 .983
Post Graduate .09 .211 .970
Post Graduate Plus Two -.02 .202 1.000
Diploma .997
-.04 .218

65
Mean
(I) Gualification
Difference Std. Error
Dependent Sig
(I-J)
Variable (J) Gualification

Training and Plus Two Diploma


.10 .093 .689
Development
Under Graduate -.04 .085 .974
Post Graduate .05 .144 .987
Diploma Plus Two -.10 .093 .689
Under Graduate -.14 .103 .543
Post Graduate -.06 .156 .984
Under Graduate Plus Two .04 .085 .974
Diploma .14 .103 .543
Post Graduate .08 .151 .945
Post Graduate Plus Two -.05 .144 .987
Diploma .06 .156 .984
Under Graduate -.08 .151 .945
Relationship Plus Two Diploma
between HRD & .16 .095 .360
Employees
Under Graduate .03 .086 .989
Post Graduate -.04 .147 .995
Diploma Plus Two -.16 .095 .360
Under Graduate -.13 .105 .600
Post Graduate -.19 .159 .619
Under Graduate Plus Two -.03 .086 .989
Diploma .13 .105 .600
Post Graduate -.06 .154 .977
Post Graduate Plus Two .04 .147 .995
Diploma .19 .159 .619
Under Graduate .06 .154 .977
Motivation level of Plus Two Diploma
.13(*) .037 .006
the employees
Under Graduate .13(*) .033 .005
Post Graduate .10 .057 .319
Diploma Plus Two -.13(*) .037 .006
Under Graduate -.01 .041 .997
Post Graduate -.03 .062 .948
Under Graduate Plus Two -.13(*) .033 .005
Diploma .01 .041 .997
Post Graduate -.03 .060 .975
Post Graduate Plus Two -.10 .057 .319
Diploma .03 .062 .948
Under Graduate .03 .060 .975

* The mean difference is significant at the .05 level.

The mean percentage of below charts 3-A will explain the difference between various qualification

groups working condition of the company. The chart 3- A states that the mean value of Plus Two is

66
4.8214 and diploma holder the value is 4.5694. The mean values of Under Graduate and Post

Graduate are 4.7604 and 5.000 respectively. The post graduate group is highly appreciative the

working condition of the factory. However, all the groups of the opinion that the working condition

in the company is very good.

5.1

5.0

4.9

Chart 13- A
4.8

4.7

4.6

4.5
Plus Two Diploma Under Gruaduate Post Gruaduate

Gualification

The mean values of the Motivation levels of employees chart 3-B shows that plus two employees

5.00, which is the highest level. Whereas the motivation level of diploma holders is lowest, the

mean value is only 4.87 followed by 4.88 and 4.90 for Under Graduate and Post Graduate

respectively. However the overall motivation level of the company is very good.

67
5.02

5.00

4.98

4.96

4.94

4.92

Chart 13 B
4.90

4.88

4.86

4.84
Plus Two Diploma Under Gruaduate Post Gruaduate

Gualification

When we analysis with T-test , (since it is two variables, the appropriate test is T-test) the employees

age group motivation level on Company Related Information, Working Conditions, Compensation

and Benefits, Employee Relations Training and Development, Relationship between HRD and

Employees and Motivation level of the employees, the test shows there is no significant difference is

found between the age groups. The following Table 4-A and 4-B will clearly indicates, there is no

value below the table value 0.05, all are above the table value. Both the groups (1-5 and 6-10)

equally agree that the company is very good to work and that they are highly motivated.

