You are on page 1of 120

2

COURSE

Teacher Guide
Photo credits: FRONT COVER (cl)Jupiter Images, (cr)Ben Shannon, (t)Index
Stock Imagery, (bl)Brand X Pictures/PunchStock, (br)Nick Koudis/Getty Images;
BACK COVER (t)Sara Turner & Jerzy Drozd; (c)Nick Koudis/Getty Images;
(b)(bkgd)Image Source, (inset) Comstock/Jupiter Images.

Copyright 2009 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved. Except as
permitted under the United States Copyright Act, no part of this publication may be
reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or
retrieval system, without prior permission of the publisher.

For pages including a copyright line, permission is granted to reproduce the material
contained on said page on the condition that such materials be reproduced only for
classroom use; be provided to students, teachers, and families without charge; and
be used solely in conjunction with the program. Any other reproduction, for sale or
other use, is expressly prohibited.

Send all inquiries to:


Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
8787 Orion Place
Columbus, OH 43240-4027

ISBN: 978-0-07-889999-7
MHID: 0-07-889999-0

Printed in the United States of America.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 047 11 10 09 08
Ta ble of Contents
To the Teacher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vi
Reading Selections by Genre . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii

Assessment
Teacher Blackline
UNIT
1 Whom can you count on? Notes Master

Lou Gehrig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Luckiest Man on


the Face of the Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47
John Kieran . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . To Lou Gehrig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
April Halprin Wayland . . . . . . Sister/Friend . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Langston Hughes . . . . . . . . . . . Poem . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48
Bizet Kizcorn. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tales of a Seventh Grade Nada . . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49
J. R. R. Tolkien . . . . . . . . . . . . from The Fellowship of the Ring . . . . . . . . . 3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50
Hillary Mayell. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hobbit-Like Human Ancestor Found . . . . . 4 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51
Anne Frank . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . from The Diary of a Young Girl . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52
Catherine Clarke Fox . . . . . . . Baby Hippo Orphan Finds a Friend . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53
Jan Klinkbeil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Finding a Way . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54
Alice Childress . . . . . . . . . . . . . When the Rattlesnake Sounds . . . . . . . . . . 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

UNIT
2 Why do you read?

Jerzy Drozd and


Sara Turner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Calamity Kids in:
The Bermuda Triangle Terrarium! . . . . . . . 8 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56
Gwendolyn Brooks . . . . . . . . . To Young Readers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Shel Silverstein . . . . . . . . . . . . . Invitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57
Sarah Ives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Real Spider Superpowers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58
T. Ernesto Bethancourt . . . . . Blues for Bob E. Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59
Eloise Quintanilla . . . . . . . . . . Hurricane Emily Bad News
for Endangered Turtles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60
David George Gordon . . . . . . . Naked Animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61
Heather Herman . . . . . . . . . . . Animal House . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62
Ben Shannon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Short Circuit . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63
Kristin Baird Rattini . . . . . . . . King Tuts Mysterious Death . . . . . . . . . . . 13 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

iii
Ta ble of Contents continued
Assessment
Teacher Blackline
UNIT
3 What makes life good? Notes Master

Gloria Gonzalez . . . . . . . . . . . . The Boy with Yellow Eyes . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65


Gary Soto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ode to Weight Lifting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66
Samantha Smith . . . . . . . . . . . . Look Around and See Only Friends . . . . . 15 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67
Emily Sohn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roller Coaster Thrills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68
Alec Zobrame . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Skate Park . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69
T. S. Eliot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Macavity: The Mystery Cat . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70
Allen B. Ury . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Survival of the Fittest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71
Luis Alberto Ambroggio,
translated by Lori M. Carlson . Learning English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72
Robert Winston . . . . . . . . . . . . What Makes Me Me? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73
Emily Sohn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Worry Seems to Shorten
a Timid Rats Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74
Mark Rafenstein . . . . . . . . . . . . Laugh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75

UNIT
4 What inuences you?

Samuel Brook Douglas . . . . . . The Day I Ran with Lance Armstrong . . . 22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76


McClain J. and Angela R. . . . Ice CubeActor/Musician . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77
Douglas Holgate . . . . . . . . . . . . Third Down and Forever . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78
Kevin J. Took, M.D. . . . . . . . . Dealing with Peer Pressure. . . . . . . . . . . . 24 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79
Joseph Bruchac . . . . . . . . . . . . . Thanking the Birds . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80
Shel Silverstein . . . . . . . . . . . . . Jimmy Jet and His TV Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81
Graham Salisbury . . . . . . . . . . from Waiting for the War . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82
Elizabeth Wong . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Struggle to Be an
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . All-American Girl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83
Cynthia Rylant . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Crush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84
Bobbi Katz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A Gold Miners Tale . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85

UNIT
5 How can you become who you want to be?

Gary Soto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The No-Guitar Blues . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86


Merrick Johnston . . . . . . . . . . . Merrick Johnston, Mountain Climber . . . 30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87
Shaheem Reid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Krumping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88

iv
Assessment
Teacher Blackline
Notes Master

Sarah Ives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chicago Kids Sink Their


Teeth into Dino Camp . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89
Steven Maxwell . . . . . . . . . . . . Asteroid Belt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90
Merrill Markoe . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Dog Diaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91
Juliann F. Willey . . . . . . . . . . . Its Not a Crime to Love Science . . . . . . . . 32 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92
Cherylene Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hollywood and the Pits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93

UNIT
6 Why share stories?

Marie G. Lee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dead and Gone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94


Britt Norlander . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dune Tunes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95
Kagan McLeod . . . . . . . . . . . . . El Inca . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 96
Noreha Yussof Day . . . . . . . . . Kancil and the Crocodiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97
A Forest Home . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98
James Thurber . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Night the Bed Fell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99
Rose Inserra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Puzzle of Pan Am Flight 103 . . . . . . . 38 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100
Mark Rose . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Too Many Mummies? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101
Peggy Thomas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Grinner: A Face from the Past . . . . . . . . . 39 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102
Vince Gotera . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Beetle on a String . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
David Escobar Galindo . . . . . . A Short Story. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Bruce Robison . . . . . . . . . . . . . Travelin Soldier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103
Ehud Ben-Ezer . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hosni the Dreamer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 104
E. Sohn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Its a Small E-mail World After All . . . . . . 41 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105
Shonto Begay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Darkness at Noon: Solar Eclipse. . . . . . . . 41 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106
Pat Mora. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . In the Blood . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Naomi Shihab Nye . . . . . . . . . Supple Cord . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107
Jane Yolen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Once a Good Man . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108

v
To the Teacher
The Glencoe Backpack Reader provide students with independent reading opportunities that can be used in
conjunction with Glencoe Literature. As in the basal text, each Backpack Reader book contains six units that each
focus on a Big Question. For students convenience, Backpack Reader books are bound in a smaller size than
the basal text, so that they may be easily carried in a backpack.

Books in the Series


Glencoe Backpack Reader, Course 1 (Grade 6)
Glencoe Backpack Reader, Course 2 (Grade 7)
Glencoe Backpack Reader, Course 3 (Grade 8)

Organization

Each unit begins with a short introduction to the Big Question. The Big Questions for Course 2 are as follows:
Unit 1: Whom can you count on? Unit 4: What inuences you?
Unit 2: Why do you read? Unit 5: How can you become who you want to be?
Unit 3: What makes life good? Unit 6: Why share stories?

Each selection is introduced by an opening direction or question that helps students set a purpose
for reading.

Within each selection, students encounter prompts and questions that help them apply reading skills.

The featured reading skills include:


Activate Prior Knowledge Draw Conclusions Question
Analyze Evaluate Respond
Analyze Persuasive Identify Authors Perspective Review
Techniques Identify Authors Purpose Set a Purpose for Reading
Compare and Contrast Infer Synthesize
Connect Interpret Understand Cause and
Determine Main Idea Monitor Comprehension Effect
Distinguish Fact from Predict Understand Sequence
Opinion
Preview Understand Text Structure

vi
Organization (cont.)

At the end of each selection, students have a choice of activities they can do to respond to the Big
Question. One activity is always a writing activity (Write to Learn) and the other is a discussion activity
(Literature Groups or Partner Talk).

Using the Backpack Reader Series


You have several options for using Backpack Reader with your students:

1. Have students read the selections on their own, after which you can check their comprehension of and
response to the readings by periodically collecting and checking their responses to the Write to Learn activities.

2. Assign or suggest specic selections according to students reading levels and interests. The Backpack Reader
Teacher Guide includes the Dale-Chall reading score for each selection as well as a comprehensive chart
showing the selections grouped by genre.

3. Provide class time for Literature Groups and Partner Talk or for paired reading of longer selections. The
Selection Chart by Genre at the beginning of this Teacher Guide shows the page length of each selection.

You also have options for assessment:

1. Use the Assessment Blackline Masters included in this Teacher Guide to obtain quantiable data on students
comprehension of each selection.

2. You can also nd the questions shown on the Assessment Blackline Masters in electronic format in the
ExamView Assessment Suite in the Literature Library Teacher Resources CD-ROM. You can use these
electronic question banks to create your own selection assessments.

vii
Course 2

Reading Selections
by Genre

Dale- Student Length Teacher


Chall Book in Guide
Genre Score Title Unit Page Pages Page

Autobiography 6.5 from The Diary of a Young Girl 1 p. 31 4 p. 5

7.1 The Struggle to Be an All-American Girl 4 p. 239 4 p. 27

6.5 Merrick Johnston, Mountain Climber 5 p. 267 8 p. 30

6.0 Hollywood and the Pits 5 p. 305 13 p. 33

Biography 6.2 A Forest Home 6 p. 345 5 p. 36

Book excerpt 7.1 Its Not a Crime to Love Science 5 p. 300 5 p. 32


7.8 Grinner: A Face From the Past 6 p. 361 3 p. 39

Essay 6.3 What Makes Me Me? 3 p. 178 7 p. 19

6.0 Thanking the Birds 4 p. 219 3 p. 25

6.0 The Dog Diaries 5 p. 294 6 p. 32

Folktale/Fantasy 6.9 Kancil and the Crocodiles 6 p. 341 4 p. 36

6.4 Hosni the Dreamer 6 p. 368 6 p. 40

4.8 Once a Good Man 6 p. 380 4 p. 432

Graphic novel 6.5 Tales of a Seventh Grade Nada 1 p. 7 12 p. 3

6.3 Finding a Way 1 p. 37 12 p. 6


The Calamity Kids in: The Bermuda Triangle
5.9 2 p. 64 12 p. 8
Terrarium!
7.3 Short Circuit 2 p. 109 12 p. 13

6.6 Skate Park 3 p. 151 12 p. 17

6.1 Third Down and Forever 4 p. 203 12 p. 23

5.9 Asteroid Belt 5 p. 282 12 p. 31

6.1 El Inca 6 p. 329 12 p. 35

Magazine article 8.3 Hobbit-Like Human Ancestor Found 1 p. 29 2 p. 4

6.8 Baby Hippo Orphan Finds a Friend 1 p. 35 2 p. 5

viii
Reading Selections by Genre (continued)

Dale- Student Length Teacher


Chall Book in Guide
Genre Score Title Unit Page Pages Page
6.5 Real Spider Superpowers 2 p. 78 3 p. 9
Hurricane Emily Bad News for Endangered
6.8 2 p. 100 2 p. 11
Turtles
6.9 Naked Animals 2 p. 102 2 p. 11

6.4 Animal House 2 p. 104 5 p. 12

7.9 King Tuts Mysterious Death 2 p. 121 3 p. 13

7.3 Roller Coaster Thrills 3 p. 145 6 p. 16

7.4 Laugh 3 p. 187 5 p. 21

7.2 Worry Seems to Shorten a Timid Rats Life 3 p. 185 2 p. 20

6.9 The Day I Ran with Lance Armstrong 4 p. 194 4 p. 22

5.8 Ice CubeActor/Musician 4 p. 198 5 p. 23

6.3 Dealing with Peer Pressure 4 p. 215 4 p. 24

6.9 Krumping 5 p. 275 4 p. 30

7.0 Chicago Kids Sink Their Teeth Into Dino Camp 5 p. 279 3 p. 31

7.2 Dune Tunes 6 p. 327 2 p. 35

6.3 The Puzzle of Pan Am Flight 103 6 p. 357 3 p. 38

6.9 Too Many Mummies? 6 p. 360 1 p. 38

6.7 Its a Small E-mail World After All 6 p. 374 2 p. 41

Novel excerpt 6.2 from The Fellowship of the Ring 1 p. 19 10 p. 3

Play 5.9 When the Rattlesnake Sounds 1 p. 49 13 p. 7

Poem 5.6 To Lou Gehrig 1 p. 4 1 p. 2

4.3 Sister/Friend 1 p. 5 1 p. 2

3.8 Poem 1 p. 6 1 p. 2

6.5 To Young Readers 2 p. 76 1 p. 9

6.0 Invitation 2 p. 77 1 p. 9

5.8 Ode to Weight Lifting 3 p. 138 3 p. 15

6.7 Macavity: The Mystery Cat 3 p. 163 3 p. 17

7.0 Learning English 3 p. 177 1 p. 19

4.9 Jimmy Jet and His TV Set 4 p. 222 2 p. 25

6.1 A Gold Miners Tale 4 p. 253 3 p. 28

6.5 Beetle on a String 6 p. 363 2 p. 39

5.6 A Short Story 6 p. 365 1 p. 39

4.8 In the Blood 6 p. 378 1 p. 42

5.4 Supple Cord 6 p. 378 2 p. 42

ix
Reading Selections by Genre (continued)

Dale- Student Length Teacher


Chall Book in Guide
Genre Score Title Unit Page Pages Page
Short story 5.5 Blues for Bob E. Brown 2 p. 81 19 p. 10

7.0 The Boy with Yellow Eyes 3 p. 126 12 p. 14

6.9 Survival of the Fittest 3 p. 166 11 p. 18

5.7 from Waiting for the War 4 p. 224 15 p. 26

6.4 A Crush 4 p. 243 10 p. 27

5.6 The No-Guitar Blues 5 p. 258 9 p. 29

5.2 Dead and Gone 6 p. 320 7 p. 34

6.8 The Night the Bed Fell 6 p. 350 7 p. 37

5.7 Darkness at Noon: Solar Eclipse 6 p. 376 2 p. 41

Song 5.0 Travelin Soldier 6 p. 366 2 p. 39

Speech 6.0 The Luckiest Man on the Face of the Earth 1 p. 2 2 p. 1

7.0 Look Around and See Only Friends 3 p. 141 4 p. 15

x
Teacher
Notes
1
UNIT

Whom ca n you count on?

pp. 23

The Luckiest Man on the Face


of the Earth
Speech by Lou Gehrig

Summary In his farewell speech, Lou Gehrig reminds fans that, despite developing a terminal disease,
his life has been extraordinarily good because he has had the support of family, friends, and fans.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.0

Partner Talk Students may discuss how strong and


courageous Gehrig was when his illness forced him to
retire, even though he may have been feeling sad and
Determine Main Idea/Supporting Details (p. 2)
scared about the future. What made him a great man
Possible response: Lou Gehrig is grateful because dur-
as well as a great baseball player were his bravery, his
ing his seventeen-year career he has received nothing
honesty, his determination, and his ability to look on the
but kindness and encouragement from his fans.
bright side of life, no matter what.

p. 3

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to Gehrigs


Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 47 to
grand men of baseball (Jacob Ruppert, Ed Barrow,
assess students comprehension of the selection.
Joe McCarthy), his teammates, and his family.
Answers: 1. C 2. B 3. A 4. D 5. A

Unit 1: Whom can you count on? 1


Grouped Selections pp. 46

To Lou Gehrig Poem by John Kieran


Summary Kierans poem expresses his admiration for the way that Gehrig could be counted on both on
and off the eld. Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.6

Sister/Friend Poem by April Halprin Wayland


Summary The speaker receives comfort and support from her sister. Dale-Chall Reading Score 4.3

Poem Poem by Langston Hughes


Summary The speaker expresses his sorrow over the loss of a friend. Dale-Chall Reading Score 3.8

Partner Talk Students may refer to the Yankees


p. 6
counting on Lou Gehrig, the narrator in Sister/Friend
Write to Learn When writing about To Lou Gehrig, counting on her sister, the narrator in Poem counting
students may say that the message of the poem is on his friend, and whom they have counted on in their
about being a leader on the playing field and in life. life, such as a family member.
When writing about Sister/Friend, students may
describe how much a sister can be a friend who gives
comfort and support when needed. When writing about
Poem, students may comment on the strong emotion Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 48 to
felt over the loss of a friend. Students may state that assess students comprehension of the selection.
they have learned that it is good to have someone to
count on, and to be there for someone else. Answers: 1. B 2. C 3. A 4. B 5. D

2 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 718

Tales of a Seventh Grade Nada


Graphic novel by Bizet Kizcorn

Summary A girl tries desperately to t in with the popular crowd, but she nally realizes that the people she can
really count on are her old friends. She can be her best self when shes with them.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.5

p. 18

Write to Learn Student writing and drawings may Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 49 to
refer to how Kara finds out that she really likes being assess students comprehension of the selection.
herself and being with her real friends.
Answers: 1. C 2. A 3. A 4. B 5. D

pp. 1928

from The Fellowship of the Ring


Novel excerpt by J. R. R. Tolkien

Summary As his friends debate the best course of action, Frodo Baggins concludes that in order to keep his
friends safe he must continue the quest to destroy the Ring alone. His friend and servant, Sam Gamgee, has other
ideas and joins him. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.2

Draw Conclusions (p. 23) Possible response: They


are frightened, anxious, and worried about Frodo and
what will happen if they cant find him.
Draw Conclusions (p. 20) Possible response: Fro-
do believes the Ring is dangerous to everyone; even Determine Main Idea/Supporting Details (p. 26)
friends he thought he could trust are under its spell. He Sam reasons that, without gear, Frodo has to get back
decides to go alone so the friends he can trust are not to the boats.
put in more danger.
Respond (p. 27) Possible response: Sam proves he
Draw Conclusions (p. 21) Possible response: understands Frodo and is a good friend who will stand
Legolas wants to find out who is willing to continue the by him no matter what happens.
quest with Frodo.
Synthesize (p. 28) Possible response: Frodo shows
Draw Conclusions (p. 22) Possible response: hes a leader and a good friend. Hes decisive, respon-
Frodos friend Sam knows him best. sible, and determined to fulfill his quest.

