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Urban Deer Management Annual

Report 2016

May 2017
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Background: City of Cranbrook 2
Area 3

Methods Data Monitoring 3
Urban Deer Counts 3
Urban Deer Complaints 3
Clover Trap Construction 3
Permitting 4
Training 4
Trapping Locations 4

Results and Discussion 5

Data Monitoring – Urban Deer Counts 5
TABLE 1: Cranbrook Urban Deer Counts 5
TABLE 2: Total Mule Deer Counted (2010-2016) 6

Urban Deer Complaints 6
TABLE 3: Public Complaints (Deer & Cougar – COS Data) 7
TABLE 4: Aggressive Deer Complaints (COS – 2004-2016) 7

Urban Deer Cull 8

Trapping Results 8
TABLE 5: Deer Cull Summary 2016 8

Ongoing Public Education 8

Conclusions 9

Schedule A: Urban Deer Zone Map
Schedule B: WildSafeBC 2016 Annual Report Kimberley-Cranbrook
Schedule C: 2016 Media Releases
Schedule D: Wildlife Permit CB16-231244

This report produced by the City of Cranbrook is a requirement under the terms of the British Columbia Ministry of
Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (MLFNRO) Wildlife Permit CB16-231244 Section 6 of Appendix A –
Terms of Permit (Schedule D) provided to the City of Cranbrook in November 18, 2016. The City of Cranbrook
gratefully acknowledges the partnership and support of Holger Bohm and Irene Teske of the Cranbrook MFLNRO
office.

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Background

Following the completion of the pilot cull program in 2011 and the subsequent cull programs of 2013,
2015 and 2016, the City of Cranbrook in partnership with the Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural
Resource Operations (MFLNRO) created four Urban Deer Management Annual reports. Links to all
reports are available below and are available to the public via the City of Cranbrook website.

Urban Deer Management Annual Report 2015/2016
http://docs.cranbrook.ca/downloads/urban_deer/2015-2016-Urban-Deer-Annual-Report.pdf

Urban Deer Management Annual Report 2015
http://docs.cranbrook.ca/downloads/urban_deer/2015-Urban-Deer-Management-Annual-Report.pdf

Urban Deer Management Annual Report 2013 – Urban Deer Management Project
http://docs.cranbrook.ca/downloads/urban_deer/2013_Urban_Deer_Management_Annual_Report.pdf

Urban Deer Management Annual Report 2011
Urban Deer Cull Pilot Project and Municipal Urban Deer Public Education
http://docs.cranbrook.ca/downloads/urban_deer/2011-Urban-Deer-Managment-Annual-Report.pdf

Staff with the City of Cranbrook, the local MFLRNO office and members of the City’s Urban Deer
Management Advisory Committee conducted an urban deer population count on November 26, 2016.
In all 142 deer were tabulated; 120 were identified as mule deer with 22 identified as white-tail.

The average deer population density for the City of Cranbrook in 2016 was 5.65 deer per km2. A total of
six urban deer population counts were completed between 2010 and 2016. The following is presented
as a year over year comparison:

Population Count (Year) Population Density (25.14 km2 total City area)
2016 5.65 km2
2015 5.44 km2
2014 4.14 km2
2013 4.77 km2
2012 4.81 km2
2010 3.66 km2
*Data provided by Irene Teske, Wildlife Biologist – Ministry of Forest, Land & Natural Resource Operations

In March 2016, staff provided a copy of the Urban Deer Management 2015-2016 Annual Report to
Council for information at their regular meeting. Staff was subsequently directed to apply to the
Province for another wildlife permit for the fall of 2016.

On November 18, 2016 the City received a general wildlife permit from MFLRNO (Schedule D) which
allowed for the population reduction of up to 100 animals from the urban deer herd. The permit was
valid from December 1, 2016 to March 15, 2017.

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Area

The trapping area occurred within the city limits of Cranbrook, B.C. which lies within the East Kootenay
Regional District. The population of Cranbrook is 19,319, based on results of the 2011 Census data
collected by Statistics Canada. The community covers an area of approximately 2,522.3 hectares
(6,610.5 acres) or 25.14 km2, based on figures provided by the B.C. Ministry of Community and Rural
Development.

Methods

Data Monitoring

To monitor the success of any urban deer management programs, the City regularly monitors urban
deer population growth through annual deer counts and numbers of human/deer conflicts reported
through complaints made to COS and/or City of Cranbrook.

 Urban Deer Counts

In an attempt to monitor population growth within the city, a deer population survey is conducted
annually within urban areas of Cranbrook city limits (25 km2 survey area). The survey area is divided
into 8 zones (Schedule A). Each zone has 2 or more volunteers dedicated to it. All volunteers must be
able to identify and classify deer by species, sex and age. The volunteers drive each zone counting and
classifying deer observed within their zone. Counts are conducted either in the early morning or early
evening. Counts of deer within each survey zone are conducted simultaneously to minimize double
counting of deer. Count data is entered into an Excel spreadsheet.

 Urban Deer Complaints

Complaints from residents involving safety related conflicts with urban deer continue to be gathered
and monitored annually by the City of Cranbrook and COS. People are regularly encouraged to phone
the COS RAPP line if they have any safety related concerns regarding wildlife. The Ministry of Forests,
Lands and Natural Resource Operations (MFLNR) are summarizing urban deer complaints, urban deer
destroyed and urban cougar complaints annually and providing that information to the City of
Cranbrook.

Urban Deer Cull

 Clover Trap Construction

The Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations was responsible for the construction of
10 modified clover traps. The original 10 modified clover traps were stolen during winter 2014. New
clover trap construction occurred during the spring and summer 2014. Clover traps were constructed as
per design modifications developed by the City of Helena Montana’s urban deer program to improve
efficiency and safety. Dimensions of each trap are 44”x84”x50”. Netting consisted of nylon panels with
1 5/8 inch opening and 930 lb. twine tensile strength. Cost per trap was approximately $1200 CAD.

