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Brunswick School Department

School Construction Application


Major Capital Improvement Program
Rating Cycle 2003-2004
Brunswick Junior High School
May 28, 2004
Table of Contents
Part I Summary of Project
Part II Educational Program Information
Part III Facility Information
Part IV Comprehensive Enrollment Analysis
Part V Maintenance and Capital Improvement Plan
Part VI Professional Facilities Studies
Part VII Instructions, Timeline & Site Location
Part I

Summary of Project
New Construction /
State of Maine Renovation Application
Department of Education Major Capital Improvement Program
School Facilities Services Rating Cycle 2003-2004

Application Submission Requirements


PLEASE SUBMIT IN SPIRAL BINDER.
PAGE

Part I: Application Information, Facilities Summary of Long-Range Facilities Plan............................... 1

Part II: Educational Program Information on Affected Facility(s) ........................................................... 6

Part III: Facility Information (provide attachment) .................................................................................. 15

Part IV: Comprehensive Enrollment Analysis (provide attachment) ...................................................... 21

Part V: Facility Maintenance and Capital Improvement Plan (provide attachment) ................................ 24

Part VI: Professional Facilities Studies/Assessment (not required) ....................................................... 30

Part VII: Instructions, Timeline & Location............................................................................................. 31

Part l: Applicant Information, Summary, & Requirements


A: Application Information
School Administrative Unit: Brunswick School Department___________________________________

School Name & Address: BRUNSWICK JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL _____________________


65 Columbia Avenue, Brunswick, ME 04011_______________________

Superintendent: James Ashe________________________________________________

Project Contact Person and Title: James Oikle, Business Manager_________________________________

Telephone Number: (207) 729-4148____________ Fax #: (207) 725-1700__________

E-mail Address: joikle@brunswick.k12.me.us____________________________________

An application for the Major Capital Improvement Program may only be submitted for a single school.
If the proposed construction or major renovation project affects other school(s), the affects need to be
addressed in Section II of this application. The School Facilities Services Team will take this into
consideration and will visit the other affected schools.

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Brunswick Junior High School
After careful study of our school facility needs, the board of directors/school committee has agreed to proceed
with the attached application (please include a copy of the board action with this application).

Nov 13, 2002 ___________________________________________________________________


Date of Vote Superintendents Signature Date

Results of Vote: _Unanimous of the members present__________________

B. Facilities Summary of Long-Range Facilities Plan


1. Briefly describe your long-range plan for the uses of each of the facilities in your unit to meet the
goals of your Comprehensive Plan.

The Brunswick School Departments application addresses district-wide needs in a single


coordinated plan that involves all four elementary schools, the junior high school, and the
proposed construction of a new elementary school. The current high school is not
affected by this plan. The application is based on a series of studies commissioned by
the school board over the last three years to look at the entire districts educational and
facility needs. Copies of these studies prepared by Harriman Associates, the Brunswick
School Department, Planning Decisions Inc. and Northeast Building Consultants Inc. can
be made available to the Department of Education. The following are goals developed
from the districts studies and their impact on each facility:

District-Wide Project Goals


All portables to be removed and replaced with permanent space
Grades K-5 in all elementary schools
Equity of educational programs among all elementary schools (e.g. - Special Ed)
Reduce overcrowding in all elementary schools
Provide capacity for all-day kindergarten
Provide better opportunities for technology integration with the curriculum to meet the
Maine Learning Results (MLR)
Discontinue the use of an outdated facility, pending approval of the School Board, and
replace it with a new elementary school
Provide capacity for a pre-kindergarten program in the new school
Provide capacity for reduced class sizes
Provide flexibility to respond to potential enrollment increases
Develop a simple and cost effective solution to the districts needs
1. Minimize construction costs
2. Reduce district-wide operations and maintenance costs
Upgrade education programs based on The Maine Learning Results and No Child
Left Behind (NCLB), apply minimum state standards and amenities for all program
spaces
Improve the educational environment
Provide the opportunity for community use of the school buildings now lacking in
some facilities
Bring all schools up to code

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Brunswick Junior High School
The following summary is one option the Brunswick School Department has studied in
detail to address its educational program and space needs for the whole district:

Coffin Elementary School - 1955


Reduce the student population from 450 to 350 to reduce overcrowding and
shortcomings in educational program space.
Minor renovations and additions to address educational program space requirements,
code and system upgrades, and site issues.
The Coffin School will continue to serve grades K-5.

Hawthorne Elementary School - 1893


Discontinue the use of Hawthorne as a n elementary school because of its very small
size, age of the building and systems, shortcomings in its programs due to lack of
space, crowded site, lack of expansion capability, lack of space for Kindergarten, and
cost of operations. Any change of use wo uld require School Board approval.
Relocate its 129 students to other elementary schools in the district.
The school could potentially be reused for other educational or municipal functions.

Jordan Acres Elementary School - 1972


Reduce the student population from 490 to 350 to reduce overcrowding and
shortcomings in educational program space.
Minor renovations and additions to address educational program space requirements,
code and system upgrades, and site issues.
The Jordan Acres School will continue to serve grades K-5.

Longfellow Elementary School 1924 original, 1943, 1987, 1998 additions


Reduce the student population from 396 to 350 to reduce overcrowding and
shortcomings in educational program space.
Minor renovations and additions to address educational program space requirements,
code and system upgrades.
The Longfellow School will continue to serve grades K-5.

A New 500 Student Elementary School


Build a new 500 student elementary school to permit the reduction of student
populations at Coffin, Jordan Acres and Longfellow schools to levels that will ease the
severe strain on those facilities. It will also provide classroom space for the relocation
of students from Hawthorne.
The new school would serve grades K-5 and would plan for space for all day
kindergarten and a pre-kindergarten program pending approval of the School Board.

Brunswick Junior High School 1959 original, 1966, 1976 additions, 1983 fire
damage reconstruction
Additional classroom space to address overcrowding.
Renovations and additions to address educational program space requirements, code
and system upgrades, and site issues.
The Junior High School will continue to serve grades 6 -8.

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Brunswick Junior High School
Brunswick High School - 1995
The high school was designed for 1200 students and currently has a population of
1137. No work to the high school is envisioned with this application.
The High School will continue to serve grades 9-12.

2. If you know at this time, summarize the proposed project; and its relationship to the districts Long
Range Facilities Plan.

Brunswick Junior High School Overview


The long-range plan for the Junior High School would be to replace the leased portable
space and upgrade needed program space with an addition to the main building. The
overall student population would be about 737 students grades 6 -8. There would be
approximately 250 students at each grade level. There would be code and system
upgrades. Because the Junior High School shares a site with the Coffin School, the Bus
Garage, the Facilities Office, and Food Services, there are significant problems with bus,
car, delivery vehicles, and pedestrian congestion during drop-off and pick-up times, a
shortage of parking all day but especially during events, and a lack of separation between
cars, pedestrians and busses at all times. At its current student population there is a
significant shortage of adequate educational program space at the Junior High School as
described below:
Four classrooms to replace the leased portable space.
One classroom for a 7 th grade math teacher.
A Music Room designed to DOE standards. There is no music room now.
One classroom for a 7 th grade science teacher.
One classroom for a 7 th grade resource room program which is currently housed in a
conference room that used to be for PET meetings.
Additional space for storage, faculty and student bathrooms.
An office for the GT teacher.
Technology room for Technology Integrator, laptop repair and mobile carts.
One classroom for the Health teacher.
Expand the satellite kitchen to become a full service kitchen and free up space in the
cafeteria now taken up with kitchen equipment.
Expand the cafeteria into the Chorus Room to reduce the number of lunches. The
current size requires six lunch servings to accommodate all students. Create a
dedicated chorus room separate from the cafeteria.

District Overview
The Brunswick School Board seeks to have a facilities project that will meet the long
range space needs of the school district for up to fifty years. The Brunswick School
Department and school board have spent many hours reviewing current and future
educational space needs and have concluded that the school district needs to construct a
new elementary school of at least 500 pupils accompanying three remaining 350 student
elementary schools. It is anticipated that the Hawthorne elementary school would be
closed due to ADA issues, the small number of students the school serves and its high
yearly operational costs.