68
T-Test on Age Group
Std. Error
Work _experience N Mean Std. Deviation Mean
Company Related 1 - 5 Years 24 4.6964 .26413 .05392
Information 6 -10 Years 6 4.7857 .07825 .03194
Working Conditions 1 - 5 Years 24 4.7396 .19084 .03896
6 -10 Years 6 4.8750 .13693 .05590
Compensation and 1 - 5 Years 24 4.25 .224 .046
Benafits 6 -10 Years 6 4.26 .305 .125
Employee Relations 1 - 5 Years 24 4.79 .273 .056
6 -10 Years 6 4.79 .188 .077
Training and 1 - 5 Years 24 4.85 .196 .040
Development 6 -10 Years 6 4.94 .136 .056
Relationship between 1 - 5 Years 24 4.67 .197 .040
HRD & Employees 6 -10 Years 6 4.72 .202 .082
Motivation level of the 1 - 5 Years 24 4.95 .088 .018
employees 6 -10 Years 6 4.87 .103 .042
Table 4-A
Independent Samples Test Age Group

Levene's Test for


Equality of Variances t-test for Equality of Means

F Sig. t df Sig. (2-tailed)

Company Related Equal variances


5.187 .031 -.809 28 .425
Information assumed
Equal variances not
-1.425 26.794 .166
assumed
Working Conditions Equal variances
.178 .676 -1.627 28 .115
assumed
Equal variances not
-1.987 10.497 .074
assumed
Compensation and Equal variances
2.214 .148 -.108 28 .914
Benafits assumed
Equal variances not
-.090 6.410 .931
assumed
Employee Relations Equal variances
1.851 .185 .000 28 1.000
assumed
Equal variances not
.000 10.962 1.000
assumed
Training and Equal variances
6.051 .020 -1.140 28 .264
Development assumed
Equal variances not
-1.420 10.899 .184
assumed
Relationship Equal variances
between HRD & assumed .224 .640 -.616 28 .543
Employees
Equal variances not
-.606 7.560 .562
assumed
Motivation level of Equal variances
.509 .481 2.000 28 .055
the employees assumed
Equal variances not
1.817 6.952 .112
assumed
Table 4-B
69
Mean Descriptive on Department

N Mean Std. Deviation

Company Related IMG


10 4.8429 .20702
Information
Control 4 4.4643 .24398
Production 8 4.6071 .27266
SMD 5 4.8000 .07825
Actuator 3 4.7619 .08248
Total 30 4.7143 .24022
Working IMG
10 4.8583 .06861
Conditions
Control 4 4.7292 .04167
Production 8 4.5833 .24398
SMD 5 4.7667 .09129
Actuator 3 5.0000 .00000
Total 30 4.7667 .18749
Compensation IMG
10 4.33 .243
and Benafits
Control 4 4.11 .295
Production 8 4.23 .170
SMD 5 4.26 .275
Actuator 3 4.24 .297
Total 30 4.25 .236
Employee IMG
10 4.80 .284
Relations
Control 4 4.69 .315
Production 8 4.81 .291
SMD 5 4.85 .137
Actuator 3 4.75 .250
Total 30 4.79 .255
Training and IMG
10 4.93 .141
Development
Control 4 4.75 .167
Production 8 4.83 .252
SMD 5 4.87 .183
Actuator 3 4.89 .192
Total 30 4.87 .188
Relationship IMG
between HRD & 10 4.78 .158
Employees
Control 4 4.54 .160
Production 8 4.56 .198
SMD 5 4.77 .190
Actuator 3 4.67 .167
Total
30 4.68 .195
Motivation level of IMG
10 5.00 .000
the employees
Control 4 5.00 .000
Production 8 4.88 .104
SMD 5 4.88 .110
Actuator 3 4.87 .115
Total 30 4.93 .096
Table 5-A
70
ONEWAY ANOVA on Department

Sum of
Squares df Mean Square F Sig.
Company Related Between Groups .551 4 .138 3.065 .035
Information Within Groups 1.123 25 .045
Total 1.673 29
Working Conditions Between Groups .522 4 .130 6.555 .001
Within Groups .498 25 .020
Total 1.019 29
Compensation and Between Groups .146 4 .037 .621 .652
Benafits Within Groups 1.473 25 .059
Total
1.620 29