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 Permitting

The Provincial government issued the urban deer cull permit to the City of Cranbrook on November 18,
2016. The permit was to lethally remove up to a combined total of 100 deer and allowed for both mule
deer and incidental white-tailed deer to be captured and euthanized, however the intent was to remove
only mule deer. White-tailed deer were included just in case they were captured and could not be
released safely and uninjured. The permit is very detailed and outlines requirements to improve
humane treatment and safety. Two contractors are required to conduct trapping activities. To reduce
stress of captured deer, capture operations occur when dark prior to daylight; traps are set at or near
dusk. Care is taken to place traps in quiet locations. When a deer is captured within the trap, it is quickly
dispatched using a Blitz bolt gun. Traps were checked regularly to reduce the amount of time deer were
inside trap. To utilize the meat, contractors are required to follow government approved guidelines and
that meat be processed by government approved meat cutters.

 Training

As contractors were experienced and have previously received full training and conducted culls, training
consisted of a half day refresher course provided by a MFLNRO biologist.

 Trap Locations

The specific areas of the City targeted for the population reduction program were based on complaints
received by City staff from the public in 2016 along with the results of the urban deer population count
conducted on November 25, 2016. The locations of the traps were determined by City staff based on
this same information along with complaints received by the provincial toll-free Report All Poachers and
Polluters (RAPP) line and specific priority areas identified by the Conservation Officer Service. After
evaluating 10 potential sites coordinators determined that 7 were suitable for traps.

The provincial government supplied 10 modified clover traps, 2 bolt guns, and all other field related
equipment, however only 8 clover traps were utilized. One regional provincial ministry staff person and
1 municipal staff person were assigned to the project. Additionally, several members of the Cranbrook
RCMP detachment were made available to City staff and the contractor if required. The City hired and
managed contractors and paid for meat processing into ground meat. Meat was then distributed to
First Nations and permitted Food Banks.

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Results and Discussion

Data Monitoring

 Urban Deer Counts

To monitor urban deer population growth over time, counts are conducted almost annually. Counts
were conducted in November 2010, March 2012, November 2012 and 2013, December 2014, November
2015 and November 2016. The results from these counts are 101, 121, 96, 120, 104, 137 and 142 deer
respectively (Table 1). Both white-tail deer and mule deer occupy urban areas of Cranbrook.

Counts conducted in the fall allow for a more detailed classification of sex and age as males still have
antlers and the size difference between adults and juveniles is greater. Since 2010, the total number of
deer counted has fluctuated between 96 and 142. Fall deer fawn ratio is very high and varies from 65
fawns: 100 does, thereby indicating an increasing population. Outside of urban environments, the fall
fawn ratio of mule deer is approximately 30 fawns: 100 does which is what is required to maintain the
population as stable. The lethal removal of deer (cull and injured deer destroyed) is slowing the increase
of the urban deer population.

Table 1: Cranbrook urban deer counts – numbers in brackets are mule deer only

Date Total Male Female Juvenile Unclassified

Nov. 2010 101 (96) 4 (4) 64 (59) 32 (32) 1 (1)

March 2012 121 (74) 0 43 (24) 25 (10) 53 (40)*

Nov. 2012 96 (57) 8 (8) 50 (34) 31 (12) 0

Nov. 2013 120 (80) 13 (11) 64 (42) 42 (27) 1 (0)

Dec. 2014 104 (71) 9 (9) 59 (37) 36 (29) 0

Nov. 2015 137 (116) 16 (14) 72 (61) 48 (40) 1 (1)

Nov. 2016 142 (120) 21 (19) 80 (70) 41 (31) 0 (0)

*difficult to classify by sex and age as antlers have been shed and juveniles are almost adult size
**Data tabulated by Irene Teske, Wildlife Biologist – Ministry of Forest, Land & Natural Resource Operations

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Table 2: Total mule deer counted within urban areas of Cranbrook (2010 – 2016)
Data provided January 27, 2017 by Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (MFLNRO)

 Urban Deer Complaints

Human/deer conflict complaints involving safety issues are being monitored by the City and COS.
Aggressive deer complaints were increasing since 2004 to a high of 42 in 2011. In 2012, post cull, the
number of complaints decreased to 27 (35% decrease) however has been on a relative stable increase
since (Table 2).

Complaints involving cougar have increased since 2004 to a high of 49 complaints in 2012. The number
of cougar complaints has reduced since 2012 to 9 in 2013 and 13 in 2014 and has remained steady with
14 in 2015. The cougar population in the East Kootenay is monitored by legal hunting harvest and
problem animal control. This data, along with reducing complaint trends, indicate that cougar
populations are decreasing since 2012.

The number of injured deer destroyed by COS and RCMP remain high.

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Table 3: Public complaints involving urban deer and cougar within the Cranbrook area * (COS data)
Data provided January 27, 2017 by Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (MFLNRO).

*except for aggressive deer data, data includes area from Moyie to Jaffray including Cranbrook

Table 4: Cranbrook aggressive deer complaints 2004 – 2016 (RAPP line data only)
Data provided January 27, 2017 by Ministry of Forests, Lands and Natural Resource Operations (MFLNRO)

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Urban Deer Cull

Mule deer in Cranbrook were live trapped using 8 modified clover traps. The trapping program
commenced January 3, 2017 and ended on February 8, 2017. During the trapping period 15 deer were
euthanized. All deer were quickly and humanely dispatched. There were no capture related injuries to
contractors or deer.