Each renovation and addition plan outlined in this document will enhance the Coffin
School, Jordan Acres School, Longfellow School, and the Brunswick Junior High School.
A K-5 elementary school organizational structure is well established in Brunswick and
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Brunswick Junior High School
reflects the unique situation of a military community. Military students are required to
change schools every two to three years; so Brunswick tries to eliminate as much
transition for them as possible.

Our proposed building project envisions at minimum a K-5 500 student elementary school
that provides the necessary space to allow for many programs not currently possible.
The new school would allow for:
A pre-school program to provide student readiness skills for children.
All day kindergarten that many Brunswick parents strongly endorse and continually
request of the administration and the school board, yet the space is not available at
the present time.
Additional programming such as gifted and talented, health education, foreign
language, and career preparation.
The possibility of adding additional locally or federally funded teachers to lower class
size.

Students from our military families would be able to be assigned to either the Coffin
School or the new elementary school if it is located on Spring Street, thereby reducing
the number of military families at just one school. The annual transition of over 50% of
their students adds stress to this naval community. Currently, due to our many space
needs problems, large numbers of students begin school at the Early Childhood Center
at Jordan Acres School and then are required to transfer to either the Hawthorne School
or the Coffin School after kindergarten. For example, Grade 1 students transfer to the
Hawthorne School after attending the kindergarten program at Jordan Acres School.
After attending both grades K and 1 at the Jordan Acres School, many students are
required to transfer to the Coffin School for grades 2 -5. This situation causes great
anxiety, anger, and concern by parents, particularly in our military families. The
reorganization of the elementary schools should be designed to bring about greater
equity and cause these concerns to dissipate throughout the school district and the
community.

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Brunswick Junior High School
Part II

Educational Program Information


Part II: Educational Program Information on Affected Facility(s)
1. State the School Administrative Units (SAU) Educational Mission, Vision, and Goals and relate them to
the proposed project.

Philosophy of the Brunswick Public Schools


Our primary purpose is to educate students with an emphasis on the mastery of basic skills
and expansion of knowledge. The worth and dignity of the individual students are
recognized in order to provide for maximum intellectual, physical, social and emotional
development. In order to reach their potentials, students will be encouraged to explore
ideas, to make choices, to appreciate aesthetics of life and to understand their
responsibilities as individuals in a democratic society.

School Board Vision


The vision of the Brunswick School Board is a community of life -long learners able to
contribute positively to society. We envision students striving towards significant
accomplishments and the attainment of their full potential. Towards this end, students shall,
to the best of their ability, acquire and apply the skills necessary to effectively communicate,
to utilize and adapt technology, to think critically and creatively, and to become responsible
individuals.

The Brunswick School Board has been at work for nearly five years to assess our
elementary space needs and to develop a process and a plan to ensure that any facility
changes enhance our educational mission. The process began in 1999 with the creation of
an Elementary Space Needs Task Force, led by two Board members and including
administrators, teachers and parents. Aware that the State was moving to end its fina ncial
support for portable classrooms, our initial emphasis was on replacing these spaces (found
at two of our elementary schools and the junior high school) with permanent classroom
space. In addition, we conducted a school-by-school assessment of the adequacy of our
existing elementary schools to support current programming and to provide appropriate
space for future program initiatives.

After the Task Force issued its report in 2000, the full Board began a series of workshops
examining our educationa l goals as they relate to the development of additional elementary
space and outlining the objectives we intend to pursue as we make these proposed
changes. The Board discussed such issues as the most appropriate size and grade
configuration for Brunswick schools, and how to ensure that every Brunswick student has an
equal opportunity to receive a quality education. We examined the particular challenges
posed by and for our large Navy population, and we also talked at length about the difficulty
of maintaining the Hawthorne School in its current form. With the help of Harriman
Associates, we worked through several scenarios through which we might attempt to meet
current and future space needs simply through renovations at each of the existing
elementary schools. Preliminary cost estimates for any of these proposed plans suggested
that it might make far more sense, in terms of both cost and the quality of our education
program, to focus our efforts on building a new school, with more modest renovations at the
remaining schools. The Board has made no formal decision on any of these matters, other
than to submit this application for State assistance in helping us meet the current and future
educational needs of Brunswick.

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Brunswick Junior High School
2. How are the buildings organized for program delivery? (Ex. by grade, house, department)

BJHS has a hybrid model of program delivery part Junior High, part Middle School. The
grade level teams focus on affective and curriculum integration issues along with grade level
coordination of programs and consistency; while departments focus on curriculum scope and
sequence, along with assessment and budgeting issues. With this model in mind, we try to
group grade levels by wing while clustering the grade level teams near each other within
those wings. Along the same lines, we have tried to group services such as nursing, physical
education, health, administration and guidance together. Finally we try to provide similar
integrity to our Music, Art, and other diversified studies program offerings.
3. Describe the extent to which the Learning Results have been integrated into the educational program in
the facilities and any limitations the current facilities presents in their further implementation.

At BJHS, the Learning Results have been integrated into the educational program through
the curricula in all subject areas with the following exceptions: Health, Gifted and Talented,
and Career Education. We are in the process of making a proposal for the hiring of both a
Gifted and Talented and Health teacher. At present, we have no space available for these
teachers but do address this issue within this plan. We have begun work on the Career
Education component under the leadership of our Tech Ed teacher. While the Learning
Results work has been done in the area of Foreign Language, the facility housing these
teachers(portable classroom) hinders their effort to deliver a first rate program. No classroom
space exists for our Music teacher who is responsible for many of the content standards
from the content area of the Visual and Performance Arts. In addition, no space exists to
house a Gifted and Talented program for those students who require specialized instruction
to reach their full educational potential. Having a floating teacher for music delivering
instruction from a cart is extremely difficult. Lessons must be planned to utilize minimal
materials. Lessons suffer, inevitably, when something necessary is misplaced or forgotten.
Literally, every class including C horus, is held in a different space. With these spaces not
being specifically designed for Music, we have issues with complaints from neighboring
classrooms about noise.
4. Have building limitations resulted in unusual or difficult scheduling, or in facilities use problems, such
as double sessions, extended day, or classes in unsuitable areas?

General Notes
At its current student population there is a significant shortage of adequate educational
program space at the Junior High School. The most visible evidence of crowding at
Brunswick Junior High School is the two portable units located out back. They house four
classrooms: two Foreign Language, one Social Studies and one Language Arts. However,
the impact of overcrowding on our school is much more pervasive than that. For example:

Extra lockers have been added to many corridors that were not originally sized to handle
lockers, creating a very constricted environment.
The gym and cafeteria stages have been converted to storage areas.
The guidance department conference room has been converted to a special education
classroom.
Due to the size of the cafeteria, we need to schedule six lunch periods which has a big
impact on the daily schedule and length of time available for students to eat. Expand the
cafeteria into the Chorus Room to reduce the number of lunches. Create a dedicated
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Brunswick Junior High School
chorus room separate from the cafeteria. Expand the kitchen so that kitchen equipment
can be removed from the cafeteria.
The number of teachers in our Technology Education program has been reduced and the
space divided up to house two Art classrooms and a Foreign Language classroom.
Student traffic flow in this area is a problem because students must pass through shop
spaces to get to other classroom spaces.
Our general Music classroom has been converted to a Math classroom and general
Music and C horus are now itinerant programs.
Former main office has been converted to a teachers room and disciplinary waiting area
for the assistant principal. Secretaries moved to a security bubble in the lobby.
Former teachers room converted to an office for school resource officer.
Former Social Studies department office converted into a Speech Language/Special
Education secretary and instructional area.
Former Title I instructional space converted to Social Studies office and Special
Education classroom.
Classroom converted into a Computer Lab.
Former Gifted and Talented office converted into Special Education classroom
Former Functional Life Skills space converted into two classrooms.
Storage of Special Education and other equipment in the hallways.

The net effect of all of these changes has been to hinder the accomplishment of our goals to
develop productive grade level teaching teams, high quality program offerings in the visual
and performing arts, and the development of smallness and connectedness within the
confines of a larger school environment. With priority being given to core curriculum areas
and needs, the Diversified Studies and Special Education programs have suffered. We
currently have no room to house a Health or Gifted and Talented program. A school climate
survey (900+ responses) conducted in March 2004 by the Center for Education Policy,
Applied Research, and Evaluation at the University of Southern Maine (Professors Walter
McIntire and David Silvernail) validated the following concerns:
BJHS has inadequacies as a physical facility. Concerns noted included the size of the
cafeteria, lockers, inadequate restrooms, grounds and buildings that need sprucing up
Perceived inadequacies in curriculum areas such as visual and performing arts, health
education, peer relations and civic responsibility.
There is no sense that the community has a clear and unequivocal sense (vision) of what
the Junior High School is, should be, could be, or aspires to be in the lives of Brunswicks
6th, 7th, and 8 th grade students.