Employee Relations Between Groups .070 4 .017 .240 .913


Within Groups 1.816 25 .073
Total 1.885 29
Training and Between Groups .109 4 .027 .748 .569
Development Within Groups .913 25 .037
Total 1.022 29
Relationship between Between Groups .332 4 .083 2.673 .055
HRD & Employees Within Groups .776 25 .031
Total 1.107 29
Motivation level of the Between Groups .117 4 .029 4.886 .005
employees Within Groups .150 25 .006
Total .267 29
Table 5-B

Through the ANNOVA test we analysis the motivation level of people who are working in various

departments, we come to know that there are significant different between various department on

Company related information, Working condition and Motivational level of the employees. The

significant values are .035, .001and .005 (Table 5-B). The mean values for these are IMG 4.8429,

production 4.4643, Control 4.6071 SMD 4.8000 and Actuator 4.8000. Here we see that IMG has

highest positive value and the least is production. The mean value of the working condition shows

that Actuator has the highest value of 5.000 and the least mean value is Production. Whereas the

motivation level IMG and Production the mean value is the same 5.00 and control and SMD the

mean value is the same 4.88 each and the least mean value is for Actuator with value of 4.87 (Table

5-A). This is also shown in the following Charts 5-A, 5-B, and 5-C.

71
4.9

4.8

4.7

Chart 14-A
4.6

4.5

4.4
IMG Control Production SMD Actuator

Department

5.1

5.0

4.9

4.8 Chart 14-B

4.7

4.6

4.5
IMG Control Production SMD Actuator

Department

5.02

5.00

4.98

4.96

4.94

4.92
Chart 14-C

4.90

4.88

4.86

4.84
IMG Control Production SMD Actuator

Department

72
Post Hoc Tests : Multiple Comparisons : Tukey HSD on Department (Table 5-C)
Mean
Difference (I-
Dependent Variable (I) Department (J) Department J) Std. Error Sig.

Company Related IMG Control


.3786(*) .12538 .042
Information
Production .2357 .10052 .164
SMD .0429 .11608 .996
Actuator .0810 .13951 .977
Control IMG -.3786(*) .12538 .042
Production -.1429 .12978 .804
SMD -.3357 .14216 .159
Actuator -.2976 .16186 .375
Production IMG -.2357 .10052 .164
Control .1429 .12978 .804
SMD -.1929 .12081 .513
Actuator -.1548 .14347 .816
SMD IMG -.0429 .11608 .996
Control .3357 .14216 .159
Production .1929 .12081 .513
Actuator .0381 .15477 .999
Actuator IMG -.0810 .13951 .977
Control .2976 .16186 .375
Production .1548 .14347 .816
SMD -.0381 .15477 .999
Working Conditions IMG Control .1292 .08346 .543
Production .2750(*) .06692 .003
SMD .0917 .07727 .759
Actuator -.1417 .09287 .556
Control IMG -.1292 .08346 .543
Production .1458 .08639 .459
SMD -.0375 .09464 .994
Actuator -.2708 .10775 .120
Production IMG -.2750(*) .06692 .003
Control -.1458 .08639 .459
SMD -.1833 .08043 .185
Actuator -.4167(*) .09551 .002
SMD IMG -.0917 .07727 .759
Control .0375 .09464 .994
Production .1833 .08043 .185
Actuator -.2333 .10303 .190
Actuator IMG .1417 .09287 .556
Control .2708 .10775 .120
Production .4167(*) .09551 .002
SMD .2333 .10303 .190
Compensation and IMG Control
.22 .144 .546
Benafits
Production .10 .115 .916
SMD .07 .133 .983
Actuator .09 .160 .979
Control IMG -.22 .144 .546
Production -.13 .149 .915
SMD -.15 .163 .886
Actuator .953
-.13 .185

