~

ADESOFG
AY
Arranged tor all electronic keyboards by Kenneth Baket.
OMPLETE KEYBOARD PLAYEF
A superb compilation of seventeen popular songs from Ireland
arranged tor all electronic keyboards by Kenneth Baker.
cludes suggested registrations, flngerlng and Iyrlcs, plus chord symbols and charts.
VELVET BAND MacNAMARA'5 BANI
DMUSSELS TH MOUNTAINS OF MOURN
(LONDONDERRY
)
PEG 0' MY HEAR
N PHIL THE FLUTEI
YOU HOMEAGAlN KATHLEEN THE SPINNING WHEE
THETOWN I LOVED SO wn
THE WILD COLONIAL BO'
I G GYPSY (THE GYPSY ROVD
WHEN IRISH EYES ARE SMIUN
The Black Velvet Band 6
Cockles And Musseis 10
Danny Boy (Londonderry Air) 34
Forty Shades Of Green 24
GalwayBay 8
1'11 Take You Horne Again Kathleen 30
IrishEyes 4
The lrish Rover 12
MacNarnara's Band 36
The Mountains OfMourne 14
Peg O' My Heart 32
PhilThe Fluter 28
The Spinning Wheel 22
TheTown I Loved So We1116
When Irish Eyes Are Smiling 26
Whistling Gypsy (The Gypsy Rover) 18
TheWild Colonial Boy 20
Chord Charts 39.40
\
IRISH EYES
Words & Music by Hank Locklin and George Carroll
© Copyright 1974 Sawgrass Music Publishing Incorporated, USA. Acuff-Rose Music Limited, 25 James Street, Londen Wl.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Voice: human voice
Rhythm: 8 beat
Tempo: medium 0=92)
INTRO
[!]
@]7
VERSES
mf l.The rnoon - light on the
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1
Shan - non__
is a sight to see. The
sun -light on Kil - Iar - ney's Iakes means horne sweet horne to
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rne. Of Na
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bless - ings, __
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ern - 'raid isIe, I'd give thern all to
cresc.
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voice to string
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ensemble, then
back to voice
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1."-,,. ...
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see a - gain-_ your smi -ling Ir ish eyes. 2. To
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eyes.
TAG
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I and I need--­
you,__
my
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love
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ly
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Ir
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ish
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rstopmythm
Verse 2:
To stroll again Antrim's GIens and see the waterfall;
To sleep beneath the mystic hills in dear old Donegal.
Or walk the shores of Eireann and hear the seagulls cry,
But most of all to look into your lovely Irish eyes.
Verse 3:
To hear again those Shandon bells ringing heavenly,
Beside the laughing waters of the lovely Lee.
Or listen to the ocean and the wind that sighs,
But most of all to see again your smiling Irish eyes.
Verse 4:
In d r ~ s I see your angel face that aches my lonely heart;
The memory when I told you we would have to part.
I can't forget that moming when we said goodbye;
I can't forget those teardrops in your lrish eyes.
I love you and I need you, my lovely Irish eyes.
5
THE BLACK VELVET BAND
Traditional
© Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited, 8/9 Frith Street. London Wl.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Seeured.
Voice: trompet
Rhythm: march 6/8
Tempo: medium 0.=88)
VERSES
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1.As I went walk - ing down Broad - way, not in ­
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- tend - ing to stay ve - ry long. met with a fro - liek - some
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dam seI as she eame a - trip - ping a
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wateh she pulled out of her poek-et, and- slipped it right in - to my
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hand. On the ve - ry first day that I
met-__
her, bad
cresc.
6
@] [!]7 CHORUS
trompet to clarinet