As a school we are clearly having difficulty meeting the requirements of state mandates in
the areas of Health education and Gifted and Talented education. With our greatly reduced
Technology education program, we are barely scratching the surface of the Learning Results
requirements in the area of career education. Our counseling department has lost their
space for small group work and our music teacher has to work in a different classroom each
period and has no access to the stage areas making it difficult to meet the learning results in
the visual and performing arts. In the past, we have been creative and inventive in solving
some of our space issues. With an expected 30 additional students and a teacher next year,
we no longer have the capacity to be flexible or expand. As a result, our programs suffer.
Further examples of problems caused by limitations in the facility include the following:

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Brunswick Junior High School
Several years ago the school eliminated the bell system and allowed teams of teachers
to dismiss their students on a staggered basis. The plus side of this change is less
crowding in the hallways, which in some areas are very constricted because extra lockers
have been added. The minus side of this change is that Special Education teachers,
tutors and Diversified Studies teachers often have trouble starting their classes on time
because students roll in over a longer period of time. As a school, we would like to go
back to a bell system but worry about student safety in terms of the crowding in the
corridors.

As we move increasingly in the direction of middle school restructuring, group work and
project work become more common in our classrooms. The sophistication of some of this
work has been heightened by the introduction of laptop technology. This school is lacking
any space to appropriately house this type of work which means that it either cannot be
assigned or else must be done at home. We would like to have at least one (but would
prefer one per grade level) Project Room where teachers can bring their class to work on
their projects. This Project Room, in some ways similar to an Art room, would also have
adequate storage for works in progress, adequate wiring , a sink, durable finishes and
furniture, and space for use of laptops and projection equipment.

The kitchen and its storage space are inadequate. The kitchen is very narrow and does
not allow for people to move around in a safe manner. In o rder to move food from the
oven to a holding oven, one must close the oven doors first because there is not enough
room to go between the oven doors and a wall. Because of a lack of space, all food must
be prepped and sent over from a nother school in the district. The project would allow us
to prep & cook all food on site. It would also allow us to replace two reach-in
refrigerators, a reach-in freezer, and a milk cooler with a walk -in refrigerator and freezer.
We would also be able to replace two wood storage cabinets that are of a limited size
with adequate storage space. With a food court we would be able to replace two ala
carte wagons. All these items at this time are in the cafeteria. With the removal of this
equipment, more space would be available for a larger and more comfortable eating
area. The addition of a full service kitchen will allow us to improve our nutritional
offerings, improve the quality of the food at time of serving, redesign the layout of the
seating area, and expand upon our breakfast program offerings. It will also improve
security and food storage capability.

Special Education Issues


All four elementary schools feed into the Brunswick Junior High School. The school houses
737 students, 105 of which are identified as having special education needs. Service
programs include self-contained classes for students with emotional disabilities, learning
disabilities and functional skills needs. In addition there are Resource classes for each
grade level, a full time Speech Therapist and the opportunity to access related services.
While all of the programs are offered, they are housed in inadequate spaces. The Functional
Life Skills program is a small classroom that leads into a kitchen area. The kitchen area is a
walk through for students with severe emotional needs. The sixth grade Resource Room
originally had been a classroom for Gifted and Talented students. The conference room was
converted into the seventh grade Resource classroom. The conference room moved to the
Title One room making it unavailable to students after school due to PET meetings which are
held in the afternoon. The eighth grade room is actually a room that has been divided in two ,
making both of those rooms inadequate for the amount and size of the students who attend
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Brunswick Junior High School
that program. The office of the psychological service provider had previously been the
teachers professional library. Equipment used by the Adaptive Physical Education teacher,
Occupational Therapist, and Physical Therapist is strewn throughout the building.

There is little space for privacy at the junior high school. Communication with families,
health providers, social workers and other professionals are essential for the progress in
student achievement. There is a serious concern about FERPA violations due to this lack of
private space.

Technology Issues
The long range goals for the Junior High include the addition of wireless laptops placed on
mobile charging / security carts to expand the use of computers beyond the traditional fixed
lab environment. We would like to offer as much access to computer technology as possible
for the students even if the MLTI program is not renewed in 2 years. Having had a great deal
of experience with the numbers of laptops associated with the MLTI program, we anticipate
the need for an air conditioned room where the carts can be stored for charging and
overnight security. The space should also be sufficient enough to provide a working and
storage space for the technician to make repairs to both the laptops and desktop computers.
Currently, all repairs are handled in the office room adjacent to the computer lab. This room
currently is shared by two people who support the technology program. It has inadequate
space for storage of laptops being repaired and no space for the storage of laptop carts. It
should also serve as a space for the Technology Integrator to store materials used in the
classroom. Currently, he must carry all materials with him since no space exists that he can
call his own.
5. What specific program changes, or new programs, will this project allow you to implement? How do
these specific program changes related to the Learning Results?

The project will allow us to provide appropriate classroom space for a Health teacher and a
Health program located nearby the nurse, guidance, and PE program areas. This project will
allow us to provide office space for a Gifted and Talented teacher who will work in the
various classroom spaces. This project will allow us to provide appropriate facilities for our
Music, Foreign Language and Guidance programs. It will allow us to locate our 7 th grade
level resource Room program in the mainstream 7 th grade classroom wing. It will also allow
us to group all of our teaching teams i nto our preferred configuration.

Our cafeteria was designed for 500 students cycling through three ticketed type A lunch
periods. The food is cooked at neighboring Coffin School and shipped over to our warming
kitchen. As the school has expanded to 750 students with six lunch periods, we have added
an a la carte program and scanable I.D. cards. Because of these changes, much more floor
space has been taken up by food storage lockers, a la carte serving carts, check out kiosks,
etc. The increase in enrollment and the decrease in available floor space for seating have
contributed to the necessity of providing six lunch periods. This situation has had an impact
on our ability to fully address the Learning Results because it impedes our ability to be
flexible when scheduling classes. Students access to and option for Diversified Studies
classes are limited because of scheduling issues. The addition of a full service kitchen will
allow us to improve our nutritional offerings, redesign the layout of the seating area so that
we may reduce the number of lunch periods to three, and expand upon our breakfast
program offerings. These changes will provide us with much more flexibility when setting our
academic schedule. It will also improve security and food storage capability.
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Having enough space so that the Non-Categorical Resource teacher could be in the same
area with the team with whom they are working would be extremely beneficial to he students.
It would provide for a seamless system of delivery to students and would assure that the
Resource teacher is part of the team. It would also help address the NCLB Highly Qualified
Teacher requirements because the teachers of special needs students would be team-taught
by both regular and special education teachers.

As a result of the Maine Learning Results, all students must meet the Content Standards.
Special education students must have the same opportunities as all other students by
demonstrating that they show competence in the performance indicators at their grade level.
The opportunity to work within the inclusive setting and then get reinforcement in the special
education setting will help those youngsters with those goals
6. Describe any consideration given to consolidation within your school administrative unit.

Brunswick School Department has for the past five years been in an ongoing process of
reviewing and evaluating space needs. (See question 1). A wide range of options were
considered and it was determined that consolidation within the school district is not
practicable and that maintaining elementary schools in the 350 to 500 student range best
meets the needs of Brunswick.

7. Describe any studies or consideration of consolidation with other school administrative units.

The superintendents and directors of special education in Cumberland County have already
initiated a number of conversations concerning regionalized services. Those conversations
have led to nascent regionalized activities in transportation and professional development.
Given the expanding expenses associated with special education and the new demands
placed on school districts by No Child Left Behind, the nature and intensity of these
conversations has resulted in a proposal to regionalize specific functions of both regular and
special education. Some functions of special education and general education that could be
supported and enhanced through regionalized activities inc lude programs and services,
professional development and assessment. We have also actively sought and currently
participate in collaboration with other school districts and municipalities. For example, we
are a member of Maine Vocational Region TEN and contribute approximately 43.5% of their
budget. We are a member of Merrymeeting Adult Education operated by MSAD 75. We
participate in Merrymeeting Child Development Services. We accept tuition students from
surrounding towns. We share transportation services with other towns where possible for
out of district placement special education students. We join with the Town of Brunswick
and MSAD 75 to collectively purchase heating fuel. We share some procurement functions
with the Town of Brunswick. We are a member of the Cumberland County Superintendents
and Special Education Directors collaborative team to address Essential Programs and
Services. We are a member of the I-95 Consortium for Administrator Certification (with
MSAD 51, MSAD 75, Falmouth, and Freeport). We are a member (with Bath and MSAD 75)
of the Midcoast Regional Gifted and Talented Program.