73
Dependent
Variable (I) Department (J) Department Mean
Difference (I-
J) Std. Error Sig.

Production IMG
-.10 .115 .916
Control .13 .149 .915
SMD -.02 .138 1.000
Actuator -.01 .164 1.000
SMD IMG -.07 .133 .983
Control .15 .163 .886
Production .02 .138 1.000
Actuator .02 .177 1.000
Actuator IMG -.09 .160 .979
Control .13 .185 .953
Production .01 .164 1.000
SMD -.02 .177 1.000
Employee Relations IMG Control .11 .159 .953
Production -.01 .128 1.000
SMD -.05 .148 .997
Actuator .05 .177 .999
Control IMG -.11 .159 .953
Production -.13 .165 .940
SMD -.16 .181 .895
Actuator -.06 .206 .998
Production IMG .01 .128 1.000
Control .13 .165 .940
SMD -.04 .154 .999
Actuator .06 .182 .997
SMD IMG .05 .148 .997
Control .16 .181 .895
Production .04 .154 .999
Actuator .10 .197 .986
Actuator IMG -.05 .177 .999
Control .06 .206 .998
Production -.06 .182 .997
SMD -.10 .197 .986
Training and IMG Control
.18 .113 .498
Development
Production .10 .091 .803
SMD .07 .105 .967
Actuator .04 .126 .996
Control IMG -.18 .113 .498
Production -.08 .117 .952
SMD -.12 .128 .890
Actuator -.14 .146 .874
Production IMG -.10 .091 .803
Control .08 .117 .952
SMD -.03 .109 .998
Actuator -.06 .129 .992
SMD IMG -.07 .105 .967
Control .12 .128 .890
Production .03 .109 .998
Actuator -.02 .140 1.000
Actuator IMG .996
-.04 .126

74
Dependent
Variable (I) Department (J) Department Mean
Difference (I-
J) Std. Error Sig.

Control .14 .146 874

Production .06 .129 .992


SMD .02 .140 1.000
Relationship IMG Control
between HRD & .24 .104 .172
Employees
Production .22 .084 .093
SMD .02 .096 1.000
Actuator .12 .116 .850
Control IMG -.24 .104 .172
Production -.02 .108 1.000
SMD -.22 .118 .341
Actuator -.12 .135 .883
Production IMG -.22 .084 .093
Control .02 .108 1.000
SMD -.20 .100 .280
Actuator -.10 .119 .904
SMD IMG -.02 .096 1.000
Control .22 .118 .341
Production .20 .100 .280
Actuator .10 .129 .935
Actuator IMG -.12 .116 .850
Control .12 .135 .883
Production .10 .119 .904
SMD -.10 .129 .935
Motivation level of IMG Control
.00 .046 1.000
the employees
Production .13(*) .037 .017
SMD .12 .042 .063
Actuator .13 .051 .097
Control IMG .00 .046 1.000
Production .13 .047 .093
SMD .12 .052 .174
Actuator .13 .059 .193
Production IMG -.13(*) .037 .017
Control -.13 .047 .093
SMD -.01 .044 1.000
Actuator .01 .052 1.000
SMD IMG -.12 .042 .063
Control -.12 .052 .174
Production .01 .044 1.000
Actuator .01 .057 .999
Actuator IMG -.13 .051 .097
Control -.13 .059 .193
Production -.01 .052 1.000
SMD .999
-.01 .057

* The mean difference is significant at the .05 level.

75
Through the Multiple comparison test we analysis the motivation level of people who are working

various department like production, control, IMG, SMD and Actuator. The test shows that there is

significant different between IMG and control, IMG and production, Actuator and Production on

Company related information, working condition and Motivation level of thee employees

respectively. The significant values are .042, .003 and .002 (Table 5-C) which is less than the table

value .05.

Mean Descriptive on salary (Table 6-A)

