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Name RELEASED FORM

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Grade 5
Form S

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North Carolina
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End-of-Grade TestsGrade 5
Reading Comprehension
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Public Schools of North Carolina


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www.ncpublicschools.org
State Board of Education
Department of Public Instruction
Office of Accountability
Division of Accountability
andServices/North
Technology Services
Carolina Testing Program
Division North
Raleigh, of Accountability
Carolina 27699-6314
Services/North Carolina Testing Program
Raleigh, North Carolina 27699-6314

2009
2007
2004 All
All rights
rights reserved.
reserved. This
This document
document may
may not
not be
be reproduced
reproduced by
by any
any means,
means, in
in whole
whole or
or in
in part,
part, without
without prior
prior
written
written permission from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh, North Carolina.
permission from the North Carolina Department of Public Instruction, Raleigh, North Carolina.
Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

A girl named Red finds a turtle while on summer vacation at her cousins country home.

Box Turtle
by Nola Thacker

Something orange and black, with a Red reached over and took the turtle,
piece of grass hanging from its mouth, was cradling her in both hands. Im going to call
watching her with red eyes as she worked. her Paint.

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She almost touched the box turtle before she You should call her Halloween,
saw it waiting still as a stone amid the because she is orange and black, said
yellow squash. When she picked it up, the Tralice.
turtle pulled its head and feet back into its Aunt Phoebe said, You can use the
shell with a pop. Red put down the can and box. Shes a beautiful turtle, or tortoise,

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took the turtle back to the house. rather. Those markings are for protection in
Tired of looking for puzzle pieces, her home in the woods. Of course, she wont
Carrie Mae had come out onto the porch and need them in a box.
was drawing the pier and the bay from the Ill fix the box up. Shell like it, said
perspective of the porch. The pier looked like Red.
a ladder. I like Halloween, but Paint is a good
Look what I found, said Red. name, too, said Carrie Mae.
A box turtle! exclaimed Carrie Mae. Red wouldnt admit that Halloween
She pushed her pencil and paper away and was a good name. Tralice was too bossy to be
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stood up to examine it. Come on. I bet we given that satisfaction. Paint, her name is
have a box in the pantry to put him in. Paint.
Her, I think. Red followed Carrie Well, you should get some grass to
Mae to the kitchen. put in the box with her, Tralice said.
The pantry smelled like the garden, Shouldnt she, Mother?
but dryer and stronger. Aunt Phoebe and I know that, said Red. Shes my
Margaret Jones kept net bags of herbs turtle. But you can hold her, Carrie Mae,
drying there. Every few months, they anytime you want to.
emptied a different set of jars and filled them Why dont you put Paint in the box,
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with freshly dried herbs, and put on labels and put the box in the corner of the porch.
with dates that Tralice wrote with green ink Then you can go and get some grass to line it
in script. with, Aunt Phoebe suggested.
Red found a box turtle, said Carrie Okay, said Red. Dont worry,
Mae as they came back through the dining Tralice. Carrie Mae and Ill take care of it.
room, where Aunt Phoebe and Tralice were Honestly, said Tralice. I suppose
studying the pieces of a jumper laid out on its all right if I look at your old turtle?
the table. May we have this grocery box to Maybe, said Red. Lets go, Carrie.
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keep her in?


Let me see, Tralice commanded. She At first Paint didnt move at all. Then,
took the turtle and turned her around and as they all crouched by the box without
around until Red grew uneasy. moving or speaking, she poked her head out
Give her back. Shes mine. of her shell. She craned her neck and then
Its okay, Red, said Tralice. Dont pushed her way through the thick, damp
get so excited. Im only looking at her. grass lining her box until she reached one

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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

side. Then slowly, slowly, she turned and big turtle race, maybe for the Fourth of July
walked until she bumped into another side of picnic at the community center, and charge
the box. She bumped from one side to the entry fees and sell tickets and give prizes.
other, over and over, until the sound of Joes We could
and Uncle Hermans footsteps as they came Joe, shes a box turtle, not a racing
into the house made her retreat into her turtle, and shes mine. And shes not for
shell. dinner, either, Red said. Her name is
Joe liked Paint immediately. Wow! Paint.