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Brunswick Junior High School
In the table below please indicate all of the major spaces in your building and briefly describe what, if
any, limitations or impact the space has on each specific program. Include core and education spaces
as well as community use spaces.

Table 1
Facility Appropriateness for Program Needs

Extent to Whi ch S pa ce M eets Exist ing Program Needs


Space
Acceptabl e
( yes/no) Facility D eficie ncy or Lim ita tion s
101 Func skills No Too small.
101A Beh Res Yes
101B Beh Res Yes
101C Testing Yes
101D LSW Office Yes
102 Sci class Yes
Sci. Office Yes
Sci. Storage Yes
103 Sci class Yes
104 SS class No Two rooms were created from one larger room. New room is too small
for a standard size class.
105 Sci class Yes
106 SS class No Two rooms were created from one larger room. The new room is too
small for a standard size classroom.
107 LA class Yes
108 Sci class Yes
109 LA class Yes
110 LA class Yes
111 SPED offices Yes
112 LA class Yes
th
113 6 Gr. BRs Yes
th
8 Gr. BRs Yes
201 Library Yes
201A Dept Head No Improper ventilation.
Office
201B Dept Head No Improper ventilation.
Office
201C Psych No Improper ventilation.
Office
201D Library No Improper ventilation
Office
201E Office No Improper ventilation.
201F Multi Media No Too small.
Lab
202 LA class Yes
203 Computer Yes
Lab
204 Math class Yes
205 LA class No Space formerly used for tutorial program, currently houses a classroom,
but is too small for a full class.
206 SS class Yes
207 Dept Head Yes
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Office
207A Dept Head Yes
Office
207B SPED class No Space formerly used for tutorial program, currently houses a special
education classroom, but is too small for the number of students in the
program.
Teacher's Rm. Yes
208 LA class Yes
209 Math class Yes
210 LA class Yes
211 SS class Yes
300 Faculty BRs Yes
301 Math class Yes
301A Storage Yes
301B Testing Yes
302 LA class Yes
303 SPED No Too small.
304 Math class Yes
305 SPED No Too small.
306 SS class Yes
307 Sci class No Space too small for a standard class. No water access for a science lab.
307A Tutor Yes
307B Tutor Yes
308 Sci class No No water access for a science lab, too small.
308A Mechanical Yes
308B Storage Yes
309 Math class No Too small.
310 Sci class No Too small.
311 SS class No Too small.
312 SS class No Too small.
313 LA class No Improper ventilation, formerly a storage closet, too small.
314 Music Yes
315 Math class No Too small.
316 Music Office Yes
318 FCS Yes Family Consumer Science
318A FCS class Yes Family Consumer Science
318B FCS Yes Family Consumer Science
kitchen
318C FCS office Yes Family Consumer Science
319 Tech Ed No Traffic into rooms behind.
319A Art No Not designed to be an art room, too small.
Classroom
319B Art No Not designed to be an art room, too small.
Classroom
319C Art/Tech No Poor design, too small.
Ed Office
319D For Lang No Space formerly used for drafting room, too small for classroom.
Classroom
319E Art Storage No Doesn't meet OSHA standards, too small.
401 Math Class Yes
402 Main No Dual purpose of space is not compatible. Size is too small to
Office/Teach accommodate two secretaries.
Workroom
402A Principal's Yes
Office
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Brunswick Junior High School
402B In school No Formerly office space, currently used to house students on in-school
suspension suspension without adequate privacy, too small.
402C Assistant Yes
Prin. Office
402D Yes Conference room.
402E Yes Resource Office.

403 Sci class Yes


404 Cafeteria No No useable kitchen, room used for storage & food serving equipment,
which makes the space too small.
405 Boys Locker Yes
Rm.
406 Nurses No Small size, improper ventilation.
Office
407 Custodian's Yes
Office
408 Guidance No No conference area.
408A Sped CR No Formerly a conference room, space too small for classroom.
408B Couns No Too small, no conference space or small group space.
Office
408C Couns No Too small, no conference space or small group space.
Office
408D Couns No Too small, no conference space or small group space.
Office
408E Guidance Yes
Storage
409 Girls Locker Yes
Rm.
409A Gym Office Yes
1
410 Gym Yes
411 Small Gym Yes
412 Weight Rm. No Improper ventilation, too small.
Bathrooms Yes
Gym Lobby Yes
Gym Office 2 Yes
SRO Off No Improper ventilation.
File Storage Yes
School Store Yes
Bathroom Yes
AD Office Yes
Stage Yes
Storage Closet Yes
415 Cust Work Yes
Electrical Rm. Yes
417 Alarm Closet Yes
Access to Roof Yes
Paper Storage Yes
Tech Room No Space does not exist.
M1 No Portable classroom, too small.
M2 No Portable classroom, too small.
M3 No Portable classroom, too small.
M4 No Portable classroom, too small.

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Brunswick Junior High School
Part III

Facility Information
Part III: Facility Information
Is this a historic building or site? No.

A: Site Characteristics

T Urban o Rural
~19.8 acres of 29.8 acre site 15 + 108 shared
1. Site Size: shared w/ Coffin Elem. & Bus Garage Est. Number of Parking Spaces: w/ Coffin Elem.

2. Sewer: (septic/public): _______Public___________Water: (well/public): _______Public____________

3. List all available on-site athletic fields, practice areas, and playgrounds.

Two athletic fields are located on the site: field hockey/baseball on the north side of the building, and
soccer/ lacrosse/softball on the west side. A ROPES Challenge Course is located in a wooded area on
the site south of the school building.

4. List all available off-site athletic fields, practice areas, and playgrounds.

Edwards Field (operated by Town of Brunswick Parks and Recreation Dept.) used for baseball and
softball practices and games as the on-site fields for these sports are inappropriately sized/arranged.
Brunswick High School athletic facilities used for track and field.
Crimmins Field (operated by Brunswick School Department) used for boys and girls soccer games

Also nearby and available, not used by Brunswick Junior High School:
Athletic fields adjacent to Municipal Meeting Facility (operated by Town Parks and Recreation)

All of these facilities are extensively used by various organizations and can often be difficult to schedule.

5. Describe any difficulties that these off-site facilities create for the program.

Additional bus requirements for transporting students to/from these facilities.

6. Describe any significant site issues (accessibility, size, drainage, safety/traffic, sewer & water, EPA
considerations, etc) that present a current or long range Health & Safety issue to the building
occupants.

Traffic Flow: Significant traffic bottlenecks at pickup/dropoff area in front of building due to high bus and
private vehicle volume exacerbated by narrow access road. Backlog to main site entrance can average 15-
20 vehicles and 3-4 buses at any given time, and blocks Columbia Avenue in both directions frequently.
Gridlock is compounded by a simultaneous backlog of 5-7 vehicles approaching from the opposite
direction, effectively choking off the access road.

Parking: Barely adequate availability of parking for staff. Problem severely exacerbated when there are
simultaneous events at both Coffin Elementary and Junior High School.

Drainage: Inadequate drainage at either end of parking lot shared with Coffin Elementary; significant
rainfall/snowmelt results in large areas of standing water and mud in warm weather, large areas of ice in
freezing weather.

Foundation: Site was predominantly marshland prior to construction resulting in considerable foundation
settling over the years with associated structural damage/repairs.

Vehicle Access to Rear of Building: No paved access around the west and south sides of building for
emergency vehicles.

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Brunswick Junior High School
7. How many acres at this site are unused but developable for educational purposes?

Approximately 3 acres are theoretically developable without encroaching on athletic fields, wetlands, or
grounds used by Coffin Elementary and Bus Garage. Approximately 2/3 of this area is located opposite the
athletic fields from the school on the west side of the site.