Unit 1: Whom can you count on? 3


respects other peoples feelings, and is responsive and
p. 28
responsible.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to a time
when the student gave up something, such as free
time, a material object, or a privilege, in order to put
the needs of others before his or her own needs. Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 50 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.
Partner Talk Students may discuss the following
qualities: someone who listens, is thoughtful and kind, Answers: 1. B 2. A 3. D 4. C 5. B

pp. 2930

Hobbit-Like Human Ancestor Found


Magazine article by Hillary Mayell

Summary Scientists have discovered a species of early humans who grew only about three feet tall and lived in
Indonesia 18,000 years ago. Dale-Chall Reading Score 8.3

sloping foreheads, and chinless. But scientists report


that their behaviors were similar to the behaviors of
modern humans at that time: they hunted and used
Respond (p. 29) Possible response: The discovery
hearths for cooking.
increases our knowledge of humans and makes some
myths and legends sound like they could be real. Literature Groups Students may discuss Sue, the
largest T-Rex discovered; Lucy, an early human who
Respond (p. 30) Possible response: It would be
lived 3.2 million years ago and was discovered in
interesting to know what they ate, what tools they had,
Ethiopia; Lucys Baby, a 3.3 million-year-old fossilized
and if their brains were similar to those of modern
child recently found near Lucys skeleton.
humans.

p. 30
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 51 to
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how the
assess students comprehension of the selection.
hobbits differ from modern humans in their looks
smaller in height, longer arms, thicker eyebrow ridges, Answers: 1. A 2. B 3. B 4. D 5. A

4 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 3134

from The Diary of a Young Girl


Autobiography by Anne Frank

Summary Against the backdrop of the Nazi occupation of Holland, a young Jewish girl relates her innermost
thoughts and feelings to her imaginary friend in the form of diary entries. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.5

say that the friend hurt his or her feelings. It would


be difficult to let someone know that he or she made
someone else feel bad.
Determine Main Idea (p. 32) Anne started her
diary because she had no real friend with whom she Partner Talk Students may discuss how restrictions
could share her feelings and ideas. like these existed in our country with Japanese intern-
ment during World War II and exist in different parts of
Synthesize (p. 34) The restrictions placed on the the world today.
Jews affected her and her family in their freedom to
move around, work, and go to school.

p. 34
Assessment Blackline Master on page 52 to assess
students comprehension of the selection.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to a situation
that happened between friends that seemed too hurtful Answers: 1. B 2. D 3. A 4. C 5. C
or embarrassing to discuss openly. The student may

pp. 3536

Baby Hippo Orphan Finds a Friend


Magazine article by Catherine Clarke Fox

Summary An orphaned baby hippo is rescued and sent to a sanctuary where he is befriended by a giant grey
tortoise. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.8

worried that salt water might hurt a fresh-water hippo.


It took hours to catch him.
Determine Main Idea/Supporting Details (p. 35) Synthesize (p. 36) Possible response: Its hard to
Main Idea: A baby hippo was rescued after a tsunami. imagine how a giant tortoise and a hippo can strike up a
Supporting Details: He had been swept out into the friendship. Friendships like Owens and Mzees are won-
Indian Ocean and left by his herd. The people were derful because they are so unusual and heartwarming.

Unit 1: Whom can you count on? 5


ones. They may also discuss the way people can help
p. 36
one another by sharing shelter, food, or friendship
during such a time.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to personal
friendships or ones that students have observed in real
life or read about.

Partner Talk Students may discuss a recent disaster Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 53 to
such as a hurricane or wildfire and the hardships of assess students comprehension of the selection.
dealing with lost homes, possessions, friends, or loved
Answers: 1. B 2. D 3. A 4. D 5. A

pp. 3748

Finding a Way
Graphic novel by Jan Klinkbeil

Summary Julie is worried she wont get into the right magnet school. Then, she discovers how she can apply the
lessons she learns in Tae Kwon Do to her studies. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.3

p. 48

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to people Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 54 to
who support students in their lives, such as parents, assess students comprehension of the selection.
teachers, or neighbors, and describe why students feel
they can count on those people. Answers: 1. A 2. C 3. A 4. D 5. B

6 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 4961

When the Rattlesnake Sounds


Play by Alice Childress

Summary Harriet Tubman and two other women wash clothes to raise money for the Underground Railroad.
When one of the women complains that she is afraid and ashamed of her fear, Harriet reminds her that everyone
feels fear. Harriet maintains that the only reason to be ashamed of fear is if the fear causes you not to act on your
beliefs. Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.9

She tells Celia that she gets scared too and that is
what makes her seem brave and hard, but she under-
stands now and wont be mad if Celia decides to leave.
Draw Conclusions (p. 51) Possible response: Celia
is complaining about being tired and hungry and Lennie
p. 61
is baiting her. Harriet wants to keep them from arguing,
so she agrees to stop and rest and have some lunch.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to a com-
Respond (p. 52) Possible response: Celia is angry mitment they made and found difficult to keep, such
about being poor and having to work so hard to help as helping a friend study when they could be doing
people go from slavery to freedom. Shes tired and re- something fun instead.
sentful toward the people who have the money to stay
in the hotel and whose clothes she washes. Literature Groups Students may discuss the lack of
civil liberties in countries around the world. They may
Determine Main Idea/Supporting Details (p. 56) discuss how people are trying to make others aware of
Main Idea: Harriet is saying that just understanding such problems and encouraging them to take action.
is not enough. You have to take action in order to
make freedom happen and you have to do it yourself.
Supporting Details: Harriet compares taking care of an
abandoned baby to caring for freedom. Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 55 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.
Determine Main Idea/Supporting Details (p. 57)
Celia is afraid that Harriet, who has a reward on her Answers: 1. A 2. D 3. D 4. C 5. B
head, will be found out and they will all be punished.

Synthesize (p. 61) Possible response: Lennie real-


izes that Celia was afraid and ashamed of her fear.

Unit 1: Whom can you count on? 7


UNIT
2

Why do you read?

pp. 6475

The Calamity Kids in: The Bermuda


Triangle Terrarium!
Graphic novel by Jerzy Drozd and Sara Turner

Summary A group of kids from a town called Calamity have a sci- adventure involving aliens and a terrarium!
Reading can open the door to this and many other adventures. Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.9

p. 75

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to read- Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 56 to
ing labels on medications and household products, assess students comprehension of the selection.
reading signs while driving, reading safety tips when
preparing food, and reading current news on product Answers: 1. C 2. A 3. C 4. D 5. C
recalls as ways reading could save their lives.

8 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Grouped Selections pp. 7677

To Young Readers Poem by Gwendolyn Brooks


Summary The poet reminds us that reading sustains us and allows us to participate more fully in the
world. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.5

Invitation Poem by Shel Silverstein


Summary Reading engages the imagination and it is fun. This poem helps motivate students to accept
the invitation to read. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.0

conjure images of different worlds with rich rewards of


p. 77
adventure, knowledge, and understanding.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to books
as invitations to look into other worlds; books encour-
age you to dream and fantasize with the storyteller, to
explore the known and unknown from different view- Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 57
points, and to enjoy the thrill of a good story. to assess students comprehension of the selection.

Literature Groups Students may discuss the im- Answers: 1. B 2. C 3. A 4. D 5. B


ages of healing, nourishing the mind, or voyages; they

pp. 7880

Real Spider Superpowers


Magazine article by Sarah Ives

Summary This article describes the qualities of real spiders that rival the abilities of Spider-Man himself.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.5

p. 80

Review (p. 79) Spiders can jump about 50 times Write to Learn Student writing may refer to the article
the length of their body; they can hold 170 times their as being informative and entertaining in its purpose.
weight; and they can spin up to seven different kinds Students may have read the article because they
of strong silk that can be used to travel from place to think spiders are creepy but cool or because they like
place, parachute, and capture prey. Spider-Man.

Unit 2: Why do you read? 9


Literature Groups Students may discuss their experi-
ences with a variety of spiders; many might have seen
some of the 25 species that have poisonous venom,
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 58
such as tarantulas. Students may have been surprised
to assess students comprehension of the selection.
at the agility and strength of spiders and how they use
their webs, that they eat about 2,000 insects a year, Answers: 1. D 2. B 3. C 4. D 5. B
that they can walk upside down, and that they taste
nutty and are sticky.

pp. 8199

Blues for Bob E. Brown


Short story by T. Ernesto Bethancourt

Summary A young musician connects with his long-absent grandfather and discovers that his talent is part of his
family heritage. Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.5

p. 99

Set a Purpose for Reading (p. 81) Possible Write to Learn Student writing may refer to the things
response: I want to discover whether or not the main that the student feels are the most important or fun,
character is going to be a blues singer. and that discovering your own talents and passions is
a step toward finding out who you are.
Set a Purpose for Reading (p. 88) Possible re-
sponse: I have the same purpose, except now I know Literature Groups Students may discuss that Bob
what the argument was about and Im interested in E. Browns grandfather was somewhat responsible
finding out more about Bobbys grandfather and how for the genes that gave Bobby the talent, and that he
he fits into the story. was able to provide Bobbys fee for the musicians
union. However, most will probably agree that Bobby
Review (p. 89) Bob E. Brown gained the crowds showed he had the talent before his grandfather
interest and applause by relaxing and enjoying making showed up and that he seems determined to make it
music and singing to the crowd. on his own.
Review (p. 92) When he called his grandfather, Bob-
by was worried about getting the money he needed to
join the union so he could be a professional blues man.
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 59
Review (p. 98) Blues and jazz are played by every- to assess students comprehension of the selection.
one, not just African Americans.
Answers: 1. C 2. B 3. C 4. A 5. D
Review (p. 99) Roberto, Bob E. Brown, has confi-
dence in himself and in his music, and he has learned
that he has inherited his talent from his grandfather.

10 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 100101

Hurricane Emily Bad News for


Endangered Turtles
Magazine article by Eloise Quintanilla

Summary Humans are not the only ones affected by dangerous weather. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.8

green and loggerhead sea turtles because their nest-


ing grounds are located there.

Preview (p. 100) The photos tell us that the article Partner Talk Students may discuss the fact that the
is about a hurricane and turtles, and the subhead tells hurricane took everyone by surprise because it hit so
us that the hurricane destroyed 84,000 turtle eggs on a hard early in the season. The conservationists were
Mexican beach. unprepared for this disaster and could not have pre-
vented the eggs from being swept away.
p. 101

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how the


author wrote the article to inform readers about how Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 60
the hurricane further endangered the sea turtles by to assess students comprehension of the selection.
destroying their eggs. Students may report that they
learned that the beach is important to the endangered Answers: 1. D 2. C 3. C 4. D 5. B

pp. 102103

Naked Animals
Magazine article by David George Gordon

Summary The selection helps us understand how different species adapt to their environments.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.9

p. 103

Preview (p. 102) Some animals are hairless or near Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how the
naked and have thrived. title and subheads attract students interest in reading
more to find out about these naked animals.
Review (p. 103) Some animals have body fat that
substitutes for fur; others have body hair.

Unit 2: Why do you read? 11


Literature Groups Students may discuss how
surprised they were to discover that furless dogs
and cats exist because humans have bred them to
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 61 to
be that way.
assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. B 2. B 3. A 4. C 5. A

pp. 104108

Animal House
Magazine article by Heather Herman

Summary A teenager mounts a campaign to promote better treatment of circus animals.


Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.4

whether animal acts should be banned due to the risk


of animal mistreatment. They may discuss how they
respect or admire Heather for all that she didgetting
Preview (p. 104) Possible response: Circus animals
a petition signed in order for the proposal to ban animal
may not be treated humanely or they may even be
acts to be put on the ballot in Denvereven if they
abused. I want to learn why Heather Herman is trying to
disagree with her ideas.
free the circus animals and how she is going about it.

p. 108

Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 62 to


Write to Learn Student writing may refer to issues
assess students comprehension of the selection.
students feel strongly about, such as the environment
or poverty, and how some may be inspired to take the Answers: 1. C 2. C 3. B 4. D 5. A
initiative to do something to help make a difference.

Literature Groups Students may discuss why they


agree or disagree with Heathers campaign and

12 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 109120

Short Circuit
Graphic novel by Ben Shannon

Summary When his cousin Nao comes to visit him in Tokyo, Masa realizes that he has become overly
dependent on gadgets and technology. Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.3

p. 120

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to Masas Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 63
dependence on technology and his learning that it to assess students comprehension of the selection.
cant do everything for him; sometimes thinking for
yourself is best. Students may describe a similar situ- Answers: 1. B 2. C 3. C 4. D 5. B
ation in which they were frustrated by gadgets or tech-
nology and were able to solve the problem themselves.

pp. 121123

King Tuts Mysterious Death


Magazine article by Kristin Baird Rattini

Summary The past comes alive in a detailed description of the clues to King Tuts death.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.9

theories about King Tuts death, but they also may have
been disappointed that the mystery was not solved.
Some may still think that the young king was poisoned
Understand Text Structure (p. 122) In sequential
because the CT scan could not definitely rule this pos-
order.
sibility out, or that the broken leg did cause a deadly
infection.
p. 123

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to students


interest in reading the article because they enjoy mys-
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 64
teries and want to find out more about how King Tut
to assess students comprehension of the selection.
died. What may have kept their interest was the way
the scientists uncovered clues to the mystery. Answers: 1. B 2. D 3. A 4. C 5. B
Partner Talk Students may discuss their excitement
about how the scientists disproved some of the major

Unit 2: Why do you read? 13


UNIT
3
What makes life good?
pp. 126137

The Boy with Yellow Eyes


Short story by Gloria Gonzalez

Summary Two boysa bully and a bookwormwho are neighbors in a small town become unlikely national
heroes when they stumble across a Nazi spy. Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.0

p. 137

Connect (p. 128) Possible response: I know some- Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how it
one who is like Norman, the bookworm, and like Willie, can be uncomfortable at first to be with someone who
the bully and athlete. is very different from you, but that life can be more
interesting when you get to know new people because
Evaluate (p. 129) Possible response: The stranger it can open up your life to new experiences.
seems mysterious and suspicious because no one
sees him during the day or knows why he is there. Literature Groups Students may discuss how they
enjoyed the story because they could identify to some
Monitor Comprehension (p. 131) The stranger is degree with both boys. They may have been surprised
careless because of the heat, which made him sleepy, by the extreme difference between Normans courage
and because he was feeling overconfident. and Willies fear. They may have been glad that the
two characters teamed up to catch the spy and then
Interpret (p. 132) Possible response: The stranger
remained in touch throughout their lives. Students may
is always carrying a case, which is apparently filled
say that the story relates to the big question because
with wires, tubes, and antennae that he assembles in
it shows taking risks and trying new things can make
an abandoned freight car.
life good.
Connect (p. 135) Possible response: It would take
a lot of courage, but I think I might react the same way
Norman did.

Interpret (p. 137) Possible response: Willie became Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 65 to
a reader when he realized, from Normans example of assess students comprehension of the selection.
knowing Morse code, how much he could learn by read- Answers: 1. A 2. C 3. A 4. C 5. B
ing and how fascinating, exciting, and fun it could be.