Table 5: Deer Cull Summary

Species Adult Females Adult Males Juvenile Females Juvenile Males

Mule 6 4 3 0

White-Tail 2 0 0 0

* 5 additional white-tail deer captured were released safely without injury to the animal or contractor.

From the perspective of the contractors, the City of Cranbrook and the MFLNRO all permit conditions
were met regarding animal handling. Meat was processed by a government approved meat cutter. All
the edible meat was ground into burger, wrapped, frozen and distributed to the Cranbrook Food Bank,
Street Angels (Ktunaxa First Nation) and the Salvation Army. A total of 807 lbs. of deer meat was
processed into ground meat. Each agency received 269 lbs. of meat. The meat was very good quality
with only positive comments received. Total cost of the cull was $13,308.00 or $550 per animal.

Education

The City of Cranbrook and the City of Kimberley jointly provided funding for a WildsafeBC Community
Coordinator position in 2016, with services split between the two communities from May 1, 2016
concluding November 30, 2016. Application was made by staff to WildsafeBC in January 2016
expressing the City’s interest in participating in the 2016 program with funding of $3000 provided
toward the position. This was the third successful season of the partnership.

WildsafeBC is a program designed to reduce human-wildlife conflict through education, innovation and
cooperation. It has evolved out of the highly successful Bear Aware program and is owned and
delivered by the British Columbia Conservation Foundation in Kamloops @ https://wildsafebc.com/.
The focus of the education program was on urban deer/human conflict management and mitigation
along with a public education campaign through the media and through school classrooms.

The program Community Coordinator Danica Roussy was shared by both the City of Cranbrook and City
of Kimberley, who each contributed funds to the program. Funds were also provided to the program by

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the BC Conservation Foundation (BCCF), Columbia Basin Trust (CBT) and the Ministry of Environment.
Staff continues to be extremely pleased with the results of this program. The City has again provided
funding in 2017 to continue the education program and the work done to date. The WildsafeBC Year
End Report 2016 - Kimberley-Cranbrook & Area was received by staff in December 2016 and is attached
for information (Schedule B).

The City of Cranbrook, through the Communications office also provided a number of media releases
through 2016 independent of the WildsafeBC program (Schedule C).

The City of Cranbrook also has an information rich page on its website around urban deer management
which is updated on a regular basis - http://cranbrook.ca/our-city/city-departments/oic/urban-deer/.

Conclusions

No injuries were incurred by the contractors conducting the cull and no deer were injured while in the
trap. Deer were competently dispatched within seconds of attending the trap site (it takes
approximately 10 seconds to collapse trap on top of deer and use bolt gun). Both contractors are
experienced hunters and are skilled at handling wildlife. In addition, the contractors were very sensitive
to public and landowner perceptions. There were no complaints from landowners with traps; however,
there were some complaints from residents of Cranbrook regarding the deer cull in general.

Moving forward into the rest of 2017, the City of Cranbrook will continue to work in partnership with
the Province through the Ministry of Forest, Lands and Natural Resource Operations in conjunction
with the Urban Deer Management Advisory Committee. The City will also continue monitor urban
deer population numbers and public complaints of deer aggression and property damage.

The City will continue to apply for management funding grants from the Province through the
$100,000 per annum fund set up by the Province through the Fish and Wildlife Branch.

The City will also partner with both the City of Kimberley and WildsafeBC in 2017 to continue the urban
wildlife public education program with a specific focus around living with urban deer.

The City of Cranbrook is working to continually improve all operations around the culling of urban deer
to minimize disruption to the public while maximizing the number of animals being removed, as per
the guidelines of the Wildlife Permit.

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Schedule A
Schedule B

WildSafeBC Year End Report 2016
Kimberley-Cranbrook & Area
Prepared by: Danica Roussy, BA, WildSafeBC Community Coordinator

Prepared by: Danica Roussy, BA, WildSafeBC Community Coordinator

Photo: Leigh Cormier, 2016
WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook Year End Report 2016 | 2016

Executive Summary

The Kimberley-Cranbrook area experienced more human-wildlife conflict than in the previous two years
(Figure 1). Wildlife encounters this year increased in Kimberley and Marysville area but decreased in
local wildlife encounters in Cranbrook (Figure 2 & 3). Part of this decrease is attributed to a much cooler,
wetter summer in 2016 compared to the hot, dry weather in 2015. Kimberley’s increase in wildlife
encounters can be attributed to an increase of food conditioned wildlife.

There were many highlights of the 2016 season; WildSafeBC BC Goes Wild Weekend and the Outdoor
Play Day with the International Students attending the College of the Rockies to name a couple.
Education programming in schools continued to be the focus of the WildlifeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook
program in 2016. The students who participated the Junior Ranger Program learnt about bears,
ungulates and predators. Educational presentations were given out to schools as well as to special
interest groups. WildSafeBC also attended many community events, attended hikes and hosted
presentations on the www.wildsafebc.com/warp website with community clubs of all ages.

The WCC also conducted garbage inspections and follow up conducting going door-to-door education in
each community to educate the public about keeping wildlife wild and communities safe, garbage
tagging and providing tips for effective attractant management. The WildSafeBC Community
Coordinator (WCC) also kept busy posting on different types of media sources to keep residents updated
on recent events and wildlife news.

st th
Figure 1 Wildlife Alert Reporting Program (WARP) map with all reported wildlife encounters from Jan. 1 – Oct. 26 2016 in
Cranbrook (right) and Kimberley (left). Colours represent different attractants wildlife are drawn to, i.e. pink – BBQ, red -
garbage, purple – residential fruit trees, green – bird feeders, light blue – pet food, yellow – livestock. Data retrieved from
www.wildsafebc.com/warp.