8. Approximately how many acres are classified as wetlands?

3.6 acres across the southwest quadrant of the site is designated as a Natural Resource Protection Zone
by the Town of Brunswick.

B: Building Characteristics
1. Type of Construction: Various Number of Stories: 1 with 2-story wing

Several types of construction are present in Brunswick Junior High School.

Original Building (less Gym) and 1966 addition: Predominantly light steel framing with
lightweight glass curtain walls, bar joists, and metal roof deck.

Gym: Heavy steel framing with masonry walls, long-span roof joists.

1976 Library/Special Education and Home Economics/Technology Education additions:


Masonry bearing cavity walls with bar joists and metal roof deck.

1976 Classroom addition: Masonry bearing cavity walls with laminated wood beams and
Tectum roof deck.

1976 Cafeteria/Physical Education addition: Masonry bearing cavity walls with either bar
joists a nd metal roof decks, or laminated wood beams and Tectum roof decks.

1983 Reconstruction of the two-story classroom wing destroyed by fire. Steel framing
with gypsum board walls and masonry veneer, steel joists, and metal roof deck.
2. Below Grade Classrooms (yes/no)____Yes _________ If yes, describe:____Band Room (314)__________

__This room steps down in elevation and there is a very high water table in this area of the building._

3. Sprinkler System:

o Full Sprinkled o % Sprinkled

T Partial Sprinkled o Custodial Closets

COMMENTS:
Corridors in original building and two-story classroom wing, gym, and cafeteria/kitchen area only. Wet system.

4. Are any of the following safety issues?

o Exit Locations T Fire Doors T Emergency Egress o Dead End Corridors

T Storage Locations o Boiler Room T Open Stairwells o Other

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Brunswick Junior High School
Explain:

Fire Doors: Door between main lobby and 1976 addition to 300-wing is too narrow and not conducive to use of
a door closer. No fire walls/doors between classrooms and hallway in this portion of the building. Doors
between gym lobby and corridor are not adequately fire-rated.

Emergency Egress: Hallway in 1976 addition to 300-wing and its egress door to main lobby too narrow.
Emergency egress from the Band Room is not ADA accessible.

Storage Locations: Bookshelves for Room 308 act as a wall to hallway in 1976 addition to 300-wing and
restrict hallway access to outside egress door. Limited storage/access to charging outlets for large custodial
equipment; such equipment must be stored in chairlift vestibule and under the main lobby stairwell. Only
heated storage for outside equipment (snow blower, etc.) is in Boiler House.

Open Stairwells: No fire separation at bottom of main lobby stairwell; area under stairs used as storage of
excess desks and large custodial equipment.

5. Where in the building is the furnace room located?

Separate building between Junior High School and Coffin Elementary. Booster pumps for hot water feed from
shared Boiler House are located in first floor mechanical room adjacent to Functional Skills Room (101) and
directly underneath Multimedia/Computer Lab (201F).

6. When was the present boiler installed?

Two cast-iron 40 psi HB Smith hot water boilers installed in 1966 and 1983. A third, older boiler in the Boiler
House is no longer used. Shared with Coffin Elementary.

7. Are there storage issues in this building? If yes, explain:

Yes. Most serious issues listed in Part III.B.4 above. Most custodial rooms, while well dispersed throughout
the building, are undersized for large custodial equipment. Stage used for storage as only other large storage
areas (stage wings) are relatively inaccessible. Inadequate flammable storage throughout building.

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Brunswick Junior High School
C. Leased Space Information:

1. In the table below please list all temporary classroom spaces that support this facilitys educational
program. Do not include administrative or transportation leases.

Table 2
Temporary Classroom Space Analysis

# of Total Permanent
Leasing # of Use as it Relates to
Class- Square or
Status Units Program
Rooms Footage Temporary

Leased Space 2 4 2,880 Temporary Foreign Language, Gr. 7 core


curriculum

Lease/Purchase 0 0 0 N/A

District Owned
0 0 0 N/A
Other (specify)
0 0 0 N/A

Totals
2 4 2,880 Temporary

2. Create and attach a chart listing the educational function(s) that take place in each of the temporary
classrooms.

Classroom Function No. Students Served


M-1 Foreign Language 126
M-2 Foreign Language 89
M-3 Gr. 7 Language Arts 108
M-4 Gr. 7 Social Studies 109

3. Will this facility need additional program space through the Leased Space Program in the near
future? If so, please explain the rationale and describe any plans and timelines that have been
developed to meet the need. How many additional spaces will be needed in each of the next five
years?

If this project does not go forward, and if the student population remains steady, use of leased space will
remain a necessity and the numbers of trailers will increase.

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Brunswick Junior High School
D. Additional Information on Facilities
1. Has this facility received Revolving Renovation Fund monies in the past? Please explain:

No .

2. Describe in detail all health & safety, code compliance, or other significant facility deficiencies that
impacts the educational program including any hazardous material issues.

Items provided in Parts III.A.6 and III.B.4 plus:

ADA: Interior/classroom doors do not have ADA-compliant hardware (first phase of installation scheduled
for Summer 2004 pending budget approval).

AHERA: Significant amount of asbestos floor tile throughout the school as well as asbestos pipe and fitting
insulation. All are monitored/maintained under the schools AHERA Operation & Maintenance Plan.

Fire Safety: Significant portions of building, including virtually all classrooms have no sprinklers. Stage
curtains are not adequately fire-rated.

OSHA: Handrails for stairs to stage and stage-wing storage areas not in compliance.

3. Please describe any deficiencies related to mechanical or other building systems such as heating,
ventilation, plumbing, and electrical.

Communications: Telephone system is antiquated; limited number of telephones and phone lines
(installation of new telephone system scheduled for Summer 2004 pending budget approval). Master clock
system is antiquated and not used.

Ventilation: Unit ventilators in older parts of the building, as well as pneumatic controls throughout the
building, are past useful life and unreliable.

Heating: Internals for 1966 boiler in shared Boiler House are difficult to maintain/replace and are reaching
the end of useful life. Both boilers are older and relatively inefficient.

Electrical: Distribution system, though fully operational, requires thorough inspection, reorganization, and
documentation by licensed electricians, especially in pre-1980 parts of the building.

Structural: Aluminum-frame windows in original portions of the building are inefficient and past useful life;
some plexiglass windows still in use (window replacements in cafeteria and adjacent classroom are
scheduled for Summer 2004 pending budget approval). Wooden frames for most of the windows in the
1966 and 1976 additions are deteriorating.

4. Are there air quality issues in the school? If yes, please describe in detail.

While air quality parameters in the school building remain within acceptable parameters, ventilation as a
whole is inadequate. The ventilation system is a patchwork of classroom unit ventilators, large central
ventilation systems, and smaller multi-room ventilation systems. Many of the unit ventilators are noisy
and/or do not perform to original rated capacity.

While air quality parameters in the portable classrooms also remain within acceptable parameters, air
movement and volumetric change is provided by small, older unit air exchangers in the individual
classrooms.

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Brunswick Junior High School
Please complete the table below. Submit any drawings or diagrams that may be helpful in
understanding the current building configuration, square footages, and additions to the original facility.

Table 3
Existing Building Space Analysis

NOTE: Complete one Table for each school in the administrative unit.

Building Name_Brunswick Junior High School____ Town__Brunswick______________

Total
Grade Date of Total
Building Square Uses as they Relate to Program
Level Construction Enrollment
Footage
Original Administration, Core Curriculum, Special Ed,
6-8 1959 29,837 737
Building Guidance, Phys Ed, Food Service

Additions 6-8 1966 11,320 254 Core Curriculum, Music, Special Ed

Library, Behavioral Ed, Science, Computer Lab,


6-8 1976 11,130 737 Technology Support

Tech Ed, Art, Home Economics, Foreign Language,


6-8 1976 9,096 737 Music Office

6-8 1976 4,173 254 Core Curriculum

6-8 1976 6,788 737 Food Service, Music, Phys Ed

Core Curriculum, Special Ed, due to a fire which


Rebuilt 6-8 1983 26,036 737 destroyed the wing

Portables 6-8 1995 (Lease) 1,440 215 Foreign Language

6-8 1999 (Lease) 1,440 217 Core Curriculum

Other N/A 1966 1,190 0 Boiler House (shared with Coffin Elementary)

98,380 (Main)
Totals 2,880 (Port) 737
1,190 (Oth)

See attached floor plans of the school.