14 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 138140

Ode to Weight Lifting


Poem by Gary Soto

Summary A twelve-year-old boy lifts weights to build a stronger body and greater self-esteem.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.8

twelve / Finished for today. / Next time maybe more, /


Im happy for now.
Connect (p. 140) Possible response: Tony feels Literature Groups Students may discuss how doing
strong when he exercises. Exercising makes me feel your best and working hard can make life good be-
good, too. I feel more positive, energized, and ready to cause it makes you feel good about yourself.
take on any challenges that may come my way.

p. 140
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 66 to
Write to Learn Possible response: One, two, three assess students comprehension of the selection.
/ Im off to a / Good start! / Four, five, six / I feel
the burn / Still I can do more / Seven, eight, nine Answers: 1. B 2. C 3. C 4. B 5. A
/ Im getting stronger / almost there / Ten, eleven,

pp. 141144

Look Around and See Only Friends


Speech by Samantha Smith

Summary A ten-year-old girl advocates youth exchanges as an instrument for creating a more peaceful future.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.0

p. 144

Interpret (p. 142) Possible response: Samanthas Write to Learn Student letters may be written
classmates probably treated her like a regular kid to leaders of other countries or leaders of world
before she went on her trip, but like a celebrity when organizations and may address their concerns
she got back. about what is happening in the world based on
current events.
Connect (p. 143) Possible response: Yes. Id like the
chance to visit another country and see how people
live there, but I know I would miss my family and
friends at home.

Unit 3: What makes life good? 15


Literature Groups Students may discuss giving
a speech to their classmates, their community, or a
group of powerful political decision makers. The title
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 67 to
of the speech might be: How Can We End Hunger? or
assess students comprehension of the selection.
How Can We Protect Our Environment? which relate to
the Big Question because addressing these issues can Answers: 1. B 2. C 3. D 4. D 5. C
make life better.

pp. 145150

Roller Coaster Thrills


Magazine article by Emily Sohn

Summary: Roller coasters provide thrills and a socially acceptable forum for releasing stress. Scientists believe
that some of the desire for new and extreme experiences may be genetic. Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.3

and may predict that they would feel scared, excited,


challenged, or amazed.
Evaluate (p. 146) Possible response: I think the Partner Talk Discussion may include students expe-
explanation sounds reasonable because many people riences with taking risks, whether its meeting some-
look for a release from everyday problems and stress. one new, trying out for a play, or deciding to go out for
a team sport. Students may state that experiencing
Monitor Comprehension (p. 148) A type-T
thrills can make life exciting, but that too many thrills
personality looks for thrills and excitement, while a
can cause stress. So maybe thrills in moderation can
type-t personality avoids the risk or the thrill.
make life good.
Connect (p. 150) Possible response: I seek out a
friend, take a long walk or run, or play a video game.

p. 150 Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 68 to


assess students comprehension of the selection.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to wanting to
Answers: 1. B 2. D 3. B 4. A 5. C
go downhill skiing or white-water rafting or skydiving,

16 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 151162

Skate Park
Graphic novel by Alec Zobrame

Summary A friendship develops between Isabell, a jock, and David, a brain. She saves him from bullies. He
helps her with the application to a skateboarding competition. She teaches him to ride a bike. But Isabell realizes
shes gone too far when she asks David to write an essay for her. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.6

p. 162

Write to Learn Student graphic novel cells may show Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 69 to
that Isabell finds that she has what it takes to make assess students comprehension of the selection.
the skateboard team, that she should get help with her
reading, and that David is a good friend she should Answers: 1. D 2. B 3. A 4. C 5. C
treat with respect.

pp. 163165

Macavity: The Mystery Cat


Poem by T. S. Eliot

Summary The poet uses personication to poke fun at the mischievous nature of cats and the tendency of
humans to assign responsibility for bad deeds to someone else. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.7

and the crimes hes wanted for, such as taking food and
jewelry, breaking windows, and destroying plans and
drawings.
Monitor Comprehension (p. 163) Macavity is
clever and a master at disappearing and deceiving Partner Talk Students may role-play using interview
people. questions that include the following: Where were you
on the day the Foreign Office Treaty was found to be
Interpret (p. 165) Possible response: Macavity
missing? Macavity answers: I was deeply involved in
seems to be able to do what other cats wish they could
solving a very difficult mathematical problem.
do: break rules or cause trouble without ever getting
caught.

p. 165
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 70 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.
Write to Learn Student posters may refer to Macavitys
being a ginger cat thats tall and thin and moves like a Answers: 1. D 2. A 3. D 4. B 5. C
snake; his habit of disappearing or always having an alibi;

Unit 3: What makes life good? 17


pp. 166176

Survival of the Fittest


Short story by Allen B. Ury

Summary When Dale Chafn unwillingly accompanies his uncle on a deer hunting expedition, they encounter
an alien race of sport hunters who use the same justication for killing humans that Dales uncle uses for killing
deer. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.9

Evaluate (p. 176) Possible response: The author


does not believe in hunting and killing animals for
Interpret (p. 166) Possible response: Dale is not sport.
happy; he is tired from staying up late the night before
and wants to go back to sleep. p. 176

Interpret (p. 168) Possible response: Uncle Emory Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how the
is a no-nonsense guy who wont take no for an answer, author turns the tables on the human hunters and
and who thinks hunting for your food makes a man out makes them the prey in order to make the reader look
of you. at hunting from the point of view of the prey.

Monitor Comprehension (p. 169) Uncle Emory Partner Talk Students may discuss that bullies are
believes that humans are number one because they not necessarily stronger than a so-called weak person.
developed arms that could kill beasts before the ani- Many times a bully is that way because hes afraid.
mals killed them. Survival of the fittest to the person who is picked on
may mean thinking on your feet and outwitting your op-
Monitor Comprehension (p. 171) When Dales
ponent, while the bully may think it means being able
stomach growls, it is loud enough to scare off the deer
to hit the hardest.
so his uncle cant shoot it.

Evaluate (p. 173) Possible response: The author


makes me feel Dales fear through dialogue and
suspense. Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 71 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.
Connect (p. 174) Possible response: I would
probably run out of fear, knowing that I could not save Answers: 1. B 2. B 3. D 4. C 5. C
Uncle Emory.

18 Backpack Reader, Course 2


p. 177

Learning English
Poem by Luis Alberto Ambroggio

Summary This poem deals with the way that identity is shaped by language and culture, and the difculty of
expressing ones feelings in a foreign language. Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.0

feelings could change the way you experience yourself


p. 177
and express yourself.

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to having to


learn how to express yourself all over again and having
to learn a whole new vocabulary. Students may also re-
fer to how clearly expressing your feelings in a new and Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 72 to
unfamiliar language could be difficult and frustrating. assess students comprehension of the selection.

Literature Groups Students may discuss the way Answers: 1. D 2. C 3. A 4. C 5. D


that using new words to communicate your ideas and

pp. 178184

What Makes Me Me?


Essay by Robert Winston

Summary This selection contains a basic personality test and discusses introversion and extroversion as
well as the Big Five personality dimensions used by psychologists to classify different personality types.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.3

Literature Groups Students may discuss the idea


that the better you know yourself and understand why
you do things, the better you will be at solving your
Evaluate (p. 183) Possible response: I guess its
problems and making good decisions. Being able to do
somewhat useful to realize that Im not very open
those things makes life good.
because I think it would be good for me to push myself
to try new things.

p. 184
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 73 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to whether
or not they agreed with the results, and if they found Answers: 1. C 2. C 3. D 4. B 5. D
the results surprising or somewhat disappointing.

Unit 3: What makes life good? 19


pp. 185186

Worry Seems to Shorten a


Timid Rats Life
Magazine article by Emily Sohn

Summary Researchers have found that some laboratory rats are more curious than others and that timid rats
produce more of a stress hormone called corticosterone in stressful situations than more adventurous rats do. This
discovery may help explain why the more adventurous rats tend to live longer. Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.2

Literature Groups Students may discuss the fact


that, in addition to possibly shortening your life, too
much stress can affect your quality of life by keeping
Interpret (p. 186) Possible response: The informa-
you from relaxing and feeling good.
tion in the article about timid rats living shorter lives
seems to show that stress is bad for you.

p. 186
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 74 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how some
people might naturally be more adventurous or more Answers: 1. C 2. C 3. B 4. A 5. D
cautious, butalthough it might not be easypeople can
choose to be more adventurous if they want to.

20 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 187191

Laugh
Magazine article by Mark Rafenstein

Summary Laughter has many physical and psychological benets, and a sense of humor is a sign of
good mental health. This selection talks about several benets of laughter and about the misuse of humor.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.4

in the situation and allowed others to laugh with them


instead of at them.
Connect (p. 187) Possible response: I would try to Partner Talk Students may discuss how laughter and
laugh it off. a good sense of humor can make people feel good and
can make life a lot more fun.
Monitor Comprehension (p. 190) Laughter can be
hurtful if it mocks someone, insults a person, or makes
people laugh at the expense of another person.

p. 191 Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 75 to


assess students comprehension of the selection.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to a time Answers: 1. C 2. A 3. D 4. A 5. C
when, instead of becoming frozen or shy about being
embarrassed, the students could have found humor

Unit 3: What makes life good? 21


UNIT
4

What influences you?

pp. 194197

The Day I Ran with Lance Armstrong


Magazine article by Samuel Brook Douglas

Summary A boys encounter with his idol, cyclist Lance Armstrong, inspires him to keep pursuing his cycling
dreams. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.9

p. 197

Identify Authors Perspective (p. 195) Possible Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how
response: Samuel looks up to Lance Armstrong and Lance Armstrongs strength, determination, and
wants to be like him. positive attitude encouraged Samuel. Samuels
experiences with Lance might have showed Samuel
Compare and Contrast (p. 196) Possible that its possible to achieve your dreams and probably
response: Samuels experience in Georgia was like encouraged him to keep cycling.
the one in France because he saw Lance Armstrong
in both. Samuels experience in Georgia was different Partner Talk Students may discuss a variety of sports
because during that race Lance spoke to him, and heroes and celebrities. They may also discuss their
a reporter took a photo of Samuel with Lance that parents, grandparents, teachers, as well as artists,
appeared in the newspaper and in Sports Illustrated. scientists, and world leaders.

Identify Authors Purpose (p. 197) Possible


response: Samuel wrote the article to tell people
about his experience and to entertain them with a
good story. Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 76 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. C 2. B 3. D 4. C 5. A

22 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 198202

Ice CubeActor/Musician
Magazine article by McClain J. and Angela R.

Summary Ice Cube relates how John Singleton helped him believe that he could write movies, and how the
inuence of his father and brother helped him navigate the pitfalls of growing up in South Central Los Angeles.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.8

p. 202

Identify Authors Perspective (p. 198) Possible Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how Ice
response: The authors think Ice Cube is very talented Cubes father and his older brother had the most influ-
and that he is at the top of his game. ence when he was growing up. In his film career, John
Singleton encouraged him to write movies, and the
Compare and Contrast (p. 199) Possible response: event that was a wake-up call for him was the murder
Ice Cube says that, instead of famous entertainers of his half-sister.
and athletes, it was his brother and father who had the
greatest influence on him. Partner Talk In their interviews, students may discuss
famous people, family members, teachers, and friends
Distinguish Fact from Opinion (p. 201) John who have influenced their lives.
Singleton directed Boyz in the Hood, Shaft, and 2 Fast
2 Furious, and he put Ice Cube in his first movie.

Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 77 to


assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. C 2. A 3. B 4. B 5. A

pp. 203214

Third Down and Forever


Graphic novel by Douglas Holgate

Summary Shaun is a football player and aspiring artist, but his father doesnt believe he can make a living with
his art. Shauns father wants him to take over the family business. Shauns friend Simon helps him work up the
courage to tell his father that he wants to go to art school. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.1

Unit 4: What inuences you? 23


p. 214

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to students Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 78 to
parents having more influence on them because they assess students comprehension of the selection.
set rules about things like studying and being respon-
sible. Others may refer to friends having the stronger Answers: 1. C 2. A 3. D 4. B 5. D
influence as they want to fit in and be liked.

pp. 215218

Dealing with Peer Pressure


Magazine article by Kevin J. Took, M.D.

Summary The article explains the positive and negative effects of peer pressure and details strategies for
resisting negative peer pressure. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.3

p. 218

Identify Authors Purpose (p. 216) Possible Write to Learn Student writing may refer to positive
response: The authors purpose for writing this article pressure from peers on a team who encouraged
is to inform readers about peer pressure and provide them to work hard in a competition or an academic
some ways to handle it. endeavor. Students may write about negative peer
pressure to cheat or break rules and what happened
Distinguish Fact from Opinion (p. 217) Most of when they gave in or stood their ground.
the article is based on opinion.
Partner Talk Students may discuss positive peer pres-
Analyze Persuasive Techniques (p. 218) Possible sure as being helpful when it encourages someone to
response: The author tries to convince the reader to try harder or to not give up, or when it makes someone
resist peer pressure by standing firm with what you feel good about him or herself.
know is right, choosing your friends wisely, and talking
to someone you trust.

Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 79 to


assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. A 2. D 3. D 4. B 5. C

24 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 219221

Thanking the Birds


Essay by Joseph Bruchac

Summary An Apache man happens upon some boys wantonly killing small birds. He uses this situation
as an opportunity to teach the boys a lesson about their culture and their relationship to the land.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.0

p. 221

Analyze Persuasive Techniques (p. 220) Possible Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how
response: Swift Eagle makes them feel that what they Swift Eagle used stories to give the boys a greater
did was wrong, not because killing birds is wrong, but understanding of the meaning of life and of their
because it is wrong to kill an animal without a real reason culture. Student writing should explain whether or not
to do so. He does this not by scolding them, but by the students think the boys learned their lesson.
talking to them as if they already knew that life is sacred.
Literature Groups Students may discuss how a
Distinguish Fact from Opinion (p. 221) Possible parent or a teacher influenced them during a conversa-
response: The statement is the authors opinion, but it tion, by setting an example, or by sharing a story.
is an opinion that is well-supported by the text.

Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 80 to


assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. D 2. D 3. A 4. B 5. C

pp. 222223

Jimmy Jet and His TV Set


Poem by Shel Silverstein

Summary Jimmy Jet watches so much television that he actually becomes a television set.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 4.9

p. 223

Identify Authors Purpose (p. 223) Possible Write to Learn Student writing may refer to negative
response: I think the poet wrote the poem to entertain effects on your physical health, such as sitting around
readers while at the same time making the point that too much and not getting enough exercise; on your men-
watching too much television can have a bad effect on tal health, such as not challenging your mind to think
youth. creatively; and on your social health, such as not partici-
pating or spending too little time engaged with friends.

Unit 4: What inuences you? 25


Partner Talk Students may discuss how watching
some TV helps them learn about current events and new
ideas, but watching too much TV can affect their school
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 81 to
work, social life, and family relationships.
assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. C 2. D 3. A 4. A 5. C

pp. 224238

from Waiting for the War


Short story by Graham Salisbury

Summary During World War II, two Hawaiian boys acquire a horse that is difcult to tame. A homesick young
Texan soldier who is waiting to ship out to combat duty in the Pacic shows the boys how to manage the horse.
Through their encounter with the soldier, the boys achieve a greater understanding of and empathy for the soldiers
and sailors stationed around them. Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.7

for his country and got wounded or died during active


combat. Giving the horse a reward is similar because its
recognition for a job well done. Its different because the
Distinguish Fact from Opinion (p. 226) No,
horse is not being put in a dangerous situation or risking
Sammys having Filipino blood doesnt make his
its life.
statement about tattoos a fact.
Identify Authors Purpose (p. 238) Possible
Compare and Contrast (p. 228) Possible
response: The author feels that war is not fairits not
response: Henry is curious and seems to be open to
fair to take young men who have barely lived their lives
Mikes friendship, but Sammy doesnt want anything to
and have them die in battle or be wounded for life.
do with an army guy.

Distinguish Fact from Opinion (p. 230) Mikes p. 238


comments about the horse are his opinions.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to having
Compare and Contrast (p. 232) Possible
teased a classmate because he or she was different,
response: Mike has a gentle manner. Hes kind and
and having felt bad about it afterwards or having gotten
friendly when he approaches the boys, as well as when
to know the classmate and discovering that he or she
he makes friends with the horse.
was just a nice kid.
Compare and Contrast (p. 234) Possible
Literature Groups Students may discuss an adult
response: Mike is different because he doesnt call
helping them through a difficult time, such as moving to
Henry boy or native or complain about where he is.
a new town or losing a friend, and feeling appreciation
Identify Authors Purpose (p. 235) Possible or love for that person for what he or she did.
response: The author mentions the war preparations
to show the reader that the situation is serious and to
give the reader a sense of whats going on around the
characters as they train the horse. Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 82 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.
Compare and Contrast (p. 236) Possible response:
Receiving a medal in wartime means the soldier fought Answers: 1. B 2. D 3. C 4. C 5. A

26 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 239242

The Struggle to Be an All-American Girl


Autobiography by Elizabeth Wong

Summary A Chinese-American girl relates her struggle to be more American and her eventual regret that she did
not become better acquainted with her Chinese heritage. Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.1

Chinese school with her brother. She was influenced


by the things she learned in school, the American
books she read, the American and Mexican foods she
Distinguish Fact from Opinion (p. 240) The
ate, and speaking English well.
author is voicing an opinion based on her childhood
memories of having to go to Chinese school. Partner Talk Students may discuss understanding how
it feels or how it might feel to be different from most of
Identify Authors Perspective (p. 242) Possible
your friends. Some students may agree with Elizabeths
response: The author has mixed feelings about her
ideas; others might say that she should have embraced
heritage. As a girl she was embarrassed about going
her heritage and been proud of who she was.
to Chinese school. She wanted to be an American.
However, as an adult she regrets not learning more
about her heritage.

p. 242 Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 83 to


assess students comprehension of the selection.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to the au- Answers: 1. B 2. D 3. D 4. C 5. B
thor wanting to be with her friends instead of going to

pp. 243252

A Crush
Short story by Cynthia Rylant

Summary A mentally handicapped man develops a crush on a woman he knows only from a distance. Though
he never speaks to her, his anonymous bouquets of owers have a surprising impact on her, and even on her
boss. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.4

Dolores enjoys running the store and is trusted by the


customers.
Compare and Contrast (p. 244) Possible Identify Authors Perspective (p. 245) Possible
response: Dick and Dolores are alike in that they response: I think the author feels that tattoos are prob-
work in the same hardware store. They are different ably okay on men but not on women. However, she
in that Dick stays in the back of the store, while finds interesting the idea of women having tattoos.