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WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook Year End Report 2016 | 2016

Reported Wildlife Encounters in Kimberley
Jan. 1st 2014 to Oct. 26th 2016
60
Number of wildlife encounters

50

40

30 2014

20 2015
2016
10

0
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Months of the year

Figure 2 The graph above shows the reported wildlife encounters in Kimberley in 2014, 2015 and 2016. The 2016 season peak
occurred during the month of August – a total of 54 reported wildlife in Kimberley. Data retrieved from
www.wildsafebc.com/warp.

Reported Wildlife Encounters in Cranbrook
Jan. 1st 2014 to Oct. 26th 2016
120
Number of wildlife encounters

100

80

60 2014

40 2015
2016
20

0
Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Months of the year

Figure 3 The graph above shows the reported wildlife encounters in Cranbrook in 2014, 2015 and 2016. The 2016 season peak
was during the month of August – a total of 47 reported wildlife in Cranbrook. Cranbrook’s reported wildlife shows a decrease
from the 104 wildlife reported to the www.wildsafebc.com/WARP website in August 2015. Data retrieved from
www.wildsafebc.com/warp.

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WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook Year End Report 2016 | 2016

Table of Contents
Executive Summary…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………1

Highlights of the Season ……………………………………….…………………………………………………………………………………4

The Junior Ranger Program…………………………………………………………………………………………………………4

Educational and Early Childhood Presentations…………………………………………………………………………5

Special Interest Groups………………………………………………………………………………………………………………5

Events and Displays…………………………………………………..………………………………………………………………..6

BC Goes Wild Weekend………………………..…………………………………………………………………………………………………7

Garbage Tagging………………………………………..……………………………………………………………………………………………7

Door to Door Education…………………………………..………………………………………………………………………………………8

Media Outreach………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………8

Challenges in the 2016 Season…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………8

Goals for the 2017 Season………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………9

Acknowledgements ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………10

Figures
Figure 1 – Wildlife Alert Reporting Program map of all reported wildlife encounters from Jan. 1st 2016 –
Oct. 26th 2016………………………………….………………………………………………………………………………………………………1

Figure 2 – Graph of all reported wildlife encounters in Kimberley from 2014 to 2016……………………………..2

Figure 3 – Graph of all reported wildlife encounters in Cranbrook from 2014-2016…………………………………2

Figure 4 – WCC presenting the Junior Ranger Program to the BC SPCA Summer Day Camp…………………….4

Figure 5 – WCC presenting Wildlife Awareness to the Outdoor Ed. Class of Parkland Middle School……….5

Figure 6 – International Exchange Students attending the College of the Rockies participating in the
Wildlife Identification Activity……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..….6

Figure 7 – WCC at WCC at the Kootenay Trout Hatchery 2016……….……………………………………………………….6

Figure 8 – WildSafeBC BC Goes Wild Weekend Nature Walk……………………………………………………………………7

Figure 9 – WWC conducting Door to Door Education………………………………………………………………………………8

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WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook Year End Report 2016 | 2016

Highlights of the Season
Junior Ranger Program
The 2016 season was the second year for WildSafeBC’s Junior Ranger Program. In Kimberley-Cranbrook,
the program is designed to introduce the concept of human-wildlife conflict and encourage kids to take
an active role in reducing conflict by identifying attractants in their backyards and community. The
program is very interactive which allows children to participate in games and activities related to
wildlife, complete a bear-safe home checklist, and gives the junior rangers the knowledge to confidently
spread WildSafeBC’s message about keeping community’s safe and wildlife wild. Figure 4 is an image of
the BC SPCA Summer Camp -A after experiencing the Junior Ranger Program.

Figure 4 WCC and BC SPCA Summer Day Campers after experiencing the Junior Ranger Program.
Photo taken by Sarah Jacklin.

The Junior Ranger Program was presented to the following participants in School District 5 & School
District 6:

 A’qamnik Elementary  Highlands Elementary School
 BC SPCA Summer Day Camps  McKim Elementary School
 TM Roberts Secondary School  Lindsay Park Elementary School
 Kimberley Independent School  Marysville Elementary School
 Kootenay Christian Academy  Girl Guides

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WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook Year End Report 2016 | 2016

Educational and Early Childhood Presentations
By the end of the 2016 season 35 educational presentations were delivered to over 1100 participants
aged 0-18. Figure 5 is an image of the WCC presenting to the outdoor education class at Parkland Middle
School. The list below represents all schools that’s participated in WildSafeBC’s educational
presentations:

 A’qamnik Elementary – Bear Awareness Presentation  Kimberley Independent School -Ungulates
 Kimberley Independent School - Bear Awareness and Predators
Presentation  Kimberley Independent Preschool – Bear
 McKim Elementary School - Wildlife Awareness Basics
Presentation  Selkirk High School – Outdoor Awareness +
 Parkland Middle School – Ungulates and Predator Bear Spray Demo
Presentation  Marysville Elementary – Ungulates and
 Mount Baker High School – Bear Awareness Predators
Presentation  Parkland Middle School – Bear Awareness
Presentation

Figure 5 WCC presenting a Wildlife Awareness Presentation in the Spring of 2016 to
Parkland Middle School Grade 9 Outdoor Education Class. Photo taken by Scott Holt.

Special Interest Groups
By the end of the 2016 season 8 educational presentations were delivered to over 180 participants aged
18 +. Figure 6 is an image of an identification activity put together for the International Students
attending the College of the Rockies International Exchange Program 2016. The special interest groups
listed below are also participants of WildSafeBC’s educational presentations during the 2016 season.