Major Capital Improvement Application 20 5/28/04


Brunswick Junior High School
Junior High School
Brunswick School Department

approach

308 shelves
Junior High School
Brunswick School Department

hallway

main stairs
Part IV

Comprehensive Enrollment Analysis


Part IV: Comprehensive Enrollment Analysis

Please attach a copy of the district s current enrollment data and projections. This Comprehensive
Enrollment Analysis should include:

School enrollment projections that estimate future enrollments in each grade on a year-by-year basis for
the next ten years. The enrollment projections should be done on a district-wide basis and a school-by-
school basis if there is more than one school serving a grade grouping that is affected by the building
project. For example, a district with three K-5 elementary schools that is proposing a project at an
elementary school should do district -wide K-5 projections and projections for each of the three elementary
schools. The same district would not need to do school by school elementary projections if it is proposing
a project at the high school.

The enrollment projections should address the following areas:

1. The anticipated size of the future K and first grade classes based upon birth levels and the pattern
of migration of preschool aged children should be articulated. In communities with significant
levels of residential development, this should include a review of residential and business
development trends and the relationship of development to changes in the entering class size.

The Brunswick School Board commissioned Planning Decisions, Inc. to develop


enrollment projections for this application. Their report is attached. Also, enrollment
projections obtained from the State Planning Office are attached.

2. The grade-to-grade progression of a class as it moves through the system, including changes in
the size of the class resulting from in or out migration should be stated. In communities with
significant residential development, this should include a review of the relationship of the new
residential development to changes in class size.

The Brunswick School Board commissioned Planning Decisions, Inc. to develop


enrollment projections for this application. Their report is attached. Also, enrollment
projections obtained from the State Planning Office are attached.

3. Any changes in administrative policy or external factors that may have influenced historical
enrollments or that may influence future enrollments should be documented. For example, the
addition of a pre-school program or the opening, expansion, or closing of a major local employer
should be considered in the projection.

Although we are not aware of any specific changes being contemplated by any major
employer, it is a matter of public record that the U.S. Naval Air Station at Brunswick,
Maine will be evaluated by the Department of Defense Base Realignment and Closure
Commission as part of the next round of nationwide evaluation of military facilities. The
commissions initial report is expected to be released sometime in 2005; and they could
recommend that the mission of the Naval Air Station be expanded, contracted, or remain
the same. Beginning next year, the government-owned housing now occupied by military
families will be leased to a private contractor for a fifty year term. In the worst-case
speculative scenario that the Naval Air Station is closed, it is highly probable that the
housing now occupied by military families with school age children will be rented to
civilian families looking for rental and any type of affordable housing in our area, thereby
minimizing the effect on the school systems student load.

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Brunswick Junior High School
4. Does your school administrative unit have full day or half-day kindergarten? If half day, what are
your future plans for your kindergarten program?

Brunswick schools currently have half-day kindergarten. The Brunswick School Board is
pursuing the objective of all day kindergarten and has included the capacity for it in this
application. Due to space constraints, it is not possible to offer all day kindergarten
without leasing additional portable units.

5. What is the status of pre-school programs in your system?

Brunswick schools currently offer very limited preschool programs to the extent that
federal funds permit. There are no current plans to expand this program into the local
budget due to the cost of staff and additional portable units.

6. What number of tuition students are under a tuition contract with your school administrative unit?

Brunswick School Department does not have a ny written contracts for tuition students at
this time. However, we have historically accepted secondary tuition students from
Durham, as well as an occasional student from Arrowsic, Georgetown, Phippsburg, West
Bath, Westport and Woolwich. During 03-04 and 02-03 we have had only one
elementary tuition student and for each of the two years preceding, we had five students.

7. What is the length of term of the tuition contract?

The Brunswick School Department is currently accepting most of Durhams high school
students. Although no formal signed tuition contract exists, Brunswick has always
accepted any Durham student wishing to attend Brunswick High School.

Presently the Superintendent and School Board leadership are reviewing the possibility
of signi ng some sort of agreement concerning 9-12 students

Due to the current crowded K-8 situation, rarely are any students accepted as tuition
students in those grades.

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Brunswick Junior High School
The final enrollment projections should provide year-by-year estimates for both individual
grades and for the grade groupings that are in use within the district. In the tables that follow,
please indicate current enrollment data on all buildings. The State Planning Office has
enrollment projections by school; however, a more comprehensive e nrollment projection
should also be included in the application.

Table 4
Current Enrollment (Resident Students)

Complete the following two charts for each school in your district.

Current Enrollment by Grade Resident Students


School Name
and Principal Other K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Totals
Coffin Elementary-
Walter Wallace 0 74 82 80 72 54 87 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 449
Hawthorne Elem.-
Michael Galarneau 0 0 23 31 23 22 30 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 129
Jordan Acres Elem.-
Scott Snedden 0 90 98 78 75 68 81 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 490
Longfellow Elem.-
Gregory Scott 0 56 65 64 71 68 72 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 396
Brunswick Jr. High-
John Paige 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 254 243 240 0 0 0 0 737
Brunswick High-
Bruce Cook 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 247 266 213 211 937
TOTAL
0 220 268 253 241 212 270 254 243 240 247 266 213 211 3,138
3

Current Enrollment (Tuition Students)

Current Enrollment by Grade Tuition Students


School Name
and Principal Other K 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Totals
Coffin Elementary-
Walter Wallace 0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
Hawthorne Elem.-
Michael Galarneau 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Jordan Acres Elem.-
Scott Snedden 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Longfellow Elem.-
Gregory Scott 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brunswick Jr. High-
John Paige 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Brunswick High-
Bruce Cook 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 60 47 50 43 200
Totals
0 0 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 60 47 50 43 201

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Brunswick Junior High School
Part V

Maintenance and Capital Improvement Plan


Part V: Facility Maintenance and Capital Improvement Plan
Maine law and Chapter 125 (Comprehensive Plan) require school administrative units to maintain a Maintenance
and Capital Improvement Plan for all school facilities. The program includes routine, preventive, and predictive
maintenance and planned capital improvements (replacements/upgrades). The areas addressed shall include (but
not be limited to): Site and site improvements; roof system; structural system (interior and exterior walls, trusses,
foundations, etc.); HVAC (heating, ventilating, air conditioning); utilities (electric, gas, water, septic, data, etc.);
safety systems (fire alarms, sprinklers, monitoring, access and evacuation, etc.); and code compliance and
inspections (ADA, building, boiler, asbestos management plan, etc.). Submit a copy of your administrative units
Maintenance and Capital Improvement Plan.

The Department of Education has made available Capital Management Asset software and MeSFMP (Maine
School Facilities Maintenance Plan) to assist districts with the development of Maintenance Plans, Capital Renewal
Plans (MRSA Title 20-A, Section 15918 and Section 4001).

Appendices No. 1 and 2 below summarize the Brunswick School Departments capital improvement procedures:

APPENDIX NO. 1 - BRUNSWICK SCHOOL DEPARTMENT FACILITIES MAINTENANCE


MANAGEMENT PROGRAM

This program delineates regular actions and responsibilities for preventive and periodic maintenance/inspections of
key systems and equipment in Brunswick School Department facilities.

I. Roof Systems: All roofs are formally inspected by our roofing service provider every October. This inspection
evaluates both small-scale remedial repair requirements and condition trend-based requirements for Roof Life
Extension (RLE). This program entails full planned restoration of the roof system, including resealing of all
splices, restoration of all flashing details, and renovation of all roof drains. All RLE projects and non-immediate
remediate repairs are incorporated into subsequent facilities with phasing as recommended by our roofing
inspectors. All suspected roof leaks are immediately addressed with our roofing service provider, investigated,
and repaired with no more than a 1-2 day turnaround.

II. HVAC and Air Quality:


a. Main Buildings: HVAC systems in all buildings are covered by a service and maintenance contract with one
of two providers. Minor routine preventive maintenance actions (local adjustments, indicator monitoring,
filter replacement) are conducted by custodial personnel. The service providers have remote system
monitoring and diagnostic capability via modem connection with each building control system.
Enhancement of this capability to an active on-line mode, with access in each custodial office and in the
Facilities Directors office, is planned for the near future.
b. Portable Classrooms: All portable classrooms, both owned and leased, have individual kerosene monitor
heating units and air exchangers serviced under a service and maintenance agreement with the installing
vendor. The vendor provides annual inspection, cleaning, and routine preventive maintenance service
during the summer vacation period, as well as year-round repair service on an on-call basis.
c. Air Quality: Air quality testing is conducted on an as-required basis by either the HVAC service provider or
a local environmental service vendor. All suspected air quality issues are immediately investigated and
testing conducted once identified.