Unit 4: What inuences you? 27


Compare and Contrast (p. 249) Possible re- elry; Cause: Ernies flowers. DickChange: He began
sponse: Ernie was very sheltered living at home with spending more time with customers; Cause: Ernies
his mother where he didnt have friends and couldnt flowers. ErnieHe made friends and learned new
learn about the world. When he lived at the group things; Cause: Moving to the group home and meeting
home, he had more exposure to people, made friends Jack.
for the first time, and learned how to do new things.
Partner Talk Students may discuss how each charac-
Compare and Contrast (p. 251) Possible ter was positively influenced by the actions of others,
response: The flowers caused changes in both Dick almost in a chain reaction.
and Dolores. Dick began spending more time in the
front talking with customers, and Dolores began
wearing white blouses instead of black T-shirts. She
even started wearing jewelry sometimes. Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 84 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.
p. 252
Answers: 1. B 2. C 3. D 4. D 5. A
Write to Learn Possible responses: Dolores
Change: She started wearing white blouses and jew-

pp. 253255

A Gold Miners Tale


Poem by Bobbi Katz

Summary In this poem a prospector tells of his failures in the gold rush, how he nally stopped rushing
after gold akes, and how he became a successful businessman by selling long underwear to gold rushers.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.1

into his own gold mine by selling long underwear to


the miners.
Compare and Contrast (p. 255) Possible Partner Talk Students may discuss losses or mistakes
response: The gold miners experience did not live up that could be turned into chances to do the right thing,
to his expectations. He expected to get rich quick by make a positive change, or learn an important lesson.
panning for gold, but he found out that gold is not easy
to find.

p. 255
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 85 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to the gold
miner following the other miners to Pikes Peak be- Answers: 1. A 2. D 3. C 4. A 5. B
cause he hated his job and believed in the promise of
striking it rich. He learns that gold mining is not as easy
as they make it out to be, and he turns his experience

28 Backpack Reader, Course 2


UNIT
5

cann you become who


How ca
you wa
want
nt to be?

pp. 258266

The No-Guitar Blues


Short story by Gary Soto

Summary A boy anxious to earn money to buy a guitar decides to collect a reward for returning a lost dog. But
his conscience bothers him about his dishonesty and he comes to realize that being dishonest could stand in the
way of becoming who he wants to be. Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.6

and felt much better afterward. Another way he could


have handled his guilt would have been to go back to
the couple, tell them the truth about where he found
Connect (p. 259) Possible response: My parents
Roger, and offer to do chores to earn the money.
did say, Money doesnt grow on trees when I asked
them for a new bike. Partner Talk Students may discuss situations in which
they are offered money or an opportunity based on a
Infer (p. 262) Possible response: Fausto probably
misunderstanding, and they can either allow the mis-
felt guilty about lying to the couple about where he
understanding to continue and receive the benefit, or
found their dog.
explain the truth and possibly lose out.
Connect (p. 265) Possible response: I have tried to
relieve a guilty conscience by offering to do extra chores.

p. 266 Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 86 to


assess students comprehension of the selection.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how Faus-
Answers: 1. B 2. C 3. A 4. D 5. B
to put the twenty-dollar bill in the church collection box

Unit 5: How can you become who you want to be? 29


pp. 267274

Merrick Johnston, Mountain Climber


Autobiography by Merrick Johnston

Summary Becoming who we want to be takes preparation, strength, and perseverance. Merrick Johnston is a
real person who embodies all these characteristics. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.5

One way to pursue a goal is to discover an interest or


talent and work on increasing your talent and your skills.
Connect (p. 269) Possible response: Your strength Literature Groups Students may discuss traits such
and skill would be depended on during difficult group or as determination, willingness to work hard to reach a
partner sports, such as whitewater rafting or canoeing. goal, competitiveness, and a desire to do something
challenging. Examples from the selection include
Infer (p. 271) Possible response: The effect of
Merricks determination to climb Denali, her training
counting footsteps on climbers was that it made their
on Mount Goode, and her not giving up despite almost
climbing tedious because once they start counting, it
falling into a crevasse and choking.
was hard to stop.

p. 274

Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 87 to


Write to Learn Student writing may refer to reading
assess students comprehension of the selection.
about a place, event, or something someone did that
seemed interesting enough to want to go and do it too. Answers: 1. B 2. C 3. A 4. D 5. C

pp. 275278

Krumping
Magazine article by Shaheem Reid

Summary Becoming who we want to be involves trying new things, like krumping, a kind of hip-hop
dancing in clown regalia. This offbeat activity has been a positive inuence in the lives of some modern teens.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.9

p. 278

Activate Prior Knowledge (p. 275) Possible Write to Learn Student writing may refer to their
response: I only know that its some form of dancing. interests, such as singing and cooking gourmet
dinners; playing the trumpet and skateboarding;
writing and painting.

30 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Literature Groups Students may discuss how
krumping keeps kids off the street, helps them
feel good about themselves, provides a forum for
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 88 to
competition with both dancing and face painting,
assess students comprehension of the selection.
and is fun to do and watch.
Answers: 1. C 2. B 3. A 4. D 5. C

pp. 279281

Chicago Kids Sink Their Teeth Into


Dino Camp
Magazine article by Sarah Ives

Summary Kids from lower-income families get an opportunity to sample the life of a paleontologist, an
experience that opens up future possibilities. Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.0

years old. Students might be interested in participating


p. 281
in the Junior Paleontologist program to find out more
about fossils and digging for dinosaurs.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how the
article made them more interested in paleontology and
other science or history careers, such as medicine,
geology, ancient history, or archaeology.
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 89 to
Literature Groups Students may discuss seeing assess students comprehension of the selection.
dinosaurs at a museum and also seeing movies with
characters like Indiana Jones, featuring scientists Answers: 1. C 2. D 3. A 4. B 5. B
who dig up fossils and treasures that are millions of

pp. 282293

Asteroid Belt
Graphic novel by Steven Maxwell

Summary In a sci- setting, a boy learns that earning a karate belt takes patience. You cant become who you
want to be by rushing into a challenge. Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.9

Unit 5: How can you become who you want to be? 31


p. 293

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to having a Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 90 to
goal, such as getting better grades, that would help a assess students comprehension of the selection.
young person have a better chance to get into college
and have the career he or she desires. Answers: 1. A 2. A 3. C 4. D 5. C

pp. 294299

The Dog Diaries


Essay by Merrill Markoe

Summary With humor and imagination, a dog owner describes what it would be like to share the lives of her
dogs for a day. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.0

any attention to the television when were all watching


an interesting show? What do you really want for din-
ner? Do you understand what Im saying?
Infer (p. 295) Possible response: No, the narrator
doesnt really want to become a dog; she just wants to Literature Groups Students may discuss how the
know what it feels like to be one. narrator learns about what dogs probably do when hu-
mans are not around, what they are probably thinking,
Understand Sequence (p. 296) Possible response:
and how they might see ordinary things and people
The times given in each paragraph and the word then
from a completely different perspective.
help show the order of events.

Infer (p. 299) Possible response: I think this man is


the authors husband.
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 91 to
p. 299 assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. B 2. D 3. A 4. C 5. B
Write to Learn Possible response: Why do you bark
at one person but not the other? Why dont you pay

pp. 300304

Its Not a Crime to Love Science


Book excerpt by Juliann F. Willey

Summary A forensic scientist analyzes the ways girls are discouraged from pursuing careers in science and what
can be done about it. Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.1

32 Backpack Reader, Course 2


girls and boys not believing the stereotypes. Both boys
and girls may argue that girls are smart enough to do
whatever they want.
Understand Sequence (p. 301) Possible response:
When I was a little girl, during high school and during Literature Groups Students may discuss careers
my college days, and eventually. that are dominated by one gender or the other, such
as nursing or auto mechanics. Students may say that
Connect (p. 302) Possible response: I agree with
it would help to stay focused on your own dreams and
the authors points that girls are not being encouraged
strengths and not on what other people think.
to become scientists.

Infer (p. 304) Possible response: Parents and teachers


should encourage girls who show an interest in science.
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 92 to
p. 304 assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. C 2. B 3. A 4. D 5. D
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to girls being
angry or annoyed about the stereotypes about brainy

pp. 305317

Hollywood and the Pits


Autobiography by Cherylene Lee

Summary The narrator comes to terms with outgrowing her show business career as she nds a new and
fascinating pursuit. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.0

p. 317

Infer (p. 308) Possible response: Cherylene is Write to Learn Student writing may refer to sacrificing
like the young mammals in the tar pits, because as your childhood being worth it because being famous
a young child, she was led into an acting career, and seems great; others will say its not worth it because it
later became stuck in an endless string of losing can lead to an unstable, difficult life.
auditions.
Literature Groups Students may discuss how
Connect (p. 312) Possible response: Cherylenes Cherylene learns that even when a person is
upbringing is different from mine because I am not a successful, he or she could end up stuck in the pits.
child star. Our upbringing is similar in that my mother
never pushed me to do something I didnt want to do,
but I knew when I did something that pleased her.

Infer (p. 315) Possible response: Cherylene learned Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 93 to
that she preferred working in the tar pits and not being assess students comprehension of the selection.
in the spotlight.
Answers: 1. B 2. D 3. C 4. B 5. D

Unit 5: How can you become who you want to be? 33


UNIT
6

Why share stories?

pp. 320326

Dead and Gone


Short story by Marie G. Lee

Summary In the hope her grandson wont repeat her mistakes, a grandmother decides to tell him the dark
secret of why there are no frogs in the lake near their cabin. Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.2

p. 326

Question (p. 321) Possible response: The narrator Write to Learn Student writing may refer to the
doesnt tell Chess the whole truth because the truth is narrators desire to share her story with her grandson
very sadand maybe she had something to do with it. because she doesnt want him to make the same kind
of mistake she made. She will tell him the whole truth
Understand Cause and Effect (p. 322) The side because she wants him to know that when youre
that won the War got to spend the summer at the Loon young sometimes you do bad things without realizing
Point, which was the best part of the lake. When the what the consequences might be.
narrators side lost, they had to spend the summer
some place other than the Point. Partner Talk Students may discuss the fact that the
grandmother still has a lot of guilt and sadness over
Predict (p. 325) Possible response: Loon Point what she did as a child, and perhaps she is ashamed
probably will probably be covered with dead frogs. to confess to her grandson.
Analyze (p. 326) Possible response: The message
of the story is to think before you act, because even
sweet kids can do harmful things when they let
themselves get carried away by competition or hate Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 94 to
and then come to regret it later on. assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. D 2. D 3. C 4. B 5. A

34 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 327328

Dune Tunes
Magazine article by Britt Norlander

Summary Scientists are beginning to understand the causes of the loud noises emitted by some large
sand dunes. Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.2

Literature Groups Students may discuss how desert


dwellers may have believed that the boom happened
because they did something bad or that it was a sign
Understand Cause and Effect (p. 328) Possible
that something was going to happen. The sounds
response: Many grains of sand moving at the same
might have inspired folktales about desert gods or
time and bouncing off of each other cause sound
nature spirits.
waves that travel through the sand. As the sound
waves move downward, they hit a layer of wet sand and
bounce back to the surface and then down again. This
back and forth movement of the sound waves causes
vibrations that get louder, creating a loud boom. Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 95 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.
p. 328
Answers: 1. A 2. D 3. B 4. C 5. C

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to the expe-


rience of going down a booming sand dune as being
strange and even scary, but very exciting.

pp. 329340

El Inca
Graphic novel by Kagan McLeod

Summary Young Garcilaso de la Vega, a boy of Spanish and Inca descent, learns about his Inca heritage through
the storytelling of his Inca uncle. When he grows up, he becomes known as El Inca because he writes about the
history of the Incan people. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.1

p. 340

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to their parents Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 96 to
and grandparents telling them stories about their ances- assess students comprehension of the selection.
tors who lived in Africa, Europe, South America, or Asia,
and maybe about settling a new land or fighting in a war. Answers: 1. A 2. C 3. B 4. D 5. D
Students may want to find out more information by read-
ing their familys letters, diaries, and journals, or checking
out books about immigrants from different countries.

Unit 6: Why share stories? 35


pp. 341344

Kancil and the Crocodiles


Folktale by Noreha Yussof Day

Summary A mouse deer and a tortoise trick the crocodiles into forming a bridge across the river so they can get
to a runbutan tree. The trick works, but Kancil, the mouse deer, admits at the end that he didnt think about how to
get back across the river. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.9

Partner Talk Students may discuss Kancil being


clever but not really clever enough and Kura-Kura
being a loyal, willing friend. The story might continue
Predict (p. 342) Possible response: They will have
with Kancil and Kura-Kura making a bridge over the
to come up with a plan to get around the crocodiles.
river, staying forever on the other side of the river, or
p. 344 getting eaten up trying to cross back.

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to Kancil


and Kura-Kura realizing that lying to the crocodiles was
a bad idea after all because now they are trapped on Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 97 to
the other side of a river full of angry crocodiles who will assess students comprehension of the selection.
not forget how they were tricked.
Answers: 1. B 2. C 3. D 4. A 5. B

pp. 345349

A Forest Home
Biography (no author given)

Summary This selection takes a look at the work of Jane Goodall, who made some of the most startling and
important discoveries about the behavior of chimpanzees. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.2

Analyze (p. 349) Possible response: Patience is


important when observing wild animals because it can
take a very long time to gain their trust.
Question (p. 346) Possible response: Jane must
overcome the problem of the chimps being both
dangerous and hard to approach.

36 Backpack Reader, Course 2


p. 349

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to Goodall Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 98 to
learning that chimpanzees are really intelligent animals assess students comprehension of the selection.
and that they even make and use tools to get food.
Answers: 1. D 2. D 3. B 4. A 5. B
Partner Talk Students may discuss Goodalls expe-
rience being different because she was seeing the
chimps as they truly live in their natural environment,
which a person might not see in a zoo.

pp. 350356

The Night the Bed Fell


Short story by James Thurber

Summary This James Thurber classic is a humorous story about a series of mishaps and misunderstandings that
befall a family in the middle of the night. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.8

unusual way, or always worrying about things that no


one else thinks about.
Predict (p. 351) Possible response: Briggs Beall Literature Groups Students may discuss the char-
might get so scared that he ends up scaring himself to acters strange fears, like Briggs Bealls fear of not
death. breathing when asleep, and Aunt Sarah Shoafs fear
of a burglar sneaking in and blowing chloroform in
Analyze (p. 353) Possible response: His relatives
her room when shes asleep. Thurber wrote this story
are funny and very weird and are afraid of strange
with funny characters and situations to entertain
things.
the reader.
Understand Cause and Effect (p. 356) Possible
response: The narrators bed falling on him causes a
funny series of misunderstandings and situations.
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 99 to
p. 356 assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. D 2. C 3. B 4. A 5. C
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to a friend
who is always telling jokes, always dressing in an

Unit 6: Why share stories? 37


pp. 357359

The Puzzle of Pan Am Flight 103


Magazine article by Rose Inserra

Summary Investigators solve the mystery of the December 1988 plane crash by collecting and assembling four
million pieces of the doomed aircraft. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.3

Partner Talk Students may discuss how both recon-


structions lead to greater understanding. In Grinner,
the reconstructions show viewers who fought in the
Understand Cause and Effect (p. 358) The initial
War of 1812; in The Puzzle of Pan Am Flight 103, the
explosion blew a hole about 10 inches wide in the
purpose of the reconstruction was to discover why the
plane, but it didnt blow the plane apart; the force of the
plane exploded.
shock waves did.

p. 359

Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 100 to


Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how
assess students comprehension of the selection.
reconstructions are fascinating to us because they are
like bringing the past back to life and can help solve Answers: 1. A 2. C 3. B 4. B 5. D
mysteries about how and why people in history did
what they did.

p. 360

Too Many Mummies?