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luck to the Black Vel - vet Band. Her eyes they
shone__
like
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dia-monds, you'd-- think she was queen of the land. With her
hair thrown 0 ver her shoul der, tied
cresc.
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clarinet to trompet
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up with a black vel - vet band. 2.'Twas Land.
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Verse 2:
'Twas in the town of Tralee an apprentice to trade I was bound,
With a-plenty of bright antusement to see the days go round;
Till misfortune and trouble came over me, which caused me to stray from my land,
Far away from my friends and relations, to follow the Black Velvet Band.
Verse 3:
Before the judge and the jury the both of us had to appear,
And a gentleman swore to the jewellery - the case against us was clear,
For seven years transportation right unto Van Dieman's Land,
Far away from my friends and relations, to follow her Black Velvet Band.
\
Verse 4:
Oh all you brave young Irish lads, a warning take by me,
Beware of the pretty young damsels that are knocking around in Tralee;
They'll treat you to whiskey and porter, until you're unable to stand,
And before you have time for to leave them, you are ooto Van Dieman's Land.
7
GALWAY BAY
Words & Music by Dr. Arthur Colahan
© Copyright 1947 by Box & Cox Publications Limited.
Published by permission of McCullough Pigott Limited, 11/13 Suffo1k Street, Dublin, Eire.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
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Voice: horn
Rhythm: 8 beat
Tempo: fairly slow 0=84)
INTRO
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VERSES
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1.If you e - ver go a - cross the sea to Ire - land, then
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may-be at the clo-sing of your day, you will sit and watch the moon rise 0 - ver
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Clad - dagh, and see the sun go down on Gal- way Bay. 2. lust to
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hear a- gain the rip-ple of the trout-stream; the wo-men in the mea-dows ma-king
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hay. And to sit be - side a turf fire in the ca - bin, and
cresc.
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clarinet to flute,
vioIin, horn
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watch the
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bare - foot Gos-soons at their play. 3.For
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the
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Verse 3:
For the breezes blowing o'er the seas from Ireland
Are perfumed by the heather as they blow.
And the women in the uplands diggin' praties,
Speak a language that the strangers do not know.
Verse 4:
For the strangers came and tried to teach us their way,
They scorned us just for being what we are.
But they might as weH go chasing after moonbeams,
Or light a penny candle from astar.
l-erse 5:
A n ~ if there' s going to be a life hereafter,
And somehow I am sure there's going to be,
I will ask my God to let me make my heaven
In that dear land across the Irish Sea.
9
COCKLES AND MUSSELS
Traditional
© Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited, 8/9 Prith Street, London WJ.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Voice: accordion
Rhythm: waltz
Tempo: medium 0=92)
VERSES
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1. In Dub lin's fair ci ty, where the
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girls are so pret ty, I first set my
eyes on sweet Mol ly Ma lone. As she
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wheeled her wJIeel bar row, thro' streets broad and
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lar
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nar - row, cry - ing: "Cock les, and mus sels, a
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CHORUS
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- live a -
live o! A live a - live
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"Cock les, and mus sels, a live a - live
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live o!"
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Verse 2:
She was a fishmonger, but sure 'twas no wonder,
For so were her father and mother before.
And they each wheeled their barrow thro' streets broad and narrow,
Crying, "Coekles and musseis, alive alive o!"
"Alive alive 01'(, (etc.)
Verse 3: \
She died bf a fever, and no one could save her,
And that was the end of sweet Molly Malone.
Now her ghost wheels her barrow thro' streets broad and narrow,
Crying, "Coekles and musseis, alive alive o!"
"Alive alive o!", (etc.)
r,I<>p ,hythm
THE IRISH ROVER
Traditiopal
© Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited, 8/9 Frith Street, London Wl.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Voice: flute
Rhythm: 8 beat
Tempo: medium (.=96)
INTRO
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1. In the year of our Lord, eight-een hun - dred and six, we set
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sail from the coal quay of Cork. We were saH - ing a - way with a
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car
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e - le - gant craft, it was rigged fore and aft, and
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the trade winds
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drove---- her. She had twen - ty three masts, and she stood sev' -ral blasts, and they
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accordion to finish
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to violin;
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called_ her the I
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Verse 2:
There was Barney Magee, from the banks of the Lee,
There was Hogan, from County Tyrone;
There was Johnny McGurk, who was scared stiff of work,
And a chap from Westmeath named Malone.
There was Slugger O'Toole, who was drunk as a role,
And fighting Bill Tracy from Dover.
And your man Mick McCann from the banks of the Bann
Was the skipper on the Irish Rover.
Verse 3:
We had one million bags of the best Sligo rags,
We had two million barrels of bone;
We had three millio.n bales of old nanny goats' tails,
We had four million barrels of stone.
We had five million hogs and six million dogs,
And seven million barrels of porter;
We had eight million sides of old blind horses' hides
In the hold of the lrish Rover.
Verse 4:
We had sailed seven years when the measles broke out,
And oUr ship lost her way in a fog.
And the\,whole of the crew was reduced down to two,
''!Was myself and the captain's old dog.
Then the ship struck a rock, 0 Lord, what a shock,
And nearly tumbled over;
Tumed nine times around, then the poor old dog was drowned.
I'm the last of the Irish Rover.
I
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ver.
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stop rhythm
13
THEMOUNTAINS OF MOURNE
Words & Music by Percy French & Houston Collisson
© Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited, 8/9 Frith Street, London WL
All Rights Reserved, International Copyright Secured,
Voice: c1arinet
Rbythm: waltz
Tempo: medium (J=92)
7
1. Oh Ma ry, this Lon - don's a won - der ful
1Tlp
sight, wid the peo - pIe here wor - kin' by day and by
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night. They don't sow po ta - toes, nor bar - ley, nor
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wheat, but there's gangs 0'
them dig - gin' for gold in the
street. At least when I axed them, that's
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what I was told; so I just took a hand at this
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1 dig - gin' for gold. But for all that 1 found there
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might as weIl be where the moun - tains
Mourne
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sweep
1.2.3.4. to violin, piano, 5.
flute, clarinet
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down to the seal 2.1 be- seal
stop rhythm
Verse 2:
1 believe that when writin', a wish you expressed
As to how the fine ladies in London were dressed,
WeIl if you'll believe me, when asked to a ball,
Faith, they don't wear a top to their dresses at all.
Oh, I've seen them meself, and you could not, in thrath,
Say if they were bound for a ball or a bath.
Don't be startin' them fashions now, Mary Macree,
Where the mountains o'Mourne sweep down to the sea.
Verse 3:
I've seen England's King from the top of a bus,
1 never knew him, tho' he means to know us.
And tho' by the Saxon we once were oppressed,
Still 1 cheered (God forgive me), 1 cheered with the rest.
And now that he's visited Erin's green shore,
We'll be much better friends than we've been heretofore,
When we've got all we want we're as quiet as can be
Where the mountains o'Moume sweep down to the sea.
Verse 4:
You remember young Peter O'Loughlin, of course?
WeIl now he is here at the head 0' the force.
1 met him today, 1 was crossin' The Strand,
And he stopped the whole street wid wan wave of his hand.
And t4ere we stood talking of days that are gone,
While the whole population of London looked on.
But for llJI these great powers he's wishful, like me,
To be back where dark Mourne sweeps down to the sea.
Verse 5:
There's beautiful girls here, oh, ni ver mind.
Wid beautiful shapes nature niver designed.
And lovely complexions all roses and crame,
But O'Loughlin remarked wid regard to the same.
"That if those roses you venture to sip,
The colours might al1 come away on your Hp."
So 1'11 wait for the wild rose that's waitin' for me,
Where the mountains of Mourne sweep down to the sea.
IS
THE TOWN I LOVED SO WELL
Words & Music by Phil Coulter
© Copyright 1980 Four Seasons Music Limited, Killarney House, Killarney Road,
Bray, Co, Wicklow, IrelandlPhil Coulter,
All Rights Reserved, International Copyright Secured,
Voice: piano
Rhythm: 8 beat
Tempo: medium ()=96)
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1. In my me mo - ry I will a1 ways_ see
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town-_ that-_ so weH. Where our
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school played ball by the gas yard- wall, and we
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laughed thro' the smoke, and the smeH. Go-ing
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horne in the train, run-ning up the dark- lane; past the
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jail, and down be-hind the foun-tain. Those were
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hap py days, in so ma ny, ma - ny
1.2.3.4.
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ways, in the town
to clarinet, guitar,
piano to finish
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istop rhythm
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Verse 2:
In the early morning the shirt faetory horn
Called women from Creggan, the Moor, and the Bog.
While the men on the dole played a mother's role:
Fed the ehildren and then walked the dog.
And when times got tough there was just about enough,
And they saw it through without eomplaining.
For deep inside was a burning pride
In the town I loved so weIl.
Verse 3:
There was musie there in the Derry air,
\
Like a language that we aIl eould understand.
I remember the day that I earned my first pay,
When I played in a small pick-up band.
There I spent my youth, and to tell you the truth,
I was sad to leave it all behind me,
For I' d learned about life, and I'd found a wife,
In the town I loved so weIl.
mf
Verse 4:
But when I've returned how my eyes have burned
To see how a town eould be brought to its knees
By the armoured ears and the bombed-out bars,
And the gas that hangs on to every breeze.
Now the army's instalIed by that old gas yard wall,
And darnned barbed wire gets higher and higher,
With their tanks and their guns, oh my God, what have they done
To the town I loved so weIl?
Verse 5:
Now the musie's gone, but they earry on,
For their spirit's bruised, never broken.
They will not forget, but their hearts are set
On tomorrow, and peaee onee again.
For what's done is done, and what's won is won,
And what's lost is lost and gone forever,
I ean only pray for a bright brand new day,
In the town I love so well.
17
WHISTLING GYPSY (THE GYPSY ROVER)
Words & Music by Leo Maguire
© Copyright 1951 Waltons Musical Instrument Galleries Ltd, 2-5 North Frederick Street. Dublin I, Ireland.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Voice: oboe
Rhythm: 8 beat
Tempo: medium 0=116)
INTRO
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VERSES
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l.The gyp - sy ro - ver came 0 - ver the hill,
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down thro' the val - ley so sha - dy. He whist-led and sang till the
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green - woods rang, and he won the heart of a la
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CHORUS
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- dy. Ah dee doo ab dee doo da day.
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Ab dee doo ab dee day dee. He whist-led and sang till the
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green - woods rang, and he won the heart of a la
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to clarinet,
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Verse 2:
She left her father's castle gate,
She left her fair young lover;
She left her servants and her state,
To follow the gypsy rover.
Verse 3:
Her father saddled up his fastest steed,
He ranged the valleys over;
He sought his daughter at great speed,
And the whistling gypsy rover.
Verse 4:
He came at last to a mansion fine,
Down by the river Clady;
And there was music and there was wine,
For the gypsy and his lady.
\
Verse 5:
"He is no gypsy, father dear,
But lord of these lands all over;
I'm going to stay 'til my dying day
With my whistling gypsy rover."
19
THE WILD COLONIAL BOY
Traditional. Arranged by Joseph M. Crofts
,
© Copyright 1950 Waltons Musical Instrument Galleries Ltd, 2-5 North Frederick Street, Dublin I, lreland.
All Rights Reserve<!. International Copyright Secured.
Voice: violin solo
Rhythm: waltz
Tempo: fairly fast 0=132)
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1. There was
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co 10 nial boy,
ing Jack was great,
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name.--_______
man.--_______
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Jack
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He was
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born and reared
led the boys
pi ace called Cas
dusk to ear
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was his fa ther's on ly son, and his
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20
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r
*
4r
mo ther's pride and joy.-------­
And
was the rale "Me
Coy".--------
And
mJ'
[!] [!8
m
~ ~
,J
zJ
I
4r
I sr
Jr 1
IJ
JJ
r
dear ly did bis pa rents love the
all the neigh bours loved young lack the
~ 7
F
to piano, flute,
(FINE)
accordion, etc.
I,A
J
Isr
4(jJ
:11
~ ~ .J
IJ
wild co 10 nial boy.
*
2. At
wild co 10 nial boy. 3. At the i
(stop rhythm
f
last time)
mp
Verse 3: Verse 6:
At the early age of sixteen years One moming on the Prairie wild
He left his native horne, lack Duggan rode along,
And to Australia's sunny land While listening to the mocking bird,
He was inc1ined to roam. Singing a cheerful song.
He robbed the rich, and he helped the poor, Out jumped three troopers, fierce and grim,
He stabbed lames MacEvoy; Kelly, Davis and Fitzroy;
A terror to Australia was They all set out to capture him,
The wild colonial boy. The wild colonial boy.
Verse 4: Verse 7:
For two more years this daring youth "Surrender now, lack Duggan, come!
Ran on his wild career; You see there' s three to one!
With a head that knew no d/Ulger, Surrender in the Queen's name, sir!
And a heart that knew no fear. You, are a plundering son!"
He robbed outright the wealthy squires, lack drew two pistols from his side,
And their arms he did destroy; And glared upon Fitzroy,
And woe to all who <iared to fight "1'11 fight, but not surrender!" cried
The wild colonial boy. . The wild colonial boy.
\
Verse 5: Verse 8:
He loved the Prairie and the Bush He fired a shot at Kelly,
Where rangers rode along; Which brought him to the ground;
With his gun stuck in its holster deep, He frred point blank at Davis, too,
He sang a merry song. Who fell dead at the sound.
But if a foe once crossed bis track, But abullet pierced his brave young heart,
And sought bim to destroy, From the pistol of Fitzroy;
He'd get sharp shootin' sure from lack, And that was how they captured him,
The wild colonial boy. The wild colonial boy.
THE SPINNING WHEEL
Words & Music by John Prands Waller & Delia Murphy
© Copyright 1950 Waltons Musical Instrument Galleries LId, 2-5 North Frederick Street, Dublin I, lreland,
All Rights Reserved, International Copyright Secured.
Voice: harp
Rhythm: 6/8 ballad
Tempo: slow 0.=54)
INSTRUMENTAL
~ 7 [!] ~ 7
@ä 011:'[ 'r:I ErJ 1'[ 'E ~ E'r:I 1 E Li EEi
'lI!f
G
~ 7
VERSES
j j
J J
JI 'e 'C J
j ]
1. Mel - low the moon - light to shine is be - gin - ning,
mp
f* f*
-r-,J .w.
j j
J.
j l,i,J J
[!]
B ~
4['
F irr

J
1
,.j
J
c10se by the win - dow young Ei - leen is spin-ning. Bent o'er the fire, her blind
C
~ 7 [!]
~ 7
[!]

SE
r
• ~ E
j
----f/I
1
4[
J

r
3 ~ '
~
J
I
Zt
f)
7.
11
J
J E
r
grand - mo - ther sit - ting, is croon - ing, and moan - ing, and drow - si - ly knit-ting.
~ 7
CHORUS
pa
@ä .J. jJ .J.
jJ I.J .3 :J '0 ~
4J.
Q
J
II
zj
J
Mer - ri -ly, cheer - i -ly, noi - si - ly whir - ring. Swings the wheel, spins the wheel,
'lI!f
22
[!] [EJ [!]
-fI
J
J
j
S(jJ
I
4f
J r
2[
J

r
ISE
r
• 'f 'f
* ~
paL
J C2J
while the foot's stir - ring. Spright - ly, and light - ly, and air - - ly ring-ing,
(FINE)
to flute, c1arinet,
~ 7 [!] ~ 7 [!] accordion, violin,
harp to finish
4[
J