III. Utilities:
a. General Services: Water and sewer service is provided by the Brunswick-Topsham Water District and
Brunswick Sewer District respectively. Electrical power is provided by Central Maine Power. Local
telephone service is contracted with Verizon. Heating oil and trash pickup are contracted by the Town of
Brunswick. Propane and propane system service is provided by a local vendor on an on-call basis.
b. Water: Annual backflow preventer inspection and seasonal activation/shut-off of irrigation systems are
provided by the Brunswick-Topsham Water District. Emergent internal plumbing issues are immediately
addressed with local licensed plumbing service providers.
c. Sewer: The on-site pump station at Brunswick High School is cleaned and serviced annually, and more
frequently if required, by a local contractor.
Major Capital Improvement Application 24 5/28/04
Brunswick Junior High School
d. Electrical: Planned and emergent electrical repairs and service are addressed with local licensed
electricians.

IV. Safety Systems:


a. Fire Alarms: All building fire alarm systems are inspected and serviced annually under a service agreement
with the equipment provider. All school building alarm systems are continuously monitored.
b. Sprinkler Systems: All installed sprinkler systems are inspected annually, with an internal inspection of dry
systems eve ry five years, under a service agreement with an outside vendor.
c. Fire Protection/Emergency Equipment: All fire extinguishers and emergency lighting systems are tested
and serviced annually by a licensed vendor. Monthly inspections of this equipment, as well as eye wash
stations and deluge showers are conducted monthly by custodial personnel.
d. Security: Security systems at Brunswick Junior High School, Brunswick High School, and Superintendents
Office are monitored 24 hours a day, and serviced on an as-required basis, by the equipment installer.
e. Interior Communication: Internal phone switching systems, intercom, and master clock systems are
covered under vendor service agreements providing service on an on-call basis.

V. Site:
a. Snow Clearance: Plowing/snowblowing of roadways, parking lots, and sidewalks is generally performed by
custodial/groundskeeping personnel and bus drivers. Plowing of parking lots and roads at Brunswick High
School is contracted annually with a local vendor. Gross snow removal is arranged with a local vendor on
an as-required basis.
b. Pest Management: Monthly inspection and monitoring in accordance with the Brunswick School
Department Integrated Pest Management Policy is performed under an annual contract with a certified
vendor.
c. Grounds Maintenance: Grounds maintenance on all school sites, with the exception of Brunswick High
School, is performed by groundskeeping personnel. Annual weeding, garden maintenance/upkeep, and
turf management at Brunswick High School is accomplished under a service agreement with a local
landscape contractor.
d. Playgrounds: All school playgrounds and playground equipment are visually inspected semi-annually by
groundskeeping personnel for safety and operability.

VI. Code Compliance:


a. General Inspection: All school buildings are inspected annually by the Town Fire Marshal and by a loss
control representative of the School Departments Workers Compensation insurance carrier for fire and
general safety.
b. ADA Compliance: All vertical/inclined lifts and elevators are serviced and annually inspected by a licensed
inspector, and are licensed by the State Board of Elevator and Tramway Safety. Routine quarterly elevator
lubrication is likewise performed under a service contract.
c. AHERA: Designated Person services, including survey, inspection, staff training, and abatement support,
under AHERA are provided under a services contract with a licensed environmental service provider. The
Facilities Director maintains all AHERA documentation and initiates all required public and contractor
notifications required by AHERA.
d. Boilers: All boilers and pressure vessels are inspected annually by a licensed boiler inspector, and, along
with their control systems, are covered in the HVAC repair and maintenance contracts. The night security
guard, all head custodians, and at least one night custodian at each school are licensed low-pressure boiler
operators.
e. Underground Storage Tanks: All underground fuel storage tanks and monitoring systems are inspected
annually by a licensed tank inspector.

VII. Miscellaneous:
a. Bleachers/Backboards: All motorized retractable bleacher and backboard installations are inspected
annually for safety and proper operation by the installer.
b. Crooker Theater: All stage rigging and support equipment at the Crooker Theater (Brunswick High School)
is inspected annually for safety and operability by the original installer. This program is being considered
for expansion to all schools with proscenium-style stages. All seats, carpeting, and stage curtains are
deep-cleaned semi-annually by a local cleaning contractor.
c. ROPES Challenge Course: The ROPES Course at Brunswick Junior High School is inspected annually
for safety and operability by the designer/installer. Repairs and maintenance are conducted by the
groundskeeping staff.
Major Capital Improvement Application 25 5/28/04
Brunswick Junior High School
APPENDIX NO 2 - BRUNSWICK SCHOOL DEPARTMENT CAPITAL IMPROVEMENT/
RENEWAL PROGRAM

This program outlines the history, performance, status, and current guidance for capital improvement/renewal
efforts for Brunswick School Department facilities.

I. Background.
Since 1969, the Brunswick School Department has maintained and annually updated a Five-Year Capital
Improvement Plan for its buildings, grounds, and vehicles in accordance with the Town Charter. Until 2003,
this plan was presented to the Brunswick School Board for approval and, once approved, was included in the
Town Capital Improvement Plan along with those from all other Town departments for consideration and
approval by the Town Council. In November, 2002, the Town of Brunswick established a Capital Improvement
Plan Committee to gather, evaluate, and consolidate the various capital needs requests for the Town
departments, and to present a unified, integrated Capital Improvement Plan for the Town Council. School
Department capital improvement proposals now undergo parallel approval processes with the School Board
and Capital Improvement Plan Committee prior to inclusion in the proposed Town budget.

The criteria for inclusion of an item into the School Department Plan is: (1) a non-recurring upgrade, renewal, or
replacement of a structure, building component, or vehicle that would increase the life of, or add required
functionality to, that structure, component, or vehicle, with (2) an estimated total cost of $25,000 or greater.
Individual phases of a multi-year project less than $25,000 are included if the total cost of the project is over
that amount; single-year projects estimated at less than $25,000 are not included in the Plan. Individual items
with estimates of $150,000 or greater are considered as separate line items by both the School Board and the
Town Capital Improvement Committee. Items with estimates between $25,000 and $150,000 are considered
individually by the School Board, but are combined into a single summary line item by the Town Capital
Improvement Committee.

II. Performance to Date.


Requirements have been most commonly generated from the results of the School Departments 1995
Facilities Study and, to a lesser extent, from the results of periodic and one-time inspections and surveys (i.e.,
ADA compliance survey, energy conservation survey, etc.). Significant past and projected capital improvement
projects for Brunswick school facilities since 1996-97 have included:

New roofs-Hawthorne, Junior High School (1996)


New boilers-Hawthorne and Bus Garage (1996)
Classroom window replacements-Coffin, Hawthorne, Longfellow, Junior High School (1997-2003)
Gym window replacements-Coffin, Junior High School (1998)
Ceiling and lighting upgrades-All schools (1997-2002)
ADA lift installations-Coffin, Jordan Acres, Longfellow, Junior High School (2000-2001)
Air quality improvement upgrades-Coffin (2003), Jordan Acres (proj. 2004), Longfellow (proj. 2005), Junior
High School (proj. 2006-2008)
Second access/egress road-High School (proj. 2008)

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Brunswick Junior High School
The Brunswick School Department has been committed to continual reinvestment in its facilities. Table 1 shows
the annual budget allocations toward the School Department Capital Improvement Plan since 1996-97.

Table 1. Capital Improvement Expenditures to Date

Year Amount Comments


1996-97 $156,405
1997-98 $321,000
1998-99 $384,400
1999-00 $332,500
2000-01 $359,700 Does not include the cost of system wide energy
conservation projects ($330,000)
2001-02 $300,000
2002-03 $291,100
2003-04 $303,800 Does not include cost of Coffin IAQ Project ($400,000).
2004-05 (projected) $317,000 Does not include cost of Jordan Acres IAQ Project
($375,000).
2005-06 (projected) $325,000 Does not include cost of Longfellow IAQ Project
($375,000).
2006-07 (projected) $321,500 Does not include Phase 1 cost of Junior High IAQ
Project ($200,000) or any renovations/construction
resulting from this application.
2007-08 (projected) $329,500 Does not include Phase 2 cost of Junior High IAQ
Project ($200,000) or any renovations/construction
resulting from this application.
2008-09 (projected) $331,000 Does not include Phase 3 cost of Junior High IAQ
Project ($200,000), High School Egress Road
($315,000), High School Tennis Courts ($130,000), or
any renovations/construction resulting from this
application.