Magazine article by Mark Rose

Summary A Peruvian museum is running out of space in which to store and preserve Inca mummies
unearthed during construction, forcing road construction crews to consider a detour under an Inca cemetery.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.9

to other museums. Students may also agree that the


p. 360
solution in the article, to build the road outside the
cemetery, is a good one.
Write to Learn Student writing may refer to the arti-
cles solution of building the road in a tunnel that goes
under the Inca cemetery so that the mummies can stay
in their burial place and not be disturbed.
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 101 to
Partner Talk Students may discuss the possibility of assess students comprehension of the selection.
raising funds to build an addition to the museum to
house the mummies or auctioning off the mummies Answers: 1. D 2. B 3. C 4. A 5. B

38 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 361363

Grinner: A Face from the Past


Book excerpt by Peggy Thomas

Summary Anthropologists help bring the past back to life by reconstructing the faces of people who died hun-
dreds, thousands, or even millions of years ago. Dale-Chall Reading Score 7.8

Analyze (p. 362) Possible response: Museum Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 102 to
visitors might learn more about the soldiers who fought assess students comprehension of the selection.
in the War of 1812 by being able to see what they
actually looked like. Answers: 1. B 2. C 3. D 4. A 5. D

Grouped Selections pp. 363367

Beetle on a String Poem by Vince Gotera


Summary The poet relates his childhood experience of catching insects and tethering them to his
dresser, and he wonders uneasily who has hold of his string. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.5

A Short Story Poem by David Escobar Galindo


Summary The poet likens the ants ability to carry many times its own body weight to our own ability
to think, imagine, and dream. Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.6

Travelin Soldier Song by Bruce Robison


Summary A girl meets a soldier in the caf where she works. They fall in love, but the soldier is killed
in Vietnam before he can return. Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.0

Question (p. 365) Possible response: The petals


are her thoughts and dreams.
Analyze (p. 364) Possible response: The speaker
Understand Cause and Effect (p. 367) Possible
wants to share a message about being thoughtful in
response: The piccolo player is the girl from the caf
what you do and treating other living things the way
who fell in love with the soldier, and she is crying be-
you would like to be treated yourself.
cause she just found out that he was killed in Vietnam.

Unit 6: Why share stories? 39


each poem is told in a way that sends a strong mes-
p. 367
sage to the reader.

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how in A


Short Story, the image of an ant carrying a petal best
tells the story of how a persons thoughts and dreams
are much larger than the person who carries them. Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 103 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.
Literature Groups Students may discuss the way all
the poets use vivid images to tell their stories, and that Answers: 1. D 2. A 3. C 4. A 5. B

pp. 368373

Hosni the Dreamer


Folktale by Ehud Ben-Ezer

Summary When a shepherd uses his pay to purchase a verse rather than material goods, he is laughed at and
teased by his companions. However, the content of the verse saves his life and unites him with his future bride.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.4

p. 373

Predict (p. 369) Possible response: Yes, Hosnis Write to Learn Student writing may refer to an experi-
dream will come true, and he will travel to a city. ence of being laughed at by siblings or peers and how
upsetting and difficult it was.
Predict (p. 371) Possible response: No, Hosni will
not obey the sheikh because he was warned by the Literature Groups Students may discuss how Hosni
verse not to cross the water until he knows how deep was not part of the group because he had his own
it is. dreams. His decision to follow his heart and buy the
verse, even when it seemed like a silly thing to do,
Analyze (p. 373) Possible response: The other saved his life and led him to the life of his dreams.
shepherds laughed at Hosni for his dreams and for
spending his money on a verse, but Hosni proved them
wrong because the other shepherds were swept away
in the wadi, while his dreams came true.
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 104 to
assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. B 2. D 3. C 4. B 5. A

40 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 374375

Its a Small E-mail World After All


Magazine article by E. Sohn

Summary Researchers have discovered that a chain of forwarded e-mail messages can reach nearly any user in
the world in ve to seven links. The fastest and most successful chains consist of acquaintances rather than close
friends. Dale-Chall Reading Score 6.7

Partner Talk Students may discuss how quick and


easy it is to connect with people all over the world by
e-mail. In some ways e-mail has brought people closer
Question (p. 374) Possible response: I would
together because it allows them to communicate more
guess that it would take at least 20 e-mails.
easily and more often; however, if people e-mail more
and talk on the phone less, it can make relationships
p. 375
less personal or less connected.

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to e-mails


quickness and convenience as its advantages; disad-
vantages may be that e-mail is sometimes abrupt and
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 105 to
it is hard to show personality or tone in e-mail. Some
assess students comprehension of the selection.
students may choose phone over e-mail because of its
immediate response and an added feature of tone Answers: 1. C 2. D 3. B 4. C 5. A
of voice.

pp. 376377

Darkness at Noon: Solar Eclipse


Short story by Shonto Begay

Summary A Native American boy learns a greater appreciation for the sun and for tribal magic when the sun
vanishes during an eclipse. Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.7

p. 377

Understand Cause and Effect (p. 377) Possible Write to Learn Student writing may refer to the mys-
response: Experiencing the solar eclipse gave teries of the phases of the moon, the way clouds form
the narrator a greater appreciation for the sun. He and then dissolve, or the changing of the seasons.
appreciated more fully the brightness of the day, the
colors in sunlight, and how the suns rays help the
corn to grow.

Unit 6: Why share stories? 41


Literature Groups Students may discuss how the
author wanted to share the story to help readers gain
more appreciation for wonderful and amazing things,
Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 106 to
like the sun, that they might take for granted.
assess students comprehension of the selection.

Answers: 1. D 2. A 3. B 4. C 5. C

Grouped Selections pp. 378379

In the Blood Poem by Pat Mora


Summary The speaker comments on the special connection and communication between grandparent
and grandchild. Dale-Chall Reading Score 4.8

Supple Cord Poem by Naomi Shihab Nye


Summary Two siblings use a piece of cord as a tangible symbol of their connection.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 5.4

Cord because they have a close relationship with


their siblings.
Analyze (p. 379) Possible response: The cord Partner Talk Students may discuss the way both
symbolizes the close relationship between the two poems show how close family relationships provide
brothers and how they are still connected even when a special comfort for people. Students may share
they dont speak. information about a special connection they have with
siblings, parents, cousins, or grandparents.
p. 379

Write to Learn Student writing may refer to how both


poets show people who are very close to each other. Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 107 to
Some students may like In the Blood because it assess students comprehension of the selection.
depicts a special bond of love between a grandfather
and a grandchild. Some students may prefer Supple Answers: 1. C 2. A 3. B 4. D 5. B

42 Backpack Reader, Course 2


pp. 380383

Once a Good Man


Folktale by Jane Yolen

Summary In this parable, a good man is rewarded by the Lord with a glimpse of Heaven and Hell, and he
nds that they are nearly identical. In both places people are sitting at a banquet where they are prevented from
feeding themselves. In Heaven, however, they do get to eat because each person feeds his or her neighbor.
Dale-Chall Reading Score 4.8

difficult or painful situation into a happy one. Students


may write that they were surprised about how heaven
was described.
Predict (p. 381) Possible response: The Good Man
might ask for peace for the entire world. Literature Groups Students may discuss the fact that
sharing stories can help us see the world from new
Predict (p. 383) Possible response: In Heaven
perspectives and gain wisdom.
people will be well fed and happy.

p. 383

Use the Assessment Blackline Master on page 108 to


Write to Learn Student writing may refer to the main
assess students comprehension of the selection.
lesson of the story being that people working together
and helping their neighbors is the thing that can turn a Answers: 1. C 2. A 3. B 4. D 5. A

Unit 6: Why share stories? 43


Assessment
Blackline
Masters
Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
1
The Luckiest Man on the Face of
the Earth
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. To whom does Lou Gehrig address his speech?


A. baseball team owners
B. his fellow players
C. baseball fans
D. his family

2. How many years did Lou Gehrigs career in baseball last?


A. eleven
B. seventeen
C. twenty-two
D. twenty-five

3. Why does Lou Gehrig consider himself a lucky man?


A. He has a wonderful family and the support of loyal fans.
B. He is looking forward to retiring from baseball.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

C. He has enough money to live comfortably without working.


D. Now he has the opportunity to try out another career.

4. What is the tone of this speech?


A. sad
B. self-pitying
C. humorous
D. grateful

5. From Gehrigs speech, what can you conclude about his character?
A. He was humble and generous with his praise for others.
B. He was arrogant about his athletic ability and mean to fans.
C. He possessed a remarkable sense of humor.
D. He had great love for his country.

Unit 1: Whom can you count on? 47


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
1
To Lou Gehrig, Sister/Friend,
and Poem
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Who are the speakers in the poem To Lou Gehrig?


A. the millions who idolized Lou Gehrig
B. Lou Gehrigs Yankee teammates
C. soldiers fighting a war at the time
D. anyone who likes Lou Gehrig

2. Which sentence does NOT describe how the speaker feels about
her sister in Sister/Friend?
A. Shes a good listener.
B. She is understanding.
C. She is self-absorbed.
D. She is comforting.

3. What do Poem and To Lou Gehrig have in common?


A. Theyre both in memory of someone.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


B. They both focus only on the past.
C. Theyre both about famous people.
D. Theyre both about athletes.

4. In which poems are the speakers feeling sad?


A. To Lou Gehrig, Sister/Friend, and Poem
B. Sister/Friend and Poem
C. Poem and To Lou Gehrig
D. To Lou Gehrig and Sister/Friend

5. What do all three poems have in common?


A. They would all make good songs.
B. Theyre all about somebody still living.
C. Theyre all written about adults.
D. They all contain memories.

48 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
1
Tales of a Seventh Grade Nada
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What is Karas problem at the beginning of the story?


A. She wishes she had a boyfriend.
B. She wants to go to the Nebulon Convention.
C. She wishes she were popular.
D. She always loses at cards.

2. According to Maria, what are the three precepts of womanhood?


A. Power, Poise, Prudence
B. Intelligence, Imagination, Insight
C. Wisdom, Warmth, Wit
D. Patience, Persistence, Popularity

3. What does Kara decide about her friendship with Maria?


A. She doesnt want to be Marias project.
B. She really likes Maria and wants to stay friends.
C. She wants Maria to change her into a new person.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. She is jealous of Marias other friend Laura.

4. What does Kara realize at the end of the story?


A. Its important to know how to talk to boys.
B. Shes happiest when shes being herself.
C. She loves being popular and cant give it up.
D. Her friends wont be angry if she insults them.

5. What do the comments in the blue boxes add to the story?


A. They help decorate the pages.
B. They tell whats going on in the pictures.
C. They tell what the characters are thinking.
D. They show what Kara is thinking.

Unit 1: Whom can you count on? 49


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
1
from The Fellowship of the Ring
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What does Frodo decide to do to prevent the Ring from harming


the Company?
A. swallow it
B. go on alone
C. choose only two best friends
D. give the Ring away

2. What is Frodos title among the Company?


A. the Bearer
B. the Ring-keeper
C. the Hobbit
D. Baggins

3. Why does Frodo call Sam a confounded nuisance?


A. Frodo thinks that Sam wants the Ring for himself.
B. Frodo is angry with Sam because he never listens to Aragorn.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


C. Sam makes it difficult for Frodo to cross the river.
D. Sam interferes with Frodos plan to go alone.

4. What quality of Sams is highlighted in this selection?


A. optimism
B. patience
C. loyalty
D. kindness

5. In the end, how does Frodo feel about Sam coming along?
A. angry
B. glad
C. stunned
D. hurt

50 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
1
Hobbit-Like Human Ancestor Found
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. When did the tiny creatures live?


A. 13,000-18,000 years ago
B. 34,000-45,000 years ago
C. 55,000-60,000 years ago
D. 1 million-1.5 million years ago

2. About how tall was the female skeleton found by scientists?


A. two feet
B. three feet
C. four feet
D. five feet

3. Which of the following behaviors did the tiny creatures have in


common with humans?
A. reading
B. cooking
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

C. counting
D. farming

4. Why did the author write this article?


A. to entertain readers with funny tales about science
B. to inform readers about the Lord of the Rings books
C. to entertain readers with stories about hobbits
D. to inform readers about an interesting discovery

5. Which of the following conclusions can be drawn from the article?


A. Scientists have not yet discovered all there is to know about the
history of humans.
B. Scientists expect to find the skeletons of these tiny creatures on every
continent.
C. Modern humans may eventually shrink to the size of these tiny
creatures.
D. The author of The Lord of the Rings was probably inspired by these
small early humans.

Unit 1: Whom can you count on? 51


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
1
from The Diary of a Young Girl
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What is the reason Anne Frank gives for starting a diary?


A. She wants a place in which to record everything that happens to her.
B. She has no real friend with whom to share her deepest feelings.
C. She kept a diary once before and enjoyed it.
D. She is afraid of the German soldiers.

2. Where does Anne Franks family emigrate to in 1933?


A. Germany
B. Israel
C. France
D. Holland

3. What is life like for Jews at the time she is writing this entry?
A. hard and insecure
B. fun and carefree
C. routine and boring

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. relaxed and easy

4. What are two examples of anti-Jewish decrees noted by


Anne Frank?
A. Jews are not allowed to attend school and are forbidden to have
children.
B. Jews are not allowed to leave home and are forbidden to marry.
C. Jews must wear a yellow star and be indoors by eight oclock.
D. Jews must dress in black and shop only on Saturdays.

5. Which of the following best suggests that Anne thinks her diary
will someday be read by other people?
A. She gives the diary a name.
B. She dates the entries.
C. She starts out with a brief story of her life.
D. She says that paper is more patient than man.

52 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
1
Baby Hippo Orphan Finds a Friend
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Whom is the baby hippo named after?


A. an Asian tsunami
B. one of his rescuers
C. a wildlife sanctuary
D. an east African country

2. Which animal befriends Owen?


A. a giraffe
B. a hippo
C. a lion
D. a tortoise

3. What occurs when Mzee rst meets Owen?


A. Mzee tries to run away.
B. A wildlife worker separates Mzee from Owen.
C. Mzee instantly befriends Owen.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. Owen injures Mzee.

4. Which best describes the authors purpose for writing this article?
A. The author wants to present scientific facts about what causes a
tsunami.
B. The author wants to explain how the Asian tsunami affected a herd of
hippos.
C. The author wants the readers to think about the importance of animal
sanctuaries.
D. The author wants to show how a disaster led to an opportunity for
friendship.

5. What conclusion can you draw from the article?


A. Some friendships have a rough beginning.
B. Animals must be kept with their mothers to survive.
C. A hippopotamus can live as long as a tortoise.
D. An animal sanctuary is a bad place for a hippo.

Unit 1: Whom can you count on? 53


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
1
Finding a Way
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Why does Julie want to go to the McCloud academy?


A. McCloud has an excellent writing program.
B. McCloud has a good martial arts program.
C. None of her friends are going to McCloud.
D. McCloud is the only magnet school in the area.

2. What do Julies friends think of her chances of getting


into McCloud?
A. They dont think shell get in.
B. Theyre not sure.
C. They think shell definitely get in.
D. They think her chances are fifty-fifty.

3. What does Julies martial arts teacher say about her?


A. Julie is an excellent student.
B. Julie has a hard time focusing.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


C. Julie is a great writer.
D. Julie has too many extracurricular activities.

4. At the beginning of the story, Julies father says, If you want


this, apply yourself. What does Julie say later on that means the
same thing?
A. I cant believe I got a D!
B. Relax, surrender to the movement.
C. I need to do some research tonight.
D. Focus on your target and follow through.

5. What is hurting Julies ability to focus on her goal?


A. her lack of writing talent
B. her self-doubt
C. her friends
D. her father

54 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
1
When the Rattlesnake Sounds
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. How does Lennie respond to Celias complaints?


A. Lennie has no patience for Celia.
B. Lennie shows compassion for Celia.
C. Lennie complains far more than Celia does.
D. Lennie ignores Celias complaints.

2. What does Celia say about the white people who stay at the hotel?
A. Celia is glad they are hotel guests because she earns money from
washing their clothes.
B. Celia tells Lennie and Harriet that the hotel guests have invited her to
one of their church meetings.
C. Celia has spoken to them about the cause and they seem interested.
D. Celia wishes they would donate some of their money to the cause so
she wouldnt have to work so hard.

3. What is Harriet talking about when she describes hiding, crossing


rivers, and hunting dogs chasing people in the night?
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

A. passage on a ship to another country


B. a trip she had once taken to visit her family
C. a time she went hunting with a group of friends
D. escaped slaves traveling by night to freedom

4. How would Harriet dene a brave person?


A. A brave person pushes forward and never feels fear.
B. A brave person acts without thinking about the consequences.
C. A brave person does what is necessary despite feeling afraid.
D. A brave person always thinks and acts the same way as Harriet.