N Mean Std. Deviation

Company Related Rs. 5000


10 4.7714 .30267
Information
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 8 4.6786 .19839
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 8 4.6429 .25326
Rs. 10000 & Above 4 4.7857 .08248
Total 30 4.7143 .24022
Working Conditions Rs. 5000 10 4.8000 .13147
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 8 4.6354 .24776
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 8 4.7708 .13176
Rs. 10000 & Above 4 4.9375 .12500
Total 30 4.7667 .18749
Compensation and Rs. 5000
10 4.26 .314
Benafits
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 8 4.21 .132
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 8 4.34 .170
Rs. 10000 & Above 4 4.14 .309
Total 30 4.25 .236
Employee Relations Rs. 5000 10 4.83 .265
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 8 4.66 .326
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 8 4.91 .129
Rs. 10000 & Above 4 4.75 .204
Total 30 4.79 .255
Training and Rs. 5000
10 4.97 .105
Development
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 8 4.71 .214
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 8 4.88 .173
Rs. 10000 & Above 4 4.92 .167
Total
30 4.87 .188
Relationship between Rs. 5000
10 4.73 .179
HRD & Employees
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 8 4.56 .235
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 8 4.75 .154
Rs. 10000 & Above 4 4.63 .160
Total 30 4.68 .195
Motivation level of the Rs. 5000
10 4.98 .063
employees
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 8 4.95 .093
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 8 4.90 .107
Rs. 10000 & Above 4 4.85 .100
Total 30 4.93 .096

76
ONEWAY ANOVA on Salary (Table 6-B)

Sum of
Squares df Mean Square F Sig.
Company Related Between Groups .104 3 .035 .575 .637
Information Within Groups 1.569 26 .060
Total 1.673 29
Working Conditions Between Groups .266 3 .089 3.057 .046
Within Groups .754 26 .029
Total 1.019 29
Compensation and Between Groups .120 3 .040 .695 .563
Benafits Within Groups 1.499 26 .058
Total
1.620 29

Employee Relations Between Groups .270 3 .090 1.447 .252


Within Groups 1.616 26 .062
Total 1.885 29
Training and Between Groups .311 3 .104 3.792 .022
Development Within Groups .711 26 .027
Total 1.022 29
Relationship between Between Groups .190 3 .063 1.795 .173
HRD & Employees Within Groups .917 26 .035
Total 1.107 29
Motivation level of the Between Groups .061 3 .020 2.552 .077
employees Within Groups .206 26 .008
Total .267 29

Through the ANOVA test we find that various income groups like below to 5000, 50001 to 7000,

7001 to 10000 and 10001 to above there are significant for working condition and Motivation level

of the employees. The significant values are .046 and .022 respectively, which are less than the table

value (Table 6-B). The mean values show that people who draw salary group 10001 and above has

better appreciation of the working condition of the company with the value of 4.9375. Whereas the

category 50001 to 7000 less appreciation of the working condition with leas mean value of 4.6354. On the

other hand the category below-5000 is highly appreciative of training development of the company with mean

value of 4.97 and lest mean value for the group 50001-7000 with mean value of 4.71(Table 6-A). This also

explain in the mean Charts 6-A and 6B

77
5.0

4.9

Chart 15-A
4.8

4.7

4.6
Rs. 5000 Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 Rs. 10000 & Above

Dalary_range
Salary Range

5.0

4.9

4.8
Chart 15-A

4.7

4.6
Rs. 5000 Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 Rs. 10000 & Above

Dalary_range
Salary Range

78
Post Hoc Tests Multiple Comparisons Tukey HSD On Salary (Table 6-C)
Mean
Difference
Dependent Variable (I) Dalary_range (J) Dalary_range (I-J) Std. Error Sig.

Company Related Rs. 5000 Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000