NOTE: Amounts only include those projects with estimated cost between $25,000 and
$150,000.

The School Department Capital Improvement Plan for 2004-05 has been approved by the Brunswick School
Board and Town Capital Improvement Plan Committee, and is awaiting approval by the Brunswick Town
Council.

III. New Planning Process.

On January 28, 2004, the Brunswick School Department contracted with Northeast Building Consultants for
facility assessment and database startup services to support future long-range facilities planning using the
DOE-provided VFA Capital Asset Management software system. While this change in the facilities planning
process cannot influence the 2004-05 Five-Year Capital Improvement Plan currently in the approval pipeline, it
will drive the proposed Plan input from 2005-06 onward.

IV. Overarching Ten-Year Capital Renewal/Improvement Guidance for K-8 Facilities.

Based on the initial field survey information provi ded by Northeast Building Consultants in May 2004, the
composite Facility Condition Index (FCI) for the Brunswick School Department K-8 facilities is 0.12. This value
will most likely increase as the initial survey data is currently being refined and lower-value requirements are
being added; however, the FCI is not expected to exceed 0.14 once these efforts are completed.

The current School Department Five-Year Capital Improvement Plan delineates the projected expenditures for
capital renewal items with a value of $25,000 or greater for the K-8 facilities through 2008-09. Renewal items
of value less than $25,000 beyond 2004-05, and all renewal items beyond 2008-09, have not yet been formally
planned and estimated, nor have funding levels for these items been determined. These out-year funding
requirements have been modeled based on the following parameters:

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Brunswick Junior High School
a. The spending projections for capital renewal items with a value of $25,000 or greater beyond 2008-09 are
based on the average yearly planned expenditure for these items over the period of the current Five-Year
Capital Improvement Plan (2004-05 through 2008-09) adjusted for inflation each year.

b. Historically, approximately 55% of expenditures for Contracted Repairs have been for capital renewal
work items with value less than $25,000. Out-year capital renewal spending projections include 55% of the
proposed 2004-05 budget for contracted repairs adjusted for inflation each year.

c. Historically, approximately 15% of expenditures for Supplies and Materials have been used for capital
renewal work items with value less than $25,000 performed in-house as self-help projects. Out-year
capital renewal spending projections include 15% of the proposed 2004-05 budget for supplies and
materials adjusted for inflation each year.The cumulative capital renewal projections for the next ten years
are shown in the following chart along with their impact on the School Departments composite K-8 FCI
based on the initial field survey data:

$900,000 0.14
Brunswick K-8 Composite
$800,000
0.12
$700,000
0.10
$600,000

0.08
Funding

$500,000

FCI
$400,000 0.06

$300,000
0.04
$200,000
0.02
$100,000

$0 0.00
2004-052005-06 2006-07 2007-082008-092009-10 2010-11 2011-122012-132013-14
Funding to Maintain FCI Funding Projection FCI Maintained FCI from Projection

It is expected that the high-value renewal projects planned for the first five years of this projection ventilation
upgrades at three schools, four boiler replacements, and roof life extensions at five schools will reduce the
out-year funding requirements to maintain current composite FCI, and will actually lower the projected FCI in
the out-years by renewing these large systems earlier than would otherwise be indicated by their respective
service lives.

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Brunswick Junior High School
V. Specific Capital Renewal/Improvement Guidance for Brunswick Junior High School and Shared Boiler
House.

Based on the initial field survey information provided by Northeast Building Consultants in May 2004, the
combined FCI for Brunswick Junior High School and the Boiler House shared with Coffin Elementary School is
0.08. This value will most likely increase as the initial survey data is currently being refined and lower-value
requirements are being added, however, the FCI is not expected to exceed 0.10 once these efforts are
completed.

Using the methodology described above, the cumulative capital renewal projections for the next ten
years for the Junior High School and Boiler House are shown in the following chart along with the
impact on their combined FCI based on the initial field survey data:

$450,000 0.12
Brunswick Junior High School and Boiler House
$400,000
0.10
$350,000

$300,000 0.08
Funding

$250,000

FCI
0.06
$200,000

$150,000 0.04

$100,000
0.02
$50,000

$0 0.00
2004-05 2005-062006-07 2007-08 2008-092009-10 2010-11 2011-122012-13 2013-14
Funding to Maintain FCI Funding Projection FCI Maintained FCI from Projection

Specific capital renewal projects listed in the current Five -Year Capital Improvement Plan (over $25,000 in
value) include the following:

Window replacement for cafeteria and adjacent classroom: $30,000 in 2004-05


Installation of ADA-compliant door hardware: $10,000 in 2004-05 and 2005-06, $15,000 in 2006-07
Roof life extension work for 6 of 15 roof sections: $56,000 in 2004-05, $35,000 in 2005-06, $16,000 in 2006-07
Telephone system installation: $36,000 in 2004-05
Ventilation system upgrade: $200,000/year for 2006-07 through 2008-09
Sprinkler system expansion: $85,000 in 2006-07
Boiler replacements: $110,000 in 2007-08
Rear access road and athletic field realignment: $31,000 in 2008-09
Flooring upgrade in gym entryway: $25,000 in 2008-09
Floor leveling in Music Room: $25,000 in 2008-09

As stated previously, it is expected that the high-value projects, and as-yet-unplanned projects for 2009-10 and
beyond, will reduce both the out-year funding requirements to maintain current composite FCI and the actual
out-year FCI, and should bring the two funding models into closer alignment.
Major Capital Improvement Application 29 5/28/04
Brunswick Junior High School
Part VI

Professional Facilities Studies


Part VI: Professional Facilities Studies/Assessment
Attach any professional facility study/assessment of the building that may have been completed within the last five
years (the absence of a study/assessment will not adversely affect your rating).

Previous studies include:


1995 Brunswick Schools Facilities Study (Harriman Associates, inventoried the physical condition of the systems
and code status of all schools in the district to support their capital improvements plans)
2002 Elementary Schools Space Needs Feasibility Study (Harriman Associates, studied all five schools in this
application and did space allocation workbooks and concept design options with cost estimates to solve their space
and program needs)
2004 Capital Asset Management Facilities Survey (Northeast Building Consultants)

See Part V for summaries of the annual facilities maintenance plans.

The Brunswick School Department will make copies of all studies available to the Department of Education upon
request. Please contact Jim Oikle, Business Manager, Brunswick School Department, 729-4148.

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Brunswick Junior High School
Part VII

Instructions, Timeline & Site Location


Part VII: Instructions, Timeline, & Site Location
A. Application Instructions
APPLICATIONS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED IF PRESENTED IN A 3-RING BINDER. SPIRAL BINDERS ARE
REQUIRED.

Please summit the original application and one copy.

All forms must be filled out completely.

Use additional sheets where necessary.

Submit applications to: School Facilities Services Team


Department of Education
23 State House Station
Augusta, ME 04333-0023

If you have further questions regarding the application or the application process please contact:

Scott Brown, AIA, Director OR Karen Bossie, Administrative Secretary


School Facilities Services School Facilities Services
Phone: (207) 624-6883 Phone: (207) 624-6848
E-Mail: scott.brown@Maine.Gov E-Mail: Karen.l.bossie@Maine.Gov

B. 2003-2004 Rating Cycle Timeline


Applications made available: September 2002 Revised December 2003

Applications accepted at Department of Education through June 1, 2004

Department of Education rating period: July 2004 through completion

C. Site Location
Please see the attached map to the schools in these applications.

From I-295 exit 28, follow Pleasant St., (Route U.S. 1 North) to first traffic light at Church Road. Turn right onto
Church Road to McKeen St. Turn Left onto McKeen St and proceed to Baribeau Drive. Turn right onto
Baribeau Drive and proceed to Columbia Ave. Turn left onto Columbia Ave and proceed to Brunswick Junior
High School on the right.

Telephone number for school: (207) 729-1669.

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Brunswick Junior High School