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A box turtle! What are you going to do with One turtles probably not enough for
him? We could make turtle soup. I could soup anyway, said Joe.
look it up. Uncle Herman bent forward a little to
Carrie Mae turned to Joe in pained study Paint. A turtle in a box is more
surprise. You cant eat a turtle! Especially properly a boxed turtle. Do you know the

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not one you know! poem about a robin redbreast in a cage
Aw, Carrie, I know that. Some people putting heaven in a rage?
will believe anything. I was just joking. No. said Red. Uncle Hermans tone
Listen, lets go find another turtle and we of voice sounded very much like Aunt
could have a turtle race. Or listen, we could Phoebes had, and Red didnt like it.
train this one, and put up signs and have a

1. Which word best describes Red? 3. Why does Red name the turtle Paint?
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A calm A Red is an artist.

B humorous B Carrie Mae suggests it.

C lazy C The turtle is a paint turtle.

D proud D The turtle has a colorful shell.


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2. Where did Red find the turtle? 4. What does Tralice do that suggests
she is bossy?
A in a box
A Tralice works with her mother.
B on the porch
B Tralice demands to see the turtle.
C in the garden
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C Tralice looks at the turtle for a


D in the kitchen long time.

D Tralice asks Reds permission to


see the turtle.

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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

5. Why does Red not want to admit that 7. How is Uncle Hermans opinion of the
Halloween is a good name for the turtle different from Reds?
turtle?
A He considers turtles unclean, but
A Red likes the name Paint better. Red likes to touch them.

B Red thinks Carrie Mae gets too B He finds the turtle uninteresting,
bossy. while Red finds her fascinating.

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C Red does not like the colors C He agrees with Joe that turtles
orange and black. are edible, and Red objects to that
idea.
D Red does not want to give Tralice
the satisfaction. D He thinks it is wrong to confine

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the turtle, but Red wants to keep
her as a pet.

6. How can Joe best be described?

A Joe is cautious.

B Joe likes to tease.


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C Joe is a gardener.

D Joe likes to cook.


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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

Goaltending
by Janae J. Carter

Do you know what youll be doing in 25 years? I do!

I want to be a writer, a ballerina, an in my diary. Writing them down keeps them


inventor, a social worker, and mayor of New more private, and nobody can talk me out of
York City. My future is no great mystery to them. Sometimes I write a plan that shows

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me, and yours doesnt have to be a mystery me what I need to do step-by-step to
either! All it takes is a goal, a little accomplish my goals.
planning, and a lot of self-confidence. 6 Other people can help you figure out
I get excited when I think about what your future, too. People who do what you
I can do, and so should you. Every dream

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want to do are your greatest resources. To
can become a reality if you work at it. You find out what they do, you can volunteer to
dont have to limit yourself to doing just one help them, do an internship, or even just talk
thing. I want to do lots of things, like to them. For instance, if you want to be a
Benjamin Franklin. He was a writer, an doctor, talk to a doctor about her goals as a
inventor, a politician, and a scientist. child and how she prepared to become a
Having a goal, something you really doctor. She may be able to tell you things
want to do, is a good place to start in solving you hadnt considered. Visiting your parents
the mystery of your future. It gives you jobs, going to career fairs, and participating
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something to work toward. Your goal may in after-school programs are other good
seem impossible at first, but if you break it options. The Internet and the library are
down, it wont seem so hard. Remember, a great places to research organizations and
goal is something you really want to do, not programs for young people. You can also
what someone else wants you to do. read biographies of people who inspire you,
One of my goals is to write books. My which can help you see how other people
favorite author is Phyllis Wheatley. She reached their goals. If youre not certain
was sold into slavery from her home in about your future, explore different careers
West Africa when she was 8 years old. She by asking yourself what you really like to do.
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refused to give up her dream of writing. Be realistic when you make your
When I read about her and how she achieved goals, but allow a little room for dreaming.
her writing success, I was amazed at what Remember, its OK for your future to be a
you can do if you try. I made a small goal to little mysterious. Thats what makes it so
write every day, even when Im tired. I feel exciting. Someday you may be an astronaut,
great when I achieve this goal because it a carpenter, an ambassador, a writer, a
prepares me for my bigger goalto write ballet dancer, or whatever else interests you.
books. You may even do it all!
Some of your goals might be more
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personal. I like to write those kinds of goals