.0929 .11654 .855
Information
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 .1286 .11654 .691
Rs. 10000 & Above -.0143 .14535 1.000
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 Rs. 5000 -.0929 .11654 .855
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 .0357 .12284 .991
Rs. 10000 & Above -.1071 .15045 .891
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 Rs. 5000 -.1286 .11654 .691
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 -.0357 .12284 .991
Rs. 10000 & Above -.1429 .15045 .779
Rs. 10000 & Above Rs. 5000 .0143 .14535 1.000
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .1071 .15045 .891
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 .1429 .15045 .779
Working Conditions Rs. 5000 Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .1646 .08076 .200
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 .0292 .08076 .984
Rs. 10000 & Above -.1375 .10072 .532
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 Rs. 5000 -.1646 .08076 .200
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.1354 .08513 .401
Rs. 10000 & Above -.3021(*) .10426 .036
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 Rs. 5000 -.0292 .08076 .984
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .1354 .08513 .401
Rs. 10000 & Above -.1667 .10426 .397
Rs. 10000 & Above Rs. 5000 .1375 .10072 .532
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .3021(*) .10426 .036
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 .1667 .10426 .397
Compensation and Rs. 5000 Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000
.04 .114 .981
Benafits
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.08 .114 .888
Rs. 10000 & Above .11 .142 .852
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 Rs. 5000 -.04 .114 .981
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.12 .120 .727
Rs. 10000 & Above .07 .147 .962
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 Rs. 5000 .08 .114 .888
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .12 .120 .727
Rs. 10000 & Above .20 .147 .549
Rs. 10000 & Above Rs. 5000 -.11 .142 .852
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 -.07 .147 .962
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.20 .147 .549
Employee Relations Rs. 5000 Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .17 .118 .494
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.08 .118 .901
Rs. 10000 & Above .08 .147 .956
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 Rs. 5000 -.17 .118 .494
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.25 .125 .212
Rs. 10000 & Above -.09 .153 .927
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 Rs. 5000 .08 .118 .901
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .25 .125 .212
Rs. 10000 & Above .16 .153 .737
Rs. 10000 & Above Rs. 5000 -.08 .147 .956
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .09 .153 .927
79
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.16 .153 .737
Training and Rs. 5000 Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000
.26(*) .078 .014
Development
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 .09 .078 .651
Rs. 10000 & Above .05 .098 .956
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 Rs. 5000 -.26(*) .078 .014
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.17 .083 .208
Rs. 10000 & Above -.21 .101 .194
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 Rs. 5000 -.09 .078 .651
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .17 .083 .208
Rs. 10000 & Above -.04 .101 .976
Rs. 10000 & Above Rs. 5000 -.05 .098 .956
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .21 .101 .194
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 .04 .101 .976
Relationship between Rs. 5000 Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000
.17 .089 .246
HRD & Employees
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.02 .089 .998
Rs. 10000 & Above .11 .111 .765
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 Rs. 5000 -.17 .089 .246
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.19 .094 .215
Rs. 10000 & Above -.06 .115 .948
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 Rs. 5000 .02 .089 .998
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .19 .094 .215
Rs. 10000 & Above .13 .115 .701
Rs. 10000 & Above Rs. 5000 -.11 .111 .765
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 .06 .115 .948
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.13 .115 .701
Motivation level of the Rs. 5000 Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000
.03 .042 .892
employees
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 .08 .042 .255
Rs. 10000 & Above .13 .053 .089
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 Rs. 5000 -.03 .042 .892
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 .05 .045 .679
Rs. 10000 & Above .10 .055 .281
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 Rs. 5000 -.08 .042 .255
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 -.05 .045 .679
Rs. 10000 & Above .05 .055 .796
Rs. 10000 & Above Rs. 5000 -.13 .053 .089
Rs. 5001 - Rs. 7000 -.10 .055 .281
Rs. 7001 - Rs.10000 -.05 .055 .796

* The mean difference is significant at the .05 level.

From the post Hoc Method when we compare the category below-5000 with other categories there is

significant value of .014, which is below the table value .05 (Table 6-C). The salary group below-

5000 is highly motivated to undergo training and development but rests of the categories are less

appreciative training and development.

80
FINDINGS

The motivational level of the company employees is very good on matters of level on
Company Related Information, Working Conditions, Compensation and Benefits, Employee
Relations Training and Development, Relationship between HRD and Employees and
Motivation level of the employees (charts 5-11)

Employees Relation, Human Resource Department and personal development of the


company are at its best (charts 8, 10.11).

Age wise comparison shows that, all thee age groups of the same opinion that the level of
Company Related Information, Working Conditions, Compensation and Benefits, Employee
Relations Training and Development, Relationship between HRD and Employees and
Motivation level of the employees are very good (Table 1-A and 1-B).