 StrongStart Wildlife Awareness Presentation  Kimberley Nature Park Society – Getaway Nature
 International Students from College of the Hike, Berry Talk-Walk & Sunflower Hill Hike
Rockies A – Presentation on Animal Safety  Rails to Trails Biker Club – WARP Talk and Bear

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WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook Year End Report 2016 | 2016

 International Students from College of the Spray Demo
Rockies B– Outdoor Play Day and Wildlife  Lions Way Lady Hikers – WARP Talk and Bear
Awareness Spray Demo
 Bellies to Babies + Baby Goose -Wildlife
Awareness

Figure 6 International Students from the College of the Rockies, Cranbrook, BC, participating in a Wildlife Identification Activity.

Events and Displays
Figure 7 is of the anxious future junior rangers about to enter the Kootenay Trout Hatchery an festival.
The event was very successful as wildlife safety precautions during hiking, camping and summer
recreation safety was discussed. By the end of the 2016 season 16 outreach events and displays were
delivered to over 800 participants,
including:

 Tim Horton’s Summer Camp
Fundraiser/BBQ
 Kimberley & Cranbrook’s Farmer’s
Market
 Kootenay Trout Hatchery
 Kimberley’s First Saturday’s
 Kimberley Community Fall Fair
 BC Goes Wild Nature Walk –
Kootenay Orienteering Club
Figure 7 WCC and 3 future Junior Rangers at the Kootenay Trout
Hatchery 2016. Photo taken by Callum Williams.

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WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook Year End Report 2016 | 2016

BC Goes Wild Weekend

Figure 8 WildSafeBC BC Goes Wild Weekend Nature Walk 2016, photo taken by Brett Lisk.

WildSafeBC’s BC Goes Wild Weekend was full of awareness activities including 3 contests: BC Goes Wild
Count Contest, Photo Challenge and Colouring Contests as well as a Nature Walk. WildSafeBC Kimberley-
Cranbrook partnered up with the East Kootenay Orienteering Club for the Nature Walk. WildSafeBC had
a booth set up for display, the WCC gave a brief presentation of how to assess your surroundings in
nature as well as what to do when encountering a non-defensive bear vs. defensive bear. Figure 8 is a
photo taken of the WCC and some participants getting ready to start the 1-hour Nature Walk on the
Ponderosa Trail in the Kimberley Nature Park.

Garbage Tagging
Garbage tagging occurred in Kimberley and Marysville for the 2016 season. Garbage, along with
residential fruit trees continue to be the top attractants in the area. The 2016 season saw an increase in
human-wildlife conflicts related to human attractants. In Cranbrook, the decrease in reported wildlife
encounters compared to 2015 can be attributed to the improvements made to manage attractants by
the City of Cranbrook and its community members.

The WCC conducted 22 garbage inspections throughout the 2016 season. A garbage tagging blitz
occurred the week following the BC Goes Wild Weekend. Bylaw enforcement officers, Conservation
officers and the WCC all worked in collaboration to successfully increase attractant management within
the community.

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WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook Year End Report 2016 | 2016

Door to Door Education
When WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook receives many different phone calls from concerned community
members reporting attractant management issues/concerns. In response to these calls, the WCC will
conduct door to door visits to encourage responsible
attractant management. Door to door education was
conducted in Kimberley, Cranbrook and in District C.
Figure 9 is a picture of the WCC conducting door to
door education to a newly established resident of
Kimberley.

Media
WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook continued to work
with Cranbrook’s The DriveFM radio news team, the
B104 Radio news team as well as Summit to deliver
short media blurbs, on current events/issues, reaching
over 50,000 people. Topics interviewed by the WCC
were: Welcome WildSafeBC Back for 2016, Bear
Attractant Management Tips and Rutting Season. The
WCC works very hard at keeping up to date
Figure 9 WWC conducing Door to Door Education in the information on social media i.e. Facebook.
McKim Area in Kimberley during the 2016 season. Photo
taken by Callum Williams.

Challenges
2016 was the third season of operation for the WildSafeBC program in Kimberley, Cranbrook and the
first season in the RDEK – District C. In both Kimberley and Cranbrook, garbage is still the number one
attractant drawing wildlife into city limits, residential fruit trees and pet food follows close behind.

In Kimberley, there seemed to be a high number of bear-residential fruit tree related calls to the COS in
September 2016, with lower bear-garbage related calls. In October 2016, there was a shift in wildlife-
conflict calls; bear-garbage related calls tripled where as bear-residential fruit tree related calls dropped.
The WCC plans to increase both commercial and residential awareness.

An April start in the 2017 season would be very effective for the WCC to be responsive to issues
regarding early signs of food conditioned wildlife as well as prepare for a busy Spring season for school
presentation. The WCC and COS believe that a mail insert brochure informing residents about each city’s
Solid-Waste Bylaws, No Feeding Bylaws and the Wildlife Act will also be beneficial in education a larger
audience. The City of Cranbrook and the WCC plan to work hard in collaboration during the upcoming
season around exploring the idea of introducing an incentive for residents to cut down their apple tree
(if they please); replacing the apple trees with maple trees for example.

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WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook Year End Report 2016 | 2016

Media releases will continue and plan to increase as well; there will be an awareness campaign launched
early in the 2017 season ensuring residents are aware of the bylaws, important events such as the BC
Goes Wild Weekend, etc. A WildSafeBC supporter sticker to be provided to businesses that join the shift
towards becoming a bear smart would be helpful when approaching businesses.

The Cities of Kimberley and Cranbrook as well as the RDEK – District C are the programs current local
sponsors, and the program is currently delivered within their limits. Over the course of 2016, several
calls came from more rural communities, stretching as far as Wasa, reporting aggressive or injured
wildlife as well as requesting program information. Further sponsorship from RDEK District C would
support a more comprehensive WildSafeBC program in the area and would allow the WCC to respond
accordingly to reported wildlife encounters, human-wildlife conflict, attractant management as well as
to educate livestock owners on electric fencing. Sponsorship from the RDEK Area E would allow support
to reach out to these communities.