r
J.
j
J
J:
J
'f
:11

t E ~
sounds the sweet voice of the young mai - den sing
-
ing.
r
(stop rhythm
last time)
Verse 2:
"Eileen, a chara*, I hear someone tapping,"
'''Tis the ivy, dear mother, against the glass flapping."
"Eily, I surely hear somebody sighing,"
"'Tis the sound, mother dear, of the autumn winds dying."
Merrily, cheerily, noisily whirring (etc.)
Verse 3:
"What' s that noise that I hear at the window I wonder?"
"'Tis the little birds chirping the holly-bush under."
"What makes you be pushing and moving your stool on?"
"And singing all wrong that old song of Coolin?"
Merrily, cheerily, noisily whirring (etc.)
Verse 4:
There's a form at the casement, the form of her true love,
And he whispers with face bent, "I'm waiting for you, love.
"Get up on the stool, through the lattice step lightly,
"And we'll rove in the grove while the moon's shining brightly."
Merrily, cheerily, noisily whirring (etc.)
Verse 5:
The maid shakes her head; on her lips lays her fingers,
Steals up from the seat, longs to go and yet lingers.
A frightened glance turns to her drowsy grandmother,
Puts one foot on the stool, spins the wheel with the other.
Merrily, cheerily, noisily whirring (etc.)
-\
\
Verse 6:
Lazily, easily, swings now the wheel round,
Slowly and lowly is heard now the reel's sound.
Noiseless and light to the lattice above her,
The maid steps, then leaps to the arms of her lover.
Slower, and slower, and slower the wheel swings.
Lower, and lower, and lower the reel rings.
Ere the reel and the wheel stopped their spinning and moving,
Through the grove the young lovers by moonlight are roving.
* pronounced KAURA
23
FORTY SHADES OF GREEN
Words & Music by Johnny Cash
© Copyright 1961 by Southwind Music Incorpora!ed, USA.
Carlin Music Corporation, Iron Bridge House, 3 Bridge Approach, London NWI for the United Kingdom,
British Commonwealth (excluding Canada and Australasia), Israel and the Republic of Ireland.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Voice: guitar
Rhythm: swing
TemPo: fairly fast 0=144)
VERSES
1.1 elose my eyes and pic
-
ture the em - 'raId of the
(2.) wish that I could spend an hour at Dub - Hn's chur-ning
mp
[!]7 [I]
~
j
~
'E2J
I
r' D
3r tU I
zJ
J 3J J
sea,
*
from the fish ing boats at Din - gle,
*
to the
surf. I'd-- love to watch the farm
-
er drain the
~ 7
[!]7 [I]
shores of Dun a dee. I miss the ri ver
bogs, and spade the turf. To see a - gain the
mf mp
[!1
Shan - non, and the folks at Skib - ber een. The
thatch - ing .of the straw the wo - men glean. I'd
[I]
\
0
7
[!]7
moor - land, and the mid - lands, with their for - ty shades of
walk from Cork to Liam to see the for - ty shades of
mf
24
CHORUS
@]
guitar to clarinet
[!] @]7
~
11
~ ~
~ : 1
:j
j
~ j :
2)
~
IJ J
~
~
green. (
But most of all I miss a girl in
green.
mp
@] [!] @]
0 ~
..
1
Tip - pe - ra ry Town. And most of all I
~
J sr
IJ.
Jl
~ 1
~
J
1
2J J
sr' p
0
[!] @]
0
7
@]7 @]7
clarinet to guitar
J )
J JJ.
2) 1
~
4J
1
~
r r
r J
miss her lips as soft as ei der - down. A ­
mf
@] [!]
1
~
J.
2)
J
J
J J J
~
sr
1
r
J f
J
gain I want to see and do the things we've done and
@]
0
7
J
~
s[jJ
1
.cl
J ~
~
r r
r'
p
3J J
seen; where the breeze is sweet as Sha - li - mar, and there's
\
2.@] l.@]
@]7
~
@]7
,
::;-­
I
~ •
14 14
for - ty shades of green. 2. I green.
I
mp
f
stop rhythm
25
WHEN IRISH EYES ARE SMILING
Words by George Graff & Chauncey Olcott. Music by Emest Ball
© Copyright 1912 M. Witmark & Sons, USA.
B. Feldman & Company Limited. 127 Charing Cross Roed, London WC2 (75%) &
Redwood Music Limited. Iron Bridge House. 3 Bridge Approach, London NW1 (25%).
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Voice: trumpet
Rhythm: waltz
Tempo: medium 0=100)
[EJ7
When I rish eyes are
mp
F
smi ling,-----__ sure, it's . lilre a
0
, ~
sr
l(
r
r"
Ir
J
*
mom in spring. In the
[!]
0
, ~
4r
r I
r
r
r
Ir
lilt of I rish laugh ter,
'\
@]7 [!]7
you can hear the an gels
26
~
~ 7
0
,
l,d
J

~ ~
J- LW sr
sing. When I rish
~ 7
hearts are hap
py,------
all the
0
"
1 1
~ ~
2F
I
r
r
r'
world seems bright and gay.
@]7
to brass ensemble
And when I rish eyes are
mJ' cresc.
7 7
0
sr
,
2r
---
--­
~ ~
r
2Mr
Ir
r
r
1 1
smi ling, sure, they steal your
,
\
r.-...
~ 7
0
::>­
sr
1F'>
~ ~
r
1 I ~ 11
heart a way.
I
stoprhythm
ff
PHIL THE FLUTER
Words & Music by Percy French
© Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited, 8/9 Frith Slreet, London Wl.
All Rights Reserved, International Copyright Secured.
Voice: flute
Rhytbm: swing
Tempo: medium 0=112)
VERSES [I]
[!J [I]

~
I
3J.
j
J.
j
"1
.J *~ .Xi
l
l: J.
j
J.
jSt'
J
r-
'D 3i J
I
---...;
1. Have you heard of Phil the Flu - ter, of the town of Bal - ly-muek? The-­
mf
[!]7 [I]
*IJ. J J. j'[ I F' [I.J j j. .J ,-}l 'I,PO r J. JJ jT ~ r; I
times were go - ing hard with hirn, in fact, the man was bruk', so he just sent out a no - tiee to his
neigh - bours one and all, as- how he' d like their eom·pa·ny that eve - ning at a ball. And­
[!] ~
f ' ~
~ 'E LI r lJ IT ; F' t .f J .J IJ Ir !
when wri - tin' out he was eare - ful to sug-gest to them: if they found a hat of bis eon­
~ 7
[!]7
[I]
[!] ~ [I]
*r
~
f
IJ
"1\
)1 sr
;t-
~ .
"
[-4ftu Ir; F';.l .9J
va - niant to the door, the more they put when - e - ver he re - ques - ted them, "The
CHORUS
[!]
7
add violin [I]
bet ter would the mu - sie be for bat - ther-in' the floor." With the toot of the flute, and the
28
f
I
[!]7
twid die of the fid - die, 0, hop - ping in the mid - die, like a her - rin' on a grid - die, 0,
[!]
[!]
0
7
~
~ , J J 'EJ F
JJ. j.p ~ ' ~ ~ I'E'
! r jf,J. H. iJl
Up down, hands a - rown' , eross - ing to the wall.
Oh! __
had - n't we the gai - e- ty at
1.2.3. 4.
[!] [!]7 [!] [!]
cut violin
-
r
I
l1li r
Phil the Flu - ter's Ball! 2. There was Phil the Flu - ter's Ball!
I!if
Verse 2:
There was Misther Denis Dogherty, who kept "The Runnin' Dog";
There was litde erooked Paddy from the Tiraloughett bog.
There were boys from ev'ry Barony, and girls from ev'ry "art",
And the beautiful Miss Bradys in a private ass an' eart.
And along with them eame bouncing Mrs Cafferty,
Little Miekey Mulligan was also to the fore.
Rose, Suzanne, and Margaret O'Rafferty,
The flow'r of Adrumgullion and the Pride of Pethravore.
With the toot of the flute, (etc.)
Verse 3:
First Httle Micky Mulligan got up to show them how,
And then the widow Cafferty steps out and makes her bow.
"I eould dance you off your legs," sez she, "As sure as you were born
"If you'll only make the piper play: 'The Rare Is In The Corn.'"
So Phil plays up to the best of his ability,
The lady and gentleman begin to do their share,
While young Mick was a 'prancing with agility,
Deerepit Mrs Cafferty was leapin' like a hare!
With the toot of the flute, (etc.)
Verse 4:
Then Phil the fluter tipped a wink to little crooked Pat,
"I think it's nearly time," sez he, "For passin' round the hat."
So Paddy did the neeessary, looking mighty eute, sez
"Ye've got to pay the piper when he toothers on the flute."
Then all joined in wid the greatest joviality,
Covering the Buckle and the Shuffle and the Trent.
Jigs were daneed, of the very finest quality,
The widow found a husband, and the fluter found the rentl
With the toot ofthe flute, (etc.)
stop rhythm
29
I'LL TAKE YOU HOME AGAIN KATHLEEN
Words & Music by Thomas P. Westendorf
© Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited, 8/9 Frith Street, London WI.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Voice: violin solo
Rhythm: 8 beat
Tempo: fairly slow (J=72)
VERSES
@]7
ITJ ITJ
IJ
...
J
-p
e
11:
zJ
JJ d
J
MJ
I
4r
4J
1. 1'11 take you horne a
-
gain, Kath -
leen;
*
a
(2.) know you love rne, Kath - leen, dear. Your
mf
@]7
~ ITJ
t&
J
l
zlJ
J
J
J
I(q)J
IJ
cross the 0 cean wild and wide.
*
To
heart was e ver fond and true. I
ITJ
where your heart has e ver been, Since
al ways feel when you are near, that
@]
@]7
@]
~ &
IJ.
4p
sJ
MJ
J
J
I
4r
first you were rny bon ny bride.
*
The
r
life holds no - thing, dear, but you. The
'\
mp
@]7
~ ITJ
ro ses all have left your cheek; I've
smiles that once you gave to rne, I
30
[!]7
watch'd them fade a - way and die. Your
scarce ly e ver see them now; tho'
* ~
~
when the fields are fresh and green,
0
~ 7
1.0
to solo violin
11 ... I
voice
ma
[!]
JJ.
tears
dark
CHORUS
0
1
f
~
J.
where
~
is
ny,
l
be - dim
'ning sha
­
[!]7
will
l
your
sad
ma ­
[!]7
J
take
[!]7
z#J
heart
0
7
when
-
e'er you speak,
ny times 1 see
[!]
J
J
h
J
1
r
your 10 - ving
eyes. ~
dow on your brow.
0
you back, Kath leen,
0
3
J
J
1 (q)rJ
will find no pain.
[!]
and
a
[!]7
violin to string ensemble
*
IJ
Oh,
to
SF
*
And
[!]
1 will
2. 0
t..l
- 1#
take you to your horne a gain. 2.1 gain.
i
mf stop rhythm
I
11
31
PEG 0' MY HEART
1
Words & Music by Bryan & Fisher
i
© Copyright 1933 EMI Catalogue Partnershlp & EMI Robbins Catalog Incorporated, USA.
Worldwide print rights controlled by Warner Bros. PubllcationsllMP Limited (50%)/
Redwood Music Limited, lron Bridge House, 3 Bridge Approach, London NWI (50%).
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Voice: guitar
Rhythm: swing