When we compare the degree of opinion between the age group with the test of Post Hoc
Tests or Multiple comparisons we found that there are significant between the age between
20-30 and 40-50 in company working condition. The significant value is .048, (highlighted in
table 1-C). This clearly says the opinion of age between 20-30 and 40-50 is not the same on
working condition of the company. The mean performance (table 1-A) of age between 20-30
and 40-50 are 4.7269 and 5.0000 respectively. The age group of 40-50 has better opinion of
the working condition of the company than age group 20-30.

The mean performances of male and female are 4.7826 and 4.4898 for company relate

information and 4.74 and 4.48 (Table 2 A) for Relationship between HRD and employees

respectively. From this value females are showing less motivation than their counter part

males who are giving good response about motivation in matters of company related

information and Relationship between HRD and employees.

The mean value of Plus Two categories shows that the working condition and motivation of

the employees is the highest with value of 4.8214 and 5.000 respectively. Whereas the mean
81
value of the diploma holders is least among the categories of qualification, with value of

4.5694 and 4.87 (Table 3- A) respectively compare with other groups.

The mean values of Under Graduate and Post Graduate are 4.7604 and 5.000 respectively.

The post graduate group is highly appreciative the working condition of the factory (Chart

3-C).

There is no significant difference is found between the age groups in motivation level on

Company Related Information, Working Conditions, Compensation and Benefits, Employee

Relations Training and Development, Relationship between HRD and Employees and

Motivation level of the employees ( Table 4-A and 4-B).

The motivation level of people who are working in various departments, we come to know
that there are significant different between various department on Company related

information, Working condition and Motivational level of the employees (5-B).

The mean values for these are IMG 4.8429, production 4.4643, Control 4.6071 SMD 4.8000
and Actuator 4.8000. Here we see that IMG has highest positive value and the least is

production. The mean value of the working condition shows that Actuator has the highest

value of 5.000 and the least mean value is Production. Whereas the motivation level IMG

and Production the mean value is the same 5.00 and control and SMD the mean value is the

same 4.88 each and the least mean value is for Actuator with value of 4.87 (Table 5-A, 5-A,

5-B, and 5-C)

The mean values show that people who draw salary group 10001 and above has better

82
appreciation of the working condition of the company with the value of 4.9375. The salary

category of 50001 to 7000 has less appreciation of the working condition with leas mean value of

4.6354. (Table 6A).

The salary category below-5000 is highly appreciative of training development of the company with

mean value of 4.97 and lest mean value for the group 50001-7000 with mean value of 4.71(Table 6-

A, Charts 6-A and 6B).

Suggestion

The age group of 40-50 has better opinion of the working condition of the company than age
group 20-30. So the newly inducted and younger ones of the company should motivate them
with job security, good career growth, sense of pride in the company, utilizing their skill and
ability and above all motivate them to understand the company objectives.

Females are showing less motivation than their counter part males who are giving good

response about motivation in matters of company related information and Relationship

between HRD and employees. Motivated female supervisor can motivate the female workers

in this regards.

The company has many diploma holders, by Instill an inspiring purpose and Providing

recognition, they will be motivated highly.

The salary category below-5000 is highly appreciative of training development of the

company. So training must be given not only work related but also career guidance,

counseling, pressure handling, conflict solving etc for the whole personal development.

HRD must undertake motivational programme to the employee level either monthly or bi-
83
monthly to keep the entire workers to know the company objectives, vision, problems and

above all to give total loyalty to the management.

The mean value shows that the overall motivation level of the company is very good, this
gives advantage for the company to introduce team work.

Conclusion

It is a truism that the world is going through enormous changes. The advancement of technology has

brought changes to the way business is done in every aspect. Employees are no longer just one of the

inputs companies use to produce; they are important assets that generate profits for the company. To

adapt to these changes, managers need new ways to manage their employees. Formerly most

employees were satisfied if their basic needs were met. In todays world employees want more.

Since employees are a companys most important resource, satisfying and retaining employees has

become a major focus for managers. To do this effectively, mangers must keep their employees

motivated, so that valuable employees stay in the company and perform at their best.