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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

8. The selection begins, Do you know 10. According to the author, which is a
what youll be doing in 25 years? I good way of carrying out a plan to
do! What is the authors purpose in achieve a goal?
beginning the selection this way?
A work on several plans at once
A to show that she has many
talents B break it down into manageable
steps
B to get the readers attention and

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interest C daydream about a triumphant
outcome
C to present herself as a strong
personality D spend a few minutes planning
every day

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D to make the reader question her
statements

11. What is the author trying to do in


paragraph 6 of the selection?
9. The author mentions Benjamin
Franklin as an example of what? A make the reader aware of useful
resources
A having many skills
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B inform the reader about the
B influencing many lives workplace

C being smart about money C encourage the reader to excel in


school
D showing great courage in conflict
D urge the reader to try several
careers
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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

12. The author urges readers, Be realistic 14. Which quotation expresses an opinion
when you make your goals. Which of the author?
activity would help a person do that?
A I get excited when I think about
A imitating people one admires what I can do, and so should you.

B seeking information about careers B He was a writer, an inventor, a


politician, and a scientist.
C writing about hopes and dreams

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C One of my goals is to write
D feeling attracted to different books.
occupations
D I made a small goal to write
every day, even when Im tired.

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13. What is the effect of listing multiple
occupations in the opening and closing
paragraphs? 15. How does the author emphasize the
importance of not giving up when
A It demonstrates reasonable goals. dealing with challenging experiences?
B It encourages people to focus on A by telling the story of Phyllis
one goal. Wheatley
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C It stresses the many exciting B by mentioning Benjamin
career choices. Franklin

D It shows how the author combines C by describing how she uses her
all these careers. personal journal

D by advising the reader that it is


all right to dream
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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

Seneca Oil and Early America


by Kerry Lighty

What would you call a stomach When used on horses, however, Seneca
remedy, a water repellent, a lamp fuel, and a oil was effective. The Seneca Indians would
squeak remover all in one? Seneca Indians allow their horses to stand in shallow pools
and colonial settlers in northwestern of petroleum, soaking their hoofs in the dark
Pennsylvania discovered that such a liquid to prevent cracking and splitting.

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substance could be found naturally in Crude oil had other unique uses in
streams. The amazing resource is called early America. Upon discovering that
Seneca oil, which is more commonly known mosquitoes were repulsed by the scent of
as petroleum or crude oil. petroleum, the Senecas spread the oily liquid

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Seneca oil was named for the Seneca on their skin and created the first insect
Indians, who collected it by skimming the repellent.
substance from the top of Oil Creek and Oil not only repels mosquitoes but
other regional streams. Early settlers later water as well. Native Americans capitalized
learned about this oil through contact with on the fact that water and oil do not mix.
Native Americans who highly regarded The Seneca and other Iroquois Indians
petroleum for its medicinal purposes. The produced an ideal war paint by mixing
Senecas believed that swallowing small petroleum with paint, which made the
amounts of the dark liquid would soothe substance immune to water. The crude oil
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stomach and digestive problems. Crude oil gave the paint a hideous, glistening
was said to have a horrible flavor, so the appearance, according to eyewitnesses.
taste would certainly make a person forget Settlers also applied Seneca oil to wood and
what his stomach felt like! Early settlers leather goods to preserve them from
were convinced of the healing qualities of moisture damage.
Seneca oil, too. A few bold and misguided Along with providing water protection,
ones even peddled the dark fluid as a remedy crude oil was believed to provide resistance
for all ailments common to man. Three to the suns rays. Native Americans spread
teaspoons, three times a day! one ad petroleum over exposed skin to protect it
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claimed, would cure all. Hence, these from the intense sunshine, making the
peddlerswith their snake oilbecame substance a rather unique suntan lotion.
quite popular among the gullible people of In contrast to water, Seneca oil was
the day. flammable. Native American tribes
Besides being taken internally, Seneca discovered that fire would burn brighter
oil was applied to the skin as an ointment. It when the dark fluid was added to it. The
was spread on wounds to aid healing. powerful visual effects enhanced the
George Washingtons troops treated frostbite ceremonies performed by the Seneca and
with petroleum. During the Civil War, other Iroquois.
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wounded soldiers were treated with Seneca 9 Also, settlers used Seneca oil as a fuel
oil and herbs. Both the Senecas and the in lamps to provide light. However, a thick,
early settlers rubbed the fluid on joints to black smoke resulted from the burning of
ease the pain and discomfort of rheumatism. petroleum. This annoying by-product kept
Despite the widespread use of Seneca oil for crude oil from widespread use as a lamp fuel.
healing purposes, the claimed effects appear Later, the distilling of crude oil into various
to be unfounded. substances led to the advent of kerosene, a