1 J.

23 J
E J
1.ijt J cl l <F 2J
2
Peg 0' my heart,- I love you, don't let us part,-­
mf
[I]
7


j

5r'
r
lW
I
J

J
J>
J

J
J> /W
*
*
I love you. I al-ways knew_ it would be
you,__
[I]
7

tFl 11t .J. j J. ] I .J ,#3,J· J4 ,11 ,1 ,j J J=d
since I heard your lilt-ing laugh-ter, it's your 1- rish heart I'm af - ter. Peg 0' my heart,­
f mf


j
F
J
J>
j

4J.
J
zJ
I
lq1
lJ <F
sr'

r >­
your glan - ces make my heart say,-- "How's chan - ces?"
[I]
7

guitar to piano
J!J
J
J
Come, be my own,- come, make your home-- in my heart.--­
f
32
7
Peg 0' my heart,- I love you,
mp
@]7

F >­
t
2J
J

<[ 't
2W J
5F'

r
J
J"
*
we'll ne-ver part,- I love you. Dear lit - tle girl,_
[!]7 [!]7
t J JJ J. ,J I '[ 'f-li J. j I J "J ,J, j 4 1\] MJ I
sweet lit-tle girl,- sweet - er than the Rose of E - rin, are your win-ning smiles en - dear - in'.
-==.. ======= f
@]7
Peg 0' my heart,_ your glan - ces with I - rish art,-­
mp
en - trance us, come, be my own,_ come make your home_ in my heart._
cresc.
ff
i
stoprhythm
33
DANNY BOY (LONDONDERRY AIR)
Traditional Irish Melody. Words by Fred E. Weatherly
© Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited. 819 Frith Street, London WL
AU Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Voice: flute
Rhythm: 8 beat
Tempo: medium 0=88)
N.C.
1.0h, Dan - ny Boy, the pipes, the pipes are
(2.)come, and an the flowers are
P
call ing, from gIen 10 gIen, and
dy ing, if I am dead, as
~ 7
[I]
7
down the moun - tain side. The sum - mer's
dead I may weIl be. You'll come and
gone, and all the ro ses fall ing,
find the place where I am ly ing,
[I]
7
it's you, it's you must go and I must
and kneel and say an A ve there for
34
bide. But come you back when
me. And 1 shall hear, tho'
mf
[!] CE] [!]7
,
sr
r
r
r
I
3r
zr
Ir
2r
r
r
I
*
sum - mer's in the mea dow, or when the
soft you tread a bove me, and all my
[!] CE]


val ley's hushed and white with snow.
grave will warm - er, sweet - er be.
f
[!]7 CE]

[!]
add flute

J sJ
,
f IJ J J

I
J
-
It's 1'11 be here in sun
-
shine or in
For you will bend and tell me that you
mp
@]


sr
r
,

I;
I
*
2r
Ir
r
I
'r
'F
sha dow, oh, Dan - ny Boy, oh, Dan
-
ny
love me, and 1 shall sleep in peace un
[!] [!]7

[!]

i
1. cutstrings
\
Boy, 1 love you so. 2.But when you
til you come to
p
[!]

2.
s
me.
t
stoprhythm
35
MacNAMARA'S BAND
Words by John J. Stamford. Music by Shamus O'Connor
© Copyright 1917 Bdwin Ashdown Limited. 8/9 Frith Street. London Wl.
All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.
Voice: clarinet
Rhythm: march 6/8 (or swing)
Tempo: medium 0.=108)
VERSES
@]
11:
sJ P J P
I
J P J
)J
I
J P
J
l
,I
M
H j ~
I
1. My name is Mac
-
na
-
ma -
ra, rm the lea - der of the
mp
~ 7
@]
--,­
~
12.
J
)1 I
sr
p
r
p I 4r
p
r
p
band, and tho' we're small in num
-
ber, we're the
0
7
1!l7
@]
"t
t
l
j
l
13
l
)1
ic
,
i ~ : I
JJ
p
J kg

best in all the land! Oh! I am the con
­
mp
f
~
:f}
J P J P
I
sJ P
J
l
J)
I
12.
duc
-
tor, and we of
-
ten have to play
*
with
1!l7 @]
1!l7
ic ic
)1 ))
,-
4r
p
r
I
sr
p
1J
2}
I
lU
5p
r
all the best mu
-
si - cian - ers you've heard a
-
bout to ­
36
[!]
BRIDGE
to accordion
..
11
5;
.n
;
.n
;
,-
.J5
'I
Y
41)
I
J J P
IJ
day. When the drums go bang, the cym - bals clang, the
mj'
~ 7
horns will blaze a - way; Mac - Car - thy puffs the
~ 7
ould bas - soon, while Doyle the pipes will play. Oh!
f
[!]
,-
3;
J J
;
J J
I
;
J J
;
P
I
5;
p
J
l
Hen - nes - sy Ten - nes - sy toot - des the flute, my word! tis some - thing
mj'
~ 7
[!]
,_
JJ
I
ir 'f
IJ J l'
1
'r
p
r
I.
p
IJ
2)
grand! Oh, a cre
-
dit to ould Ire -
land, boys, is
\
~ 7 [!]
CHORUS
to brass ensemble
,...
sp J1
...
I
2)
.,
'f
11
4J. J.

rJ
r
1 ~
J
J
Mac - na - ma
-
ra's band! Tra - la - la la la,
f
37
0
7
*1
J
@]7
*-
j
la
*1
~ .
~
0
7
zJ.
la
la,
sD
r
p
I
LJ.
J.
I
J'
j
l
tra - la la la la. Tra la
@]
4Q
#r
p
I
sr
Q
HP
I
tj:
r
la la la la la la la la.
IJ
F
J
J I
4J. J.
I
sD
r p
Tra - la - la la la,
*
tra - la la
@]7
sr Jl
lJ.
I
*.
3J
l
I .3
4Q
#r Q
I
Q
r
I.
la. Tra
-
la la la la la la la la la
@]7
1.2. @] 13. @]
to clarinet
tra - la - la laI 2. When­ laI
i
ff
mp
stop rhythm
Verse 2:
Whenever an election's on we play on either side,
The way'We play our fine ould airs fiUs Irish hearts with pride.
Oh! if poor Tom Moore was living now, he'd make yez understand
That none could do hitnjustice like ould "Macnamara's Band".
When the ~ m s go bang, (etc. continuing into CHORUS)
Verse 3:
We play at wakes and weddings, and at every county ball,
And at any great man's funeral we play the "Dead March In Saui".
When the Prince of Wales to Ireland came, he shook me by the hand,
And said he'd never heard the like of "Macnamara's Band".
When the drums go bang, (etc. continuing into CHORUS)
38
CHORD CHARTS (For Left Hand)
C7
aceompaniment seetion "I
C Cm
accompaniment seetion "I I accompaniment section "I
I H I '.U I.H.I ,BI I H I I.H I HI
• •
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CHORD CHARTS (For Left Hand)

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The Black Velvet Band 6
Cockles And Musseis 10
Danny Boy (Londonderry Air) 34
Forty Shades Of Green 24
GalwayBay 8
1'11 Take You Horne Again Kathleen 30
IrishEyes 4
The lrish Rover 12
MacNarnara's Band 36
The Mountains OfMourne 14
Peg O' My Heart 32
PhilThe Fluter 28
The Spinning Wheel 22
The Town I Loved So We1116
When Irish Eyes Are Smiling 26
Whistling Gypsy (The Gypsy Rover) 18
The Wild Colonial Boy 20
Chord Charts 39.40

\

IRISH EYES
Words & Music by Hank Locklin and George Carroll
© Copyright 1974 Sawgrass Music Publishing Incorporated, USA. Acuff-Rose Music Limited, 25 James Street, Londen Wl. All Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured.

Voice: human voice Rhythm: 8 beat Tempo: medium 0=92)

INTRO

[!]

@]7

VERSES

mf

l.The

rnoon - light

on

the

mp

2

1

Shan - non_ _

is

a

sight

to

see.

The

sun -light

on

Kil

- Iar - ney's

Iakes

means

horne

sweet

horne

to

[!]

*~

I.

J.
rne.

'1

2)) Of

14r
Na

r
ture's

sr
rna

[!]7

p I J 3............. ;r

ny bless - ings, _ _

*

2

ern - 'raid

isIe,

I'd

give

thern

all

to

cresc.

my lovely Irish eyes. But most of all to see again your smiling Irish eyes.. Ir .."-..2.ly ish l I . Or walk the shores of Eireann and hear the seagulls cry. love J.[!] I ~ ~ ~7 1. But most of all to look into your lovely Irish eyes. then back to voice ~ . Verse 4: In dr~s I see your angel face that aches my lonely heart. I and I need--­ you. I can't forget that moming when we said goodbye.3. [I] voice to string ensemble. your smi -ling Ir ­ ish eyes.S I~. I love you and I need you. 5 . Beside the laughing waters of the lovely Lee.. Verse 3: To hear again those Shandon bells ringing heavenly.J -­ f §. 2. see a . Or listen to the ocean and the wind that sighs. 1. To sleep beneath the mystic hills in dear old Donegal. The memory when I told you we would have to part._ _ my ~7 [I] ::> ~~ l J. * r 11 stopmythm Verse 2: To stroll again Antrim's GIens and see the waterfall. To - gain-_ mf mp TAG [!] eyes. I can't forget those teardrops in your lrish eyes.

tend . o7 hand.ry long.ing F down p @] r not ) in ­ Broad . bad cresc.way. 6 . All Rights Reserved.liek .THE BLACK VELVET BAND Traditional © Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited.As IH I r went walk .-ä j j r Je r r I of her \ p r i [[J I IJ J J Ir J J andslipped it right in . _ __ A @] . 8/9 Frith Street. Voice: trompet Rhythm: march 6/8 Tempo: medium 0. ~7 i *ä J J J IE 3J J I J.trip .ping a long. International Copyright Seeured.ing erTJ I Jr I __ j met with r a F 1~ J J fro .some o7 dam seI as she eame a . .=88) VERSES *.to my wateh she pulled out poek-et.ry first day that I met-__ her. mp @] to stay ve . On the ve . London Wl. @] @] g 'P 1.