Presentations for early years continues to be a challenge. BC has encouraged teachers within School
District 5 and 6 to incorporate more forest play into their daily/weekly schedules. Presentations made
up for the early years such a bear basics, animals with hooves and predators should be added into the
WildSafeBC structured educational programming.

Finally, the 2016 WildSafeBC season ran from the middle of May until the middle of November even
though wildlife species such as coyotes, cougars, moose, elk and deer are still active in the winter
months. An extended contract that allows for some “off-season” hours would allow the WCC to support
community members when they need it. Requests for winter wildlife presentations began in late June
2016.

Goals for 2017
The 2017 season is just around the corner! WildSafeBC is looking forward to further developing the
existing partnerships as well as working together to find new solutions to reduce human-wildlife conflict
by educating the public wildlife attractant management in and around city limits. The list below provides
a more accurate description of WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook goals for 2017.

 Secure further support from RDEK District C to deliver programming to rural areas
surrounding Kimberley, Cranbrook and area.
 Sponsorship from RDEK Area E.
 Awareness Campaign
 Exploring Apple tree incentives with the City of Cranbrook and Kimberley
 Continue to develop educational programming for primary classes (K-3)
 Connect with Bylaw Enforcement Officers and Conservation Officers further on
reconstructing/amending bylaws
 Collaborate with existing community groups to increase local capacity for volunteers
 Collaborate with existing community groups that build upon existing partnerships and
involves residents in finding solutions to local wildlife

9|Page
WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook Year End Report 2016 | 2016

Acknowledgements
WildSafeBC is grateful for the enormous amount of support throughout the 2016 season. WildSafeBC
acknowledges the funding support of sponsors, The Ministry of Environment, BC Conservation
Foundation, The Colombia Basin Trust, The Regional District of East Kootenay – District C, the City of
Kimberley and the City of Cranbrook. Thank you to the operations, communications and planning staff
at both Cities, who have been pro-active in collaborating with WildSafeBC to find lasting solutions to
human-wildlife conflict.

Special Thanks to the Conservation Officer Services staff Jeff Scott, Ray Gilewicz and Denny Chretien
support staff Jennifer Hunt.

Thank you to the staff at the BC Conservation Foundation including, but not limited to, Frank Ritcey, Jen
Bellhouse, Trina Radford and Shelley Nohels.

The WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook’s educational programming would not be the same without such
an amazing audience and supportive educators.

Thank you to all community participants, together, WildSafeBC Kimberley-Cranbrook is possible!

10 | P a g e
Schedule C

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE File: 1470.01

City Wraps Up Fall 2015 Urban Deer Population Management Program

Cranbrook, BC (January 18, 2016) – A deer population management program has been completed in the
City of Cranbrook. The program began on Tuesday December 1, 2015 with the setup and baiting of traps
and concluded on January 13, 2016, with a total of twenty deer being captured and euthanized.

“I am very pleased with the results of this program to manage and control our urban deer situation,” says
Mayor Lee Pratt. “I know some people do not agree with our program, but in the interest of the protection
of citizens’ property and the safety of our residents it had to be done.”

The Wildlife Permit was issued to the City of Cranbrook on October 19, 2015 by the Ministry of Forest, Land
and Natural Resource Operations (MFLNRO) and was valid from December 1, 2015 expiring on January 31,
2016.

All of the deer euthanized were processed and 855 lbs. of meat has been distributed to three local
organizations to be used for human consumption. This process was clearly identified in the guidelines
embedded in the Wildlife Permit provided by MFLNRO. All meat preparation was conducted by a qualified
butcher and processed in a facility inspected and approved by both Interior Health and MFLNRO.

The specific areas of the City targeted were based on complaints received by City staff from the public in
2015 along with the results of the urban deer population count conducted on November 7, 2015. The
results were 137 deer – the highest number of deer counted since this program began in 2010. The locations
of the traps were determined by City staff based on this information along with complaints received by the
provincial toll-free Report All Poachers and Polluters (RAPP) line and specific priority areas identified by the
Conservation Officer Service.

The program was completed under the $15,000 budget at $10,374.00 or $494 per animal. Built into the cost
includes: placement and tear down of each clover trap, purchase of bait and supplies, liability insurance,
provincially mandated equipment training, mileage, vehicle cleaning; processing, packaging and distribution
of the meat and all associated contractor administration costs.

The City of Cranbrook remains committed to the urban deer translocation trial set to begin in February.
Council understands the value of the trial and contributed $10,000 to the project last fall and has been
asking the Province for several years for additional tools to deal with urban deer.

“The recent population management program was approved and organized before we knew exactly when
the translocation trial was going to begin,” says Mayor Pratt. “We have direction from our residents to try
to deal with our urban deer population. The current method used to manage deer populations is the only
way we are authorized to do that, which is dictated by the Wildlife Act and enforced by MFLNRO. It is very

Phone: (250) 426-4211
Toll Free: (800) 728-2726
Facsimile: (250) 426-7264
Address: 40-10th Avenue South Cranbrook, BC V1C 2M8
important for the public to recognize that this upcoming translocation trial is only a test and was never
intended to move a large number of animals from each municipality involved and large numbers of urban
deer will still remain in Cranbrook.”

The City of Cranbrook extends its thanks to the District of Elkford, the City of Kimberley, the District of
Invermere, VAST Resource Solutions, MFLNRO staff and all of the granting groups and supporting agencies
for coming together for the translocation trial and who have remained unwaveringly supportive and
involved – and who have not threatened to pull their support. The City is very interested to see the end
results of this trial.

