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Comparative study of Cefpodoxime and to study the

market potential for RANBAXY’s product portfolio

Summer project submitted

in

Partial Fulfilment of the Requirements for the Award of


Post Graduate Diploma in Management
(Recognized by AICTE, Ministry of HRD, Govt. of India)

By

UTTAM KUMAR PATRA


PGO9-112
Under the guidance of

Mr. RAJEEV VERMA

Regional Head, New Delhi

RANBAXY LABORATORIES INDIA LTD.

And

Mr. Vikas Saxena

Assistant Professor

INMANTEC, Ghaziabad

INTEGRATED ACADEMY OF MANAGEMENT AND TECHNOLOGY


GHAZIABAD

Date: 15/07/0
Appendix IV

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
This project is entirely nourished by the careful supervision of Mr. Rajeev
Verma, Zonal Head, New Delhi Area, Ranbaxy Laboratories India Ltd. Without
his guidance this report would not be promoted as a successful one. Whenever I
needed any kind of help or advice, he stretched his helpful being to answer my
queries and guided me in the best possible way to complete this project work.

Prof. Vikas Saxena, assistant professor, INMANTEC, has also performed


a great role of assistance with all his vast knowledge and experience to give a
clear structure to this project. He has monitored every week progress of the
project while also enlightening the uncovered areas of my knowledge.

As this project deals with study of market potential as an integrated part


of the entire system I would also acknowledge Mr. Honey Hei, Mr. Kulmeet
Singh, Mr. Ankur Chakrabarty, Mr. Amit Soni, Mr. Sumit, and Mr. Nandan for
their generous cooperation to my project activities. Their contribution in the
development of knowledge and idea about this project was unremarkable.

I would like to acknowledge Mr. Anurag Malik, Manager-Placements and


Mrs. Sarika Shekhar Kaushik, Asst. Manager-Placements and the whole
Corporate Resource Division team of INMANTEC for their regular supervision
and assistance in completion of this project.

Last but not the least I would like to acknowledge the chemists who are
the primary sources of collected information and data. Without their help &
generous contribution in giving me the right information I would not have been
able to do this project work perfectly. I like to thank them for their kind
cooperation in this regard.

Uttam Kumar Patra


Appendix V

Content
CHAPTER Title PAGE NO
NO.
CHAPTER 1 Introduction
Objective 2
Pharmaceutical Industry 3
The Indian Pharmaceutical Industry 5
Market Structure And Trends 9
Restructuring Of Pharma 10
Outsourcing Of Pharma 11
Strategic Alliances 12
Types Of Drug: 13
Pharma: Through Poter Eye 14
Pharma Marketing And Its Challenges 17
Ranbaxy: Company Profile 19
SWOT Analysis 28
Pharmaceuticals Marketing In Ranbaxy 31
Sales Promotion Activity Through Medical 35
Representatives
Distribution 36
Ranbaxy Business Strategy 37
Molecules Used in survey 39
CHATER 2 Research Methodology
Research Methodology 43
Research Design 43
Sampling Design 43
Data Collection 44
Designing Of Questionnnaire 44
Data Analysis 45
Research Limitations 45
CHAPTER 3 Calculation 47-58
Findings 59
Conclusion 60
Recommendations 61
ANNEXURE 62-68
BIBLIOGRAPHY 69
Appendix VI

List of Tables:
Sl No. Description Page
No
T1 The Product-Wise Gross Revenue Breakup For Year Ending 22
December 2007
T2 Brand Selling Portfolio 47

T3 Sale Of Cefpodoxime Strip/Wk 49

T4 Sale Of Cefpodoxime Clav Strip/Wk 51

T5 Sale Of Cefporoxime Strip/Wk 52

T6 Sale Of Cefuroxime Clav Strip/Wk 53

T7 Sale Of Esomeprazole Strip/Wk 54

T8 Sale Of Multivitamin Strip/Wk 55

T9 Sale Of Acelofenac Strip/Wk 56

T10 Sale Of Doxofyline Strip/Wk 57

T11 Sale Of Gemifloxacin Strip/Wk 58


Appendix VII

List of Graphs:
Sl No. Description Page
No
G1: Brand Selling Portfolio 48

G2: Sale Of Cefpodem Xp In Different Location 51

G3: Sale Of Ceroxim In Different Location 52

G4: Sale Of Ceroxim Xp In Different Location 53

G5: Sale Of Raciper In Different Location 54

G6: Sale Of Riconia In Different Location 55

G7: Sale Of Altraflam- In Different Location 56

G8: Sale Of Synasma In Different Location 57

G9: Sale Of Gembax In Different Location 58


Appendix VIII

List of Charts:
Sl No. Description Page
No
P1: AQUISITION FIGURE OF RANBAXY AS O F DEC 08 20

P2: Sale Of Cefpodoxime Strip/Wk 49

P3 Sale Of Cefpodoxime Strip In Aiims/Wk 50

P4 Sale Of Cefpodoxime Strip In Malviya Nagar/Wk 50

P5 Sale Of Cefpodoxime Strip In C R Park/Wk 50

P6 Sale Of Cefpodoxime Strip Jangpura/Wk 50

P7 Sale Of Cefpodoxime Strip In Nfc/Wk 50

P8 Sale Of Cefpodoxime Strip In Jamia Nagar/Wk 50

P9 Sale Of Cefpodoxime Strip In Okhla/Wk 50

P10 Sale Of Cefpodoxime Clav Strip/Wk 51

P11 % Selling Overall Sales Of Cefpodem Xp In Different Location 51

P12 Sale Of Cefporoxime Strip/Wk 52

P13 % Selling Overall Sales Of Ceroxim In Different Location 52

P14 Sale Of Cefuroxime Clav Strip/Wk 53

P15 % Selling Overall Sales Of Ceroxime Xp In Different Location 53

P16 Sale Of Esomeprazole Strip/Wk 54

P17 % Selling Overall Sales Of Raciper In Different Location 54

P18 Sale Of Multivitamin Strip/Wk 55

P19 % Selling Overall Sales Of Riconia In Different Location 55

P20 Sale Of Acelofenac Strip/Wk 56

P21 % Selling Overall Sales Of Altraflam-P In Different Location 56

P22 Sale Of Doxofyline Strip/Wk 57


Appendix IX

P23 % Selling Overall Sales Of Synasma In Different Location 57

P24 Sale Of Gemifloxacin Strip/Wk 58

P25 % Selling Overall Sales Of Gembax In Different Location 58


Appendix X

Executive Summary
Now a day in this competitive world there are many companies are
existed. Every company wants to attract more and more customers to them there
are many policies which are being implementing by these companies. There are
various products of big companies which failed due to lack of aggressive
marketing and proper promotion of that product.

The following report details the comparative study of Ranbaxy’s one of


the top 20 molecule, Cefpodoxime and market research for the market potential
of Ranbaxy’s selected product portfolio. This write-up is arranged in such a
manner as to follow the collected data from chemists through personal
interviews, surveys and a detailed questionnaire was designed for that purpose.
The interviews have been conducted from the respondents at different locations.
The sample includes 100 respondents. The data gathered has been analyzed on a
question-by-question basis. The details of the research findings are mentioned
after the analysis, and recommendations are given to the management based on
the research findings.
Summer project in RANBAXY

CHAPTER 1
INTRODUCTION

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Objectives
The purpose of research is to discover answers to questions through the application of
scientific procedures. The main aim of research is to find out the truth which is hidden and
which has not been discovered as yet. Though each research study has its own specific
purpose but the research objectives can be listed into a number of broad categories, as
following:-

Major:
1. To measure the service quality of the products.
2. Find out the reason why a particular brand is mostly selling or not.
Minor:
3. To find out various promotional strategies used by Ranbaxy Lab.
4. To find out the importance of medical representative in the pharma sector.
5. To find out various roles played by medical representative to enhance the sale.

Importance of the topic to the company

 Organization can be able to know about its customer demand and can plan
accordingly.

 Organization can know about the target customer by which, organization gives
more emphasis to a particular customer groups.

 Organization can get to know what the real needs of consumers are.

 Organization can get to know its position in the competitive market.

 Organization can be able to know about its competitors.

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Pharmaceutical industry:
Globalization is widely seen as a dominating phenomenon of 21st century encompassing
worldwide integration of financial systems, trade liberalization, deregulation and market
opening resulting in a global market and patterns of industrial development. In last few
decades it is evident that firms and institutions from peripheral countries or developing world
are making sustained and deliberate effort to take advantage of the new opportunities. The
rise of East Asia followed by growth in China and India has led to emergence of new breed of
Multinational Enterprises (MNEs) from these countries. By the end of 2004 China emerged
as fifth largest outward direct foreign investor with a total US $ 37 billion and was the third
largest exporter after Germany and the US (Child and Rodrigues, 2005). Similarly albeit on a
smaller scale in the last decade Indian economy saw a dramatic growth in overseas
investment by the Indian industry. The firms from latecomer countries are making inroads in
sectors such as manufacturing (steel and pharmaceuticals) and services (IT) and trading as
well as high technology sectors like semi-conductors. Some of the firms such as Infosys,
Lenovo, Ranbaxy and Espat are now competing at a global level. Multinational enterprises
from developing countries are a clear representation of a sustained increase in outward
Foreign direct investment (FDI) from developing countries which has risen from $60 billion
in 1980 to $ 869 billion in 2000 and to a total in excess of $1trillion for the first time in 2004
(UNCTAD, 2004). Outward FDI from developing countries accounts for more than 10
percent of the world‟s outward FDI. The rise of outward FDI and new MNEs that embody it,
from economies such as India, China, Korea, Singapore, Malaysia and Taiwan is a key
phenomenon for the world economy in last decade. It shows that firms from developing
countries are rising to compete at the frontiers of the world market and this research also
focusing on the strategies they have adopted to achieve that.

The first wave MNEs from the developing world documented by authors such as Kumar and
mcleod (1981) and Lall (1983) succeeded as international players despite many difficulties.
Their success was due as much to the difficulties encountered at home as to the incentives
driving internationalization. One of the most salient features of first wave MNE activity is the
direction and motivation of FDI compared to western MNEs. Much empirical work on first
MNEs indicated strong and marked trend investments in neighboring and other countries
which were at a similar or earlier stage of their development. Prominent first wave countries
such as India, Philippines, Argentina and Columbia did not show any significant increase in
either the level of the total outward FDI, nor a significant shift towards developed country
hosts. But the arrival of the second wave MNEs from developing countries represents quite a
different phenomenon.

First wave countries experienced very low or negative economic growth rate whereas second
wave countries grew rapidly over the intervening decade and half. This has been further
enhanced by fundamental changes in the world economy which were a direct result of
globalization. Globalization has created a more broad and competitive market across

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countries due to convergence of production and industrial patterns. As a result firms need to
have 4 competitive advantages that are globally viable rather than domestically. Most of these
developing countries also went through a fundamental shift in the policy orientation from an
import substituting role to an export oriented outward economy. Firms in these countries now
faced competition in domestic market with global firms and needed upgrade their capabilities
to survive. These changes had a profound impact in creating a second wave of MNEs from
developing countries. Therefore Mathews (2006) argues that analysis of second wave
requires different perspectives that differ from those created to account for outward FDI from
developed countries, and the first wave of MNEs from developing countries. Initial analysis
of second wave of MNEs reveals that overseas move of firms in the second wave is a result
of the „pull factors‟ that are drawing firms into global connections unlike „push factors‟ that
drove firms as stand-alone players in the first wave (Mathews, 2006). Dunning et al. (1997)
suggest that in the case of second wave of MNEs from East-Asian countries such as Taiwan
and Korea were subsidized by governments with government policy interacting with firm
strategies. The rise of second wave MNEs from emerging countries is less driven by cost
factors per se, but more by a search for markets and technological innovations to compete
successfully in the Global economy (Yueng, 2000). The sudden appearance of the second
wave of firms and their capacity to create competitive positions to existing incumbents has
raised interesting questions as they are not simply occupying space vacated by incumbents
instead in many cases they are creating new economic space by their organizational and
strategic innovation. Thus the changes in the world economy, specifically its globally
interlinked character is responsible for driving the new approaches to and patterns of
internationalization in firms from peripheral countries. Therefore Mathews (2006) suggests
that existing theories and framework of internationalization have failed to capture
organization and strategic innovations adopted by developing country MNEs for new modes
of internationalization. In this context the Indian pharmaceutical industry provides an ideal
case to investigate approaches and motives of second wave MNEs firms from developing
countries. From the beginning of the 1990s, the Indian government started liberalization by
removing restrictions on trade such as regulations on FDI and opened Indian market to
overseas firms. As a result of liberalization policy Indian Economy witnessed dramatic
growth, changes in domestic market and firm activities specifically in relation to overseas
expansion strategies. The cumulative number of overseas project approved during the 1990s
is estimated to be 2652, a nearly 11 fold increase from the number of projects permitted
during 1975-90 (230) (Pradhan,2004). The growth of overseas investment is been
characterized by significant changes in location and sectorial distribution. In the 1990s the
majority of investments has originated from the service sector and was increasingly
developed country-oriented with majority ownership in most cases. The most important
destination of Indian outward FDI to date is the USA which accounted for 19% of total
cumulative outflows from 1996-2003.

In 2005 Indian firms acquire 136 firms overseas with a total value of US $4.3 billion. The
Indian pharmaceutical Industry is at the forefront in international expansion compared to
other manufacturing sectors in the Indian Economy.

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The Indian pharmaceutical industry is the thirteenth largest in the world in terms of market
output; accounting for a market of about US$ 2.5 billion (Ramani, 2002). It is ranked as the
most advanced pharmaceutical industry amongst developing countries and is one of India‟s
best science-based industries. Indian firms have been investing abroad for many years but it
is only since the late-1990s that outward FDI flows have risen considerably. The
liberalization of government policies and relaxation of regulations on FDI abroad have helped
Indian firms to expand internationally. In the last decade some Indian pharmaceutical firms
have successfully internationalized their operations and emerged as a major producers and
suppliers of generic drugs all over the world. In the absence of more systematic longitudinal
firm level data this research is based on case study evidence. The findings suggest that Indian
pharmaceutical firms are accessing advanced markets and acquiring new technology through
the process of internationalization. Indian firms augmenting existing skills in production
capabilities and process R&D by acquiring technology focused firms in advance markets.
The analysis suggests that Indian pharmaceutical firms have adapted to the realities of
globalization and are finding new niche through the process of internationalization.