Verse 3: Before the judge and the jury the both of us had to appear.2. Far away from my friends and relations. which caused me to stray from my land. They'll treat you to whiskey and porter. For seven years transportation right unto Van Dieman's Land. to follow the Black Velvet Band.. 1 . @] '>- 2 l y sp Her r eyes p ~( f r like the Black Vel . y sr J • dia-monds. \ Verse 4: Oh all you brave young Irish lads..vet band.j ~ up f I black vel .the case against us was clear. And before you have time for to leave them. mp rsropmytbm Verse 2: 'Twas in the town of Tralee an apprentice to trade I was bound. Till misfortune and trouble came over me.vet Band.[!] s. to follow her Black Velvet Band. they shone__ mf mp [!]7 IJ P r y ~ you'd-- J J J think she J J the 1 J. thrown 0 ver her shoul der. And a gentleman swore to the jewellery . was queen of With her hair cresc. a warning take by me.'Twas Land. 2.fä fä @] [!]7 • ps trompet to clarinet CHORUS 11 '( j J luck to tJ J J I IJ.. 7 . land. until you're unable to stand. Far away from my friends and relations.. [!] clarinet to trompet 4.3. tied @] I ~ [!]7 with a - 1. Beware of the pretty young damsels that are knocking around in Tralee. you are ooto Van Dieman's Land. With a-plenty of bright antusement to see the days go round.

lust to J J si J J J I go down on Gal. International Copyright Secured.~ I :J ~J J .J ~ I VERSES [I] @]7 horn to clarinet @ .dagh.ver go a . Arthur Colahan © Copyright 1947 by Box & Cox Publications Limited.cross the sea to Ire .J . Published by permission of McCullough Pigott Limited.way j mp the sun Bay.J.J J J I j * .land. then mp ~ @]7 at the clo-sing of your [I] @ 'r b b r ~ may-be ~ @]7 J. Dublin. All Rights Reserved.iJ day. I J #J and see ~ @]7 [I] 2 @]7 2. Voice: horn Rhythm: 8 beat Tempo: fairly slow 0=84) INTRO ~ ~ 1 @]7 cl e JJ J J mf .If ~J you @]7 ITJ ~ IIJ J J J J J J j I J J .GALWAY BAY Words & Music by Dr.:J Clad . you will I.~ ~ * 14 1. 1) I e . 11/13 Suffo1k Street. .J J 3 J J 5J 3 j I 0 - sit and watch the moon rise cresc. 3). . ver [!]7 @~ . Eire. mf 8 .

3. And somehow I am sure there's going to be. 2. ITJ f7\. And to sit be . 9 . Verse 4: For the strangers came and tried to teach us their way.bin.For mf mp Verse 3: For the breezes blowing o'er the seas from Ireland Are perfumed by the heather as they blow. vioIin. I will ask my God to let me make my heaven In that dear land across the Irish Sea.4. They scorned us just for being what we are. the wo-men in the mea-dows ma-king [!]7 [!]7 in the ca . And the women in the uplands diggin' praties.foot Gos-soons at 3. ~ 1 @]7 T' ITJ their play. l-erse 5: An~ if there' s going to be a life hereafter. and hay. @]7 clarinet to flute.side a turf fire cresc. Or light a penny candle from astar. But they might as weH go chasing after moonbeams. horn 5. Speak a language that the strangers do not know.gain the rip-ple of the trout-stream. I t> 14 the sea'-l stop rhythm watch the bare .m 7 @]7 1 hear a.

ing: . r a cry . Voice: accordion Rhythm: waltz Tempo: medium 0=92) VERSES @] IErnl 11: 2J 1. 8/9 Prith Street.row. ~ J thro' 13J streets J broad J and wheeled [I\7 @] [I] @] [I] J nar r . International Copyright Secured. r and Ir mus r sels. All Rights Reserved. I first set my eyes on sweet Mol ly Ma lone. In Dub J lin's J fair 1 J ci J ty. zJ J lar "Cock sr les. J where J the mp [I\7 girls are so pret ty.COCKLES AND MUSSELS Traditional © Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited. As she .r @] IErnl 2J J her J wJIeel \ IJ bar J row. London WJ.

.ing: [!] "Cock les.live - live mf IErnl J ===­ o! 2 J ~ [!]7 Jl a I. And they each wheeled their barrow thro' streets broad and narrow.- [!] [!]7 [!] CHORUS aJ I.2. but sure 'twas no wonder. J A IJJ live J live I J==-f o!" 1.. For so were her father and mother before. (etc. [!] ~ [!]7 a [!] o!" tJ . "Coekles and musseis.hythm Verse 2: She was a fishmonger. . Crying. (etc. I o!" 2. live l a J .I<>p . and mus sels. alive alive o!" "Alive alive o!". And that was the end of sweet Molly Malone.She live - live mp r ..) . and no one could save her. a live a - @]7 live [!] ~ to clarinet to violin 3. J a IJ o! ~ lJ A II~ j.. Now her ghost wheels her barrow thro' streets broad and narrow. alive alive o!" "Alive alive 01'(.) Verse 3: \ She died bf a fever.. Crying. zJ J Cry .live . "Coekles and musseis.

quay of 4f n IJ J J IJ 3c:r * @J7 ci . International Copyright Secured.way with a IJ sail 31 J J from the coal 3J J IJ Cork. All Rights Reserved.J 2:[3 IIJ f1 @J7 [IJ flute to accordion ~ r sr i7J we set VERSES ~r ~ ~ p "t 4i n 11: 1J fZJ J 1. J :l. 8/9 Frith Street. r ?J go 4r EJ I 1J 4.THE IRISH ROVER Traditiopal © Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited.-U sr and ~ 1 . rigged fore how_ _ the trade winds .dred and six. 7iif ~ ~ @J7 1 [IJ We were saH . eight-een hun .-:J J 4J7) I IJ hall car of bricks.gant craft. @J7 3( ~ [!] r 1 sr r1 4r In the year of our Lord.J 'U I'E lJ .- * ~ J J We'd an mp ~'r c:r e 12 ~ ~ @J7 [IJ ~ sr t:J it was 1 4p r PJ and aft. London Wl. )5 I 3r . Voice: flute Rhythm: 8 beat Tempo: medium (.ty ~ 'E ~ [!] [IJ for the grand [IJ in New York.le .J .=96) INTRO CE] f @J7 ~ [!] [IJ ~!l .ing @J7 a .

• her the I 2. And nearly tumbled over. She had ~ [!]7 [IJ [!]7 3( r I sr CJ . ''!Was myself and the captain's old dog. [IJ I ~ ~ . f mf' f stop rhythm i Verse 2: There was Barney Magee.'E7?) 1) . We had two million barrels of bone. I'm the last of the Irish Rover. 4iTJ I 11 J J 1J ~ drove---. then the poor old dog was drowned.n bales of old nanny goats' tails. We had eight million sides of old blind horses' hides In the hold of the lrish Rover.. Verse 3: We had one million bags of the best Sligo rags. And oUr ship lost her way in a fog.J af 1 I stood sev' -ral blasts.. 0 Lord. And the\. Verse 4: We had sailed seven years when the measles broke out.her.whole of the crew was reduced down to two. who was drunk as a role. and they ~ F twen . We had four million barrels of stone.. [!]7 I C 14 __ .. There was Ro called_ I - rish Ro ver... accordion to finish 4.. who was scared stiff of work. [!]7 [IJ r to violin. ver. from County Tyrone. And a chap from Westmeath named Malone.ty three masts. We had three millio.2. And your man Mick McCann from the banks of the Bann Was the skipper on the Irish Rover. We had five million hogs and six million dogs. from the banks of the Lee. There was Hogan. 1. Then the ship struck a rock. And seven million barrels of porter. and she cresc.3. 13 . Tumed nine times around. And fighting Bill Tracy from Dover. There was Johnny McGurk. There was Slugger O'Toole. what a shock.

7 bar . IJ so J I J 2J I gJ a 0 Isr hand 7 (jJ at this just took cresc.THEMOUNTAINS OF MOURNE Words & Music by Percy French & Houston Collisson © Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited. 8/9 Frith Street. Oh Ma ry. wid the peo . this Lon .kin' by day and by r @] [!]7 J * J I J sJ night. They don't sow [I] nor J IJ J J IJ J J po ta . International Copyright Secured. At least when I axed them. that's mf @] ~i 14 r r' what I Jl was I. Voice: c1arinet Rbythm: waltz Tempo: medium (J=92) 7 1.don's a won - der ful 1Tlp sight.gin' for gold in the street. IJ * told.ley. nor 7 wheat.toes. .pIe here wor . London WL All Rights Reserved. but there's gangs 0' them dig .

tains sweep as weIl be ~ 1. there )1 1 . Where the mountains o'Mourne sweep down to the sea. . clarinet [!] beseal 1. like me. 1 never knew him. IS . of course? WeIl now he is here at the head 0' the force. 1 was crossin' The Strand. When we've got all we want we're as quiet as can be Where the mountains o'Moume sweep down to the sea. [!] I [!] to the seal flute. But O'Loughlin remarked wid regard to the same. The colours might al1 come away on your Hp. Wid beautiful shapes nature niver designed. piano. all found f [!] J might 07 [!] 0' J J I J * JJ J I J J J I J J J Mourne _ _ where the moun . Still 1 cheered (God forgive me).. Faith. and you could not. when asked to a ball.4. We'll be much better friends than we've been heretofore.. Verse 4: You remember young Peter O'Loughlin. in thrath. 5. And he stopped the whole street wid wan wave of his hand. Verse 3: I've seen England's King from the top of a bus. ni ver mind. Don't be startin' them fashions now. And now that he's visited Erin's green shore. a wish you expressed As to how the fine ladies in London were dressed. oh.07 [!]7 [!] ~7 f' fl ~ j J dig . And t4ere we stood talking of days that are gone.1 stop rhythm i Verse 2: 1 believe that when writin'. "That if those roses you venture to sip.3. While the whole population of London looked on. WeIl if you'll believe me. Say if they were bound for a ball or a bath. 1 cheered with the rest. Mary Macree. But for llJI these great powers he's wishful.2. But for 1RfJ sj that j 1 I j [!]7 J.. And tho' by the Saxon we once were oppressed. to violin. To be back where dark Mourne sweeps down to the sea. I've seen them meself.gin' for J I J tJ J I J * gold. . And lovely complexions all roses and crame. 1 met him today. Where the mountains of Mourne sweep down to the sea. tho' he means to know us. Verse 5: There's beautiful girls here. . down 2. Oh. they don't wear a top to their dresses at all." So 1'11 wait for the wild rose that's waitin' for me.