--30--

For more information, please contact:

Chris Zettel
Corporate Communications Officer
City of Cranbrook
Phone: 250-489-0238
Cell: 250-420-1686
zettel@cranbrook.ca

Phone: (250) 426-4211
Toll Free: (800) 728-2726
Facsimile: (250) 426-7264
Address: 40-10th Avenue South Cranbrook, BC V1C 2M8
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE File: 1470.01

Report All Acts of Aggression by Urban Deer, City Asks
Each and Every Report Important To Determining Future Population Management

Cranbrook, BC (March 31, 2016) – Any incidents involving acts of deer aggression in the City of Cranbrook
should be reported. Both City staff and the provincial Conservation Officer Service keep close tabs on these
reports of aggressive deer behaviour in order for Mayor and Council to make any future decisions around
urban deer management.

“These reports of aggression are crucial to helping staff determine where clover traps should be placed in
any future deer management program the City undertakes,” says Chris Zettel, Corporate Communications
Officer for the City of Cranbrook. “The reality is if the incident isn’t reported the incident didn’t occur.”

Deer living in town are habituated to the presence of people and have lost their natural wariness of humans.
Although the deer look cute and harmless, they can and have been aggressive – especially toward people
and dogs. The higher than normal deer population level has led to the sighting and reports of cougars,
coyotes and the occasional wolf in the municipality over the past 5 years.

“I continue to hear anecdotal stories of encounters people have with aggressive deer but didn’t bother to
report for any number of reasons,” Zettel says. “Lots of people told me they didn’t want to be a bother.
Many tell me complaining would not make any difference. I’m here to tell you that reporting an incident no
matter how frequently it occurs is not a bother and your complaint is important.”

To report an incident to the Conservation Officer Service, please call 1-877-952-7277. To report an incident
to the City of Cranbrook, please call 250-426-4211 or email urbandeer@cranbrook.ca.

“Although residents may also report deer damage to gardens and shrubs, it is important to know that those
reports do not play a factor in decisions around deer management,” adds Zettel.

Late May through June is historically the time of year does give birth to their fawns. Does will drive away
their offspring from the previous year and look for a secluded place to give birth. Deer have one or two
fawns per year and triplets do occur once in a while. The white-spotted fawn relies on its colouration, lack
of scent and silence for protection. It is quite common for does to leave fawns hidden while they forage in
the area, returning occasionally to nurse. If you come across a fawn, it is best to leave it alone.

It is also important for residents to remember that does with fawns are very wary of their surroundings and
can act or react aggressively if they feel threatened. Give the deer plenty of space to either move or leave
the area. Do not walk closer to the deer, choose another route. Be sure to walk your dog on a leash and
be ready to let go of the leash if a deer attacks.

Phone: (250) 426-4211
Toll Free: (800) 728-2726
Facsimile: (250) 426-7264
Address: 40-10th Avenue South Cranbrook, BC V1C 2M8
--30--

For more information, please contact:

Chris Zettel, Corporate Communications Officer
City of Cranbrook
Phone: 250-489-0238
Cell: 250-420-1686
Skype: chris.zettel1
zettel@cranbrook.ca

Phone: (250) 426-4211
Toll Free: (800) 728-2726
Facsimile: (250) 426-7264
Address: 40-10th Avenue South Cranbrook, BC V1C 2M8
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE File: 1470.01

Public Must Take Larger Role in Enforcement of the Deer Feeding Bylaw, City Says

Cranbrook, BC (April 12, 2016) – Residents are being asked to step up and help the City of Cranbrook ensure
the deliberate feeding of deer inside the municipality does not happen.

“Deliberate feeding of the deer is just one piece of the puzzle around urban deer and part of the reason we
have the deer issues we do,” says Chris Zettel, Corporate Communications Officer for the City of Cranbrook.
“This is the easiest thing we, as a community can do to try to minimize these problems – by simply not
feeding them.”

The bylaw states no one is to provide deer with food by intentionally leaving food, food waste or other
attractive edible material for the sole purpose of feeding deer. For example, leaving out a bale of hay, a bag
of apples or other compostable food scraps on any property where these items are not consistently being
grown or produced for human consumption would be a violation of the Bylaw.

Home fruit and vegetable gardens intended for human consumption or ornamental plants and flowers will
not be included as material intended for the sole purpose of feeding deer under the deer feeding bylaw.

“Like so many of our bylaws, enforcement is done on a complaint driven basis,” says Zettel. “We don’t have
the ability to patrol the City looking for infractions around the deer feeding bylaw. We need residents to let
us know if deliberate feeding of deer is happening and where. You will have to provide our staff your name
and phone number, so our bylaw officers can contact you should more information be needed.”

Anyone found violating the Deer Feeding Prohibition Bylaw will be committing an offense and can be fined
on an escalating fine schedule; $ 100 for the first offense, $200 for the second, $500 for the third. Each day
a violation occurs constitutes a new and separate offense.

For more information or to report a location where deliberate deer feeding is happening, please call Bylaw
Services @ 250-489-9598. The City cannot act on anonymous complaints as evidence is required if the
offender is to be fined.

--30--

For more information, please contact:

Chris Zettel, Corporate Communications Officer
City of Cranbrook
Phone: 250-489-0238
Cell: 250-420-1686
zettel@cranbrook.ca

Phone: (250) 426-4211
Toll Free: (800) 728-2726
Facsimile: (250) 426-7264
Address: 40-10th Avenue South Cranbrook, BC V1C 2M8
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE File: 1470.01

Wildlife Issues Need to Be Reported To Province, City Says

Cranbrook, BC (June 8, 2016) -- Residents are reminded that if you see or have issues with any wildlife,
please call the Provincial RAPP line to report it at 1-877-952-7277, 24 hours a day, 7 days per week. This
information is passed along directly to the local branch of the Conservation Officer Service, where it is
recorded and depending on the wildlife issue it will be responded to.