5. Which of these character traits describes Harriet?


A. impulsive
B. daring
C. timid
D. impatient

Unit 1: Whom can you count on? 55


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
2
The Calamity Kids in: The Bermuda
Triangle Terrarium!
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Why are Will and Amy afraid to talk to Reed?


A. Hes scary.
B. Hes a mechanic.
C. Hes an older kid.
D. Hes the smartest kid in town.

2. What does sealing the atmospheric integument with the cover


mean?
A. putting the lid on the terrarium
B. solving complicated equations
C. doing experiments with the terrarium
D. moving the terrarium to the Bermuda Triangle

3. Why doesnt Wendys rock hit the monster?


A. Shes a bad shot.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


B. There are only three dimensions within the portal.
C. There are more than three dimensions within the portal.
D. She doesnt throw the rock hard enough.

4. What do the kids do to rescue Jacob?


A. They each work independently.
B. They search the town.
C. They fight with each other.
D. They work together.

5. What could be one moral of this story?


A. Never experiment with terrariums.
B. Never leave your notes behind.
C. Reading can save someones life.
D. Not all extra-dimensional beings are evil.

56 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
2
To Young Readers and Invitation
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. In To Young Readers, to what does the poet compare good books?


A. vehicles
B. food
C. plants
D. lamps

2. In To Young Readers, what is a reader?


A. a dreamer
B. an eater
C. a guest
D. a healer

3. In the third stanza of To Young Readers, what is the Feast?


A. the ideas contained in books
B. a rocket to another planet
C. the applause of an audience
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. a tasty dessert

4. In Invitation, who is invited to come in?


A. only wishers
B. only pretenders
C. only dreamers
D. everyone

5. In Invitation, what is the reader invited to do?


A. write a story
B. read a book
C. light a fire
D. ask questions

Unit 2: Why do you read? 57


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
2
Real Spider Superpowers
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Why do spiders jump?


A. They want to frighten people.
B. Their walking motion is awkward.
C. They have too many legs to walk.
D. That is how they catch insects to eat.

2. Why are scientists interested in studying how spiders can walk


upside down?
A. to learn how gravity affects insects
B. to make better products such as sticky notes
C. to learn how to make Spider-Man more spider-like in the next movie
D. to develop better rockets to send astronauts into space

3. How do spiders use the silk they spin?


A. to make soft nests
B. to provide food and shelter for their young

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


C. to catch prey and make egg sacs
D. to protect themselves from birds and small rodents

4. Why did the author write this article?


A. to inform the reader about the next Spider-Man movie
B. to entertain the reader with funny stories about spiders
C. to persuade the reader not to be afraid of spiders
D. to inform the reader about how amazing spiders are

5. Why does the writer compare Spider-Man to real spiders?


A. to prove that the movie character is more popular than real spiders
are
B. to show that, compared to humans, spiders have some amazing
physical abilities
C. to show that spiders, like Spider-Man, may someday be able to fight
criminals
D. to discover the secret of Spider-Mans powers

58 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
2
Blues for Bob E. Brown
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. In what city is Bob E. Browns music scene?


A. New Orleans
B. Chicago
C. New York
D. Los Angeles

2. How did Bob E. Brown learn to play the blues?


A. His grandpa taught him.
B. He listened to old blues records.
C. He took lessons from a professional musician.
D. He listened to the musicians at Marys place.

3. What was standing in the way of Bob E. Brown getting a gig at


Marys place?
A. He didnt have the talent it took.
B. It was too dangerous to ride the subway at night.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

C. He didnt have a union card.


D. There were no musicians to back him.

4. Why does Bob E. Brown like his grandpa?


A. His grandpa is a good listener and knows the blues.
B. His grandpa is rich and can help him out.
C. His grandpa knows Mary and can get him a gig.
D. His grandpa will sign Bob E. Brown for his record label.

5. In the end, how does Bob E. Brown stay true to himself?


A. He refuses the union card paid for by his grandpa.
B. He rejects his grandpa and decides never to see him again.
C. He refuses to play and sing for his grandpa.
D. He decides to keep Bob E. Brown as his stage name.

Unit 2: Why do you read? 59


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
2
Hurricane Emily Bad News for
Endangered Turtles
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What effect did Hurricane Emily have on the wildlife on the Yucutan
Peninsula?
A. It destroyed all species of wildlife.
B. It affected people and property but spared wildlife.
C. It killed the entire sea turtle population.
D. It destroyed most of the sea turtle eggs.

2. Which of these areas is the most important nesting ground for


Mexican sea turtles?
A. Mexico City
B. Cancun
C. Akumal
D. Port Arthur

3. Why is Alejandro Arenas Martinez quoted in the article?

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


A. He is a tourist who witnessed the hurricanes devastation.
B. He interviewed the director of Xcacel sea turtle conservation.
C. He is an expert on sea turtle conservation.
D. He is an expert on the causes of hurricanes.

4. What percentage of the sea turtle eggs would have hatched if not
for the hurricane?
A. 10%
B. 100%
C. 50%
D. 80%

5. What is one conclusion you can draw from this article?


A. Damage caused by disasters like Hurricane Emily can be
quickly repaired.
B. Events that happen today can have consequences far into the future.
C. Turtles are an especially fragile form of wildlife and can be
easily killed.
D. Turtles lay so many eggs that they can recover easily from natural
disasters.

60 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
2
Naked Animals
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. About how many kinds of wild mammals live on Earth?


A. 1,000
B. 5,000
C. 10,000
D. 50,000

2. How did some cats and dogs become hairless?


A. They have a genetic defect.
B. They were bred to have that trait.
C. They have adapted to their environment.
D. They developed a skin disease.

3. In what type of climate would you expect to nd hairless animals?


A. warm
B. cold
C. snowy
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. rainy

4. What does this article say about humans and other mammals?
A. Unlike other mammals, humans do not adapt to changes in their
environment.
B. Humans have absolutely nothing in common with other mammals.
C. Humans have some behaviors and characteristics in common with
other mammals.
D. Humans are much faster to adapt to changes in the environment than
other mammals.

5. What is the most important factor in determining whether a mammal


has hair?
A. the mammals natural environment
B. the way the mammal wants to look
C. how the mammal grooms itself
D. whether the mammal lives in water

Unit 2: Why do you read? 61


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
2
Animal House
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Why does Heather Herman want to free animals from performing


in circuses?
A. She doesnt like the circus.
B. She thinks animals should not interact with people.
C. She objects to the cruel treatment of circus animals.
D. She wants to be famous.

2. What did Heather do after her father showed her brochures about
animal cruelty?
A. She organized a protest at a local circus.
B. She wrote letters to her state representatives.
C. She did research on the web and wrote to local newspapers.
D. She cared for circus animals.

3. What did Heather have to do to get an animal-protection law placed


on the ballot?
She had to be supported by a national organization.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


A.
B. She had to collect 5,000 signatures on a petition.
C. She had to meet with the city council to discuss the problem.
D. She had to raise $5,000 to pay for legislative costs.

4. What did Heather learn about making a commitment?


A. It is not difficult once you get started.
B. You need to raise money to make your plan work.
C. Other people can do the work once you give them your idea.
D. Obstacles can be overcome though you may feel discouraged at
times.

5. What do you think is Heathers opinion of the political process re-


quired to change something in society?
A. The political process works if youre willing to put in the time and
effort.
B. There are far too many legal obstacles for a person to succeed at
making a change.
C. The political process is too complicated for people to understand.
D. It is the responsibility of adults to change the political process.

62 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
2
Short Circuit
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What is Shinjuku?
A. the biggest game arcade in the world
B. the busiest train station in the world
C. the tallest building in the world
D. the busiest restaurant in the world

2. Why cant Masa help Nao gure out the discount on the souvenirs?
A. He doesnt take math at school.
B. He doesnt know about percentages.
C. The battery in his calculator is dead.
D. Nao doesnt want his help.

3. What does Nao study two nights a week?


A. karate
B. aikido
C. judo
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. tai chi

4. What does Masa learn in this story?


A. Its a good idea to study judo after school.
B. You cant survive without technology to help you.
C. Always pay attention in French class.
D. Its not wise to let technology do everything for you.

5. Why is Nao able to do so well in Tokyo?


A. She speaks the language.
B. She knows how to think for herself.
C. She can order in foreign restaurants.
D. She knows a lot about technology.

Unit 2: Why do you read? 63


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
2
King Tuts Mysterious Death
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What was the original theory about how King Tut died?
A. He became ill and died from a plague.
B. He was murdered with a blow to the head.
C. He died of infection from a broken leg.
D. He was killed in battle.

2. How would either Aye or Horemheb have benetted from


King Tuts death?
A. They would have been released from prison.
B. They would have married the kings wife.
C. They would have been paid to commit the murder.
D. They would have gained more power.

3. What conclusion can you draw about the importance of CT scans


in unraveling the secrets behind King Tuts death?
A. CT scans can be useful in ruling out incorrect conclusions about the
cause of King Tuts death.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


B. CT scans have provided a definite explanation for the cause of King
Tuts death.
C. CT scans have been unable to provide any further information about
King Tuts remains.
D. CT scans provide the same information about King Tuts remains that
X-rays provide.

4. If King Tut did not suffer a crushed skull or broken leg, what might
have caused the breaks in King Tuts bones?
A. a long-lasting disease such as the plague that affected ancient Egypt
B. slow-acting poison administered by King Tuts advisers
C. damage during the removal of the mummy from the tomb
D. damage from exposure to the acids in modern-day humid air

5. What have you learned from this article about the King Tut mystery?
A. The cause of King Tuts death has definitely been identified.
B. The cause of King Tuts death is still under investigation.
C. The cause of King Tuts death is impossible to determine.
D. The cause of King Tuts death is of no further interest to scientists.

64 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
3
The Boy with Yellow Eyes
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What reputation did Willie have at school?


A. bully
B. class president
C. teachers pet
D. geek

2. When does this story take place?


A. during modern times
B. during the Gulf War
C. during World War II
D. in the eighteenth century

3. What was the tapping sound Norman and Willie heard?


A. Morse code
B. a woodpecker
C. construction equipment
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. kids playing

4. Which was more important in catching the spy: Willies athletic skill
or Normans book learning?
A. Willies athletic skill was more important.
B. Normans book learning was more important.
C. Both were equally important.
D. Neither was important.

5. What do you think the townspeoples reaction was when they


learned what the stranger was up to?
A. They had suspected he was a spy all along.
B. They were surprised.
C. They didnt believe it.
D. They didnt have any reaction at all.

Unit 3: What makes life good? 65


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
3
Ode to Weight Lifting
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. How many curls does Tony do?


A. nine
B. twelve
C. fourteen
D. eighty-three

2. What are Tonys biceps like?


A. curls
B. marshmallows
C. apples
D. grapefruits

3. What happens to Tonys body as he curls weights?


A. His legs cramp.
B. His eyes burn.
C. His face turns red and his vein deepens.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. all of the above

4. Why does Tony bite his arm?


A. Hes hungry.
B. Hes happy.
C. Hes wound up.
D. He mistakes it for an apple.

5. Why does Tony roar like a lion?


A. Hes proud of himself.
B. He feels like a wild animal.
C. He wants to get rid of extra energy.
D. Hes rehearsing for a school play.

66 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
3
Look Around and See Only Friends
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. To whom did Samantha Smith write a letter?


A. her grandparents
B. Yuri Andropov, of the Soviet Union
C. the president of the United States
D. the leader of Japan

2. What was Samantha Smiths greatest wish for the year 2001?
A. She would lose her freckles.
B. She would visit every country in the world.
C. There would be world peace and understanding.
D. She would make more friends in other countries.

3. What is Samantha Smiths attitude toward the future?


A. bored
B. frustrated
C. negative
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. hopeful

4. Who would get to take part in the International Granddaughter


Exchange?
A. grandchildren in countries around the world
B. the granddaughters of world leaders
C. the granddaughters of people who live in the United States and Japan
D. the grandchildren, nieces, and nephews of world leaders

5. Which of these statements best summarizes Samantha Smiths


message?
A. There will never be peace among nations.
B. Traveling to other countries can broaden your mind.
C. People can promote world peace through personal contact.
D. The grandchildren of world leaders should travel more.

Unit 3: What makes life good? 67


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
3
Roller Coaster Thrills
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Why do many people enjoy roller coasters?


A. They like riding upside down.
B. They can act wildly on them.
C. They enjoy being scared.
D. They like having their insides churned up.

2. What helps shape how you feel about seeking thrills and
new experiences?
A. previous experiences
B. friends
C. genes
D. your genes, previous experiences, and friends

3. What do mountain climbers and skydivers have in common?


A. They avoid trying new things.
B. They enjoy taking risks.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


C. They have t-type personalities.
D. They do not like roller coasters.

4. Why do amusement parks build bigger, scarier roller coasters?


A. A lot of people seek ever more thrilling experiences.
B. A lot of people dont want to take any risks.
C. Bigger roller coasters make peoples stomachs churn.
D. Bigger roller coasters apply stronger forces to peoples bodies.

5. In what way can roller coasters be good for you?


A. They can subject your body to intense forces.
B. They can help you make friends.
C. They can help you release stress.
D. They can get you out of the house.

68 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
3
Skate Park
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What is Isabells talent?


A. reading
B. homework
C. art
D. skateboarding

2. How does Isabell help David?


A. She teaches him to read an application.
B. She teaches him to ride his bike.
C. She teaches him to skateboard.
D. She teaches him to write an essay.

3. How does David help Isabell?


A. He helps her fill out her application.
B. He helps her practice her skateboarding.
C. He helps her with her bike riding.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. He helps her write her essay herself.

4. Why does Isabell get angry with David?


A. because he wants to write her essay for her
B. because hes worried about cheating
C. because she doesnt like to feel stupid
D. because shes worried about the skateboard competition

5. What could be another title for this graphic novel?


A. How to Write an Essay
B. How to Win a Skateboard Competition
C. How to Be a Real Friend
D. How to Ride a Bike

Unit 3: What makes life good? 69


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
3
Macavity: The Mystery Cat
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What kind of cat is Macavity?


A. a handsome cat
B. a master cat
C. a clean cat
D. a criminal cat

2. What special power does Macavity have that allows him to leave a
crime scene without being seen?
A. levitation
B. invisibility
C. ability to cast spells
D. an evil eye

3. What helps Macavity get away with crime?


A. his disappearing act
B. no footprints on file at Scotland Yard

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


C. his alibis
D. all of the above

4. Which of the following best describes Macavitys character?


A. respectable
B. dishonest
C. sincere
D. honorable

5. Which of the following best describes how Scotland Yard feels


about Macavity?
A. amused
B. bored
C. frustrated
D. surprised

70 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
3
Survival of the Fittest
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What is the most important difference between Dale and his uncle?
A. Dale likes to sleep in while his uncle likes to rise early.
B. Dale is against hunting and his uncle is for it.
C. Dale is much smaller and younger than his uncle.
D. Dale likes healthy food while his uncle likes junk food.

2. What does Uncle Emory mean by The name of the game is the sur-
vival of the ttest?
A. Only people who are fit and in shape will survive.
B. The strongest creatures have the right to hunt and kill weaker
creatures.
C. Its the name of a new reality TV show.
D. The person who is the fittest will be the only survivor of the hunting
trip.

3. How does the small creature feel about hunting?


He enjoys it.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

A.
B. He can take it or leave it.
C. He thinks it is okay as long as he kills only adult creatures.
D. He doesnt see the point of it.

4. How are Dale and the young creature alike?


A. They are both first-time hunters.
B. They are about the same age.
C. They dislike hunting.
D. They are about the same height.

5. Who is most like Uncle Emory?


A. Dale
B. the younger Grezzemblik
C. the older Grezzemblik
D. no one

Unit 3: What makes life good? 71


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
3
Learning English
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What does the speaker think will happen if he describes his feel-
ings in English?
A. Hell lose friends.
B. He wont make friends.
C. Hell forget Spanish.
D. Hell change.

2. According to the speaker, what must you know to understand him?


A. how he feels
B. what he thinks
C. Spanish
D. English

3. What is the language of his heart?


A. Spanish
B. English

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


C. both Spanish and English
D. gestures and facial expressions

4. Which statement best describes the speakers opinion?


A. Language doesnt matter.
B. You can describe your feelings in any language.
C. Your language is an important part of who you are.
D. People dont change when they use a new language.

5. What does the speaker mean by the blood of your soul?


A. your heart
B. your blood
C. your religion
D. your deepest self

72 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
3
What Makes Me Me?
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What test do psychologists use to study personality?