Co. Bray. by the gas * J J and we $~~ ~ ~ I!] 7 ~ ~ ~ 2J laughed f1 thro' the \ 1 1J smoke. run-ning the dark- 'c:J * past the I uif . horne in the EJ • * 4 1 r up F Q - f' I ii lane.J ways_ see me I will a1 * zJ the mp I!] 7 town-_ that-_ weH. school .THE TOWN I LOVED SO WELL Words & Music by Phil Coulter © Copyright 1980 Four Seasons Music Limited. so Where our ~ I!] 7 t~~ J.J played I sr' ball fl 4J 1 ~ ~ fJJ yard- I .]111: 3d. 1. Killarney House.J wall. IrelandlPhil Coulter. In my . Wicklow.1!]7 ~~ ~ J I gr train. Killarney Road. * J J Go-ing $~~ :i: 16 ~ . International Copyright Secured.J mo Isr' ry J7J 4J 1 ~ 1 ~ f) . All Rights Reserved. 4J J I lU"_ I_4 ~ and the smeH. Voice: piano Rhythm: 8 beat Tempo: medium ()=96) ~ I!] 7 .

For I'd learned about life.4. and down be-hind the foun-tain. Now the army's instalIed by that old gas yard wall. And when times got tough there was just about enough. but they earry on.1n the n:r. guitar. hap J py I sr' days. I I •• 2. While the men on the dole played a mother's role: Fed the ehildren and then walked the dog. and what's won is won. never broken. Verse 4: But when I've returned how my eyes have burned To see how a town eould be brought to its knees By the armoured ears and the bombed-out bars. I remember the day that I earned my first pay. With their tanks and their guns. And the gas that hangs on to every breeze. For deep inside was a burning pride In the town I loved so weIl. i I stop rhythm mf Verse 2: In the early morning the shirt faetory horn Called women from Creggan. piano to finish . They will not forget. And they saw it through without eomplaining. weH. For their spirit's bruised. In the town I love so well.[!]7 jail.in so ma --=r J J J J ny. Verse 5: Now the musie's gone. oh my God. I was sad to leave it all behind me. ma . For what's done is done. what have they done To the town I loved so weIl? Verse 3: There was musie there in the Derry air. and to tell you the truth.ny 1. Those were mp ~ [!]7 @] ~ ~~ 3d. in the town ~ [!]7 ~ 2~ @] ______________ __ weH. @] ways. J ] I 4J:. And darnned barbed wire gets higher and higher. There I spent my youth. the Moor. I ean only pray for a bright brand new day. and I'd found a wife. but their hearts are set On tomorrow.3.2. When I played in a small pick-up band. \ Like a language that we aIl eould understand. _ _ _ _ _ __ to clarinet. In the town I loved so weIl. and the Bog. and peaee onee again. And what's lost is lost and gone forever. 17 .

J J. IJ~ He I 3 J 2J whist-led and j sang c:r till the val . 18 ~ 3 Ah 2J dee J 4§ Il J . Ireland.dy.ley cresc. International Copyright Secured.woods won the heart la mf CHORUS [!J ~7 [!J 11 [!J ab dee doo da ~7 ~ tJ. Voice: oboe Rhythm: 8 beat Tempo: medium 0=116) INTRO [!J @] [!J ~7 1 t [!J @] 1 ~ ä Il'(f'f CE E Cr I'r E [1 'E rl ' $3.3 doo 3 day. * .dy. Dublin I. rang. 3 iJ J J down thro' the 4c:J 1 J so sha J . .IW Ji3 VERSES [!J l. [!J ~7 [!J ~7 [!J !f ~7 ~.The gyp sy ro ver came ver ~7 0 - the hill. All Rights Reserved.WHISTLING GYPSY (THE GYPSY ROVER) Words & Music by Leo Maguire © Copyright 1951 Waltons Musical Instrument Galleries Ltd. 2-5 North Frederick Street. add strings each time @] [!J I. @] G 1 @] 4JJ and IsJ he P?J D 7 J ai J of a l~ 3 aJ aJ green . [Ij7 ~ä 4F aF J .

.-.. piano. For the gypsy and his lady. . I~J.. .woods and - 2J I'@r ~ Iv @]7 5. @] r. father dear." 19 . Verse 4: He came at last to a mansion fine. . uJ) L. mp I stop rhythm Verse 2: She left her father's castle gate. . \ Verse 5: "He is no gypsy. She left her servants and her state. flute f] J won the heart Jf TI ItJ of a la aß green . He sought his daughter at great speed. Verse 3: Her father saddled up his fastest steed.She ~V' dy. She left her fair young lover. @] @] @] @] I IJ he to clarinet. To follow the gypsy rover. I'm going to stay 'til my dying day With my whistling gypsy rover.. But lord of these lands all over. Down by the river Clady.. -dy. I J He @] @]7 J 2J and j sang c:J till the whist-led @]7 4r @] lr 1J rang. And there was music and there was wine. And the whistling gypsy rover. He ranged the valleys over. 1\ '" @] @]7 lJ dee @] @]7 J Ab J doo 4c:J I r ab dee day J dee. 2.

his Ca IJ He was He-­ name. © Copyright 1950 Waltons Musical Instrument Galleries Ltd. great. 3[jJ and his he-­ cresc. their in pranks. All Rights Reserve<!. He At ~ [I] 7 [§J ~~ zr was fish F his in' Ir fa or F I 'r ther's at on poach ~ . dawn. There was (2. JJ Jack or 10 Jack mp [I] 7 ~ aß Dug swing IJ gan ing I sJ was a ITJ J I J. Voice: violin solo Rhythm: waltz Tempo: fairly fast 0=132) ITJ ~~I'rll: .J ly in' I lF son.--_ _ _ _ _ __ born led and the reared boys in in Ire all land. International Copyright Secured. Crofts . Arranged by Joseph M. 2-5 North Frederick Street.--_ _ _ _ _ __ man.d 1. 20 . lreland. a from [I] 7 pi ace dusk called to \ @]7 Cas ear tle ly maine.) ham ~ ~ ~r nial was zJ a mer I 4r wild throw F I er co ing IJ boy. Dublin I.THE WILD COLONIAL BOY Traditional. trout.

sir! You. Out jumped three troopers. And woe to all who <iared to fight The wild colonial boy. etc. ~7 F (FINE) ~~ . He sang a merry song. He'd get sharp shootin' sure from lack. But if a foe once crossed bis track. The wild colonial boy. He robbed the rich. . At 3. And glared upon Fitzroy. And sought bim to destroy. Kelly.J dear all zJ ly the I 4r did neigh r bis bours I sr pa loved Jr rents young 1 IJ love lack JJ the the to piano. Verse 8: He fired a shot at Kelly.A 10 10 J nial nial boy. too.J wild wild IJ co co I. and he helped the poor. From the pistol of Fitzroy. And to Australia's sunny land He was inc1ined to roam. (stop rhythm last time) i * 4(jJ 2. The wild colonial boy. . Singing a cheerful song. He frred point blank at Davis. The wild colonial boy. And a heart that knew no fear. Davis and Fitzroy. lack Duggan. Verse 7: "Surrender now. A terror to Australia was The wild colonial boy. He stabbed lames MacEvoy. With a head that knew no d/Ulger. With his gun stuck in its holster deep. While listening to the mocking bird. Who fell dead at the sound. fierce and grim. At the :11 mp Verse 6: One moming on the Prairie wild lack Duggan rode along. Which brought him to the ground. "1'11 fight. flute. But abullet pierced his brave young heart.[!]7 ~7 ~~ r mo was r ther's the 1 sr pride rale r and "Me Ir joy. He robbed outright the wealthy squires. come! You see there' s three to one! Surrender in the Queen's name. Verse 4: For two more years this daring youth Ran on his wild career.-------­ Coy". And that was how they captured him. boy. They all set out to capture him. but not surrender!" cried The wild colonial boy.-------- * m 4r And And mJ' [!] [!8 ~~ . are a plundering son!" lack drew two pistols from his side. Isr f Verse 3: At the early age of sixteen years He left his native horne. accordion. And their arms he did destroy. \ Verse 5: He loved the Prairie and the Bush Where rangers rode along.

ri -ly.ing. j l. All Rights Reserved.=54) INSTRUMENTAL ~7 [!] ~7 @ 011:'[ 'r:I E rJ 1'[ 'E ~ ä 'lI!f G j E'r:I 1E Li E Ei ~7 VERSES J 1.. mp -r-. c10se by j j J.ly whir . Voice: harp Rhythm: 6/8 ballad Tempo: slow 0.3 :J '0 noi .ther sit . ~ 4J. 11 grand . . cheer . is croon . her blind C ~7 [!] J• ~7 [!] @ä SE r J• jJ ~E ----f/I j J 1 4[ r 3~' ~7 ~ J I Zt E r f) 7.i -ly.si .THE SPINNING WHEEL Words & Music by John Prands Waller & Delia Murphy © Copyright 1950 Waltons Musical Instrument Galleries LId. jJ I.J J B ~ the win .gin .low J [!] the moon . International Copyright Secured.light to J I 'e 'C J shine is j ] j be . the wheel.mo .w.ing. CHORUS @ .ting.i. Dublin I.leen is spin-ning. lreland. 2-5 North Frederick Street.J .J .si . spins the wheel.dow young Ei . ä 'lI!f 22 . 1 4[' Bent f* .J.ly knit-ting. Mel .ring. Swings Q J II zj J pa Mer .ning.j F irr J • J f* o'er the fire.J. and drow . and moan .