THE INDIAN PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY:


Indian pharmaceutical industry is undergoing fast paced changes. The Indian Generics market
is witnessing rapid growth opening up immense opportunities for firms. India has one of the
fastest growing pharmaceutical markets in the world. The Indian pharmaceutical market is
the 15th largest individual market by sales, but the 4th by volume of product. This is further
triggered by the fact that generics worth over $40 billion are going off patent in the coming
few years which is close to 15% of the total prescription market of the US. The Indian
pharmaceutical companies have been doing extremely well in developed markets such as US
and Europe, notable among these being Ranbaxy, Dr. Reddy‟s Labs, Wockhardt, Cipla,
Nicholas Piramal and Lupin. The companies have their strategies in place to leverage
opportunities and appropriate values existing in formulations, bulk drugs, generics, Novel
Drug Delivery Systems, New Chemical Entities, Biotechnology etc. The industry ranks
fourth globally in terms of volume and in terms of value, it is ranked thirteenth. The industry
has thrived so far on reverse engineering skills exploiting the lack of process patent in the
country. This has resulted in the Indian pharmaceutical players offering their products at
some of the lowest prices in the world. The quality of the products is reflected in the fact that
India has the highest number of manufacturing plants approved by US FDA, which is next
only to that in the US. Multinational companies have traditionally dominated the industry,
which is another trend seeing a reversal. Currently, it is the Indian companies which are
dominating the marketplace with the local players dominating a number of key therapeutic
segments. The market is also very fragmented with about 30,000 entities and the organized
sector consisting of about 300 entities. Consolidation is increasing in the industry with many
local players building a global outlook and also growing inorganically through mergers and
acquisitions.

India currently represents just US $6 billion of the $550 billion global pharmaceutical
industry; its share is increasing at 10 % a year. The organized sector of India‟s
pharmaceutical industry consists of 250 to 300 companies, which accounts for 70 % of the

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market, with the top ten companies representing 30%. The Indian pharmaceutical industry
has developed wide ranging capabilities in the complex field of drug processDevelopment
and production technology. It is well ahead of other developing countries in process R&D
capabilities and the range of technologically complex medicines manufactured. The Indian
government adopted a new Patents Act in 1970, which laid the foundations of the modern
Indian Pharmaceutical industry. It removed product patents for pharmaceuticals, food and
agro-chemicals, allowing patents only for production processes. The statutory term for
production processes was shortened to five years from grant or seven years from application.
The 1970 Patent Act greatly weakened intellectual property protection in India, particularly
for pharmaceutical innovations. It started the era of reverse engineering where firms
developed new products by changing their production processes like Dr. Reddy. Trained
manpower, comparative ease of imitation and a strong chemistry base among Indian research
institutes supported manufacturers and gave theIndian pharmaceutical industry its current
profile. The industry‟s exports were worth more than US $ 492.30 in 2005-06 and they have
been growing at a compound annual rate of 22.7 percent over the last few years (National
pharmaceutical policy, 2006).

The value of the Indian Pharmaceutical industry‟s overseas acquisition has grown from just
US $8 million in 1997 to $116 million in 2004. Indian firms have acquired over US $1 billion
worth of pharmaceutical companies overseas in 2005. There are 3 developments which are
pushing expansion of the Indian pharmaceutical industry into overseas markets;

A. Opportunities opened in the US generic market due to the Hatch-Waxman Act,


B. Increasing outsourcing by MNC pharmaceutical firms and
C. Strengthening of patent laws in the domestic market.
D. Implement all these techniques in India for producing good medicines.

These three developments are creating new challenges and opportunities for Indian industry
and internationalization is one of route adopted by Indian to succeed in this newenvironment.
The generic opportunity is a result of the passing of the Hutch Waxman Act in the US in
1984. Under this new law, manufacturers of generic drugs no longer had to go through a
lengthy period of extensive clinical trials in order to market a generic drug - demonstration of
bio-equivalence was sufficient to acquire a patent on a generic drug procedures were
established for the resolution of disputes between branded drug manufacturers and generic
manufacturers. Western markets were a lucrative business opportunity and the low cost
advantage enjoyed by Indian firms on account of the cheap availability of scientific labour
combined with scale economies inherent in the manufacture of bulk chemicals made for big
margins. Between 1999 and 2005 drugs worth $ 64 million went off patent allowing generic
companies to take advantage of better business opportunities. In the generics industry
prescription drugs worth $40 billion in the US and $25 billion in Europe are due to loose
patent protection by 2007-08. In 2004 the US senate passed the Greater Access to Affordable
Medicine Act diluting some of the proinnovator provisions of 1984 Hatch-Waxman Act,
giving a big boost to the generic business in the US. Similarly Europe is emerging as a key
market and a potential growth driver. The size of market in 2006 was US $ 14.2 billion with

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Germany, France, the UK and Italy accounting for more than 50% of market. Governments in
Europe are trying to reduce healthcare costs by embracing generic drug companies.
Liberalization facilitated the ability of Indian firms to exploit this opportunity to market
generics drugs to the US and other Western economies. Indian firms are preparing themselves
to take a share of this increasing global market. Indian drug manufacturerscurrently export
their products to more than 65 countries worldwide; the US being the largest customer.
However Indian firms face some difficult challenges such as non tariff barriers, decreasing
profits in the generics market, competitive threats from big pharmaMNEs and reputation in
western markets. For example, US regulation disqualifies Indian firms from bidding for
government contracts and Indian firms have to submit separateApplications for each state
even when firms have FDA approved products and facilities. Another challenge is the
reduction in profit margin due to intense competition from Chinese and Eastern European
manufacturers as well as authorized generics produced by main manufacturer. Currently
Indian industry is estimated to account for 22% of generics in the world market. Indian firms
are aiming to move up the value chain by developing capabilities to produce „super generics‟
rather than „generics generics‟ to branded generics.

Furthermore, stronger patent protection under the new patent law of 1999 has shut down the
avenues for exploitation of generics opportunity in domestic market, but promised large
rewards to Indian firms that could leverage their reverse engineering capabilities in advanced
markets. The stronger patent law restricts reverse engineering of newly patented molecule,
thus affecting an important source of growth for Indian firms. Alsomultinational
pharmaceutical firms have entered India after 2005 and using the same resource base as
Indian firms to compete in the Indian domestic market further increasing pressure on profit
margins of Indian firms. The contract research and manufacturing services (CRAM) market
has emerged as huge opportunity for the Indian pharmaceutical industry. According to Frost
and Sullivan (2005), the global outsourcing market is worth$37 billion and growing at almost
11%; 50% of the contract manufacturing market is in North America, 40% in Europe and just
10% in Asia and the rest of the world. Indian firms possess requisite capabilities to cater for
the requirements of outsourcing markets, still India accounts for barely 1.5% of the global
CRAM industry. Due to untested patent protection law and lack of data protection MNC
firms are reluctant to outsource early stage R&D work to Indian firms. Therefore Indian firms
are trying to increase their share in the outsourcing market by moving closer to the market.

Geographically the overseas acquisition by Indian pharmaceutical firms continues to be


directed at developed countries specifically the US and Europe. The major acquisitions are in
the area of marketing although some companies are investing in building manufacturing and
R&D capacities in developed markets. Indian companies have already established
manufacturing plants in the US, Europe, Brazil, Russia and China.

The Indian Region demonstrated strong brand building capabilities, with as many as 6 brands
(Sporidex, Revital, Mox, Cifran, Volini and Storvas) featuring in the top 100 brands list of
the Indian pharmaceutical industry.

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The Indian region was perceived as the „Best-in-class‟ by customers, as it topped the List of
companies both Indian and multinational in terms of corporate Image. (Source: Ac Nielsen,
ORG MARG Report, June 2004)

The Pharmaceutical industry in India is ranked 4 th world-wide when compared its volume.
Most of the companies generate sales from generic products by back engineering but
companies like Ranbaxy and Biocon are engaged in developing their own novel drugs; as a
result Indian pharma companies are marketing their drugs at the cheapest cost in the world.
The quality of the drugs could be estimated from the fact that after US, India has the most
number of FDA approved manufacturing facilities.

B OOMING SALES:
India is gaining in importance as a manufacturer of pharmaceuticals. Between 1996 and
2006, nominal sales of pharmaceuticals were up 9% per annum and thus expanded much
faster than the global pharmaceutical market as a whole (+7% p.a.). Demand in India is
growing markedly due to rising population figures, the increasing number of old people and
the development of incomes. As a production location, the country is benefiting from its
wage cost advantages over western competitors also when it comes to producing medicines.

India has discovered the world market:


Since the end of the 1980s India has been exporting more pharmaceuticals than it imports.
Over the last ten years the export surplus has widened from EUR 370 m to EUR 2 bn. At
32% in 2006, the export ratio was about twice as high as in 1996 and will likely rise further in
the coming years (Germany: 55% at present).

New patent law necessitated reorientation:


Legal changes in India in 2005 made it considerably more difficult to produce “new”
generics. Foreign pharmaceuticals, which enjoy 20 years of patent protection, can no longer
be copied by means of alternative production procedures and sold in the domestic market.

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Hence, a reorientation was required in India‟s pharmaceutical industry. It now focuses on


drugs developed in-house and contract research or contract production for western drug
makers.

Considerable impact of hampering factor:


The sector‟s development is slowed by major infrastructure problems. These are, above all,
qualitative and quantitative shortcomings in the energy and transport sectors.

Strong growth continues:


Up until 2015, we expect pharmaceutical sales to rise by 8% p.a. to just under EUR 20 bn,
compared with an increase of 6% in the world as a whole and 5% in Germany. But even then,
India‟s share in the world pharmaceutical market would only come to slightly over 2%
(Germany: 7%). In Asia, India looks set to lose market share, as other Asian countries are
registering even stronger growth.

India's pharmaceutical industry in the spotlight:


In 2001, India‟s pharmaceutical industry became the focus of public debate when Cipla, the
country's second-largest pharmaceuticals company, offered an AIDS drug to African
countries for the price of USD 300, while the same preparation cost USD 12,000 in the US.
This was possible because the Indian company produced an all-inone generic pill which
contains all three substances required in the treatment of AIDS. This kind of production is
much more difficult in other countries as the patents are held by three different companies. In
the final analysis, the price slump was a result of India's lax patent legislation. In 2005, patent
legislation was tightened, so India‟s pharmaceutical sector had to adjust.

M ARKET STRUCTURE AND TRENDS

The first Indian pharmaceutical company, Bengal Chemicals and Pharmaceutical Works,
which still exists today as one of 5 government-owned drug manufacturers, appeared

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in Calcutta in 1930. For the next 60 years, most of the drugs in India were imported
by multinationals either in fully-formulated or bulk form.

The government started to encourage the growth of drug manufacturing by Indian companies
in the early 1960s, and with the Patents Act in 1970, enabled the industry to become what it is
today. This patent act removed composition patents from food and drugs, and though it kept
process patents, these were shortened to a period of five to seven years. The lack of patent
protection made the Indian market undesirable to the multinational companies that had
dominated the market, and while they streamed out, Indian companies started to take their
places.

They carved a niche in both the Indian and world markets with their expertise in reverse-
engineering new processes for manufacturing drugs at low costs. Although some of the larger
companies have taken baby steps towards drug innovation, the industry as a whole has been
following this business model until the present.
In 2002, over 20,000 registered drug manufacturers in India sold $9 billion worth of
formulations and bulk drugs. 85% of these formulations were sold in India while over 60% of
the bulk drugs were exported, mostly to the United States and Russia. Most of the players in
the market are small-to-medium enterprises; 250 of the largest companies control 70% of the
Indian market€. Thanks to the 1970 Patent Act, multinationals represent only 35% of the
market, down from 70% thirty years ago.
Most pharma companies operating in India, even the multinationals, employ Indians almost
exclusively from the lowest ranks to high level management. Mirroring the social structure,
firms are very hierarchical. Homegrown pharmaceuticals, like many other businesses in
India, are often a mix of public and private enterprise. Although many of these companies are
publicly owned, leadership passes from father to son and the founding family holds a
majority share.

Research and Development


Both the Indian central and state governments have recognized R&D as an important driver
in the growth of their pharma businesses and conferred tax deductions for expenses related to
research and development. They have granted other concessions as well, such as reduced
interest rates for export financing and a cut in the number of drugs under price control.
Government support is not the only thing in Indian pharma favor, though; companies also
have access to a highly-developed IT industry that can partner with them in new molecule
discovery.

RESTRUCTURING OF PHARMA
The Indian Pharmaceutical Industry has come a long way from waiting for imports of bulk
drugs from global majors for re processing to becoming an industry which is driving product
development and breaking new grounds in medicine research worldwide. This transformation

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can be better gauged in terms of volume numbers where in the industry which was earlier
stagnating is now expected to touch a turnover of INR250 billion ($5.7 billion) at the end of
the 10th Five Year Plan (2002-2007). Part of this amazing growth story will be propelled by
capital investments of around INR100 billion ($2.3 billion), most of which have already been
committed to the Government of India.

The Indian pharmaceutical industry has a unique amalgamation of three critical factors which
make it so attractive for investment thereby adding impetus to growth.
 - The process patent regime
 - Price controls
 - Exemptions to Small Scale Industries (SSIs)

The commitment to infrastructure development, technological competency augmentation and


a wide array of products has boosted the industry to already achieve the $4 billion mark.

The implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices has become a further supplement to


the industry now producing bulk drugs for all the major therapy segments which are the most
in demand. The competencies developed in India in organic synthesis & process engineering
have helped derive the most cost effective solutions in time efficient scales and compliant
with high quality standards. An important outcome of this was India‟s low cost production of
anti-retroviral for export to humanitarian and international organizations in needy African
countries which brought global recognition and acceptance of the industry as a major player
in the global drug producing nations.

OUTSOURCING OF PHARMA

It has been well recognized that the global pharmaceutical industry is facing a number of
challenges at present. The difficulties the industry is experiencing have forced all drug
companies to change their current operation models. They are now forced to pursue more
efficient, cost-effective and productive ways to conduct their operations, whether in R&D or
manufacturing. The keys for them to make a quick turnaround are to get drug discovered
quicker, developed faster, manufactured cheaper and marketed wider.

Outsourcing has been proven to be one of the effective solutions for drug companies to
quickly turn the situation around as it provides them with the desired efficiency, flexibility
and agility. Among all emerging countries for outsourcing, China and India have risen
rapidly and become stars in the global pharmaceutical outsourcing arena as both countries
possess the unique combination of low cost and quality service. The current global financial
crisis has also greatly enhanced the importance of these two countries to many drug
companies around the world who are vigorously seeking cost reduction.