A. the Personality Test
B. the Five Dimensions Test
C. the Big Five Test
D. What Makes Me Me

2. What dimension describes how easily you get along with others?
A. openness
B. extroversion
C. agreeableness
D. neuroticism

3. If you have high a score for conscientiousness, how will it affect


your neuroticism score?
A. It depends on how you scored for extroversion.
B. You will have a lower neuroticism score.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

C. You will have a higher neuroticism score.


D. It will have no effect.

4. Which of the following describes an introvert?


A. talks before thinking
B. good listener
C. easily bored
D. outgoing

5. Which statement is true?


A. Taking a test can tell you everything about your personality.
B. A persons personality cannot change over the course of his or her
life.
C. Genes have no influence on a persons personality.
D. Genes and environment help shape a persons personality.

Unit 3: What makes life good? 73


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
3
Worry Seems to Shorten a Timid
Rats Life
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What are baby rats like?


A. Most are curious.
B. Most are timid.
C. Some are timid and others are curious.
D. A few are fearful, but most are curious.

2. What happens to a rat when stressed?


A. The levels of hormones in its blood dont change.
B. Its levels of corticosterone decrease.
C. Its levels of corticosterone increase.
D. It jumps around less.

3. How do scientists measure stress in a rat?


A. by measuring how active it is
B. by measuring a chemical in its blood

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


C. by measuring the change in its heart rate
D. by putting it in a tube for a period of time

4. What does the author suggest people do to increase their chances


of living longer?
A. be open to new experiences
B. let go of all their fears
C. be more cautious
D. adopt pet rats

5. Why might it be better to be adventurous than timid?


A. You could have more fun.
B. You could avoid stress.
C. You could have more corticosterone.
D. You could live longer.

74 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
3
Laugh
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Why would a doctor order laughter for a heart attack patient?


A. to exercise the abdominal muscles
B. to help fight possible infections
C. to reduce tension, stress, and anger
D. to boost the immune system

2. What type of humor is harmful?


A. put-downs
B. knock-knock jokes
C. puns
D. long jokes

3. How does laughter help the body?


A. It can improve your balance.
B. It helps improve peoples looks.
C. It can make you smarter.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. It helps prevent some illnesses.

4. Which people probably cope BEST during bad times?


A. people who can laugh at themselves
B. people who tell jokes
C. people who make fun of others
D. people who do not like to laugh

5. What should you do the next time you nd yourself in an embar-


rassing situation?
A. run away and hide
B. find someone else to laugh at
C. find the humor in the situation
D. get angry at the other people in the situation

Unit 3: What makes life good? 75


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
4
The Day I Ran with Lance Armstrong
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. How do Samuels parents feel about his love of cycling?


A. They do not like it.
B. They feel he should try something else.
C. They support him.
D. They think it is silly.

2. Why did Samuel run alongside the racers in Georgia?


A. to get his picture in the newspaper
B. to encourage them up the steep hill
C. to bother them
D. to get their autographs

3. Why was Samuel allowed to go beyond the barrier with a VIP pass?
A. He told the security people he was Lances biggest fan.
B. He begged and pleaded to meet Lance.
C. He was picked randomly out of the crowd.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. Someone recognized him from the newspaper photo.

4. How is Samuels experience most likely to inuence him?


A. He will become a newspaper journalist.
B. He will stop watching cycling races.
C. He will pursue his love of cycling.
D. He will move to France.

5. Which word best describes Samuel?


A. determined
B. lazy
C. unlucky
D. unmotivated

76 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
4
Ice CubeActor/Musician
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Why does Ice Cube say it is a good idea for adults to read
kids magazines?
A. so they can see what rap music is all about
B. to find out if their kids are in trouble
C. so parents can find out more about their kids
D. to keep up with trends

2. Who were Ice Cubes biggest personal inuences?


A. his father and brother
B. his mother and father
C. his sister and mother
D. his brother and son

3. How does Ice Cube feel about a rating system for music
and movies?
A. He thinks it is unfair.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

B. He thinks it is a good idea.


C. He thinks it is just as bad as censorship.
D. He feels a rating system would be harmful to the arts.

4. What does Ice Cube mean when he says, the misconception is


I am what I put out only?
A. You cant believe everything you hear about him.
B. There is more to him than his public image.
C. His public image has nothing to do with who he really is.
D. He cares a lot about how he is perceived by others.

5. What do you think the interviewers think of Ice Cube?


A. They think he is an important performer.
B. They do not respect his work.
C. They think he may be famous one day.
D. They think he is a good father.

Unit 4: What inuences you? 77


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
4
Third Down and Forever
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What does Shauns father want him to do?


A. study art in college
B. be a pro football player
C. take over the family business
D. follow his own dreams

2. How long have Shaun and Simon been friends?


A. for at least twelve years
B. since the beginning of high school
C. for around five years
D. since yesterday

3. What does Midway offer in addition to its football program?


A. a good business school
B. other sports
C. nothing

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. a strong arts program

4. Why does Shaun hang around with Simon?


A. Simon makes him look good.
B. Simon has always been supportive.
C. He feels sorry for Simon.
D. Simon is one of the popular kids.

5. At the end of the story, what advice might Shaun give a


younger kid?
A. Always do exactly what your parents tell you to do.
B. Art and football dont go together.
C. You shouldnt pass up the chance to own a good business.
D. Its important to follow your own dreams.

78 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
4
Dealing with Peer Pressure
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Which sentence best describes peer pressure?


A. Its hard to handle.
B. Its not very common.
C. Its always negative.
D. Its always positive.

2. Why might a person give in to peer pressure?


A. The person feels confident and popular.
B. The person enjoys doing things that are wrong.
C. The person doesnt care what people think of him or her.
D. The person is afraid to go against the group.

3. What is one way to avoid peer pressure?


A. Stay home from school.
B. Avoid hanging out with kids you dont know.
C. Hang out only with friends your parents choose for you.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. Hang out with friends who act the way you want to act.

4. What is the main purpose of this article?


A. to define peer pressure
B. to inform teens about how to handle peer pressure
C. to entertain the audience with stories about peer pressure
D. to persuade the reader not to engage in peer pressure

5. What can you do if youre nding peer pressure hard to handle?


A. Keep your concerns to yourself.
B. Give in to the peer pressure just this once.
C. Talk to an adult you trust.
D. Stay away from other teens.

Unit 4: What inuences you? 79


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
4
Thanking the Birds
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Where are the Apache people from?


A. outside of the United States
B. the Onandaga Indian Reservation
C. the Northeast
D. the Southwest

2. How does Swift Eagle decide to teach the boys a lesson?


A. He tells their parents what the boys have done.
B. He makes them listen to boring stories about himself.
C. He yells at them and makes them stop shooting birds.
D. He helps them to cook and eat their kill.

3. What lesson does Swift Eagle teach the boys?


A. The gifts of the Earth are not to be wasted.
B. They should never kill any living thing.
C. His tribe and theirs are very different.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. They should become storytellers.

4. What other lesson do you think the boys learned that day?
A. It is okay to kill deer, but not birds.
B. Values can be taught through examples and stories.
C. They should respect their elders.
D. They must never hunt with BB guns.

5. What interests the author about this story?


A. Swift Eagles quick thinking and cleverness
B. the boys ability to learn from their mistakes
C. similarities between distant Native American groups
D. the differences between Indians and non-Indians

80 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
4
Jimmy Jet and His TV Set
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. According to the poem, what grew out of Jimmy Jets hair?


A. his chair
B. a tuning dial
C. antennae
D. TV tubes

2. How much TV did Jimmy Jet watch?


A. just The Early Show
B. just The Late Late Show
C. his one favorite show
D. shows all day and all night

3. What happened to Jimmy Jet?


A. He watched so much TV that he turned into one himself.
B. He became weak, sick, and died.
C. He disappeared.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. He was on The Late Late Show.

4. The line, And his brains turned into TV tubes is an example of


which of the following?
A. exaggeration
B. fact
C. opinion
D. persuasion

5. What is the main idea of the poem?


A. Watching TV is a great way to relax.
B. All TV shows are bad for you.
C. It is not healthy to watch so much TV.
D. Kids should watch only educational shows.

Unit 4: What inuences you? 81


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
4
from Waiting for the War
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Where is Mike from?


A. Hawaii
B. Texas
C. Ohio
D. Iowa

2. How do Sammy and Henry feel about the soldiers in Hawaii?


A. They dont mind them.
B. They like having them around.
C. They think theyre friendly.
D. They dont like them.

3. Why does Mike take the horse into the water?


A. because horses love water
B. because Mike wants to cool off
C. because the horse cant throw him there

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. because the horse will be calmer in the water

4. What is one reason Henry decides Mike is not a bad guy?


A. Mike gives him the five dollars.
B. Mike is going to die in battle.
C. Mike treats the Hawaiians with respect.
D. Mike talks to horses.

5. What does Henry mean when he says, One way or the other,
Sammy, he aint coming back?
A. Even if he survives, Mike will not be the same person.
B. Theres no way Mike will live through the war.
C. When the war is over, Mike will go home to Texas, not Hawaii.
D. Mike wont visit the boys again because hes angry with them.

82 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
4
The Struggle to Be an
All-American Girl
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. How long has it been since the author went to Chinese school?
A. five years
B. ten years
C. fifteen years
D. twenty years

2. To what does she compare quitting Chinese?


A. a struggle
B. a funeral
C. a party
D. a divorce

3. How did the authors grandmother make her feel?


A. comfortable
B. loved
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

C. tired
D. embarrassed

4. Why did the authors mother send her to Chinese school?


A. as a punishment
B. so she wouldnt get into trouble after school
C. to learn about her culture
D. because the author asked to go

5. What does the author mean when she says At last, I was one of
you; I wasnt one of them. Sadly, I still am?
A. She is sad that she didnt study harder in Chinese school.
B. She wishes now that she had been more accepting of her culture.
C. She regrets wasting time at Chinese school.
D. She does not want to be associated with her Chinese culture any
more.

Unit 4: What inuences you? 83


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
4
A Crush
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What does Dolores have that sets her apart from the other women
in town?
A. a job
B. a tattoo
C. a car
D. a boyfriend

2. What do the women in town say about Dolores?


A. She doesnt want friends.
B. She doesnt want flowers.
C. She doesnt want love.
D. She doesnt want a job.

3. Why does Ernie nally come outside the group home?


A. He wants to meet Dolores.
B. He doesnt want Jack to plant the seeds.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


C. He wants to go out to breakfast with Jack.
D. He is curious about the seeds Jack is planting.

4. How has Jack inuenced Ernie?


A. He helped Ernie meet Dolores.
B. He taught Ernie how to order breakfast.
C. He got Ernie interested in being a botanist.
D. He helped Ernie open up and be more confident.

5. How do the owers change Dolores?


A. She starts to care about her looks.
B. She falls in love with Dick.
C. She stops caring about how other people see her.
D. She quits her job at the hardware store.

84 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
4
A Gold Miners Tale
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Based on clues from the speaker in A Gold Miners Tale, what did
he think gold mining would be like?
A. easy
B. slow
C. dangerous
D. difficult

2. What did the speaker learn about gold mining?


A. It didnt take long for him to become rich.
B. There were no more shovels or pans to buy.
C. Not many people traveled west to look for gold.
D. He wasnt likely to get rich after he paid his expenses.

3. What did the speaker in A Gold Miners Tale think of working in the
hydraulic mine?
A. He thought it was fun.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

B. He thought it would make him rich.


C. He found the work to be hard.
D. It was better than panning for gold.

4. What does the speaker dream about?


A. gold nuggets
B. a hot meal
C. a new horse
D. his family

5. In A Gold Miners Tale, how does the speaker change between the
beginning and the end of the poem?
A. He no longer wants to get rich.
B. He has found a smarter way to make money.
C. He decides to get a regular job and settle down.
D. He moves back to the Midwest.

Unit 4: What inuences you? 85


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
5
The No-Guitar Blues
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Which two words best describe Fausto?


A. hardworking and deceitful
B. honest and respectful
C. lazy and mean
D. confused and intolerant

2. Why cant Faustos parents get him a guitar?


A. Theres not enough time.
B. Theres not enough room in the house.
C. Theres not enough money.
D. Theres not enough musical talent in the family.

3. What is a normal dog name to Fausto?


A. Bomber
B. Roger
C. Will

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. Sarah

4. After pulling off his scam successfully, how does Fausto feel?
A. happy
B. afraid
C. hungry
D. guilty

5. The next time Fausto wants money, what will he probably do?
A. Ask his parents for some.
B. Look for a real job.
C. Steal something.
D. Think of a new scam.

86 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
5
Merrick Johnston, Mountain Climber
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What job does Merrick do for her mom?


A. cook
B. guide
C. assistant
D. songwriter

2. What must you be to be a good mountain climber?


A. familiar with all types of terrain
B. open-minded and strong
C. fit, skilled, and quick-thinking
D. over five-feet tall

3. Why are crevasses a danger to hikers?


A. Glaciers can shift and move while youre climbing.
B. The cracks in ice are invisible to the eye.
C. If you fall into one, its very hard to get you out.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. Falling into one means you are lost forever.

4. What did mountain climbing teach Merrick?


A. She decided she had found her true calling in life.
B. She saw an area of the world she had never visited before.
C. She learned how to get along with others on a long trip.
D. She learned about making decisions and enjoying the moment.

5. How long did the hike to the summit of Mount McKinley take?
A. one month
B. sixteen days
C. twenty-two days
D. forty-five days

Unit 5: How can you become who you want to be? 87


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
5
Krumping
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. In what part of the country is krumping popular?


A. Georgia
B. Texas
C. California
D. Ohio

2. What two things are brought together in krumping?


A. clowns and cooking
B. clowns and dancing
C. soldiers and dancing
D. firefighters and knitting

3. What caused the popularity of krumping to grow?


A. music videos
B. news programs
C. festivals

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. advertisements

4. What does word of mouth mean?


A. People must sing while they dance.
B. Theres a password people must know to krump.
C. People performed rap tunes.
D. People told each other about krumping.

5. According to the article, why do kids get into trouble?


A. They are too busy.
B. They like to clown around.
C. They have nothing else to do.
D. They dont know how to dance.

88 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
5
Chicago Kids Sink Their Teeth Into
Dino Camp
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What is a scientist who studies fossils called?


A. a marine biologist
B. a forensic examiner
C. a paleontologist
D. a zoologist

2. From where does the Junior Paleontologist program


select students?
A. all over the world
B. Montana
C. the east coast
D. Chicago

3. What did one student nd?


A. a 65-million-year-old tooth
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

B. dinosaur bones
C. a fossilized skull
D. remnants of a prehistoric bird

4. Which of these would you need to become a Junior Paleontologist?


A. good grades
B. excitement about learning
C. money to pay for the program
D. knowledge about dinosaurs

5. What do programs like Junior Paleontologists help kids do?


A. stay off the streets
B. discover their true passion
C. find the meaning of life
D. get extra credit in science

Unit 5: How can you become who you want to be? 89


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
5
Asteroid Belt
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What is most important to Carlos?


A. getting the next belt
B. learning more kung fu
C. beating Talzia in the tournament
D. having fun

2. Which word describes Carloss personality?


A. impatient
B. relaxed
C. optimistic
D. lazy

3. How does Carlos feel after he loses his tournament bout?


A. OK. Hell do better in the next tournament.
B. Relieved. He was afraid hed do even worse.
C. Depressed. Hes sure hell never reach his goal.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. Glad. This was a good learning experience.

4. Which sentence from the story best sums up Roger Darzzans


message?
A. Theres always next time, right?
B. Staying here overnight wont change the outcome, you know?
C. All a belt is really good for is holding up your pants.
D. In the end, its all about what youve learned.

5. What should Carlos do if he wants to follow Roger Darzzans


advice?
A. try to earn an asteroid belt as soon as possible
B. make earning the next belt the focus of his life
C. practice, learn, and enjoy kung fu
D. be hard on himself every time he fails

90 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
5
The Dog Diaries
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What does the author want to discover by becoming a dog?


A. how carpet tastes
B. what her dogs are really thinking
C. what it is like to take a day off
D. if her dog really loves her

2. What did the author nd herself doing?


A. getting bored by 10 a.m.
B. fighting for dinner scraps
C. giving up on the experiment
D. putting her head in a garbage can

3. What does the author include throughout the essay?


A. humorous details
B. sad stories
C. unbelievable escapades
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. boring facts

4. According to the diary, how does the narrator seem?


A. desperate to be like a dog
B. uncomfortable around animals
C. committed to her experiment
D. hungry for garbage

5. Until another human appears, what is the authors situation?


A. She misses human conversation.
B. She is locked out of her house.
C. She is happy to roam free.
D. She is looking for attention from neighbors.

Unit 5: How can you become who you want to be? 91


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
5
Its Not a Crime to Love Science
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What career did Willey consider when she was a little girl?
A. biologist
B. astronaut
C. veterinarian
D. nurse

2. The eld of forensics is concerned with which of the following?


A. the environment
B. matters of law
C. medicine
D. nutrition

3. How does the author feel about stereotypes and ignorance?


A. They are repeat offenders who do nothing but discourage.
B. She is grateful for their presence in her life.
C. They can really motivate a person to work hard and succeed.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. Everyone will just have to put up with them.