Slower. "And we'll rove in the grove while the moon's shining brightly. noisily whirring (etc. Steals up from the seat. cheerily.) (stop rhythm last time) r Verse 3: "What' s that noise that I hear at the window I wonder?" "'Tis the little birds chirping the holly-bush under. noisily whirring (etc. dear mother. I hear someone tapping. harp to finish :11 - ing. love. I 4f -fI J r 2[ ~7 J • r ISE air - while the foot's Spright . against the glass flapping. of the autumn winds dying. "Get up on the stool. Verse 2: "Eileen. The maid steps. cheerily. and light . cheerily.) -\ \ Verse 6: Lazily." '''Tis the ivy. and slower the wheel swings. on her lips lays her fingers. mother dear. a chara*. And he whispers with face bent. and lower. and r J• C2J 'f 'f ly ring-ing. c1arinet." "What makes you be pushing and moving your stool on?" "And singing all wrong that old song of Coolin?" Merrily." Merrily. voice j of J the the sweet young t E mai - ~ den J: J sing to flute. "I'm waiting for you.) Verse 5: The maid shakes her head. and lower the reel rings. swings now the wheel round." "Eily. spins the wheel with the other. * pronounced KAURA 23 . then leaps to the arms of her lover. noisily whirring (etc. Merrily.) Verse 4: There's a form at the casement. I surely hear somebody sighing. Through the grove the young lovers by moonlight are roving." "'Tis the sound. Noiseless and light to the lattice above her. Puts one foot on the stool. the form of her true love. and slower.ly. accordion. noisily whirring (etc.ring." Merrily. through the lattice step lightly. easily. Slowly and lowly is heard now the reel's sound. longs to go and yet lingers.[!] [EJ 'f [!] *~ J J paL j S(jJ stir .ly. Ere the reel and the wheel stopped their spinning and moving. cheerily. violin. (FINE) ~7 [!] J• [!] *ä 4[ sounds r J. A frightened glance turns to her drowsy grandmother. Lower.

gle. The I'd [I] moor .ty for .Hn's of the chur-ning mp ~ [!]7 D 3r ing boats to watch [I] tU at the ~ j sea. farm .1 elose (2. London NWI for the United Kingdom. Israel and the Republic of Ireland. turf. USA.) wish my eyes and that I could pic ture spend an hour - the at em . Voice: guitar Rhythm: swing TemPo: fairly fast 0=144) VERSES 1. glean. Carlin Music Corporation.ty [!]7 shades shades of of mf 24 .lands. walk from and Cork the to 0 7 mid . Liam to with their see the for .'raId Dub .er * 3J J to the drain the ~7 [!]7 of and Dun spade a the dee. Iron Bridge House.ing and .men een. surf.land. All Rights Reserved.non.gain ver the mf mp [!1 Shan .FORTY SHADES OF GREEN Words & Music by Johnny Cash © Copyright 1961 by Southwind Music Incorpora!ed. International Copyright Secured. British Commonwealth (excluding Canada and Australasia).of \ the the folks straw at the Skib . I To shores bogs. thatch . * 'E2J I from the I'd-- r' fish love I zJ [I] J Din . 3 Bridge Approach.ber wo . miss see ri the a .

­ mf @] [!] ~ J. ( green.cl J 1 3J J as Sha .mar. ei 2) der 1 J 4J A . J And 1 2J most J sr' of p I pe all 0 [!] @] 07 @]7 @]7 ~ ~ r r miss her J lips ) as 1 J soft clarinet to guitar r as JJ. ~ J seen. ra Jl ry .. ~ J But 11 ~~ most ~ of ~ I 1 :j miss j a ~j: girl 2) in mp @] [!] @] 0 ~ ~ ~ J sr Tip IJ. 2) J gain J to 1 J J J see and do ~ sr the 1 r J things we've f J done and I want @] 07 ~ ~ .ty shades of l. green.li . ~ s[jJ where the r r r' breeze is sweet \ p . 1 - ~1 Town.-­ 14 I for green.@] 14 @]7 2. I mp 2.down. and there's ~ @]7 • . f stop rhythm I 25 .CHORUS @] guitar to clarinet [!] @]7 ~: all ~ IJ green.@] ::.

-__ sure.. @]7 you [!]7 hear can the an gels 26 . London WC2 (75%) & Redwood Music Limited. Ir 0 * l( In J the [!] .WHEN IRISH EYES ARE SMILING Words by George Graff & Chauncey Olcott. Music by Emest Ball © Copyright 1912 M. Iron Bridge House. it's .~ 4r lilt r of '\ Ir I r rish r laugh Ir ter. Feldman & Company Limited. lilre a . 3 Bridge Approach. 127 Charing Cross Roed. Witmark & Sons. International Copyright Secured. Voice: trumpet Rhythm: waltz Tempo: medium 0=100) [EJ7 When mp I rish eyes are F smi l i n g . . B.. All Rights Reserved.. London NW1 (25%).~ sr mom 0 r in r" spring. USA.

to brass ensemble @]7 And when I rish eyes are mJ' cresc. sr When 0 l.d I J rish sing.. r a 1F'> 1 heart way. ~7 hearts are hap py. \ 1 . 0 7 7 2Mr sure. ~~ sr smi 0 r ling.~ ~7 ~~ J- "­ LW .--­r r your steal sr ~~ ~7 r. ff stoprhythm I~ I ::>­ 11 .------ all the 0 ~~ 2F world " I seems 1 r bright r and 1 r' gay. .-.. Ir they 1 2r --.

9J re . F' t .bours one and all.PO r J. "The CHORUS [!] 7 add violin bet ter would the mu . Voice: flute Rhytbm: swing Tempo: medium 0=112) * * VERSES [I] • J [!J [I] "1 ~ . j'[ I F' [I.J j j.~.tin' out he was if they found a hat of bis eon­ [!]7 .ther-in' the floor.sie be for bat . jSt' 1. ~ [I] "1\ [!] [I] *r 28 va . . F'." With the [I] toot of the flute. and the f . j J.niant to f" IJ the door. J J. JJ so he jT ~ r..-}l 'I. of the The.ted them.ver he .how he' d like their eom·pa·ny that eve .ning at a ball.ly-muek? 3i JI ---. And­ [!] ~ IJ ~ 'E LI ~7 r lJ I T .. the Flu . the man was bruk'.­ mf [!]7 [I] IJ. 8/9 Frith Slreet..tiee to his neigh . j 'D town of Bal .ing hard with hirn.J eare .ter.Xi ll: J. in fact. London Wl.f J . I times were go . International Copyright Secured. Have you heard of Phil r- ~ .J . All Rights Reserved. a s . j J.J I 3J.ques .t.ful to sug-gest to them: Ir ! ~ f'~ when wri .e . )1 the sr [-4ftu Ir. just sent out a no .l more they put when ..PHIL THE FLUTER Words & Music by Percy French © Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited.

F [!] r J J. And then the widow Cafferty steps out and makes her bow. There were boys from ev'ry Barony. (etc. Jigs were daneed." So Paddy did the neeessary. "For passin' round the hat. Little Miekey Mulligan was also to the fore.'" So Phil plays up to the best of his ability. and the fluter found the rentl With the toot ofthe flute.e. Deerepit Mrs Cafferty was leapin' like a hare! With the toot of the flute.) Verse 3: First Httle Micky Mulligan got up to show them how. had . The widow found a husband.die. hop . sez "Ye've got to pay the piper when he toothers on the flute. Covering the Buckle and the Shuffle and the Trent. of the very finest quality. Rose. looking mighty eute. And along with them eame bouncing Mrs Cafferty.ing to the wall. Suzanne. While young Mick was a 'prancing with agility.J J 'EJ Up down. H. like a her . "As sure as you were born "If you'll only make the piper play: 'The Rare Is In The Corn.) Verse 4: Then Phil the fluter tipped a wink to little crooked Pat. 4. And the beautiful Miss Bradys in a private ass an' eart. 0. j.n't we the gai . "I eould dance you off your legs." Then all joined in wid the greatest joviality. cut violin r jf.rown' .die. (etc. 0.2. hands 1. There was r Phil the Flu .die." sez he.ter's Ball! Phil the Flu - ter's Ball! stop rhythm I!if Verse 2: There was Misther Denis Dogherty.rin' on a grid . The lady and gentleman begin to do their share.J. and girls from ev'ry "art".ty [!] I [!]7 [!] I l1li 2.3.p ~ '~~ I 'E' eross . (etc." sez she. The flow'r of Adrumgullion and the Pride of Pethravore. With the toot of the flute.) 29 . [!] [!] 07 ~ ! Oh! __ ~. There was litde erooked Paddy from the Tiraloughett bog. iJl at a .ping in the mid . and Margaret O'Rafferty. "I think it's nearly time.[!]7 twid die of the fid . who kept "The Runnin' Dog".

first life 4p you holds '\ sJ J J I 4r bon dear.leen.thing. International Copyright Secured. All Rights Reserved. you. near. dear. 8/9 Frith Street. London WI. rne..) know gain. 11: zJ @]7 d horne love J a rne. Since that @] @]7 @] MJ ~& IJ. J - ITJ MJ - I 4r leen.. * IJ To I e ITJ where al your ways heart feel has when e you ver are been. Voice: violin solo Rhythm: 8 beat Tempo: fairly slow (J=72) VERSES -p e IJ 1.I'LL TAKE YOU HOME AGAIN KATHLEEN Words & Music by Thomas P. ny but bride. r * The The mp ~ ro smiles ses that @]7 ITJ have you left gave your to cheek. take (2. Westendorf © Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited. were rny no . Kath Kath . true. * 4J a Your mf t& ~ ITJ J cross heart l zlJ the was 0 J J cean ver wild fond J I(q)J and and wide. I've I all once 30 . 1'11 ITJ @]7 JJ you you .