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STRATEGIC ALLIANCES
A number of firms around the world have been using strategic alliances to become more
competitive globally. The reasons attributed to such alliances vary from economies of scale,
increased revenue, cross selling, synergy, tax write-offs, and diversification and resource
transfers among others.
After the liberalization of Indian economy in 1991, Indian companies have used these
strategic alliances to expand into other markets and prepare for increased competition at
home. But after joining the World Trade Organization in 1995, India had to change its patent
laws by 1 January 2005 to meet its commitments under the WTO's agreement on Trade
Related Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS). In the post-2005 scenario, the pharmaceutical
industry has undergone a significant change due to the TRIPS agreement.

Though a number of reasons are attributed to these strategic alliances in literature, there is no
particular pattern that can be observed in these alliances. Analyzing the Indian
Pharmaceutical Industry and the strategic alliances in the recent past and what drives these
alliances. A value chain framework has been proposed that analyses the critical capabilities
needed along the value chain in the Pharmaceutical Industry, the existing capabilities of the
firms and how these alliances are supposed to bridge the capability gap.

Expansion towards Generic Drugs

The last three years has seen several major shifts in generics company strategies. From 2006
to 2008 a period of high M&A activity was seen as many companies sought to expand
geographically and create the scale required to compete with large pharmaceutical
companies. Since the global financial crisis the level of deals has declined due to the
implications of restricted debt markets and the need to reduce company debt.

The global financial crisis has also affected government debt and subsequently healthcare
cost containment has become a prominent issue. Many nations and in particular the US is
seeking to reduce healthcare costs through promotion of generics and creating better approval
pathways for biogenerics.

Pricing Of Medicines

WHILE MUCH PROGRESS has been made in transforming the health sector since 1994, we
begin this first calendar year of the second decade of our freedom with the momentous task of
sustaining efforts to improve access to affordable quality medicine. The transformation of the
pharmaceutical industry, both in terms of ensuring the quality of medicine and reducing
prices of drugs at manufacturing, distribution and retail industry levels has been the most
challenging part of the transformation process in the health sector so far.

Following broad and intensive consultation, government passed the Medicine and Related
Substances Act in 1997 to provide a legislative framework for improving access to affordable

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medicine. This entails making the entire pricing system on medicine more transparent and
capping the prices where necessary.

While seeking to reduce the prices at manufacturing and distribution levels, the interventions
also sought to remove any incentive that encouraged prescribers and dispensers of medicines
to issue more expensive medicines to recoup a better percentage margin.

The opponents of the transformation process within the retail pharmacy industry initially
argued that the dispensing fee that can be charged by pharmacists was too low and would
therefore undermine the viability of this industry. In subsequent arguments in court on this
matter, they questioned not only the dispensing fee set by government but also the whole idea
of regulating prices in order to improve accessibility to medicine. Highly priced medicine is
preferred because of better returns when using a percentage mark-up system. The lowering of
medicine prices to benefit the consumer is therefore bad news for those who have built their
business models on this practice.

When applying government pricing regulations on the same medicine quoted above, a
pharmacist would simply add 26% on the manufacturer's price of R31.45. This means that a
consumer would buy the medicine at R39.63 instead of an unjustifiable R55.43 set by MHS.

TYPES OF DRUG:

Generic Drugs
A generic drug (generic drugs, short: generics) is a drug which is produced and distributed
without patent protection. The generic drug may still have a patent on the formulation but not
on the active ingredient.

Depending upon the jurisdiction, medications may be divided into over-the-counter drugs
(OTC) which may be available without special restrictions, and prescription only medicine
(POM), which must be prescribed by a licensed medical practitioner. The precise distinction
between OTC and prescription depends on the legal jurisdiction. The International Narcotics
Control Board of the United Nations imposes a world law of prohibition of certain
medications. They publish a lengthy list of chemicals and plants whose trade and
consumption (where applicable) is forbidden. OTC medications are sold without restriction as
they are considered safe enough that most people will not hurt themselves accidentally by
taking it as instructed.

Over the Counter Drug


It is also known as medication drugs. These can be purchased without prescription.
Prescription Drugs
These have to be prescribed or administered by healthcare professionals

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Pharma: Through Poter’s Eye


Today's business environment is extremely competitive and in economics parlance where
perfect competition exists, the profits of the firms operating in that industry will become zero.
However, this is not possible because, firstly no company is a price taker (i.e. no company
will operate where profits are zero).
Secondly, they strive to create a competitive advantage to thrive in the competitive scenario.
Michael Porter, considered to be one of the foremost gurus' of management, developed the
famous five-force model, which influences an industry.

Industry competition
Pharma industry is one of the most competitive industries in the country with as many as
10,000 different players fighting for the same pie. The rivalry in the industry can be gauged
from the fact that the top player in the country has only 6% market share, and the top five
players together have about 18% market share.
Thus, the concentration ratio for this industry is very low. High growth prospects make it
attractive for new players to enter in the industry.
Another major factor that adds to the industry rivalry is the fact that the entry barriers to
pharma industry are very low. The fixed cost requirement is low but the need for working
capital is high.

Bargaining power of buyers

Enhance over the long term, as product patents come into play from 2005.
The unique feature of pharma industry is that the end user of the product is different from the
influencer (read doctor). The consumer has no choice but to buy what doctor says. However,
when we look at the buyer's power, we look at the influence they have on the prices of the
product.
In pharma industry, the buyers are scattered and they as such does not wield much power in
the pricing of the products. However, government with its policies, plays an important role in
regulating pricing through the NPPA (National Pharmaceutical Pricing Authority).

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Bargaining power of suppliers

The pharma industry depends upon several organic chemicals. The chemical industry is again
very competitive and fragmented. The chemicals used in the pharma industry are largely a
commodity.
The suppliers have very low bargaining power and the companies in the pharma industry can
switch from their suppliers without incurring a very high cost.
However, what can happen is that the supplier can go for forward integration to become a
pharma company. Companies like Orchid Chemicals and Sashun Chemicals were basically
chemical companies, who turned themselves into pharmaceutical companies
Barriers to entry

Pharma industry is one of the most easily accessible industries for an entrepreneur in India.
The capital requirement for the industry is very low, creating a regional distribution network
is easy, since the point of sales is restricted in this industry in India.
However, creating brand awareness and franchisee amongst doctors is the key for long-term
survival. Also, quality regulations by the government may put some hindrance for
establishing new manufacturing operations.
Going forward, the impending new patent regime will raise the barriers to entry. But it is
unlikely to discourage new entrants, as market for generics will be as huge.

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Threat of substitutes

This is one of the great advantages of the pharma industry. Whatever happens, demand for
pharma products continues and the industry thrives. One of the key reasons for high
competitiveness in the industry is that as an ongoing concern, pharma industry seems to have
an infinite future.
However, in recent times, the advances made in the field of biotechnology, can prove to be a
threat to the synthetic pharma industry.

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Pharma Marketing and Its Challenges


While many pharmaceutical companies have successfully deployed a plethora of strategies to
target the various customer types, recent business and customer trends are creating new
challenges and opportunities for increasing profitability. In the pharmaceutical and healthcare
industries, a complex web of decision-makers determines the nature of the transaction
(prescription) for which direct customer (doctor) of pharma industry is responsible.
Essentially, the end-user (patient) consumes a product and pays the cost.

Use of medical representatives for marketing products to physicians and to exert some
influence over others in the hierarchy of decision makers has been a time-tested tradition.
Typically, sales force expense comprises an estimated 15 percent to 20 percent of annual
product revenues, the largest line item on the balance sheet. Despite this other expense, the
industry is still plagued with some very serious strategic and operational level issues.

From organizational perspective the most prominent performance related issues are
 Increased competition and unethical practices adopted by some of the propaganda
base companies.

 Low level of customer knowledge (Doctors, Retailers, Wholesalers).

 Poor customer (both external & internal) acquisition, development and retention
strategies

 Varying customer perception.

 The number and the quality of medical representatives

 Very high territory development costs.

 High training and re-training costs of sales personnel.

 Very high attrition rate of the sales personnel.

 Busy doctors giving less time for sales calls.

 Poor territory knowledge in terms of business value at medical representative level .

 Unknown value of revenue from each retailer in the territory

 Absence of ideal mechanism of sales forecasting from field sales level, leading to
huge deviations

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PATENTS
Patents are a vital aspect of the global pharma industry. Patent protection is essential to spur
basic R&D and make it commercially viable. But, only the developed nations endorse
product patents. Most third world countries have patent laws but enforcement is totally lax.

NEW DRUG APPROVAL (NDA)


Prior to launching its products in any country, a pharma company undertakes patent
registration to protect its own interests. To protect the interests of the consumers, it is
necessary that the product be approved by the drug authorities in that country. Mostly the
process for seeking approval is initiated alongside the patent registration process.

WTO
Due to pressure from the developed countries, across the world uniformity in patent laws is
being implemented under WTO (World Trade Organization - earlier GATT i.e. General
Agreement on Tariffs & Trade). Presently, different countries have different patent types and
life period. WTO has decided upon a product patent life of 20 years in all countries.

RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT (R&D)


The pharmaceutical industry is characterized by heavy R&D expenditure. It is only the large
pharmaceutical companies who can allocate significant resources for R&D to introduce new
products. As the products are an outcome of significant R&D expenditures incurred by these
companies, they have their products patented. The patent allows the companies concerned to
wield immense pricing power for their new products.

THE COMPETITION
The level of competition on day to day basis in very high in Acute segment however the
degree of competition in not as much as high in Chronic therapy area. As doctor has to
prescribe drug for a long time in chronic cases and patient is supposed to consume it without
any change of brand. While in acute cases doctor is changing brands on day to day basis. In
acute area however there is a large competition from local and propaganda companies.

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Ranbaxy: Company Profile


Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited (Ranbaxy), India's largest pharmaceutical company, is an
integrated, research based, international pharmaceutical company, producing a wide range of
quality, affordable generic medicines, trusted by healthcare professionals and patients across
geographies. Ranbaxy today has a presence in 23 of the top 25 pharmaceutical markets of the
world. The Company has a global footprint in 46 countries, world-class manufacturing
facilities in 7 countries and serves customers in over 125 countries.

Ranbaxy is one of the leading pharmaceutical Companies in India commanding a market


share of around 5%. The Company has clocked sales of USD 299 Mn(2008). Growing ahead
of the market, the Company has enhanced its competitive position in the domestic market
through its focused approach. The Company‟s business has been realigned to its customer
groups and investments have been made in high growth segments. These efforts have resulted
in strengthening its Chronic franchise (Life Style led) as well as has reinforced its leading
position in the acute segment.

FORMATION

Ranbaxy was started by Ranbir Singh and Gurbax Singh in 1937 as a distributor for a
Japanese company Shionogi. The name Ranbaxy is a portmanteau word from the names of its
first owners Ranbir and Gurbax. Bhai Mohan Singh bought the company in 1952 from his
cousins Ranbir Singh and Gurbax Singh. After Bhai Mohan Singh's son Parvinder Singh
joined the company in 1967, the company saw a significant transformation in its business and
scale

In June 2008, Ranbaxy entered into an alliance with one of the largest Japanese innovator
companies, Daiichi Sankyo Company Ltd., to create an innovator and generic pharmaceutical
powerhouse. The combined entity now ranks among the top 20 pharmaceutical companies,
globally. The transformational deal will place Ranbaxy in a higher growth trajectory and it

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will emerge stronger in terms of its global reach and in its capabilities in drug development
and manufacturing.

On June 11 2008, Daiichi-Sankyo acquired a 34.8% stake in Ranbaxy, for a value $2.4
billion. In November 2008, Daiichi-Sankyo completed the takeover of the company from the
founding Singh family in a deal worth $4.6 billion by acquiring a 63.92% stake in Ranbaxy.

In November 2008, Daiichi Sankyo completed the acquisition of 63.92% shares of Ranbaxy
and in the process infused. The coming together of Ranbaxy and Daiichi Sankyo is a path-
breaking confluence that, in one sweep, catapults the new, empowered entity to the status of
the world's 15th largest pharmaceutical Company. Individually, the two pharmaceutical
giants are formidable - one, India's largest generics Company and the other, among the largest
innovator companies in Japan.

Ranbaxy also reached settlements with the makers of the world's two largest selling drugs --
Lipitor (with Pfizer (PFE) ) and nexium (with AstraZeneca (AZN) ). This decision will allow
for an earlier introduction of a generic formulation in several countries. Ranbaxy is also
bringing out novel drug-delivery systems and was the first Indian company to license a
product in this field to Bayer AG.

0.00% 0.89% 1.72% Daiichi Sankyo

Mutul Funds
5.30% 12.43%
Banks, Fin. Inst., Ins
4.16% Co.
9.57% FIIs
63.92%
Private Corporate
2.01% Bodies
Indian Public
As of Dec. 08
2008
P1: AQUISITION FIGURE OF RANBAXY AS OF DEC 08

VISION & M ISSION


The Indian pharmaceutical industry is at the center stage in the global
Pharmaceutical arena and Ranbaxy is at the forefront in delivering the India centric
advantages to the advanced and developing countries of the world.

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The Endeavour at Ranbaxy is to provide value. Value through pioneering work, research &
development and quality pharmaceuticals across the globe. Ranbaxy keeps alive this
Endeavour as it steps into the new millennium, and reaffirms its commitment to the
environment, the people and a healthier future.

Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited has excelled in its endeavor in drug research and
manufacture, providing quality products not only at par with global markets but also
facilitating the same.

Ranbaxy are committed to provide quality generics at affordable prices to the patients
worldwide with a view to help bring down the healthcare costs. Companies grow from
strength to strength in the global generic space in the years to come. While the company
continues to enhance the momentum of generics business in over 125 markets, they are also
accelerating drug discovery program through collaborations and alliances.

Ranbaxy is driven by its vision to achieve significant business in proprietary prescription


products by 2012 with a strong presence in developed markets. The Company aspires to be
amongst the Top 5 global generic players and aims at achieving global sales of US $5 Bn by
2012.

VALUES
 Achieving customer satisfaction is fundamental to our business
 Provide products and services of the highest quality
 Practice dignity and equity in relationship and provide opportunities for our people to
realise their full potential
 Ensure profitable growth and enhance wealth of the shareholders
 Foster mutually beneficial relations with all our business partners
 Manage our operations with high concern for safety and environment
 Be a responsible corporate citizen

B USINESS SEGMENTS

There are three basic business divisions: pharmaceutical dosage forms, active
pharmaceuticals ingredients (API) and allied business which comprises of animal healthcare,
diagnostics and a range of other products. Of these, the pharmaceutical dosage forms division
is the largest sector, accounting for two thirds of annual sales.