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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

product that provided good lighting without slippery substance was also applied to wagon
all the black smoke. In the late 1800s, wheels to cause them to turn more freely and
kerosene replaced whale oil as the American to eliminate irritating squeaks.
lamp fuel of choice. Seneca oil, or petroleum, played an
The lubricating properties of interesting role in early America, ranging
petroleum were also known in from the comical to the ingenious. As a
nineteenth-century America. Many mills in natural resource, crude oil had many worthy
the oil country of northwestern Pennsylvania applications, and it is still very valuable and

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used petroleum on their machine tools to versatile today.
reduce the friction, wear, and noise. The

16. In the second paragraph, what does 18. According to the selection, what was

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the word gullible mean? one effect of the Senecas mixing
petroleum with paint, particularly
A confident during a time of war?
B determined A to look more frightening to their
enemies
C highly excited
B to create new colors to fool their
D easily deceived enemies
EA
C to prevent sunburn during
midday battles
17. Which would most likely be a use for
Seneca oil by early settlers in D to provide light for nighttime
Pennsylvania? battles

A to heat their houses

B to season their food


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C to treat a cut on the leg

D to eliminate squeaks on an
elevator
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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

19. According to the selection, which item 21. How were the early American settlers
best completes the graphic organizer? and the Native Americans similar in
their approach to Seneca oil?

A Both used it as lamp oil.


lamp
? fuel B Both thought it was poison.

Seneca C Both tried it for various needs.

D
Oil
D Both tried to make money from it.
squeak stomach
remover remedy

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22. Which statement about Seneca oil is
A food preservative best supported by the selection?

B cooking grease A Seneca oil was useful as an


alternative to kerosene.
C snake repellent
B The settlers used Seneca oil to
D suntan lotion treat a variety of illnesses.
EA
C Seneca oil has been replaced by
crude oil in recent times.
20. In paragraph 9, what does the word
D The settlers taught Native
advent mean?
Americans many uses for Seneca
A arrival oil.

B eating
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C farming

D opposition
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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

Heat Waves
by Eileen Ressler

Before
breakfast
even the
sky was
white

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hot & Then
by noon all at
the tar once the
on the rush of a
rooftops park full And

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bubbled & of pigeons slid a
up rose the flying off glittering
ghost waves filled our red band
of heat from ears and from
the hoods of flooded Jocelyns
parked cars, us off sleek hair,
and even our the steps her long
hair was hot & along black
to the touch the gutter bangs
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as we sat a tiny spilling
in the torrent over her
last of silver brown,
slab wrappers brown
of & metal eyes,
shade poptops her
It was a bobbing white
SCORCHER! in the teeth
blast gleaming
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that & bright


stung squealing
our skin drowned
& made us out in a
SHRIEK! gush of
cold water
pumping up
from old pipes
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down below the


overflowing streets
IT WAS WAY COOL!

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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

23. Who is most likely the speaker in the 26. How does the arrangement of the
poem? stanzas affect the poem?

A Jocelyn A It adds detail to the poem.

B a bus driver B It helps to show the subject of the


poem.
C a police officer
C It makes the mood very strong

D
D one of the children and easy to guess.

D It breaks the poem into


easy-to-read sections.
24. Why does the speaker refer to ghost

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waves of heat?

A Heat makes objects appear to 27. What is the effect of ending each
glow. stanza with words in capital letters?
B Heat makes some people feel A It makes the reader think of loud
dizzy. city noises.

C Heat rising from cars makes the B It gives a sense of suddenness


EA
air appear to move. and excitement.
D Heat waves are another name for C It offers a hint of what happens in
periods of hot weather. the next stanza.