0 gain. t.ving your 1 r eyes. see and a [!] [!]7 [!] [!]7 violin to string ensemble *~ JJ. sad ma ­ when ny e'er .0 a gain.. 11 CHORUS 0 1 [!]7 0 you back.times you 1 speak. l z#J your heart J find J no 1 (q)rJ pain.1 mf stop rhythm i 31 . Kath leen. 1 will 0 11 ~7 .[!]7 watch'd scarce them ly fade e a ver way see and them die. to solo violin 2. Your tho' voice ma is ny.. brow.dim sha J 10 on J h .. now. tears dark ­ your dow ~ * IJ Oh. l be 'ning J J . I 1. to will take f ~ [!]7 0 3 will ~ J.l I 1# take you to your horne 2. where * [!] SF And ~ when 07 the fields are fresh and [!] green.

make your home-- f 32 .­ f ~7 mf F ~ ~. be my own. International Copyright Secured.-- chan . lron Bridge House. USA.. Worldwide print rights controlled by Warner Bros.ijt J cl don't l <F 2J Peg my heart.ter. PubllcationsllMP Limited (50%)/ Redwood Music Limited.11 .- I love you. let us part. 23 J E J 0' 2 1 . j J.ces?" ~ J!J guitar to piano J J in my heart. it's ~ ~ l~J . my heart.1 .- come.ces lJ [I] 7 J J> <F j sr' "How's >­ r ~W your make my heart say.~w.#3.­ mf ~ ~~ >­ j 5r' I r lW I J ~ J J> ~W I ~ [I] 7 al-ways knew_ love you.PEG 0' MY HEART Words & Music by Bryan & Fisher © Copyright 1933 EMI Catalogue Partnershlp & EMI Robbins Catalog Incorporated.J· J4 since I heard your lilt-ing laugh-ter. 1 i Voice: guitar Rhythm: swing ~ 1 ~7 J. * [I] 7 J ~ it J J> /W ~ would be you. All Rights Reserved. 3 Bridge Approach.. ] I . >­ J zJ I lq1 glan .J. London NWI (50%).__ * tFl 11 t .J . j 4J. .rish heart I'm af .--­ Come.j J J=d Peg 0' your 1.

~ ~ [!]7 J J J J.rish art. come make your home_ in my heart.J. ._ your glan ..dear .rin.- love you.- I love you.J ~ I '[ 'f-li J. @]7 Peg 0' my heart.in'._ ~========= ff stoprhythm i 33 ._ we'll ne-ver part. Dear * [!]7 sweet lit-tle girl. mp t ~I) t ~~ @]7 2J J ~> <[ l~J F ~ >­ 't 5F' I r 2W J ~ J J" ~W lit . j ~. are your win-ning smiles en .ces with I .er than the Rose of E ..= =. j 4 ======= f 1\] M J I sweet .7 Peg 0' my heart. be my own.trance us._ cresc.­ mp en .tle girl. come.] I J "J ..

ny P Boy. The You'll sum . from if gIen I 10 am gIen. 1. 819 Frith Street. dead.)come. London WL AU Rights Reserved. International Copyright Secured. an the the pipes flowers are are call dy ing. Weatherly © Copyright 1999 Dorsey Brothers Music Limited.DANNY BOY (LONDONDERRY AIR) Traditional Irish Melody. be.tain may weIl side. (2. Words by Fred E. the and pipes. ing. and as ~7 [I] 7 down dead the I moun . Dan . kneel it's and you say must an go A and ve I there must for 34 .0h.C.mer's come and gone. ing. Voice: flute Rhythm: 8 beat Tempo: medium 0=88) N. find and the all place the where ro I ses am fall ly ing. [I] 7 it's and you.

and white sweet . sleep sr oh. me. But And come 1 you shall back hear. . f [!]7 add flute CE] ~7 [!] ~ in and f IJ It's For J 1'11 you J be will l~' here bend 2~r I :~ sun tell J shine me or that r J sJ in you mp @] ~ ~ ~ ~tZJJ sha love I. t 35 . in ~ 'F ny un oh. be.er with snow.But when you p ~ 2. [!] r r in tread r the a I 3r zr mea bove CE] [!]7 Ir dow. and . me.bide. til 1 you love come you to \ so.ny shall 1 Dan peace [!] [!]7 i ~ [!] cutstrings ~ Boy. Ir r Dan I 'r Boy. sum .mer's you soft I * 2r r r when all the my or and ~ [!] CE] ~7 val grave ley's will hushed warm . [!] s stoprhythm ~ me. dow. when tho' mf .er. 2. I * 2r 1. me. sr .

International Copyright Secured.36 1!l7 4r all @] 1!l7 p the r best )1 mu ic I sr si p 1J cian . London Wl. and P I sJ we of P J ten have l I 12.der of the . 8/9 Frith Street. My sJ P J P I J P J name is Mac )J the IJ P J l I lea .MacNAMARA'S BAND Words by John J.­ )1 I sr tho' p r we're small p I 4r in num p ber. to play * 5p a J) ~ with .I ~ 12.ers 2} I lU you've heard - r bout )) to ic ­ .na - ma - ra. and we're r p the 07 1!l7 t l j best l 13 in all l the )1 land! ic "t . Voice: clarinet Rhythm: march 6/8 (or swing) Tempo: medium 0.=108) . VERSES @] M Hj~ 11: 1. @] i~: >­ I JJ I p J am the kg con Oh! ­ f mp :f} J duc P J tor. rm mp ~7 @] J --. Stamford. All Rights Reserved. band. Music by Shamus O'Connor © Copyright 1917 Bdwin Ashdown Limited.

Oh! f . P the day..thing mj' ~7 [!] IJ grand! 'f J Oh.nes .ma Tra . to brass ensemble CHORUS 'f . J J I . boys.land. my word! p J l tis some .n I J J . P I 5. I ir Ire p IJ . 1~ J J 11 4J. 2) is 'ä ~7 [!] rJ Mac sp r J1 I 2) ra's band! ...J5 [!] to accordion BRIDGE 'I Y IJ When .la f 37 .. . the cym . Hen . J J . 41) the 11 5.la . . drums .sy toot ...n . l' a \ 1 'r cre p dit r to JJ ould I. Mac - Car - thy puffs the ~7 ould bas . go bang. mj' ~7 horns will blaze a - way..sy Ten ..na . while Doyle the pipes will play.soon. la.des the flute. la J...nes .._ [!] 3.bals clang. J J . .

continuing into CHORUS) 38 .la p I LJ.la . ~. (etc.la la J. he shook me by the hand. IJ F J J I 4J. The way'We play our fine ould airs fiUs Irish hearts with pride. . la la J. Oh! if poor Tom Moore was living now.la . And said he'd never heard the like of "Macnamara's Band". continuing into CHORUS) Verse 3: We play at wakes and weddings. and at every county ball.3 la la 4Q la #r la I sr la Q la r la Jl la I. I *. la. When ­ laI ff mp stop rhythm i Verse 2: Whenever an election's on we play on either side. When the ~ms go bang. 1. @]7 3J Tra l I . la. And at any great man's funeral we play the "Dead March In Saui". I J' @] j Tra l la @]7 j la 4Q la #r la p I sr la la Q r la la HP I tj: la la. @] to clarinet 13. When the drums go bang. (etc.2. la.la 07 zJ.0 7 *1 **1 ~ J sD tra r . @] la. he'd make yez understand That none could do hitnjustice like ould "Macnamara's Band". When the Prince of Wales to Ireland came. la @]7 lJ. tra .la laI 2. I sD Tra * Q la r p la tra .

I .H IJ nl IH ~"n I I.I ~ LI ~ nI 5 3 1 (fingering) IHU H.H~1 5 3 2 1(fingering) D accompaniment section Dm D7 I accompaniment section I accompaniment seetion ~~I~UIUI~HI IHI~UIUIJnl 5 3 1 (fingering) 5 2 l(fingering) 5 •• 2 1 (fingering) E~ E~m E~7 I accompanimenr seetion "I I accompaniment seenon "I accompaniment seetion lUIU~IHI~nl IUI~HIHI'UI IUIU~IHIHfi 4 2 1 (fingering) 4 2 1 (fingering) 5 2 1 (fingering) E accompaniment seetion fu ~ "I [~ I~ H.H.U I.eerlon "I lUI~ U IJ nI HHI.U I~ I.H.BI IH~H I.~" 4 2 1(fingering) 4 2 1(fingering) 5 3 1 (fingering) .H I~ H I I I 5 2 1 (fingering) 5 2 1 (fingering) 3 • • 2 1 (fingering) D~ 1- accompaniment section "I I accompaniment sect/on "I lHln~IH~'Hi 4 2 1 (fingering) 4 2 • 1 (fingering) lHIH~.I .HI IUnI'-'.IHI.1 H" I LI I~ 5 3 1 (fingering) I accompaniment seetion "I accompaniment seetion "I 5 2 1 (fingering) F ~ n "I accompaniment seetion I accompaniment secuon "I I accompaniment .CHORD CHARTS (For Left Hand) C accompaniment seetion Cm C7 "I I accompaniment section "I aceompaniment seetion "I IH'.

IH~UI 5 3 l(fingering) A~ A~m A~7 1'- accompaniment seetion I I accompaniment seccion I accompaniment seetion ~!IH~I.U.CHORD CHARTS (For Left Hand) G~(F#) accompaniment section F#m G~(F#)7 I I accompaniment sec:tion I I accompaniment seetion I 5 3 I (fingering) IUI~UIHIH!I IUI~UIH.I~UI 5 3 I (fingering) 5 3 1 (fingering) r G accompaniment section Gm accompaniment secdon G7 I I accompaniment section I 5 • • 3 1 (fingering) 5 3 1 (fingering) lUI'. accompaniment section B~m B~7 I I accompaniment seetion I accompaniment seccion I • 5 2 • 1 • (fingering) IHIJUIHIH!I 5 2 I (fingering) 3 2 • I (fingering) B accompaniment section Bm B7 I accompaniment seetion I accompaniment seetion I lHI~H.IHI~nl 5 2 1 (fingering) 5 • • 2 I (fingering) IHI'llIHIH!1 4 3 2 (fingering) .H.! IH." '" 5 3 1 (fingering) IH~ U I I.HIH" IUIHlIHIH~1 IUIH~~HI~UI 4 2 1 (fingering) 4 2 1 (fingering) 5 3 1 (fingering) r A accompaniment section ~ ~ I I accompaniment seetion I accompaniment seeboD I ~ ~ IH.I"!I IHU.! IH I IH!I 5 3 1 (fingering) 5 4 2 (fingering) B~ .

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