Dosage Form Sales (94% of total revenue)The dosage form sales grew from 91% of global
sales in 2006 to 94% of global sales in 2007. It comprises the majority of ranbaxy's sales,
including sales of generic pharmaceuticals, value added generic pharmaceuticals and branded
generics.

API (Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients & Others) (6%) Ranbaxy supplies API to leading
generic companies in more than 50 countries. The API division has in its portfolio over 50

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products covering a wide therapeutic range such as Cardio-vasculars, Anti-infectives, Anti-


ulcerants, Anti-diabetics, Anti-depressants, Anti-virals and others. In 2001 Ranbaxy
identified Consumer Healthcare as its new business area with the launch of 4 brands: Revital,
Pepfiz, Gesdyp & Garlic Pearls. During 2006, the business registered sales of US $ 19 Mn
registering a growth of 19%.

Operating metrics
Installed Production Sales Quantity Sales Value in
Product Name
Capacity in Cr Quantity in Cr in Cr Dec 2007
Tablets 9,424 6,413.29 7,901.19 2,015.44
Bulk Drugs 2,001 1,547.02 1,819.07 969.47
Formulation
2,992 2,025.27 2,291.48 613.06
(Capsules)
Syrups & Powder
44 42.32 50.05 280.12
Dry
Injectible Vials 39 35.55 103.09 253.66
Ointments NA 317.80 983.84 133.15
others NA NA NA 86.68
Liquids NA 1,372.73 3,259.35 85.15
Ampoules 48 99.47 104.37 79.47
Other fiscal
NA NA NA 68.80
benefits
Other operating
NA NA NA 33.69
income
Royalty income NA NA NA 12.72
Drops NA 46.56 46.86 7.00

T1: The product-wise gross revenue breakup for year ending December 2007

PRODUCTS

Using the finest R&D and Manufacturing facilities, Ranbaxy Laboratories Limited
manufacture and markets generic pharmaceuticals, value added generic pharmaceuticals,
branded generics, active Pharmaceuticals (API) and intermediates.

The Company remains focused on ascending the value chain in the marketing of
pharmaceutical substances and is determined to bring in increased revenues from dosage
forms sales.

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Ranbaxy's diverse product basket of over 5,000 SKUs available in over 125 countries
worldwide, encompasses a wide therapeutic mix covering a majority of the chronic and
acute segments. Healthcare trends project that the chronic treatment segments will outpace
the acute treatment segments, primarily driven by a growing aging population and
dominance of lifestyle diseases. Our robust performance in Cardiovasculars, Central
Nervous System, Respiratory, Dermatology, Orthopedics, Nutritionals and Urology
segments, clearly indicates that the Company has strengthened its presence in the fast-
growing chronic and lifestyle disease segments.

Top 20 Molecules
• Simvastatin
• AmoxiClav Potassium
• Isotretinoin
• Amoxycillin and Combinations
• Ciprofloxacin and Combinations
• Ketorolac Tromethamine
• Omeprazole and Combinations
• Cefuroxime Axetil
• Cephalexin
• Loratadine and Combinations
• Clarithromycin
• Ginseng+Vitamins
• Diclofenac and Combinations
• Ranitidine
• Cefaclor
• Cefpodoxime Proxetil
• Efavirenz
• Atorvastatin and Combinations
• Fenofibrate
• Ofloxacin and Combinations

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CORPORATE PROFILE OF RANBAXY

B OARD OF DIRECTORS
Dr.TsutomuUne Chairman Non Executive and Non
independent Director
Mr.AtulSobti CEO and managing Director
Mr.Takashi Soda Non-Executive Director
Dr. Anthony H. Wild Independent Director
Mr.Rajesh V. Shah Independent Director
Mr. Akihiro Watanabe Independent Director
Mr. Percy Shroff Independent Director
EXECUTIVE TEAM
Mr. AtulSobti Chief Executive Officer & Managing
Director
Mr. ArunSawhney President – Global Pharmaceuticals Business
Mr. OmeshSethi President and Chief Financial Officer
Dr. Sudarshan K. Arora President – Research & Development
Mr. BhagwatYagnik Head – Global Human Resources
Mr. Dale Adkisson Head - Global Quality
Mr. Hiroyuki Okuzawa Head – Global Synergy Project

GEORAPHICAL SEGMENTS:

Ranbaxy is a truly global operation, producing its pharmaceutical preparations in


manufacturing facilities in seven countries, supported by sales and marketing subsidiaries in
44 countries, reaching more than 100 countries throughout the world. The United States,
which alone accounts for nearly half of all pharmaceutical sales in the world, is the
company's largest international market, representing more than 40 percent of group sales. In
Europe, the company's purchase of RPG (Aventis) S.A. makes it the largest generics
producer in that market. The company is also a leading generics producer in the United
Kingdom and Germany and elsewhere in Europe. European sales added 16 percent to the
company's sales in 2004. Ranbaxy's other major markets include Brazil, Russia, and China,
as well as India, which together added 26 percent to the group's sales.

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Ranbaxy & Daiichi Sankyo combined rank among the top 20 global pharmaceutical
companies

WORLDWIDE PRESENCE
• Ground presence in 46 countries, products sold in over 125 countries
• Manufacturing locations in 7 countries
• Global consolidated sales –US $ 1519 Mn (2009)
• Business -International 77%-Domestic 23%
• >13000 employees globally represented by 50 nationalities

COMPANY STRATEGIES

For the year 2009, Ranbaxy has a clear strategy to harness its growth potential in emerging
markets, rebuild the US business through a series of actions on products and facilities;
actualize significant revenue upsides through First-to-File and Day-1 launches strengthen
the product / therapeutic pipeline and look for M&A opportunities, complementing our
geographic and therapeutic basket. Our focus will be to resolve regulatory compliance issues
and continue to strengthen cGMP across all locations. Besides this, Ranbaxy and Daiichi
Sankyo will identify key projects to realize synergies at both the front and back ends of the
business, although, there will be much to contend with, considering that the industry is
projected to grow at around 5% in 2009.

Ranbaxy is focused on increasing the momentum in the generics business in its key markets
through organic and inorganic growth routes. The Company continues to evaluate acquisition
opportunities in India, emerging and developed markets to strengthen its business and
competitiveness. Growth is well spread across geographies with focus on emerging markets.
Ranbaxy has forayed into new specialty therapeutic segments like Bio-similars, Oncology,
Peptides and Limuses. These new growth areas will add significant depth to the existing
product pipeline.

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R&D

Ranbaxy views its R&D capabilities as a vital component of its business strategy that will
provide a sustainable, long-term competitive advantage. The Company has a pool of over
1,200 scientists engaged in path-breaking research.

Ranbaxy is among the few Indian pharmaceutical companies in India to have started its
research program in the late 70's, in support of its global ambitions. A first-of-its-kind world
class R&D centre was commissioned in 1994. Today, the Company's four multi-disciplinary
R&D centers at Gurgaon, in India, house dedicated facilities for generics research and
innovative research. The robust R&D environment for both drug discovery and development
reflects the Company's commitment to be a leader in the generics space offering value added
formulations based on its Novel Drug Delivery System (NDDS) and New Chemical Entity
(NCE) research capabilities.

The new drug research areas at Ranbaxy include anti-infectives, inflammatory / respiratory,
metabolic diseases, oncology, urology and anti-malaria therapies. Presently, the Company has
8-10 programs including one Anti-malaria molecule for which Phase-III clinical trials have
commenced in India, Bangladesh and Thailand. The Company has signed collaborative
research programs with GSK and Merck.

NDDS focus is mainly on the development of NDA/ANDAs of oral controlled- release


products for the regulated markets. Ranbaxy‟s first significant international success using the
NDDS technology platform came in September 1999, when the Company out-licensed its
first once-a-day formulation to a multinational company.

INDUSTRY STRUCTURE & DEVELOPMENTS


 The global pharmaceuticals market sales grew by approximately 5.7% (at constant
exchange rate), to reach US$ 727 Bn in 2009. North America, Europe and Japan
remained the key markets accounting for about 86% of the worldwide pharmaceutical
sales in 2009.
 Developed Markets (US, Japan, UK, Spain, Germany, France, Italy and Canada) grew
by 4% during the year. The 'Pharmerging' markets (Brazil, Russia, India, China,
Turkey, Mexico and South Korea) continued to strengthen their position in the global
landscape and grew by 17% in 2009. Global pharmaceutical market is projected to
grow at a cumulative average growth rate (CAGR) of 4-7% for the 2008-2013 period.
Forecasted CAGR for the Developed Market ranges between 2-5%, while the
Pharmerging markets are expected to have a CAGR between 13-16%, for the same
period
 Significant factors that have resulted in a slowdown in the pharmaceutical market are
(a) lower consumer spend due tothe economic downturn, (b) increased volume for
generic drugs leading to a decrease in the total value for the industry, and (c) lesser
number of new patent protected products in the market.

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 Pharmaceutical sales in North America, the world's largest market, were US$ 316 Bn,
a growth of 4.0%, constituting 43% of the global sales in 2009; of these sales in the
United States accounted for US$ 298 Bn and grew by 3.9%. Europe clocked sales of
US$ 226 Bn, a growth of 4.7%, and contributed 31% to the global pharmaceutical
industry. Sales in Latin America, led by key markets of Brazil and Mexico, grew by
11.9%, to reach US$ 33 Bn. Asia, Africa and Australia combined, grew by 9.6%, to
US$ 152 Bn; Japan, the world's second largest market, recorded sales of US$ 80 Bn,
and grew by 6.1%.
 The industry, especially in the generics market, has become highly competitive. This,
coupled with the drying up of pipelines of innovator companies is leading to
consolidation in the generics and innovator industry, as a consequence, new hybrid
models between innovator and generic companies are evolving. Thus, the
pharmaceutical industry is witnessing adoption of new business models, where
innovator and generic companies work together to leverage each other's strengths. The
new business model will help innovator companies get access to emerging markets,
lower manufacturing and R&D cost base; while generics companies will gain from
higher R&D capabilities of innovators and access to innovator drugs.

TOP COMPETITORS OF RANBAXY IN PHARMA M ARKET

 Cipla Ltd.
 Dr. Reddy'S Laboratories Ltd
 Nicholas Piramal India Ltd.
 Glaxosmithkline Pharmaceuticals Ltd
 Cadila Healthcare Ltd.
 Pfizer Ltd.
 Sun Pharmaceutical Inds. Ltd
 Wockhardt Ltd
 Aventis Pharma Ltd
 Biocon Ltd

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SWOT Analysis
STRENGTHS

 One of the largest distribution networks that comprises 2500+ skilled field force.
Dedicated task forces for specialised& chronic therapies
 A strong player in the NDDS segment. Key brands include Cifran OD (Ciprofloxacin),
Zanocin OD (Ofloxacin) &Sporidex AF (Cephalexin)
 Strong brand building capabilities, reflected in the fact that around 20 brands feature in
the “Top-300 brands of the Industry” list. Leading brands are Sporidex (Cephalexin),
Cifran (Ciprofloxacin), Mox (Amoxycillin), Zanocin (Ofloxacin) &Volini(Diclofenac)
 A well-built customer interface, with one of the highest customer coverage across
India, and an excellent franchise with both Generalists & Specialists. This is proven by
Ranbaxy India‟s Corporate Image being perceived as „Best-in-Class‟ by customers
(source: AC Nielsen ORG MARG Report, June 2004)
 Great emphasis is placed on Knowledge Management and Medico-marketing
initiatives such as Advisory Board Meetings, Post Marketing Surveillance Studies and
Continuous Medical Education programs. These have resulted in an excellent customer
relationship with the medical fraternity. More than 2000 interface programs
(Symposia, CME‟s) are conducted and about 20 Clinical Papers published annually

 Efficient technologies for large number of Generics.

 Large pool of skilled technical manpower.

 Increasing liberalization of government policies.

 Tactful reengineering process

 Copy the manufacturing process of patented drugs

 Adapting quickly changed environment

 Quality of drugs

 Cross licenses , joint ventures & alliances

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WEAKNESS:

1. Fragmentation of installed capacities.

2. Non-availability of major intermediaries for bulk drugs.

3. Lack of experience to exploit efficiently the new patent regime.

4. Low share of India in World Pharmaceutical Production

5. Very low level of Biotechnology in India and also for New Drug Discovery Systems.

6. Lack of experience in International Trade.

7. Low level of strategic planning for future and also for technology forecasting.

OPPORTUNITIES

1. Aging of the world population.

2. Growing incomes.

3. Growing attention for health.

4. New diagnoses and new social diseases.

5. Spreading prophylactic approaches.

6. Saturation point of market is far away.

7. New therapy approaches.

8. New delivery systems.

9. Spreading attitude for soft medication (OTC drugs).

10. Spreading use of Generic Drugs.

11. Globalization

12. Easier international trading.

13. New markets are opening.

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THREATS:

1. There are certain concerns over the patent regime regarding its current structure. It
might be possible that the new government may change certain provisions of the
patent act formulated by the preceding government.

2. Threats from other low cost countries like China and Israel exist. However, on the
quality front, India is better placed relative to China. So, differentiation in the contract
manufacturing side may wane.

3. The short-term threat for the pharma industry is the uncertainty regarding the
implementation of VAT. Though this is likely to have a negative impact in the short-
term, the implications over the long-term are positive for the industry.
4. Containment of rising health-care cost.

5. High Cost of discovering new products and fewer discoveries.

6. Stricter registration procedures.

7. High entry cost in newer markets.

8. High cost of sales and marketing.

9. Competition, particularly from generic products.

10. More potential new drugs and more efficient therapies.

11. Switching over form process patent to product patent.

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Pharmaceuticals Marketing In Ranbaxy


Marketing in Pharmaceutical industry is totally different from other industries like FMCG.
Industrial goods etc. because of following reasons:-

 The pharmaceutical product does not reach directly as the patients consume only
those brands which are being prescribed by the doctor so as we know companies
can‟t sell directly to patients i.e the end users of the products is away from
companies. So there can‟t be concept of direct seeking in the pharma market. So it is
doctor who is the customer for companies.
 Pharma marketing is also different as the product is technical in nature as compared to
any consumer product. The product has to undergo various clinical trails, medical test,
before it is introduced in the market.