D It makes the reader feel sorry for


the overheated children.
25. How does Jocelyn show that she is
surprised?
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A She squeals. 28. What does the poet use to emphasize


the emotions of the children in the
B She slides her headband off. poem?
C She brushes her hair from her A short lines
eyes.
B alliteration
D She jumps into the cold water.
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C vivid descriptions

D correct punctuation

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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

29. Which is the best summary of the 30. Based on the information in the poem,
poem? which statement is most likely true?

A Relief on a hot day can come A Jocelyn was on her way to the
unexpectedly. park.

B City parks are fun in the B The children had been feeding
summer. pigeons.

D
C People help those who help C The city had been experiencing
themselves. high heat.

D Water is too precious to waste. D The day before had been cool and
pleasant.

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EA
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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

a recipe for Homemade Graham Crackers


by Mollie Katzen

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EA
31. What is the purpose of this selection? 32. When a person starts this recipe,
about how long is it before the dough
A to entertain readers with a story is ready to be placed in the oven?
about a snack
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A about 10 minutes
B to persuade readers to buy
graham crackers B about 15 minutes

C to inform readers how to make a C about 25 minutes


favorite snack
D about one hour
D to describe to readers the taste of
graham crackers
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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

33. The recipe says, Yield: about 3 dozen. What does the word yield mean?

A amount of dough

B number produced

C preparation time

D
D serving size

34. Which step belongs in box 1?

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measure the push the
? butter and dough
honey together
1 2 3

A melt the butter and honey


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B roll the dough

C mix the dry ingredients

D set a timer for 10 minutes


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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

35. In step 3, what is being mixed with a 36. What would make it easier for
fork? someone to follow this recipe?

A the dry ingredients A divide step 3 into several smaller


steps
B the butter and the honey
B include a drawing of how to mix
C the flour and the butter with a fork

D
D the six ingredients C include a drawing of measuring
spoons

D list the three steps before listing


the ingredients

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EA
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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

Weirdest of All
by Melanie A. Stinson

If anyone sees, Ill have to leave I wish Lion would stop, Gordon
town. Gordon looked both ways down the grumbled as he and Zee strolled downtown
school hallway. He hoped his body would after school. I wish hed eat his own
hide Zee, who was slipping her special lunches.

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home-baked pumpkin seeds into his Hes not going to, Zee said. She
backpack. Gordon was planning to invent a stopped in front of a poster. Not till we
new recipe. make him understand that its unacceptable
Secrets have a way of getting out, for him to act the way he does toward us.
Zee said, bright clothes and red hair flashing She pointed to the poster, which read

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like neon. COMMUNITY BAKE-OFF.
The Weirdos, Lion jeered as he and Oh no, Gordon said. No way am I
his buddies swaggered up. Born weird. entering that.
Dress weird. Act weird. Youd win.
Weird, how? Zee asked. As in Maybe. But the teasing would never
magical? As in wizards and elves? Do you stop.
mean mysteriously strange, fantastic, or just Zee looked at him. Dont you want to
plain eerie? be legitimate?
Zees good with words, Gordon Whats that?
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thought. She uses words to dance around Recognized for the talent you are.
Lions teasing. Gordon mumbled, Gotta go, and
Weirds what I mean, Lion said, started walking away. He could hear Zee
frowning at Zee. calling him, but he didnt stop until he
Gordon hunched his shoulders. Weird reached his kitchen. By then, Gordon
was exactly how he felt. And if Lion found realized that he did want to enter that
out his secret, hed be weirdest of all. contestto see if he could win and to prove
Lion held out his lunch bag. Gordon he waswhat was that word? Legitimate.
reluctantly traded with him. If he didnt, Gordon took a deep breath. What if he
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Lion would tease him all day, and Gordon entered the contest and Lion found out?
couldnt stand that. It was bad enough that Four days, a dozen egg whites, and a
Gordons own brain always kept him bottle of vanilla extract later, Gordon was
worrying about whether his haircut was famous in his hometown. The newspaper
funny-looking and whether his clothes looked even ran a story about him.
OK. Embarrassing. The next day, hed have to face his
You bring in great lunches, Gordo, classmates. He knew just how hed do it, too.
said Lion. That cheesy bread smothered in You bake? Lion scoffed as Gordon
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spaghetti saucemamma mia! entered the classroom armed with a tray.