4. How does the author prove that you can love science and
have fun?
A. She talks about how science maniacs love to work.
B. She tells how she hid her intelligence.
C. She talks about how much homework she did.
D. She tells about her fun activities at school.

5. According to Willey, what must change in order for girls to have fair
access to science education?
A. the qualifications for forensic scientists
B. careers in science
C. what is taught in science classes
D. societys attitude toward girls

92 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
5
Hollywood and the Pits
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. With whom did Cherylene Lee perform?


A. her mother
B. her sister
C. her father
D. her brother

2. In what way are skeletons in the La Brea Tar Pits used in this story?
A. to add an element of terror to the story
B. to show that there are interesting sites to visit in Los Angeles
C. to explain how the skeletons make many people in Hollywood feel
D. to compare trapped animals to a young person trapped by Hollywood

3. How does Cherylene feel when she no longer gets acting jobs?
A. happy
B. relieved
C. disappointed
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. angry

4. Which saying summarizes the lesson Cherylene learns?


A. Slow and steady win the race.
B. No use crying over spilled milk.
C. Quitters never win.
D. The squeaky wheel gets the oil.

5. In her heyday, Cherylene was called


A. the Oriental bombshell.
B. the Chinese Lauren Bacall.
C. the Oriental Sister Duo.
D. the Chinese Shirley Temple.

Unit 5: How can you become who you want to be? 93


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
Dead and Gone
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What is your FIRST clue that the story the narrator is remembering
is not a happy one?
A. when Grandma recalls cleaning up the frog carcasses after the War
B. when Grandma remembers having a wood stove in the cabin
C. when Chess runs off to play with his friends Steve and Bob
D. when Grandma tries to sound like a know-it-all to cover up
her sadness

2. Against whom did the narrator ght the Wars?


A. the kids who lived on her side of the lake
B. the kids who lived by another lake
C. the older kids around the lake
D. the kids from the other side of the lake

3. Aside from frogs, what did the kids throw at each other?
A. dirt

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


B. loons
C. rocks
D. sodas

4. When did the narrator begin to regret what they had done
to the frogs?
A. while she was throwing frogs at the other kids
B. when she saw the dead frogs at Loon Point
C. when she had children and grandchildren of her own
D. while the rain was keeping her group away from Loon Point

5. Why does Grandma want to talk to Chess so badly at the end


of the story?
A. She wants to make sure he doesnt make the same mistakes she
did.
B. She wants to make sure he has dry clothes when he goes to the
lake.
C. She wants to tell him about the dangers of the thinning ozone layer.
D. She wants to remind him to be careful when hes swimming.

94 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
Dune Tunes
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What happens when sand on the dunes moves?


A. Grains of sand rub together and bounce off each other.
B. Sandboarders at sand parks jump on for a ride.
C. It causes the bottom layers of sand to get wet.
D. The moving dunes cause an earthquake.

2. What does Melany Hunt think causes sand dunes to roar?


A. disturbances caused by sandboarders
B. people hooking up amplifiers to the dunes
C. wet sand coming to the surface of the dunes
D. sound waves bouncing back and forth

3. Why cant the sounds be heard in smaller dunes?


A. The sounds are too quiet for humans to hear.
B. The smaller dunes do not have a lower wet layer.
C. The smaller dunes are too smooth on the sides.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. The sounds are too far down in the ground.

4. What is the main purpose of this passage?


A. to provide tips on how to sandboard safely
B. to promote sandboarding at the Sand Master Park in Oregon
C. to explain why some sand dunes make noise
D. to describe how desert dwellers survive

5. What conclusion can you draw from this article?


A. Scientists are baffled by supernatural occurrences such as booming
sand dunes.
B. Sandboarding is a very dangerous activity.
C. Scientific explanations may exist for things people dont always
understand.
D. Mechanical engineers at the California Institute of Technology cant
explain everything.

Unit 6: Why share stories? 95


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
El Inca
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Where and when does the story take place?


A. Peru in the 1500s
B. modern-day Peru
C. modern-day Spain
D. Spain in the 1500s

2. Who was Garcilasos mother?


A. a Spanish woman
B. an Inca commoner
C. an Inca princess
D. a Spanish princess

3. What was the symbol of an Inca warriors rank?


A. a sword
B. an earring
C. a magana

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. sandals

4. How does Garcilasos father feel about the Inca culture?


A. ashamed
B. uninterested
C. regretful
D. proud

5. Why is Garcilaso de la Vega known as El Inca?


A. because he trained as an Inca warrior
B. because he was related to the emperor of the Incas
C. because he wanted people to call him that
D. because he preserved Inca traditions in writing

96 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
Kancil and the Crocodiles
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Why did the animals talk to the crocodiles from a distance?


A. The king warned them not to approach the crocodiles without
his permission.
B. They were afraid that they would be eaten if they came closer.
C. The crocodiles were always too grumpy to talk to them.
D. The parrots warned other animals not to talk to them.

2. Why were the crocodiles excited about going to the kings party?
A. They wanted to see the new orangutans twins.
B. They were eager to see other forest creatures.
C. They knew there would be food at the party.
D. They were tired of swimming in the water.

3. Why did Kancil urge Kura-Kura to count loudly?


A. He was afraid his friend would lose count along the way.
B. He did not want to have to do all of the counting himself.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

C. He knew that the crocodiles were counting along too.


D. He wanted to make sure the crocodiles were distracted.

4. Who are the greediest creatures in this folktale?


A. Kancil and Kura-Kura
B. Buaya and the crocodiles
C. the orangutan twins
D. the parrots

5. Which words best describe Kancil?


A. shy and quiet
B. clever and sneaky
C. smart and honest
D. loud and cheerful

Unit 6: Why share stories? 97


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
A Forest Home
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Jane observed chimpanzees on which of the following continents?


A. South America
B. Europe
C. Asia
D. Africa

2. What does Jane conclude from observing David Greybeard and


the termites?
A. Chimps are easily frightened by other animals.
B. Chimps are very social creatures.
C. Chimps are easily frustrated when their efforts to obtain food fail.
D. Chimps are intelligent and capable of using tools.

3. Why does Jane crouch down when three chimps surround her?
A. She is playing a game of hide and seek with them.
B. She wants to communicate to them that she means them no harm.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


C. She is picking up a weapon from the ground to defend herself.
D. She is hiding bananas from them so they cannot take her food.

4. What quality of Janes helped her succeed in her work?


A. patience
B. sense of humor
C. creativity
D. honesty

5. As Jane spends more and more time with the chimps, how does
she come to feel about them?
A. She fears them because they are dangerous.
B. She finds them fascinating and works to gain their trust.
C. She is interested in them only in scientific terms.
D. She hopes to capture them and take them to a zoo.

98 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
The Night the Bed Fell
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Why did the narrators mother not want her husband to sleep
in the attic?
A. She needed him to keep an eye on Grandfather so he wouldnt
disappear.
B. Briggs Beall, a relative and houseguest, wanted to sleep in the attic.
C. Aunt Melissa Beall had died while sleeping in the attic.
D. The bed in the attic is wobbly and the headboard is unsafe.

2. What do Aunt Sarah Shoaf and Aunt Gracie Shoaf have in common?
A. They both had premonitions that they would die on South High Street.
B. They both throw shoes down the hallway.
C. They both have a fear of burglars breaking into their house at night.
D. They had both fallen out of their beds.

3. What was the only actual threat to Briggs in the story?


A. the narrator not awaking in time to save him
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

B. suffocation from camphor


C. his bed falling
D. sleeping too long

4. What is the tone of this story?


A. humorous
B. serious
C. terrifying
D. sad

5. What conclusion can you draw about the characters in the story?
A. They are lazy and like to sleep late.
B. They dislike each other.
C. They are a bit odd.
D. They dont jump to conclusions.

Unit 6: Why share stories? 99


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
The Puzzle of Pan Am Flight 103
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. How many pieces of wreckage were used to reconstruct the plane?


A. more than four million
B. around a million
C. less than a million
D. hundreds

2. What did the ight data recorder reveal?


A. A bomb was hidden somewhere on the plane.
B. It explained how the entire airplane should be reconstructed.
C. The airplane engine and control settings were all normal.
D. It indicated the location of the hole that was created by the bomb.

3. What blew the plane apart?


A. the explosion of the bomb
B. the force of the shock waves
C. hitting the ground

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. the engines exploding

4. How did investigators gure out what caused the crash?


A. by looking at the luggage compartment
B. by studying all the evidence
C. by learning about airplanes
D. by checking the flight data recorder

5. What conclusion can you draw from the article, The Puzzle of
Pan Am Flight 103?
A. Air travel is unsafe for the vast majority of people who use it.
B. Bad weather contributed to the cause of the crash.
C. The pilot must have been responsible for the accident.
D. Different types of evidence pointed to the cause of the accident.

100 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
Too Many Mummies?
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. How were the mummies discovered?


A. through following historical clues
B. through listening to an archaeologist
C. through expanding the local museum
D. through building a new highway

2. How old are the mummies?


A. around 100 years old
B. around 500 years old
C. around 1,000 years old
D. around 5,000 years old

3. What did the tools found with the mummies say about them?
A. They were primarily injured soldiers.
B. They were members of the wealthy upper class.
C. They were farmers and craftsmen.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. They were from another country.

4. What was the authors purpose in writing this article?


A. to inform readers about an unusual problem in Peru
B. to persuade readers to donate money to Peruvian museums
C. to alarm readers about a dangerous problem
D. to help readers understand the culture of Peru

5. What is the main idea of Too Many Mummies?


A. Archaeologists learn a great deal about a culture by examining
its remains.
B. Unexpected discoveries can create new problems.
C. New roads should not be constructed in Peru.
D. Peru needs more and larger museums.

Unit 6: Why share stories? 101


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
Grinner: A Face from the Past
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What is the main idea of Grinner: A Face from the Past?


A. Blue eyes and reddish brown hair were the most common features
among soldiers in the 1800s.
B. Scientists use reconstructions of people who lived long ago to help
people understand the past.
C. The Hall of Human Biology and Evolution in New York City has
dioramas of prehistoric families.
D. Twenty-eight skeletons from the War of 1812 were found on the
shores of Lake Erie in Canada.

2. How did one of the soldiers get the nickname Grinner?


A. He was buried with a letter addressed to Grinner.
B. His nickname was written on his uniform.
C. His white teeth and dropped jawbone gave him a grin.
D. He had shiny, silver braces on his white teeth.

3. How did the team conclude that the soldiers were Americans?

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


A. They wore American military dog tags around their necks.
B. The cemetery markers indicated Americans were buried there.
C. The papers that were found with them indicated their nationality.
D. The insignias on the buttons found with them were American.

4. What do the reconstructions at the New York State Museum show?


A. what life was like in America before the Europeans came
B. what life was like more than three million years ago
C. what a soldier in the war of 1812 might have looked like
D. what a Viking man would have looked like long ago

5. What is true about reconstructions like the ones mentioned in


the article?
A. Reconstructions can show us exactly what the real people looked
like.
B. Reconstructions can be created only of people who died recently.
C. Without a complete skeleton, scientists wont attempt a
reconstruction.
D. Scientists have to base reconstructions on educated guesses.

102 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
Beetle on a String, A Short Story, and
Travelin Soldier
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. In Beetle on a String, what is the unforgiving tether?


A. the beetles wings
B. the flowers
C. the dresser drawers
D. the thread

2. What do you think the narrator of Beetle on a String will tell his
children about catching insects?
A. It is a cruel thing to do.
B. You can do it only in Manila.
C. Beetles make great kites.
D. Some beetles make clicking sounds.

3. In the poem A Short Story, what is the ant carrying?


A. a house
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

B. a twig from a tree


C. a petal of a flower
D. a wagon

4. To what does A Short Story compare the ants petal?


A. the soul of a young girl
B. a big castle full of fairies
C. petals from a dahlia
D. a box of thoughts

5. In the song Travelin Soldier, how does the young man feel when
he rst meets the girl with a bow in her hair?
A. carefree
B. lonely
C. angry
D. tired

Unit 6: Why share stories? 103


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
Hosni the Dreamer
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What did the other shepherds think of Hosni?


A. They thought he was shy.
B. They thought he was a fool.
C. They thought he was wise.
D. They thought he was wealthy.

2. What did Hosni nally spend his money on at the market?


A. embroidered robes
B. pots and plates
C. sweet halvah
D. a single verse

3. Why does Hosni take the young maiden with him?


A. She does not want to return to the city.
B. She needs to go back to the prince.
C. He must take her back to the city.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. He wants to marry her right away.

4. In the end, it is clear that Hosni is what kind of man?


A. dishonest
B. wise
C. foolish
D. snobbish

5. What is the lesson this tale teaches?


A. Follow your own inner voice and dont worry about what others think.
B. Do what your friends do in order to be accepted by others.
C. Work hard and save your money so that you can be wealthy
some day.
D. Get revenge on those who have ridiculed you.

104 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
Its a Small E-mail World After All
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What is the main point of this article?


A. to explain how to start an e-mail chain
B. to explain how to get on several e-mail lists
C. to show how e-mail can quickly connect random people
D. to show how exciting it is to be a part of the e-mail studies

2. How many people were involved in the e-mail study?


A. 13
B. 18
C. 384
D. 24,000

3. Why did many of the chains fail?


A. The recipients didnt have access to e-mail.
B. The recipients thought the messages were junk e-mail.
C. The recipients e-mail provider wouldnt carry the messages.
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

D. The recipients didnt want to participate in the study.

4. The most successful chains were sent to others by which of


the following?
A. family
B. best friends
C. casual acquaintances
D. total strangers

5. What conclusion can you draw based on this e-mail study?


A. Through just a few acquaintances, you can contact a surprising
number of people.
B. The Internet has made it possible for people to e-mail others who live
far away.
C. Junk e-mail and scientific studies take up too much of peoples time.
D. You can use e-mail to make friends and search for a new job.

Unit 6: Why share stories? 105


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
Darkness at Noon: Solar Eclipse
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. What was the FIRST clue the boy had that something was wrong?
A. The sun disappeared.
B. His father went to pray.
C. The dogs laid down.
D. He felt uneasy.

2. Why did the boy think, I had only started to live?


A. He thought the death of the sun would mean his death as well.
B. He believed that he was too young to understand what was
happening.
C. He was eager to grow up and become an adult.
D. He knew that if the sun died his family would have to live
somewhere else.

3. What does the boy call the disappearance and reappearance


of the sun?
an eclipse

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


A.
B. a holy cycle
C. a catastrophe
D. a death

4. What did the young boy believe brought the sun back?
A. the clouds
B. the gods
C. the prayers
D. the pollen

5. What did the episode teach the boy?


A. how to pray for the suns return
B. what an eclipse is
C. to be thankful for the sun
D. how to sprinkle corn pollen

106 Backpack Reader, Course 2


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
In the Blood and Supple Cord
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. In the poem In the Blood, what does blood represent?


A. Anger between relatives.
B. Disease.
C. The connection between grandson and grandfather.
D. A violent incident.

2. In the poem In the Blood, what is the key to being able to hear the
silent music?
A. listening with love
B. being very quiet
C. dancing properly
D. whispering the words

3. In the poem Supple Cord, why do the brothers tug on the cord
in the dark?
A. to keep one another from dreaming
Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

B. to let one another know if they are still awake


C. to make the time in the dark go faster
D. to see which one of them is stronger

4. In Supple Cord, what does the cord represent?


A. the arguments the brothers had earlier
B. the bedtime both brothers must keep
C. the songs the brothers would like to sing
D. the connection between the two brothers

5. What do the poems In the Blood and Supple Cord have in


common?
A. They both describe a romance.
B. They both describe a familial relationship.
C. They both describe an argument.
D. They both describe a dance.

Unit 6: Why share stories? 107


Name: ________________________________________ Date: __________________

UNIT
6
Once a Good Man
Directions: Fill in the circle next to the correct answer for each question.

1. Why was the man not surprised to see an angel at his front door?
A. Angels came to visit him regularly.
B. God told him the angel was coming.
C. Angels walked the Earth in those days.
D. He looked up and saw her on her way down.

2. Why does the Chief Angel tell the man And never lack courage?
A. The man is traveling to the unknown.
B. The journey is painful and difficult.
C. Where they are going is very frightening.
D. The man is afraid that the angel has tricked him.

3. Why is the man startled by what Hell looks like?


A. It is much scarier than he had imagined.
B. It looks like a wonderful place, at first.
C. It is above the Earth instead of below.

Copyright Glencoe/McGraw-Hill, a division of The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.


D. It is not as far away as he had thought.

4. Why is the man startled by what Heaven looks like?


A. It is full of robes and rainbows.
B. It has no food or drink.
C. It is much smaller than he expected.
D. It looks almost exactly like Hell.

5. What is the message of this folktale?


A. People should share what they have with others.
B. Courage is more important than kindness.
C. There is no punishment after death.
D. Heaven and Hell are exactly the same.

108 Backpack Reader, Course 2

Related Interests