Strategies are followed by pharmaceutical companies:-

 Personal Selling
 Symposium
 Sample Gifts
 Promotional Literature
 Conferences
 Direct Mailing

Pharmaceutical marketing is the business of advertising or otherwise promoting the sale of


pharmaceuticals or drugs.
Mass marketing of prescription medications was rare until recently, however. It was long
believed that since doctors made the selection of drugs, mass marketing was a waste of
resources; specific ads targeting the medical profession were thought to be cheaper and just
as effective. This would involve ads in professional journals and visits by sales staff to
doctor‟s offices and hospitals. An important part of these efforts was marketing to medical
students.
The marketing of medication has a long history. The sale of miracle cures, many with little
real potency, has always been common. Marketing of legitimate non-
prescription medications, such as pain relievers or allergy medicine, has also long been
practiced. Mass marketing of prescription medications was rare until recently, however. It
was long believed that since doctors made the selection of drugs, mass marketing was a waste
of resources; specific ads targeting the medical profession were thought to be cheaper and
just as effective. This would involve ads in professional journals and visits by sales staff to
doctor‟s offices and hospitals. An important part of these efforts was marketing to medical
students.

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Direct and indirect marketing to health care providers


Physicians are perhaps the most important component in pharmaceutical sales. They write the
prescriptions that determine which drugs will be used by the patient. Influencing the
physician is the key to pharmaceutical sales. Historically, this was done by a large
pharmaceutical sales force. A medium-sized pharmaceutical company might have a sales
force of 1000 representatives. The largest companies have tens of thousands of
representatives around the world. Sales representatives called upon physicians regularly,
providing information and free drug samples to the physicians.
This is still the approach today; however, economic pressures on the industry are causing
pharmaceutical companies to rethink the traditional sales process to physicians.
More recently, the Partners Healthcare, Massachusetts' largest hospital and physician
network, will adopt new guidelines prohibiting physicians and researchers from accepting
gifts from pharmaceutical manufacturers. This will include meals or individual drug samples,
and also drug samples left by companies will be distributed through a centralized system,
while educational programs and fellowships will also be required to be centrally reviewed
and approved.
Pharmaceutical companies are developing processes to influence the people who influence
the physicians. There are several channels by which a physician may be influenced, including
self-influence through research, peer influence, direct interaction with pharmaceutical
companies, patients, and public or private insurance companies. There are also web based
instruments that can be used to determine the influencers and buying motives of physicians.
There are a number of firms that specialize in data and analytics for pharmaceutical
marketing.

Individual research
Physicians discover pharmaceutical information from such sources as the Physician's Desk
Reference and online sources such as PDR.net, as well as via PDAs with applications.
They also rely upon pharmaceutical-branded e-detailing sites, pharmaceutical sales and non-
sales representatives, and scholarly literature. Scholarly literature can be in the form of
medical journal article reprints, often delivered by sales representatives at their place of
employment or at conference exhibitions.

Peer influence

Key opinion leaders


Key opinion leaders (KOL), or "thought leaders", are respected individuals, such as
prominent medical school faculty, who influence physicians through their professional status.
Pharmaceutical companies generally engage key opinion leaders early in the drug
development process to provide advocacy and key marketing feedback.Some pharmaceutical
companies identify key opinion leaders through direct inquiry of physicians (primary
research).

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Colleagues
Physicians acquire information through informal contacts with their colleagues, including
social events, professional affiliations, common hospital affiliations, and common medical
school affiliations. Some pharmaceutical companies identify influential colleagues through
commercially available prescription writing and patient level data .Doctor dinner meetings are
an effective way for physicians to acquire educational information from respected peers.
These meetings are sponsored by some pharmaceutical companies.

Direct physician contact with pharmaceutical sales representatives


A pharmaceutical representative will often try to see a given physician every few weeks.
Representatives often have a call list of about 200 physicians with 120 targets that should be
visited in 1-2 week cycles.
Because of the large size of the pharmaceutical sales force, the organization, management,
and measurement of effectiveness of the sales force are significant business challenges.
Management tasks are usually broken down into the areas of physician targeting, sales force
size and structure, sales force optimization, call planning, and sales forces effectiveness.
A few pharmaceutical companies have realized that training sales representatives on high
science alone is not enough, especially when most products are similar in quality. Thus,
training sales representatives on relationship selling techniques in addition to medical science
and product knowledge, can make a difference in sales force effectiveness. Specialist
physicians are relying more and more on specialty sales reps for product information, because
they are more knowledgeable than primary care reps.

Physician targeting
Marketers attempt to identify the universe of physicians most likely to prescribe a given drug.
Historically, this was done by measuring the number of total prescriptions (TRx) and new
prescriptions (NRx) per week that each physician writes. This information is collected by
commercial vendors. The physicians are then "deciled" into ten groups based on their writing
patterns. Higher deciles are more aggressively targeted. Some pharmaceutical companies use
additional information such as:

 profitability of a prescription (script),accessibility of the physician,


 tendency of the physician to use the pharmaceutical company's drugs,
 effect of managed care formularies on the ability of the physician to prescribe a drug,
 the adoption sequence of the physician (that is, how readily the physician adopts new
drugs in place of older, established treatments), and
 the tendency of the physician to use a wide palette of drugs
 Influence that physicians have on their colleagues.
Data for drugs prescribed in a hospital are not usually available at the physician level.
Advanced analytic techniques are used to value physicians in a hospital setting

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Opinion Leader Influence Mapping


Alternatives to segmenting physicians purely on the basis of prescribing do exist, and
marketers can call upon strategic partners who specialize in delineating which characteristics
of true opinion leadership, a physician does or does not possess. Such analyses can help guide
marketers in how to optimize KOL engagements as bona fide advisors to a brand, and can
help shape clinical development and clinical data publication plans for instance, ultimately
advancing patient care.

Sales force size and structure


Marketers must decide on the appropriate size of a sales force needed to sell a particular
portfolio of drugs to the target universe. Design the optimal reach (how many physicians to
see) and frequency (how often to see them) for each individual physician. Decide how many
sales representatives to devote to office and group practice and how many to devote to
hospital accounts. Additionally, customers are broken down into different classes, each class
is differentiated by their prescription behaviour and of course, their business potential.
Direct marketing to patients
Recent years have seen an increase in mass media advertisements for pharmaceuticals.
Expenditures on direct-to-consumer (DTC pharmaceutical advertising) have more than
quintupled in the last seven years since the FDA changed the guidelines.

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Sales Promotion Activity through


Medical Representatives
JOB DESCRIPTION
Medical sales representatives are a key link between medical and pharmaceutical companies
and healthcare professionals. They work strategically to increase the awareness and use of a
company‟s pharmaceutical and medical products in settings such as general practices,
primary care trusts and hospitals.

Based in a specific geographical location, and usually specializing in a particular product or


medical area, medical sales representatives try to ensure clients are aware of, buy and
subsequently use their company's products. They may also make presentations and organize
group events for healthcare professionals, as well as working with contacts on a one-to-one
basis.

TYPICAL WORK ACTIVITIES


In particular, typical work activities include:

 Arranging appointments with doctors, pharmacists and hospital medical teams, which
may include pre-arranged appointments or regular 'cold' calling;

 Making presentations to doctors, practice staff and nurses in GP surgeries, hospital


doctors, and pharmacists in the retail sector. Presentations may take place in medical
settings during the day or may be conducted in the evenings at a local hotel or
conference venue;

 organizing conferences for doctors and other medical staff;

 building and maintaining positive working relationships with medical staff and
supporting administration staff e.g. receptionists;

 managing budgets (for catering, outside speakers, conferences, hospitality, etc);

 keeping detailed records of all contacts and reaching (and if possible exceeding)
annual sales targets;

 Planning work schedules and weekly and monthly timetables. This may involve
working with the area sales team or discussing future targets with the area sales
manager. Generally, medical sales executives have their own regional area of
responsibility and plan how and when to target health professions;

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 regularly attending company meetings, technical data presentations and briefings;

 keeping up with the latest clinical data supplied by the company and interpreting,
presenting and discussing this data with health professionals during presentations;

 monitoring competitor activity and competitors' products;

 developing strategies for increasing opportunities to meet and talk to contacts in the
medical and healthcare sector

 staying informed about the activities of health services in a particular area;

 Working with team managers to plan how to approach contacts and creating effective
business plans for making sales in a particular area.

Distribution:
 For distribution of the product, mainly pull strategy is practiced.
 The product is sold directly to the customer only by the medical stores only with
doctor‟s prescription.
 For distribution: the customer comes to the medical store and asks about the medicine,
the medical store owner inquires to the stockiest situated near to their medical store
by direct contact or by the phone and the stockiest contacts to the dealer of the
company or to the godown of the company where the stocks are delivered from ware
houses in the respective regions and at there the stocks are delivered directly from the
production units.
 In this distribution network, cost of the distribution is on company up to the stock
reaches to the stockiest and while in the case of the product reaching from stockiest to
the various medical stores charges do mostly the medical stores pay.

It has a network of 24 sales offices and depots, liaising with around 1300 stockists and
1,30,000 retailers across the country

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Ranbaxy Business Strategy

What‟s the secret behind successes? For one, the company operates in niche formulations
(chronic) segments such as psychiatry, cardiovascular, gastroenterology and neurology.
While most of the top Indian companies have focused on antibiotics and anti–invectives
(acute), Pharma focused on therapeutic areas such as depression, hypertension and cancer.
The company has introduced the entire range of products and has gained leadership position
in each of these areas. Being a specialty company insulates Sun
Pharma from the industry growth. The first quarter results for FY02 explain this to some
extent. While the industry was affected to a large extent by a slowdown in the domestic
formulations market, Pharma logged a growth of 26% in revenues.
The bases of marketing strategies can be best described in these two models in bothacute and
chronic segments:

Super Core Model

Involving the search for, and distribution of a small number of drugs from TherapyChronic
Area that achieve substantial global sales. The success of this model depends on achieving
large returns from a small number of drugs in order to pay for the high cost of the drug
discovery and development process for a large number of patients. Total revenues are highly
dependant on sales from a small number of drugs.
This model incorporates highly specialized approach in the entire manner. Initially the
competition is seems more at entry level but since growth is stable and more in this area;
Every company is striving very hard to enter in this area. The major strategy in this model
involves right focus to highly specialized customer by well trained team.

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CORE M ODEL
In which a larger number of drugs from Acute Threapy Area are marketed to big diversified
markets. The advantage of this model is that its success is not dependant on sales of a small
number of drugs. Here presenting a large number of product and taking the advantage of
opportunity cost is one of the important strategy Other strategy includes daily reminders to
cross the perceptual filter and get the brand name in to the sub-conscious state of mind.

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Molecule used in survey


CEPODEM:
Cefpodoxime proxetil is an orally administered, extended spectrum, semi-syntheticantibiotic
of the cephalosporin class. The chemical name is (RS)-1(isopropoxycarbonyloxy) ethyl(+)-
(6R,7R)-7-[2-(2-amino-4- thiazolyl)-2-{(Z)methoxyimino}acetamido]-3-methoxymethyl-8-
oxo-5-thia-1-azabicyclo [4.2.0]oct-2-ene- 2-carboxylate.

Its empirical formula is C21H27N5O9S2 and its structural formula is represented below:

The molecular weight of cefpodoximeproxetil is 557,6.Cefpodoxime proxetil is a prodrug; its


active metabolite is cefpodoxime. All doses ofcefpodoximeproxetil in this insert are
expressed in terms of the active Cefpodoxime moiety. The drug is supplied both as film-
coated tablets and as flavored granules for oralsuspension.

CLINICAL PHARMACOLOGY
Absorption and Excretion:
Cefpodoxime proxetil is a prodrug that is absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and
deesterified to its active metabolite, cefpodoxime. Following oral administration of 100 mg
ofcefpodoximeproxetil to fasting subjects, approximately 50% of the administered
cefpodoxime dose was absorbed systemically. Over the recommended dosing range (100 to
400 mg), approximately 29 to 33% of the administered cefpodoxime dose was excreted
unchanged in the urine in 12 hours. There is minimal metabolism of cefpodoximein vivo.

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Microbiology:
Cefpodoxime is active against a wide spectrum of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.
Cefpodoxime is stable in the presence of beta-lactamase enzymes. As a result, many
organisms resistant to penicillins and cephalosporins, due to their production of beta-
lactamase, may be susceptible to cefpodoxime. Cefpodoxime is inactivated by certain
extended spectrum beta-lactamases.
Aerobic Gram-positive microorganisms:
Staphylococcus aureus(including penicillinase-producing strains)
NOTE: Cefpodoxime is inactive against methicillin-resistant staphylococci.
Staphylococcus saprophyticus
Streptococcus pneumoniae(excluding penicillin-resistant strains)
Streptococcus pyogenes
Aerobic Gram-negative microorganisms:
Escherichia coli
Klebsiellapneumoniae
Proteus mirabilis
Haemophilusinfluenzae(including beta-lactamase producing strains)
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis
Neisseria gonorrhoeae(including penicillinase-producing strains)
The following in vitro data are available, but their clinical significance is unknown.
Cefpodoxime exhibits in vitro minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of ≤ 2.0 mcg/mL
against most (≥90%) of isolates of the following microorganisms. However, the safety and
efficacy of cefpodoxime in treating clinical infections due to these microorganisms have not
been established in adequate and well-controlled clinical trials.
Aerobic Gram-positive microorganisms:
Streptococcus agalactiae
Streptococcus spp. (Groups C, F, G)
NOTE: Cefpodoxime is inactive against enterococci.
Aerobic Gram-negative microorganisms:
Citrobacterdiversus
Klebsiellaoxytoca
Proteus vulgaris
Providenciarettgeri
Haemophilusparainfluenzae
NOTE: Cefpodoxime is inactive against most strains of Pseudomonas and Enterobacter.
Anaerobic Gram-positive microorganisms:
Peptostreptococcusmagnus

INDICATIONS:
CEPODEM suspension is indicated for the treatment of the following infections:
Upper Respiratory Tract Infections: Tonsillitis, Otitis Media, Sinusitis, Pharyngitis.
Lower Respiratory Tract Infections: Acute Bronchitis, Pneumonia, Superinfection of chronic
obstructive airways disease

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CONTRAINDICATIONS
Known allergy to cefpodoximeproxetil or cephalosporin group.

SIDE-EFFECTS
Side effects reported are mild and transient and include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting,
abdominalpain, colitis and headache. Rarely hypersensitivity reactions, rash, pruritis,
dizziness,thrombocytosis, thrombocytopenia, leucopenia or eosinphelia may occur.