Everyone knew Lions lunches were You bake things, like a girl? Lion waved
the worst. Gordon had once thrown away a the newspaper photo of Gordon in a bakers
pickle-and-peanut-butter sandwich. hat.
Zee nudged Gordon, and he followed
her, head down.

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Yes, he bakes, Zee said. See? Sounds like youre starving, said
Grand Prize Winner, Community Bake-Off. Zee.
Prize: Fifty dollars. My mom burned dinner again last
Lion laughed harder. night, so I skipped it, Lion admitted. Now
Gordon uncovered his tray of you know. Breakfasts as bad as lunch. He
prizewinning cookies. sized up the duo. If that cookie makes me
Gordons magic recipe, Zee bragged. sick, all promises are off.
Lion eyed the cookies with suspicion. Gordon handed him the cookie.

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Whats in them? Lion wolfed it down. So its good.
Great bakers never give out their What else do you bake, Gordon?
secrets. Zee bit into one. Mmmm. Still Zee answered, Cakes, pies, baked
warm. Alaska.
A crowd gathered around them. Lion thought for a moment, then said,

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Hands reached. Mouths opened. Cookies My birthdays next week. Could you do the
disappeared. cake?
I think its cool that you bake, Maybe, Gordon said.
Gordon, Stephanie said. Chocolate? With pudding and
Lion, you love his lunches, Zee marshmallows?
prompted. Thats doable, said Gordon.
Gordo made those lunches? Lion One problem, though, Zee said.
said, dumbfounded. His stomach growled. Cakes made by champion bakers cost
He reached for the last cookie, but Zee money.
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snatched and swallowed it in one fluid move. What do you mean?
The whole class laughed. Lion glared. Weirdest-of-all cake, Gordon
Gordon removed a cookie from his surprised himself by saying. Its not free.
backpack. Saved one just for you, Lion. Youre a laugh a minute. How
Two dollars. much?
Nobody else paid, Lion said. Ten dollars.
Nobody else treats us as bad as you The room grew quiet. Lion licked the
do, Zee scolded. You want that for free, you icing off his fingers. Guess my mom would
treat us like classmates. pay thatto support our towns most
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And promise never to bug us again, promising baker.


Gordon added. Gordon grinned. Most promising
Cant promise. baker, he thought. Legitimate, at last.
No cookie, then, Gordon said.
Lions stomach rumbled louder.
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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

37. At the end of the selection, which 40. Which adjectives best describe Zee?
statement describes Lion?
A shy and anxious
A He is bored with childish games.
B proud and selfish
B He reaches out to help another
person. C funny-looking and confused

C He appreciates another persons D self-confident and supportive

D
talents.

D He worries too much about how


he looks. 41. Which statement best describes
Gordon?

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A Gordon is often mean-spirited.
38. Which best describes Lion at the
beginning of the selection? B Gordon likes to spend time alone.

A a bully C Gordon wants to be Lions friend.

B a friend D Gordon worries about what


people think.
EA
C a comic

D a coward
42. What is the importance of Lion calling
Gordon by his full name near the end
of the story?
39. Which two students approve of
Gordons baking before Gordon and A Lion is showing respect for
Lion settle their differences? Gordon.
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A Gordon and Zee B Lion knows Gordon dislikes his


name.
B Lion and Gordon
C Lion is showing off his sense of
C Zee and Stephanie humor.

D Stephanie and Lion D Lion wants to flatter and please


Gordon.
R

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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

43. Which experience is most similar to Gordons experience at the bake-off?

A cooking dinner for friends

B playing on a team

C singing in a choir

D
D winning a writing contest

SE
EA
EL
R

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Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

Yellowstone National Park


Yellowstone was the first national Yellowstone is one of the few places in
park in all the world. It is famous for its the United States where people can see wild
spouting geysers (G-zerz), bubbling buffalo, or bison. In the early 1800s, millions
mudpots, hot springs, and beautiful scenery. of buffalo roamed across the United States.
About 500 tourists travelled to Yellowstone After 100 years of hunting, less than
the first year it was open. Now, over