Please do not contact City of Cranbrook Bylaw staff or the local branch of the SPCA with wildlife issues. They
are only able to deal with domestic animals – not wildlife.

However, around issues with urban deer, residents are encouraged to contact the RAPP line first toll free at
1-877-952-7277 (RAPP), but are also asked to report the issue to the City of Cranbrook for its records by
calling 250-426-4211 or emailing urbandeer@cranbrook.ca. City staff may not be able to respond directly to
all emails or phone messages around urban deer issues, however staff will be sure to record those
complaints.

It is also important to remember that late May through June is historically the time of year does give birth to
their fawns. Does will drive away their offspring from the previous year and look for a secluded place to give
birth. Deer have one or two fawns per year and triplets do occur once in a while. The white-spotted fawn
relies on its colouration, lack of scent and silence for protection. It is quite common for does to leave fawns
hidden while they forage in the area, returning occasionally to nurse. If you come across a fawn, it is best to
leave it alone.

It is also important for residents to remember that does with fawns are very wary of their surroundings and
can act or react aggressively if they feel threatened. Give the deer plenty of space to either move or leave
the area. Do not walk closer to the deer, choose another route. Be sure to walk your dog on a leash and
be ready to let go of the leash if a deer attacks.

--30--

For more information, please contact:

Chris Zettel, Corporate Communications Officer
City of Cranbrook
Phone: 250-489-0238
Cell: 250-420-1686
Skype: chris.zettel1
chris.zettel@cranbrook.ca

Phone: (250) 426-4211
Toll Free: (800) 728-2726
Facsimile: (250) 426-7264
Address: 40-10th Avenue South Cranbrook, BC V1C 2M8
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE File: 1470.01

Options Available for Yard & Garden to Reduce Damage by Urban Deer

Cranbrook, BC (June 15, 2016) – Regular summer activities including yard and garden maintenance are in
full swing and the possibility is there that you and your neighbours won’t be the only ones stopping by to
admire all your hard work. The City of Cranbrook’s urban deer population – both mule and white tail deer –
will be active in many areas of the community looking to make a meal out of many plants and shrubs.

In spring and summer months, mule deer eat a variety of herbaceous plants and grasses during the summer,
even though they are primarily browsers of shrubs. Talk with your landscape professional or visit your
favourite local nursery to find out more about deer-resistant plants that thrive locally. There are also a few
techniques that can be used to protect your property from deer damage.

“Fencing is really your only guaranteed way of preventing deer damage in your yard,” says Chris Zettel,
Corporate Communications Officer for the City of Cranbrook. “But, using a combination of hazing,
repellents, choosing deer resistant plants along with fencing can also be quite effective.”

In the City’s Zoning Bylaw under Fencing, in all residential zones, the maximum height for a fence in the
front yard is 1 metre and all other yards, 1.8 metres.

If you have issues around urban deer aggression, you are encouraged to contact the RAPP line first, but are
also asked to report the issue to the City of Cranbrook for its records by calling 250-426-4211 or emailing
urbandeer@cranbrook.ca. City staff may not be able to respond directly to all emails or phone messages
around urban deer issues, however staff will be sure to record those complaints.

The Ministry of Environment website also has much information on how to reduce deer conflicts in your
yard @ www.env.gov.bc.ca/cos/info/wildlife_human_interaction/docs/ungulates.html.

--30--

For more information, please contact:

Chris Zettel, Corporate Communications Officer
City of Cranbrook
Phone: 250-489-0238
Cell: 250-420-1686
Skype: chris.zettel1
chris.zettel@cranbrook.ca

Phone: (250) 426-4211
Toll Free: (800) 728-2726
Facsimile: (250) 426-7264
Address: 40-10th Avenue South Cranbrook, BC V1C 2M8
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE File: 1470.01

Deer Mating Season Approaches; Public Awareness Encouraged

Cranbrook, BC (September 26, 2016) -- Focus on the local urban deer population shifts away from
aggressive does to the upcoming autumn deer mating period or the fall rut. Residents and visitors are
advised to continue to exercise both caution and common sense.

“This is a transition stage in the year where we will start to see an increase in activity from our local urban
buck population,” says Chris Zettel, Communications Officer with the City of Cranbrook. “Issues of
aggression by bucks during the annual rut are not common, but it is still important that our residents at least
be aware.”

In the weeks leading up to the rut (into November and December) bucks increase their displays of
dominance and indirect threats. A dominant buck typically circles a rival with deliberate steps; back arched,
head low and tail flicking. Bucks can also display dominance by violently thrashing the bushes with their
antlers.

“Some does with fawns may also remain wary and potentially aggressive toward people with dogs through
the fall,” says Zettel. “We are asking that you try your best to give deer plenty of space to move or leave the
area. Please do not walk closer to the deer; try and find another route.”

Any acts of deer aggression where public safety is at risk should be reported. The City of Cranbrook and the
provincial Conservation Officer Service each keep track of these instances of aggression. To report an
incident to the Conservation Officer Service, please call 1-877-952-7277. To report an incident to the City of
Cranbrook, please call 250-426-4211 or email urbandeer@cranbrook.ca.

--30--

For more information, please contact:

Chris Zettel, Corporate Communications Officer
City of Cranbrook
Phone: 250-489-0238
Cell: 250-420-1686
Skype: chris.zettel1
chris.zettel@cranbrook.ca

Phone: (250) 426-4211
Toll Free: (800) 728-2726
Facsimile: (250) 426-7264
Address: 40-10th Avenue South Cranbrook, BC V1C 2M8
Schedule D