PRECAUTIONS
General
It is important to consider the diagnosis of pseudomembranous colitis in patients who present
with diarrhea subsequent to the administration of cefpodoximeproxetil.
Warning
Particular care will be needed in patients who have had an anaphylactic response to
penicillin. Cefpodoxime proxetil should not be given to those patients with previous history
ofhypersensitivity to cephalosporins or other B-lactams. Allergic reactions are particularly
likely in patients with a history of allergies.
Drug Interactions
Plasma concentrations are decreased by approximately 30% when Cefpodoxime proxetil is
administered with antacids or H2 blockers. Close monitoring of renal function is advised
when cefpodoxime is administered concomitantly with compounds of known nephrotoxic
potential. Plasma levels of cefpodoxime increase when cefpodoxime is given with
probenicid.
Overdosage
Symptoms following an overdose may include nausea, vomiting, epigastric distress and
diarrhea. In the event of serious toxic reaction from overdosage, haemodialysis or peritoneal
dialysis may aid in the removal of cefpodoxime from the body, particularly if renal function
is compromised.

TAKEN PRODUCT PORTFOLIO


The following 9 products of Ranbaxy‟s product portfolio were taken for the purpose
to know their market potential as compared with their competitors. All the products were
taken only in tablet form.
1. CEPODEM (Cefpodoxime)
2. CEPODEM-XP (Cefpodoxime + Clavulanic Acid)
3. CEROXIM (Cefuroxime)
4. CEROXIM-XP (Cefuroxime Axetil)
5. RACIPER (Esomeprazole)
6. RICONIA (Multivitamin)
7. ALTRAFLAM (Aceclofenac)
8. SYNASMA (Doxofylline)
9. GEMBAX (Gemifloxacin)

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CHAPTER 2
RESEARCH
METHODOLOGY:

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RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
Research methodology is a way to systematically solve the research problem. It may be
understood as a science of studying how research is done scientifically. In it we study the
various steps that are generally adopted by a researcher in studying his research problem
along with the logic behind them. It is necessary for the researcher to know not only the
research methods or techniques but also the methodology.

RESEARCH DESIGN
The following research is Descriptive Research which is based on facts and figures.
This project is done according to the “descriptive research design.”

A research design is a framework or a blue print for conducting the market research project.
It details the procedures necessary for obtaining the information needed for obtaining the
information needed to structure or solve a marketing research problem.

Design maybe broadly classified into:


- Exploratory research
- Conclusive research

Conclusive research is typically more formal and structured than exploratory research. It is
based on large representative samples and that data obtained are subjected to a quantitative
analysis. The findings from this research are considered to be conclusive in nature in that they
are used as input into marginal decision making.

As the name implies, major objective of “descriptive research” is to describe something


usually market characteristics and time. Descriptive research is pre planned and structured. It
is typically performed on large representative samples. A descriptive design requires a clear
specification of the “who, what, when, where, why and way (the W‟s of research).
Descriptive research assumes that the research has much prior knowledge about the problem
solution.

SAMPLING DESIGN

Rarely will be a marketing research project involves examining the entire population i.e.
relevant to the problem, In considering the sampling design there are three things-

Retailers survey
Sample size

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The total sample size was 100.


Research period
Research was conducted in t he month of May.
Sampling Area
The area where sampling was done is
 AIIMS
 MALVIYA NAGAR
 CHITTARANJAN PARK
 JANGPURA---BHOGAL
 NEW FRIENDS COLONY
 JAMIA NAGAR(OKHLA)
 OKHLA (FORTIS HOSPITAL)

DATA COLLECTION METHOD


For Retailers Survey I fill the questionnaires of 8-10 retailers per day.

Data Collection
Mainly Primary data was used in my research and a bit of secondary data for understanding
the background of my research.

Primary Data: Two types of primary data, i.e. Questionnaire method and Interview method
was used in the survey. Primary data are generally information gathered or generated by the
researcher for the purpose of the project immediately at hand. These methods are used
with customers to acquire the real information, which is current and effective, and it helps a
lot in the planning and selling.

The data for the analysis was collected through direct interview of the prospects‟. This
method Involves asking prospects and extracting the proper information in terms of
written responses.
I visited 5-6 customers a day, and few of them filled the questionnaires also.
Secondary Data: Data, documents, records, or specimens that have been collected, are in
existence prior to the beginning of the study. It had information about our product and its
terms and also details about the other competitor companies of our product existing in the
same market. This information was extracted from facts and figures already there, from
magazines, internet, Newspaper & journals etc.

DESIGNING OF QUESTIONNNAIRE

Having defined the sample size and the type of data to be collected, the next step is to
develop the questionnaire and deciding on what all elements will be included in it. The design
of the questionnaire can have as much influence over the response rate as the method of
completion.

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In order to get the information through questionnaire, personal interview method is adopted
as it helped both purpose of getting the information and some vital additional information
with the respondents expressed while to researcher.

DATA ANALYSIS

The data were initially analyzed in the excel sheet with the help of Microsoft Office Excel
2003. The results were then presented in the form of different types of charts; column charts,
bar charts & pie charts.

Analysis has been done through the following steps.

 Preparing and organizing the raw data.


 Summarizing the data contained in the categories.
 Determining whether significant differences exist between categories.
 Explaining why difference exists.
 Making recommendations.

In the present study data was stored and tabulated in absolute numbers as well as
percentages and presented in bivariate and multivariate data to obtain more meaningful
conclusions.

RESEARCH LIMITATIONS
Though every effort was put in to make this report authentic in every respect, there
were few uncontrollable factors that might have had their influence on the final
report. The various limit ing factors are-:
 The study was mainly conducted in the national capital region of Delhi . It has
not have included relevant respondents in other areas in the sample size.
 The retailer some often does not provide actual information required for the project
work.
 Most of the Questionnaire is poorly filled.
 The data could be gathered from secondary source thus any error in the information
would have also got replicated in this report.
 As the data was gathered from the secondary sources, the validity of the data could not be
tested.
 Time constraint was the major limitation faced by the researcher.
However, every effort is made to ensure that these do not in any way adversely affect the
results of the study and inject an element of objecting in the report.

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CHAPTER 3
CALCULATION:

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SALE OF BRAND (IN %S):

overall south delhi Sale in different location of south delhi Ranbaxy product (in %s)
CEPODEM DOXCEF GUDCEF MONOCEF- TOTAL PERCENTAGE AIIMS MALVIYA C. R. PARK JANGPURA--- NEW JAMIA OKHLA
O NAGAR BHOGAL FRIENDS NAGAR (FORTIS
COLONY (OKHLA) HOSPITAL)
560 33 80 215 888 63.06306 63.35079 75.26316 64.2857 80.15267 69.8113 37.8641 46.6667
CEPODEM- DOXCEF-CV GUDCEF- TAMBAC TOTAL
XP CV
165 92 15 10 282 58.51064 67.60563 59.18367 41.1765 67.74194 61.5385 44.898 57.6923
CEROXIM CEFTUM CEFAKIND ZOCEF TOTAL
257 754 350 118 1479 17.37661 14.88834 20.68966 24.6667 26.72414 6.86275 13.1148 13.3971
CEROXIM-XP PULMOCEF- ZOCEF-CV ZEFU-CV TOTAL
CV
72 7 146 20 245 29.38776 14.66667 32.07547 76.9231 80.76923 0 13.3333 18.5185
RACIPER NEKCIUM NEXPRO ESOZ TOTAL
463 860 235 28 1586 29.19294 27.73537 31.52866 32.7273 28.27225 27.3973 33.5227 25.7813
RICONIA A-Z SUPRADIN ZEVIT TOTAL
616 532 213 40 1401 43.96859 36.30769 40.06734 42.4 42.10526 55.814 47.0874 58.6022
ALTRAFLAM- ZERODOL-P HIFENAC SIGNOFLAM TOTAL
P
286 230 222 307 1045 27.36842 17.12329 33.33333 28 45.16129 28.0899 24.6154 25.4777
SYNASMA DOXOBID DOXOVENT DOXORIL TOTAL
584 98 12 137 831 70.27677 69.91525 78.65854 76.1194 62.19512 64.5833 77.2277 58.4615
GEMBAX G-CIN EG1 TOPGEM TOTAL
119 72 55 0 246 48.37398 33.96226 55 45 50 47.3684 58.3333 51.1628

T2: Brand Selling Portfolio

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Ranbaxy Product sales/wk


90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

0
CEPODEM CEPODEM-XP CEROXIM CEROXIM-XP RACIPER RICONIA ALTRAFLAM-P SYNASMA GEMBAX

OVERALL AIIMS MALVIYA NAGAR CHITTARANJAN PARK


JANGPURA---BHOGAL NEW FRIENDS COLONY JAMIA NAGAR(OKHLA) OKHLA (FORTIS HOSPITAL)

G1: Brand Selling Portfolio

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CEFPODOXIME :
CEPODEM DOXCEF GUDCEF MONOCEF-
O
OVERALL 560 33 80 215
AIIMS 121 2 16 52
MALVIYA NAGAR 143 9 0 38
CHITTARANJAN PARK 45 0 7 18
JANGPURA---BHOGAL 105 0 10 16
NEW FRIENDS COLONY 37 0 5 11
JAMIA NAGAR(OKHLA) 39 12 30 22
OKHLA (FORTIS 70 10 12 58
HOSPITAL)
T3: SALE OF CEFPODOXIME STRIP/WK

Overall

MONOCEF-O
24%
GUDCEF
9% CEPODEM
63%

DOXCEF
4%

P2: SALE OF CEFPODOXIME STRIP/WK

Here I can say that in Cefpodoxime therapy 63% market share captured by Ranbaxy in south
Delhi.

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AIIMS Malviya nagar CHITTARANJAN


CEPODEM CEPODEM PARK
CEPODEM
DOXCEF 0% DOXCEF
20% DOXCEF
27% 5%
GUDCEF GUDCEF 26%
9% 63% GUDCEF
75%
MONOCE MONOCEF- 64%
1%
F-O O 0% MONOCEF-
O
10%

JANGPURA--- NEW FRIENDS JAMIA


BHOGAL COLONY NAGAR(OKHLA)
CEPODEM CEPODEM CEPODEM
12%
8% DOXCEF DOXCEF DOXCEF
21% 21%
0% 9% 38%
GUDCEF GUDCEF GUDCEF
80% 70% 29%
MONOCEF- 0% MONOCEF- MONOCE
O O 12% F-O

P3: Sale of Cefpodoxime Strip in AIIMS/Wk


OKHLA (FORTIS P4: Sale of Cefpodoxime Strip in Malviya Nagar/Wk
P5: Sale of Cefpodoxime Strip in C R Park/Wk
HOSPITAL) P6: Sale of Cefpodoxime Strip in Jangpura/Wk
CEPODEM P7: Sale of Cefpodoxime Strip in Nfc/Wk
P8: Sale of Cefpodoxime Strip in Jamia Nagar/Wk
DOXCEF P9: Sale of Cefpodoxime Strip in Okhla/Wk
39% 46%
GUDCEF

MONOCEF-
8% O
7%

But if I consider individually different location market share of Ranbaxy, it varies. AIIMS
63%, Malviya nagar 73%, C.R PARK 64%, JANGPURA BHOGAL 80%, NFC 70%, JAMIA
NAGAR 38% and OKHLA 46%.

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CEPODEM XP (CEFPODOXIME CLAV):

CEPODEM- DOXCEF- GUDCEF- TAMBAC

OVERALL
XP
165
CV
92
CV
15 10
CEFPODOXIME clav
AIIMS 48 19 2 2 5% 4%
MALVIYA NAGAR 29 20 0 0
CHITTARANJAN 7 10 0 0 CEPODEM-XP
PARK
JANGPURA--- 21 3 7 0 DOXCEF-CV
BHOGAL 33%
NEW FRIENDS 8 2 3 0 58% GUDCEF-CV
COLONY TAMBAC
JAMIA 22 25 2 0
NAGAR(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS 30 13 1 8
HOSPITAL)

T4: & P10: SALE OF CEFPODOXIME CLAV STRIP/WK

CEPODEM-XP Sale /wk in diff location


AIIMS CEPODEM-XP DOXCEF-CV GUDCEF-CV TAMBAC

48
MALVIYA
NAGAR
29 30
18% CHITTARANJAN 19 20 21 2225
29% PARK 13
710 7 8 8
JANGPURA--- 22 00 00 3 0 230 20 1
13%
BHOGAL
NEW FRIENDS
18%
5% 13% COLONY
JAMIA
4% NAGAR(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS
HOSPITAL)

P11: % SELLING OVERALL SALES OF


CEFPODEM XP IN DIFFERENT LOCATION
G2: SALE OF CEFPODEM XP IN
DIFFERENT LOCATION

Although the overall market share of Ranbaxy is 58%, but in C.R.Park and Jamia Nagar
Doxcef is leading.

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CEROXIM

CEROXIM CEFTUM CEFAKIND ZOCEF


OVERALL 257 754 350 118
AIIMS 60 217 89 37 ZOCEF
CEFUROXIME
MALVIYA 78 147 115 37 8% CEROXIM
NAGAR 17%
CHITTARANJAN 37 84 26 3
PARK CEFAKIND
JANGPURA--- 31 58 26 1 24%
BHOGAL
NEW FRIENDS 7 71 13 11
COLONY CEFTUM
JAMIA 16 59 42 5 51%
NAGAR(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS 28 118 39 24
HOSPITAL)

T5: & P12: SALE OF CEFPOROXIME STRIP/WK

AIIMS
Sale /wk in diff location
CEROXIM
MALVIYA CEROXIM CEFTUM CEFAKIND ZOCEF
NAGAR
217
11% CHITTARANJA
3% 23% N PARK 147
6% 115 118
89 78 84
JANGPURA--- 60 58 71 59
12% BHOGAL 37 37 37 26 31 26 42 28 39
1311 16 24
3 1 7 5
NEW FRIENDS
15% 30% COLONY

JAMIA
NAGAR(OKHLA
)

P13: % SELLING OVERALL SALES OF


CEROXIM IN DIFFERENT LOCATION
G3: SALE OF CEROXIM IN
DIFFERENT LOCATION

CEFTUM mostly sailing worldwide, in India market share of CEFTUM is high. Where
ceftum captured 51%, ceroxim captured only 17%. Different location result also supports
this.