D
two million people drive through the park
What makes a geyser go off? Water soaks
every year.
into the ground near molten rock, or magma.
Yellowstone is 3,472 square miles It is heated to temperatures as high as
(8,992 sq km). Almost all of the park is in 400 degrees Fahrenheit (204C). The water
the northwest corner of Wyoming, with the

SE
is unable to boil at the normal temperature
remainder in Idaho and Montana. because of the weight of the water above.
The park gets its name from a golden
canyon in the area. A waterfall that is
higher than Niagara Falls drops 308 feet
(94 m) into a canyon with yellow stone walls.
The yellow stone of the canyon was once How
thought to be gold. Geysers
Yellowstone Park has over 200 active Work
EA
geysers, which is more than in all the rest of
the world combined. Yet all of Yellowstones
geysers are different. Beehive Geyser shoots
water over 200 feet (61 m) high. Riverside Water from
Geyser sprays at an angle, not straight up. Rain and Snow
Old Faithful is the most famous of
Yellowstones geysers. About once every
65 minutes, it spouts a column of water
about 130 feet (40 m) high. The jet usually
EL

lasts from 2 to 5 minutes. 100 ft


Yellowstone has many hot springs, or
pools, in various colors. The largest hot
spring in the park is Grand Prismatic. It is 200 ft
370 feet (113 m) across. Mudpots are hot
springs with smaller supplies of water. The
small amount of moisture mixes with acid 300 ft
gases. Sometimes, rising bubbles of gas fling
mud several feet high.
R

The mudpots come in a variety of Lava


colors: cream, grey, black, and even pink.
One of Yellowstones geysers first The water then becomes superheated. Steam
erupted in a parking lot underneath a car. and bubbles form as the pressure builds.
People nearby thought the cars radiator was Suddenly, a spout of hot vapor and water is
boiling over. Thats how the geyser got the forced to the surface and high into the air. As
name Radiator Geyser. the water seeps back down, the process starts
again.

Page 20 Go to next page


Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

100 wild bison were leftall in Yellowstone. Yellowstone and cared for them. Over time,
The bison in Yellowstone were then the herd grew. Yellowstone bison now
protected from hunters. A man known as number about 3,000.
Buffalo Jones took more bison to

44. What is the purpose of this selection? 46. What best describes a geysers action?

D
A to describe wild bison to the A blazing
reader
B repeating
B to inform the reader about a
national park C rare event

SE
C to persuade the reader to visit D natural disaster
Yellowstone

D to entertain the reader with


stories of geysers 47. How is a mudpot different from other
geysers?

A It is yellow.
EA
45. How are Beehive Geyser and
Old Faithful alike? B It is inactive.

A Both are named after insects. C It has less water.

B Both spray at an angle, not D It contains magma.


straight up.

C Both produce a water column at


least 125 feet high. 48. What is the most likely reason
EL

Buffalo Jones brought bison to


D Both produce a water column at Yellowstone?
least once an hour.
A to rebuild the population of an
endangered species

B to control the excess grass


growing in the park
R

C to make the park look like it did


in the 1800s

D to provide animals for tourists to


hunt

Page 21 Go to next page


Do Not ReproduceNCDPI North Carolina Test of Reading. Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009

49. What is emphasized with the diagram of a geyser?

A the importance of the geyser

B the force that produces a geyser

C the geysers nearness to Earths core

D
D the process involved in a geysers eruption

50. Which statement best completes the graphic organizer?

SE
Water is Pressure A spout
Water of hot vapor
heated as ? becomes builds as
high as steam and and water
superheated. shoots into
400F. bubbles
form. the air.
EA
A Water is forced to the surface.

B Water weighs more than normal water.

C Water soaks into the ground near magma.

D Water is unable to boil at normal boiling point.


EL

STOP
R

End of Reading Comprehension

Page 22 Go to next page


D
SE
EA
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The North Carolina Department of Public Instruction wishes to express gratitude to the following authors
and publishers, whose generous permission to reprint literary selections has made these tests possible.
Every effort has been made to locate the copyright owners of material reprinted in this test booklet.
Omissions brought to our attention will be corrected in subsequent editions.
EL

Box Turtle from Summer Stories by Nola Thacker. Copyright 1988 by Nola Thacker. Used by
permission of HarperCollins Publishers. (Pg. 4953).