84
Bibliography

1. Drake, M.W. and Kosse, The Human side of Organisation. 8th ed. Upper Saddle River, New
Jersey Hall.

2. Ellemerrs, N., De Gilder, D. and Haslam, S.A. 2004, Motivating individuals and groups at
work: a social identity perspective on leadership and group performance. Accademic of
management review, 29(3):459-476.

3. Freemantle, D. 2001. The Stimulus Factor: the new dimension in Motivation. Amsterdam,
Prentice Hall

4. Gray, R. 2004. How people work and how you can help them to give their best. Taipei,
Prentice Hall, Financial Time.

5. Hughes, L. 2003. Motivating your employee, Women business, online from


http://proquest.umi.com/pqdlink?did=298684521&sid=fmt=4&elientle=39523&ROT=309&
vname=pqd.

6. Lawler, E.E III 2003. Treat people right! How organization and individual can propel each
other into a virtual spiral of success. San Francisco, Jossey-Bass

7. Locke, E.A. and Latham, G.P work Motivation, The High Performance Cycle, New Jersey,
Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.

8. Robins, S.P. 2000. Managing Today. 2nd ed. Upper Saddle River, New Jerse, Prentice Hall.

9. Schuler, R.S. 1998. Human Resource Management. In Poole, M and Warner, M. edit, The
IEBM hand book of human resource management. Sigapore, Thomason Learning

10. Steer, R..M. and Shapiro, D.L. 2004. Thel future of work Motivation theory, Accademy of
Management Review, 29(3); 379-385.

85
11. Steers, R. (1987) Motivation and Work Behaviour, London: McGraw Hill

12. Whitely, B.E. 2002. Principle of research in behavioral Science. 2nd ed. Montreal, McGraw
Hill.

13. http://www.woory.com/

Appendix: 1

EMPLOYEES MOTIVATION AND PERFORMANCE


WOORY AUTOMOTIVES PRIVATE LIMITTED - INDIA

DEMOGRAPHIC DETIALS

1 Age 20 to 30 31 to 40 41 to 50 51 and above

2 Gender Male Female

3 Qualification Diploma Under Post Plus Two


Graduation Graduation
4 Work experience 0-5 years 6-10 years 11-15 years 16-and above

5 Department

6 Salary range Below Rs Rs 5001 to Rs7001 to d) 10001 and


5000 Rs 7000 Rs10000 above

Mention your level of satisfaction by tick mark for the given particulars based on following
criteria

1 Very good
2 Good
3 Satisfied
4 Bad
5 Very bad

86
Sl.
Particulars 1 2 3 4 5
No
COMPANY RELATED INFORMATION

1 My company is the best company to work with


2 The work I do helps to achieve the objective of my company
3 The company has assured me the job security
4 The company utilizes your skills and abilities properly.
5 The company helps me to have a good career growth
WORKING CONDITION

6 Cleanliness in the company is


7 Ventilation in the company is
8 Lighting in the company is
9 The company or management had given me freedom to take
decision in my work
10 There is no work pressure in the company
COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS

11 The present salary structure is


12 The salary earned is adequate when compared to similar
companies
13 The allowances provided by the company is
14 The benefits other than monetary incentives offered in your
company are
15 The social security (PF, ESI,) offered in your company are
EMPLOYEE RELATIONS

16 The supervisor approaches is


17 The company rewards me for my suggestions and ideas
adequately
18 The relationship with my supervisor is
19 The relationship with my colleagues is
TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

20 The company provides adequate training facility for my


career development
21 The training given to you is related to your work
22 The training programme given by the company should be
compulsory
RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN HUMAN RESOURCE DEPARTMENT & EMPLOYEES

23 The HR department addresses your problems and needs


frequently
24 Time taken by the HR department to solve your problems
immediately
25 The HR department assist us to identify your training and
development needs

87
26 The HR department is fair, even in the treatment of all the
employees equally
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT

27 I am highly motivated in my job


28 I am motivated to see the success of the company
29 I would continue to work in the company even if I get an
offer from another company with same pay and benefit.
30 I am getting a sense of pride, satisfaction and achievement
from doing the job

88