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CEROXIM XP

CEROXIM-
XP
PULMOCEF-
CV
ZOCEF-
CV
ZEFU-
CV
CEFUROXIME CLAV
OVERALL 72 7 146 20
AIIMS 11 0 54 10
8%
MALVIYA NAGAR 17 4 32 0
CHITTARANJAN PARK 10 1 2 0 29% CEROXIM-XP
JANGPURA---BHOGAL 21 2 3 0 PULMOCEF-CV
NEW FRIENDS COLONY 0 0 6 2 ZOCEF-CV
JAMIA NAGAR(OKHLA) 2 0 12 1 ZEFU-CV
60% 3%
OKHLA (FORTIS 10 0 37 7
HOSPITAL)

T6: & P14: SALE OF CEFUROXIME CLAV STRIP/WK

Sale /wk in diff location


CEROXIM-XP
AIIMS CEROXIM-XP PULMOCEF-CV ZOCEF-CV ZEFU-CV

54
MALVIYA NAGAR
3% 37
14% 15% 32
0% CHITTARANJAN
PARK 21
17
11 10 10 12 10
JANGPURA--- 6 7
4 230 00 2 20 1
24% BHOGAL 0 0 120 0
30%
NEW FRIENDS
COLONY
14%
JAMIA
NAGAR(OKHLA)

OKHLA (FORTIS
HOSPITAL)

P15: % SELLING OVERALL SALES OF


CEROXIME XP IN DIFFERENT LOCATION
G4: SALE OF CEROXIM XP IN
DIFFERENT LOCATION

Zocef-cv is the main competitor of Ranbaxy. AIIMS, MALVIYA NAGAR, NFC, JAMIA
NAJAR & OKHLA, should be more focused to increase the sales volume.

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RECIPER

RACIPER NEKCIUM NEXPRO ESOZ


ESOZ
OVERALL 463 860 235 28 2% ESOMEPRAZOLE
AIIMS 109 230 50 4 NEXPRO
MALVIYA NAGAR 99 171 44 0 15%
CHITTARANJAN PARK 36 55 17 2
RACIPER
JANGPURA---BHOGAL 54 108 29 0
29%
NEW FRIENDS 40 64 37 5
COLONY
NEKCIUM
JAMIA 59 82 25 10
NAGAR(OKHLA) 54%
OKHLA (FORTIS 66 150 33 7
HOSPITAL)

T7: & P16: SALE OF ESOMEPRAZOLE STRIP/WK

AIIMS Sale /wk in diff location


RACIPER
RACIPER NEKCIUM NEXPRO ESOZ
MALVIYA
NAGAR 230
14% CHITTARANJAN 171
23% 150
PARK
109 99 108
13% JANGPURA--- 82 66
50 55 54 64 59
BHOGAL 44 36 29 40 37 33
17 2 2510
9% NEW FRIENDS 4 0 0 5 7
21%
COLONY
12%
8% JAMIA
NAGAR(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS
HOSPITAL)

P17: % SELLING OVERALL SALES OF


RACIPER IN DIFFERENT LOCATION
G5: SALE OF RACIPER IN
DIFFERENT LOCATION

Esomeprazole is developed and marketed by AstraZeneca under the brand name of Nekcium.
It is a large selling drug worldwide. In south Delhi nekcium captured 54%, whereas raciper
contain only 29%. Marketing strategy should be kept for sales growth in all location.

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RICONIA

RICONIA A-Z SUPRADIN ZEVIT ZEVIT


OVERALL 616 532 213 40 3% MULTIVITAMIN
AIIMS 118 125 55 27
SUPRADI
MALVIYA 119 132 45 1
NAGAR
N
CHITTARANJAN 53 46 26 0 15%
PARK
JANGPURA--- 64 61 27 0 RICONIA
BHOGAL 44%
NEW FRIENDS 48 21 14 3 A-Z
COLONY
38%
JAMIA NAGAR 97 77 28 4
(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS 109 58 14 5
HOSPITAL)

T8: & P18: SALE OF MULTIVITAMIN STRIP/WK

AIIMS
Sale /wk in diff location
RICONIA RICONIA A-Z SUPRADIN ZEVIT
MALVIYA 132
NAGAR 125
118 119
109
CHITTARANJAN 97
18% PARK 77
19% 6461
55 5346 58
JANGPURA--- 45 48
BHOGAL 27 26 27 2114 28
16% 14
20% 1 0 0 3 4 5
NEW FRIENDS
8% COLONY
10% 9% JAMIA
NAGAR(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS
HOSPITAL)

P19: % SELLING OVERALL SALES OF


RICONIA IN DIFFERENT LOCATION
G6: SALE OF RICONIA IN
DIFFERENT LOCATION

A-Z is the main competitor of RICONIA (44%). AIIMS & MALVIYA NAGAR should be
more supervised by marketing professional.

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ALTRAFLAM :

ALTRAFLAM- ZERODOL- HIFENAC SIGNOFLAM


P P ACELOFENAC
OVERALL 286 230 222 307
AIIMS 50 59 61 122
MALVIYA 57 54 17 43
NAGAR
CHITTARANJAN 21 16 11 27 27% ALTRAFLAM-P
30%
PARK
ZERODOL-P
JANGPURA--- 56 41 27 0
BHOGAL HIFENAC
NEW FRIENDS 25 21 16 27
COLONY 21% 22% SIGNOFLAM
JAMIA NAGAR 32 7 50 41
(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS 40 32 40 45
HOSPITAL)

T9: & P20: SALE OF ACELOFENAC STRIP/WK

ALTRAFLAM-P Sale /wk in diff location


AIIMS
ALTRAFLAM-P ZERODOL-P HIFENAC SIGNOFLAM
MALVIYA NAGAR 122
14% 18% CHITTARANJAN
PARK 505961 5754
43
56
41 5041 40 4045
11% JANGPURA--- 27 27 25211627 32 32
BHOGAL 17 211611 7
20% 0
9% NEW FRIENDS
COLONY
JAMIA
20% 8% NAGAR(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS
HOSPITAL)

P21: % SELLING OVERALL SALES OF


ALTRAFLAM-P IN DIFFERENT LOCATION
G7: SALE OF ALTRAFLAM- IN
DIFFERENT LOCATION

In this category market share are divided equally. Ranbaxy contain only 30% share. AIIMS is
the most sale region, but there signoflam is in leading position. If the sale increase in AIIMS
the overall sales also increased.

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SYNAZMA

SYNASMA DOXOBID DOXOVENT DOXORIL


OVERALL 584 98 12 137 DOXOFILINE
AIIMS 165 48 0 23
DOXORIL
MALVIYA 129 5 0 30 17%
NAGAR
CHITTARANJAN 51 0 0 16 DOXOVEN
PARK T
JANGPURA--- 51 16 6 9 1%
BHOGAL DOXOBID
NEW FRIENDS 31 8 3 6 12% SYNASMA
COLONY 70%
JAMIA NAGAR 78 6 3 14
(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS 76 15 0 39
HOSPITAL)

T10: & P22: SALE OF DOXOFYLINE STRIP/WK

AIIMS Sale /wk in diff location


SYNASMA MALVIYA SYNASMA DOXOBID DOXOVENT DOXORIL
NAGAR 165
CHITTARANJAN 129
13% PARK
28% JANGPURA--- 78 76
14% BHOGAL 48 51 51
30 31 39
23 16 16 6 9 15
5%
NEW FRIENDS 0 50 00 836 6 314 0
9% COLONY
22%
9% JAMIA
NAGAR(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS
HOSPITAL)

P23: % SELLING OVERALL SALES OF


SYNASMA IN DIFFERENT LOCATION
G8: SALE OF SYNASMA IN
DIFFERENT LOCATION

In this category Ranbaxy is leading. 70% market share captured by ranbaxy. Due to
unavailability for 2-3 months of synasma in some market the market share falls down. Til
date availability is the major problem of synasma.

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GEMBAX

GEMBAX G-CIN EG1 TOPGEM


GEMIFLOXACIN
TOPGEM
OVERALL 119 72 55 0
0%
AIIMS 18 18 17 0
MALVIYA 33 12 15 0 EG1
NAGAR
22%
CHITTARANJAN 9 7 4 0
PARK
JANGPURA--- 13 10 3 0 GEMBAX
BHOGAL 49%
NEW FRIENDS 9 6 4 0
COLONY G-CIN
JAMIA NAGAR 14 4 6 0 29%
(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS 22 15 6 0
HOSPITAL)

T11: & P24: SALE OF GEMIFLOXACIN STRIP/WK

GEMBAX Sale /wk in diff location


AIIMS
GEMBAX G-CIN EG1 TOPGEM
MALVIYA 33
NAGAR
15% CHITTARANJAN
19% 22
PARK 181817
JANGPURA--- 15 13 14 15
12 10
BHOGAL 97 9
12% 4 64 46 6
NEW FRIENDS 3
28% 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
COLONY
8%
JAMIA
11% 7% NAGAR(OKHLA)
OKHLA (FORTIS
HOSPITAL)

P25: % SELLING OVERALL SALES OF


GEMBAX IN DIFFERENT LOCATION
G9: SALE OF GEMBAX IN
DIFFERENT LOCATION

These categories of drugs are sold in very low amount. Ranbaxy captured 49%, but G-CIN
and EG1 gives tough competition in this market.

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FINDINGS
 Ranbaxy holds its strengths in Active pharma Ingredients (API‟s) and formulation
development manufacturing in both the domestic and international market. Ranbaxy
is also major exporter of technology which is presently sold companies in china,
Canada ,Germany, UK,USA ,many more
 From above diagrammatic representation it is found that opinion of Doctors towards
Ranbaxy, Good are 28% and Best is 72%
 In Cefpodoxime therapy 63% market share captured by Ranbaxy in south Delhi, But
if I consider individually different location market share of Ranbaxy, it varies. AIIMS
63%, Malviya nagar 73%, C.R PARK 64%, JANGPURA BHOGAL 80%, NFC 70%,
JAMIA NAGAR 38% and OKHLA 46%.
 In case of CEPODEM XP although the overall market share of Ranbaxy is 58%, but
in C.R.Park and Jamia Nagar Doxcef is leading.
 In case of CEFUROXIME, CEFTUM mostly sailing worldwide, in India market share
of CEFTUM is high. Where ceftum captured 51%, ceroxim captured only 17%.
Different location result also supports this.
 I case of CEFUROXIME clav Zocef-cv is the main competitor of Ranbaxy. AIIMS,
MALVIYA NAGAR, NFC, JAMIA NAJAR & OKHLA, should be more focused to
increase the sales volume.
 Esomeprazole is developed and marketed by AstraZeneca under the brand name of
Nekcium. It is a lagre salling drug worldwide. In south Delhi nekcium captured 54%,
whereas raciper contain only 29%. Marketing strategy should be kept for sales growth
in all location.
 In MULTIVITAMIN segment A-Z is the main competitor of RICONIA (44%).
AIIMS & MALVIYA NAGAR should be more supervised by marketing professional.
 In ACELOFENAC market share are divided equally. Ranbaxy contain only 30%
share. AIIMS is the most sale region, but there SIGNOFLAM is in leading position. If
the sale increase in AIIMS the overall sales also increased.
 In DOXOFILINE category Ranbaxy is leading. 70% market share captured by
ranbaxy. Due to unavailability for 2-3 months of synasma in some market the market
share falls down. Til date availability is the major problem of synasma.
 GEMIFLOXACIN are sold in very low amount. Ranbaxy captured 49%, but G-CIN
and EG1 gives tough competition in this market.

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CONCLUSION
There can be various ways through which a business organization can achieve success in the
market, but all those ways can be comprised into as above, then it can be rightly said that it
revolves specifically around three parties or more; the triangular linkages or the relationship
between these three parties (company, customers and competitors) determine the success and
failure of business organization. In the medium to long run, the domestic pharmaceutical
market will be largely driven by the increasing prevalence of chronic segment. The basis of
success in any competitive context can be, at the most, elemental level commercial success;
and commercial success can be derived either from a cost advantage or a value advantage or
ideally from a combination of both. In other words, the organization with Competitive
Advantage tends to be the cost leader in the industry or a seller of most differentiated
products amongst all the players.

If we have to compete with our rivals then we have to make concrete marketing strategy and
follow it strictly. We also have to keep a keen watch on our rival‟s strategy and take steps
according to them.

Besides we also have to work on other possible areas of marketing like maintain good
relation with doctors & chemists that can strengthen our sales.

At last the role of supply chain is very prominent in both the phases (in acute as well as in
chronic). But the successes of any pharmaceutical industry; when a company changes its
concentration from “Acute” to “Chronic” therapy market depend on competitiveness of
supply chain. Supply Chain Managers can provide considerable value to their companies by
understanding the customers' delivery requirements. A very powerful tool for understanding
these requirements is account segmentation. A company can use account segmentation to
identify market segments Such as Acute & Chronic therapy market. Which is well positioned
to serve and then organize its product range and even SKU‟s and service in a superior way.

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RECOMMENDATIONS
RANBAXY is taking very most care to satisfy the above factor however but a little extra
care & also monitors the feedback provided by its marketing executives then the results will
boost up.

In my view following key factors may be helpful in increasing the sales of a company,
these are:-
 Frequent Doctors‟ Visits.
 Maintaining better relations with the doctors.
 Samples & Gifts.
 Availability of products with retailers.
 Company should give more profit to the chemists
 The company should work more on replacement schemes, replacement of expired
medicines.
 Company should keep in mind about cost factor
 Dosage.
 Advertisement in medical journals.
 Quality assurance.
 Before launching a new product company should provide information to the chemists by
arranging get together & Seminars.

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Annexure

RETAIL CHEMIST PRECTPION SURVEY


BRAND MATRIX SURVEY:
Name of the chemist:

Composition No of Rx No of Rx per No of Rx No of Rx Total Remarks


name per Week Week per Week per Week no of
Rx /
Wk
(Cefpodoxime CEPODEM DOXCEF GUDCEF MONOCEF-O
(RANBAXY) (LUPIN) (MANKIND) (ARISTO)

Cefpodoxime CEPODEM DOXCEF –CV GUDCEF-CV TAMBAC-CV


+ clavulanic XP (LUPIN) (MANKIND) (CADILA)
acid (RANBAXY)

Cafuroxime CEROXIM CEFTUM CEFAKIND ZOCEF


(RANBAXY) (GSK) (MANKIND) (ALKEM)

Cafuroxime + CEROXIM PULMOCEF- ZOCEF-CV ZEFU CV


clavulanic acid XP CV (MICRO) (ALKEM) (FDC)
(RANBAXY)

Esomeprazole RACIPER NEKCIUM NEXPRO ESOZ


(RANBAXY) (AstraZeneca) (TORRENT) ( Glenmark)

Multi vitamin RICONIA A TO Z SUPRADYN ZEVIT(GSK)


(RANBAXY) (ALKEM) (PIRAMAL)

Aceclofenac ALTRAFLAM ZERODOL HIFENAC SIGNOFLAM


P (IPCA) (INTUS) (LUPIN)
(RANBAXY)

Doxofylline SYNASMA DOXOBID DOXOVENT DOXORIL


(RANBAXY) (DR. REDDY) (GLENMARK) (MACLEODS)

Gemifloxacin GEMBAX G-CIN EGI (CIPLA) TOPGEM


(RANBAXY) (LUPIN) (TORRENT)

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LIST OF CHEMISTS:

Sl Name Address Ph No.