Goaltending by Janae J. Carter from New Moon, November/December 2002. Reprinted with permission
from New Moon The Magazine for Girls and Their Dreams; copyright New Moon Publishing, Duluth, MN.
www.newmoon.org.

Seneca Oil and Early America by Kerry Lighty reprinted by permission of Cricket magazine, June 2002,
Vol. 29, No. 10 copyright, 2002 by Kerry J. Lighty.
R

Heat Waves by Eileen Ressler reprinted by permission of Cricket magazine, August 2001, Vol. 28, No. 12
copyright, 2001 by Eileen Ressler.

Homemade Graham Crackers reprinted with permission from The Enchanted Broccoli Forest by Mollie
Katzen. Copyright 1982 by Mollie Katzen, Ten Speed Press, Berkeley, CA. www.tenspeed.com.

Weirdest of All by Melanie A. Stinson from Highlights for Children, December 2003. Copyright 2003 by
Highlights for Children, Inc., Columbus, Ohio.

Yellowstone National Park used with permission of Sterling Publishing Co., Inc., from The Most
Fascinating Places on Earth by Donna E. Hicks, Illustrations by Mark A. Hicks, 1993 by Mark Hicks &
Donna Hicks. (Pg. 1617).
North Carolina Test of Reading
Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009
Answer Key

Item Number Correct Answer Goal


1 D 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas

D
2 C 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
3 D 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,

SE
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas
4 B 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas
5 D 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
EA
6 B 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas
7 D 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas
8 B 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
EL

conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of


fiction and nonfiction
9 A 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
10 B 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
R

11 A 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing


conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
12 B 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
13 C 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of

3 August 2009 Page 1


North Carolina Test of Reading
Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009
Answer Key

fiction and nonfiction


14 A 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
15 A 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing

D
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
16 D 1 Vocabulary usage and decoding
17 C 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of

SE
fiction and nonfiction
18 A 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
19 D 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
20 A 1 Vocabulary usage and decoding
21 C 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
EA
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas
22 B 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
23 D 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
EL

24 C 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing


conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
25 A 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas
26 B 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
R

conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of


fiction and nonfiction
27 B 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas
28 C 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of

3 August 2009 Page 2


North Carolina Test of Reading
Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009
Answer Key

fiction and nonfiction


29 A 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
30 C 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing

D
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
31 C 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction

SE
32 B 1 Vocabulary usage and decoding
33 B 1 Vocabulary usage and decoding
34 C 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
35 D 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
36 A 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
EA
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
37 C 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas
38 A 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
EL

ideas
39 C 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
40 D 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas
R

41 D 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative


and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas
42 A 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas

3 August 2009 Page 3


North Carolina Test of Reading
Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009
Answer Key

43 D 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing


conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
44 B 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of

D
fiction and nonfiction
45 C 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
46 B 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing

SE
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
47 C 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
48 A 3 Respond to selections using critical, evaluative
and interpretative processes,
comparing/contrasting/evaluating characters, events,
ideas
EA
49 D 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
50 D 2 Reading Comprehension strategies, drawing
conclusions, identifying and interpreting elements of
fiction and nonfiction
EL
R

3 August 2009 Page 4


North Carolina Test of Reading
Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009
Raw to Scale Score Conversion

Raw Score Scale Score


0 321
1 321
2 322
3 323

D
4 323
5 324
6 325
7 326
8 327

SE
9 328
10 329
11 330
12 331
13 332
14 333
15 334
16 335
EA
17 336
18 337
19 338
20 339
21 340
22 341
23 342
24 343
25 344
EL

26 345
27 346
28 346
29 347
30 348
31 349
32 350
33 351
R

34 351
35 352
36 353
37 354
38 355
39 356
40 357
41 358

10 August 2009 Page 1


North Carolina Test of Reading
Grade 5 Form S RELEASED Fall 2009
Raw to Scale Score Conversion

42 359
43 360
44 362
45 363
46 365

D
47 367
48 369
49 371
50 374

SE
EA
EL
R

10 August 2009 Page 2