No.
AIIMS
1 NDMC SHOP NO. 3 OUTSIDE GATE NO. 011-26192746
1 9582777382/84/85
SAFDARJUNG
HOSPITAL
NEW DELHI 110029
2 AMBEY MEDICINE CORNER 37A/S, SHOP NO. 24 011-26193664
SAFDARJUNG 9266363084
HOSPITAL
NEW DELHI-29
3 SUPER MEDICAL AID F-3, YUSAF SARAI 011-26588356
BUS STOP, NEER 011-46066143
AIIMS
4 SUPER HELPLINE PHARMACY 17/9, YUSUF SARAI 011-26192646
NEW DELHI-16 9013000530
5 METRO CHEMIST 74/3, YUSUF SARAI 011-46665304/05
NEW DELHI-16
6 CHAWLA CHEMIST 72/2, YUSUF SARAI 011-41019157/58
NEW DELHI-16 011-46665311/13
7 B. L & Co. 50/1 & 2, YUSUF 011-26516819
SARAI 011-26518511
NEW DELHI-16
8 JAGADANBA CHEMIST 17/7, YUSUF SARAI 011-26193796
NEW DELHI-16 011-26165517
9 PARAS CHEMIST 10/2, YUSUF SARAI 011-26193685
NEW DELHI-16 011-26190124
10 HELP + CARE CHEMIST 7/1-2, YUSUF SARAI 011-64514466
NEW DELHI-16 9999084244
11 SOUTH DELHI MEDICO 5/6, 1ST FLORE 011-65432660
YUSUF SARAI, NEW 011-41756462
DELHI-16
12 BHUTANI INT. MEDICO SHOP NO. 20, 21, 011-26175739
GATE NO. 1 9250950094
SAFDARJUNJ
HOSPITAL NEW
DELHI-29
13 HELPLINE PHARMECY 18/4, YUSUF SARAI 011-46072742
NEW DELHI-16 011-32049150
14 PIONEER MEDICO SHOP NO. 37, 011-26175037
SAFDARJUNG 9891259560
HOSPITAL NEW
DELHI-21
15 HELP LINE CHEMIST 74/1, YUSUF SARAI, 011-64703051/52
NEW DELHI-16 011-26525248
16 MEDICINE CORNER SHOP NO. 2. OPP 011-26183370
GATE NO. 1, 011-64695484
SAFDARJUNG

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HOSPITAL, NEW
DELHI-29
17 ALL INDIA CHEMIST SHOP NO. 1, AIIMS- 011-26160796
SAFDARJUNG
SUBWAY
NEW DELHI-29
18 BHARAT MEDICOS 14/4. YUSUF SARAI, 011-26193812
NEW DELHI-16 011-26194329
19 ALL INDIA MEDICOS NDMC MKT, NEAR 011-46066360
AIIMS, YUSUF 011-26589896
SARAI NEW DELHI-
29
20 SAFDARJUNG MEDICOS SHOP NO. 22, GATE 011-26192644
NO.1, SAFDARJUNG
HOSPITAL, NEW
DELHI-20
21 INDER MEDICOS P-3, NDMC MKT, 011-46665307/09
YUSUF SARAI. NEW
DELHI-29
22 AGARWAL MEDICOS S-4, NDMC MKT, 011-26588699/655
YUSUF SARAI, NEW
DELHI-29

MALVIYA NAGAR
23 CHAWLA CHEMIST E8/12, SHOP NO. 1, 011-26684666
MAIN ROAD , 9811102388
MALVIYA NAGAR,
N.D.-17
24 PARKASH CHEMIST C-31, MALVIYA 011-26680685
NAGAR, NEW 9868183121
DELHI-17
25 WELLBEING PHARMACY SHOP NO. 2, MAIN 011-41832295
MARKET, MALVIYA 9810077430
NAGAR, N.D.-17
26 RELIGARE WELLNESS SHOP NO. 23, 011-46544198
MALVIYA NAGAR, 011-40548706
N.D.17
27 ANAND CHEMIST SHOP NO. 1&2, A-78, 26686122
MALVIYA NAGAR, 26687672
N.D.17
28 RAMAN MEDICOS 90/35A, MAIN MKT, 9810300888
MALVIYA NAGAR, 26681140
N.D.17
29 APOLLO PHARMACY MALVIYA NAGAR 011-26672056
30 98.4 MALVIYA NAGAR 011-41734011
31 SANJIVANI E-3/12, MALVIYA 011046251185
NAGAR, N.D.-17 9650720739
32 BATRA MEDICOS 6/75, MALVIYA 011-26681144
NAGAR, NEW 011-26682244
DELHI-17
33 NARANG BROS. E-1/10, MALVIYA 011-26683344
NAGAR, N.D.17 011-26683355
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34 AJIT CHEMIST
35 BLISS PHARMA
36 AYUSHMAN CHEMIST
37 LIFE LINE MEDICOS
38 PRIYA CHEMIST
39 SAI MEDICOS D-76, MALVIYA 011-26672097
NAGAR
40 SUNRISE MEDICOS MALVIYA NAGAR 011-26673233
41 ARORA STORE 011-26685526
42 MORDERN CHEMIST 011-26684880
43 VERMA BROS MALVIYA NAGAR

CHITTARANJAN PARK
44 DEB MEDICOS SHOP NO.8, A- 011-26272064
BLOCK, DDA 011-26272971
SHOPPING
COMPLEX, MKT
NO.3 C.R.PARK,
N.D.-19
45 NEW FRIENDS COMPANY D-776, SHOP NO.2, 011-41603306
(CHEMIST) PVT. LTD. C.R.PARK, N.D.-19 9810617306
46 BHUMIKA CHEMIST & E-779, MKT NO.2, 011-26271354
COSMETICS C.R.PARK, N.D.-19 011-26275646
47 ANOOP MEDICOS D-776, SHOP NO.6, 011-26278768
MKT NO.2, 011-41011384
C.R.PARK, N.D.19
48 APOLLO PHARMACY D-776, C.R.PARK, 011-26273151
NEW DELHI-19
49 TABS & CAPS D-773, MKT NO-2, 011-26276537
C.R.PARK, N.D.19 011-40505717
50 RAJ MEDICO C-411, C.R.PARK, 011-26277111
NEW DELHI-19 9718981111
51 CHAKRABARTI MEDICAL SHOP NO-33, MKT 011-26276108
STORE NO-3, C.R.PARK, 9968328201
N.D.-19
52 GAURAV MEDICAL STORE 1/12, GOVIND PURI 011-26213229
MAIN ROAD, NEW 9811554412
DELHI-19
53 TALWAR MEDICOS GOVIND PURI

JANGPURA---BHOGAL
54 KATHPALIA MEDICOS 8/12, JUNGPURA 011-24327300
EXTN, HOSPITAL 011-24327301
ROAD, NEW DELHI-
14
55 JHANKAR CHEMIST 8/8, HOSPITAL 9311040823
ROAD, JUNGPURA 9911040823
EXTN. NEW DELHI-
14
56 HEALTH CARE CHEMIST SHOP NO-3, 011-24376226
PROPERTY NO-112, 9910017883

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MASJID ROAD,
BHOGAL, N.D.-14
57 LIFE LINE MEDICOS SHOP NO-3, 011-65090056
1.BIRBAL ROAD, 011-64707679
JUNGPURA, NEW
DELHI-14
58 S.R.MEDICOS S-17, MASJID ROAD, 011-24378612
JUNGPURA, N.D-14 9818078612
59 APOLLO PHARMACY JUNGPURA 011-24374849
60 SHREE NATH CHEMIST SHOP NO-35, SHIV 011-32501047
MARKET, MASJID 9899627789
ROAD, JUNGPURA
61 VIVA SHOP NO-1, 2 011-43588554
CENTRAL ROAD,
BHOGAL, N.D.-14
62 JAINYSON 13, CENTRAL ROAD, 011-24378318
BHOGAL, N.D.-14 9811020605
63 KALRA MEDICOS 3, ARYAA SAMAJ 011-24372996
BUILDING, 011-41823148
HOSPITAL ROAD,
BHOGAL
64 GUARDIAN PHARMACY 1-B JUNGPURA 011-24377383
EXTN, HOSPITAL
ROAD, BHOGAL,
N.D.-14
65 UROS MEDICO BHOGAL
66 ASHOK MEDICOS 92, HARINAGAR,
ASHRAM, NEW
DELHI-14
67 AGGARWEAL MEDICAL STORE 96, HARINAHAR,
ASHRAM N.D.-14
68 A.K.MEDICOS

NEW FRIENDS COLONY


69 FRIENDS MEDICOS & STORES 11-A, BHARAT 011-26929246
NAGAR, N.F.C, NEW 011-65242999
DELHI-65
70 RELIGARE WELLNESS SHOP NO-134A, 011-26310074
TAIMOOR NAGAR,
N.F.C, NEW DELHI-
65
71 GUPTA MEDICOSE 134-B, TAIMOOR 011-26922925
NAGAR, N.F.C, N.D- 9810006285
65
72 AMAR MEDICOS 134-A, TAIMOOR 011-26331750
NAGAR, N.F.C 011-26315317
73 KUKREJA‟S 61, BJHARAT 011-26912467
NAGAR, N.F.C, NEW 9213192677
DELHI-65
74 LIONS HOSPITAL CHEMIST OPPOSITE B-BLOCK, 011-26324739
SHOP N.F.C, NEW DELHI- 011-26324749
65
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Summer project in RANBAXY

75 M.M.MEDICARE NFC
76 SANGHI MEDICOS NFC

JAMIA NAGAR(OKHLA)
77 HIBA CHEMIST F-41, SHOP NO-1, 9811273902
NAFEES ROAD, 9990575519
BATLA HOUSE,
JAMIA NAGAR, NEW
DELHI-25
78 MADINA MEDICARE 110, MAIN ROAD, 011-26988782
ZAKIR NAGAR,
OKHLA, NEW
DELHI-25
79 KAIFISONS CHEMISTS S-6, 91/1, MAIN 011-26988271
ROAD, ZAKIR 9899899501
NAGAR, N.D.-25
80 BRIGHT PHARMA 100/29, MAIN ROAD, 9990200240
ZAKIR NAGAR, N.D.-
25
81 BISMILLAH MEDICOS T-326/5, MAIN 9999478611
ROAD, OKHLA
VILAGE, N.D.-25
82 JENU MEDICOS SHOP NO-3, JAMA 011-26925350
MASJID, MAIN 011-26984844
MARKET, OKHLA
VILAGE, N.D-25
83 MOULANA MEDICOS BATLA HOUSE
84 RAJHDHANI MEDICOS BATLA HOUSE
85 BATLA MEDICOS BATLA HOUSE
86 AHAMED MEDICOS ZAKIR NAGAR
87 AL SUFIA MEDICOS ZAKIR NAGAR
88 A TO Z PHARMA ZAKIRNAGAR
89 MASHHOOD MEDICOS ZAKIRNAGAR
90 LOYAL CHEMIST ZAKIRNAGAR
91 IQBAL MEDICOS ZAKIRNAGAR

OKHLA (FORTIS HOSPITAL)


92 BAKSHI BROS. 88-A/1, SARAI 011-26845933
JULENA, NEW 011-26845934
DELHI-25
93 BHARAT CHEMIST 91-A, SARAI 9911990332
JULENA, NEW
DELHI-25
94 RATI RUM CHEMIST 159/B, SARAI 011-26920067
JULENA, NEW 9810073081
DELHI-25
95 AMAR MEDICOS 159/2, SARAI 011-26920896
JULENA, NEW 9899983103
DELHI-25
96 MANAB HEALTH CARE 91-B, SARAI 011-64694475
JULENA, NEW

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Summer project in RANBAXY

DELHI-25
97 LAYAL PHARMACY 166/3, SARAI 011-42602121
JULENA, NEW 9971873162
DELHI-25
98 SHRI RUM MEDICOS 151, SARAI JULENA, 011-26321000
NEW DELHI-25 011-26837827
99 VIVA 2/4, SARAI JULENA, 011-26843870
NEW DELHI-25
100 GUARDIAN PHARMACY SHOP NO. 2/09, NEW 011-41015565
OKHLA ROAD, 011-32524056
SARAI JULENA,
NEW DELHI-25
101 EASCORT‟S & CO. 2/10, JULLENA 011-26831915
COMPLEX, OKHLA 9818600315
ROAD, NEW DELHI-
25
102 JEEVAN REKHA 151/5, SARAI 9213785555
JULLENA, NEW
DELHI-25
103 BALARAM MEDICOS 162/3, SARAI 9711017885
JULLENA, NEW
DELHI-25
104 NATH BROS. SOUTHEND 6-7, HANUMAN 011-26832802
MANDIR MARKET, 011-26832803
SARAI JULLENA,
N.D.-25
105 SHRI SHRI RAMA CHEMIST SARAIJULLENA
106 SANJIBANI MEDICOS SARAI JULLENA
107 GARG CHEMIST SARAI JULLENA 011-26344855

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Bibliography:
Books & Journal:
 KOTHARY, Research methodology,2nd edition,2007
 Naresh K. Malhotra , Introduction to Market Research
 Walker-Mullins-Boyd-Larreche, Marketing strategy, 5th edition, TATA
Mcgraw- Hill
 Marketing Research- Cooper and Schindler.
 “Marketing Management”, by Keller Kotler
 Deutsche bank report: India’s pharmaceutical industry on course for
globalization.

Website:
 www.ranbaxy.com
 www.scribd.com
 www.wikipidia.org
 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov
 www.mims.com/
 www.medlineindia.com
 www.bharatbook.com/.detail.asp?=44690
 www.news.pharma-mkting.com/

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