Page 1 of 7 

Strategy Analysis – Options 
Long Put 
Action: Buying a Put option 
Expectation: Stock/Market will be Bearish 
Profit: Unlimited on stock price/market falling 
Loss: Limited to amount invested into position (premium) 
Breakeven: Strike price – premium 

Index 
Long Put ........................................................................................................................................................... 1 
Explanation ................................................................................................................................................... 2 
Benefits......................................................................................................................................................... 2 
Risks ............................................................................................................................................................. 2 
How to … ..................................................................................................................................................... 3 
Tips & Hints.................................................................................................................................................. 3 
Payoff Diagram – Long Put ........................................................................................................................... 4 
Put Strike Prices ­ ATM/ITM/OTM .............................................................................................................. 5 
Volatility – Long Put..................................................................................................................................... 6 
Greeks........................................................................................................................................................... 6 
Trading Plan.................................................................................................................................................. 7

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 2 of 7 

Explanation 
Option traders use Put option contracts to benefit in a fall of the underlying share price. Options trade at a 
discounted price to the share. Therefore, instead of Short Selling the full value of the shares, you can benefit in 
a fall in price using less exposure of capital. 
Stock investors also use Put option contracts as a means to Protect their stock positions. This is because the Put 
option gives the buyer (taker) the right to sell their shares at the strike price. 
Example: 

Price 
Number 
Total Value 

QQQQ 
$51.07 
100 shares 
$5,107.00 

QQQQ Dec 51.00 Puts 
$1.75 
1 contract 
$175.00 

To purchase 1 QQQQ Dec 51.00 put, we would spend $175.00 (not including brokerage). The equivalent value 
of shares is $5,107, giving us “leverage” over a fall in the share price. 

Benefits
·  Profit from a fall in the underlying (market/stock)
·  Purchasing long­term options requires a smaller investment to hold value of the same underlying stock 
position. Example; $10,000 of stock might be approximately $1,000 of option value. Gives you leverage 
exposure over the stock.
·  Risking smaller amount of investment capital to gain a larger percentage of profit.
·  Can buy an option that benefits from the markets falling.
·  Can also adopt defensive strategies if the markets change conditions.
·  Allows stock investors to sell their shares at a fixed price, no matter how much the stock may have 
fallen 
Risks
·  Lack of understanding can cause investors to pay too high a price for options or to purchase wrong 
options to suit expected goals.
·  Education and practice are required to gain a thorough understanding of options. This takes time and 
patience.
·  100% of position could be lost if position is not managed correctly
·  Different strategies could be adopted depending on the investors outlook for the stock and time­frame 
for investment

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 3 of 7 

How to …
·  Establish that share price is likely to fall
·  Decide on time frame for expected move in value
·  Choose the type of Put option you wish to purchase – ATM/OTM/ITM. This includes what strike price 
and expiration.
·  Establish exit criteria before entering into position. How long will you hold the position if it is shifting 
against you? At what point will you close the position for a profit?
·  Place order for selected Call option 
Tips & Hints
·  Only purchase options if you fully understand how they work, and have practiced and evaluated your 
results
·  Long­term (long expiration date) options can be purchased, and strike prices on different levels. 
Different options will suit different outlooks for time.
·  As with any investment strategy, only invest capital that you can afford to invest with.
·  An understanding of Volatility, the Greeks and Theoretical values will help establish which option 
contract to trade.
·  Establish a clear and precise plan for entry and exit.
·  Although you use less capital on the one position, do not increase the amount of money you use. 
Example, you may buy $10,000 of stock, but do not buy $10,000 of options. Purchase $1,000 of options 
or 10% of the value you would use on stocks (this is an example)

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 4 of 7 

Payoff Diagram – Long Put 
Payoff Diagrams show the potential profit or loss for a position, when the underlying share price is trading at 
different prices. It will also highlight the breakeven level for the trade. 
A payoff diagram assumes the position is at expiry, showing only the intrinsic value of the option. 
Profit/Loss if closed prior to expiry 

16 

Expiry 

14 

31­Oct­03 

12 

Profit/Loss 

31­Jul­03 

10 

31­Mar­03 






35.00 
­2 

40.00 

45.00 

50.00 

55.00 

60.00 

65.00 

70.00 

75.00 

­4 

Stock Price 

The above Payoff Diagram for a Long Put option position shows the following information:
·  Breakeven: Exercise price ($51.00) minus Premium paid ($1.75) = $49.25. That is, if QQQQ is trading 
below $49.25, then this position will be in a profit
·  Maximum Loss: $1.75
·  Maximum Profit: unlimited
·  Time: on or before expiration of the December contracts 
Falling Share Price 
As QQQQ falls in value, the payoff diagram shows us that the value of the QQQQ Dec 51.00 puts will rise in 
value. 
$50.00 
QQQQ 
­$1.00 
Put Option 
profit* 
* These are approximate values

$45.00 
$4.00 

$40.00 
$9.00 

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

$35.00 
$14.00 

Page 5 of 7 

Put Strike Prices ­ ATM/ITM/OTM 
ATM: At The Money 
This refers to the strike price that is At (or Near) the current share price. ATM strike prices have little to no 
Intrinsic value. Offers the best balance between the risks and rewards for the strategy. 
OTM: Out of The Money 
This refers to the strike prices that are below the current share price. OTM Put options will produce a 
significant return if the share price falls strongly, but also has greater risk of losing value should the share price 
remain steady or rise. 
ITM: In The Money 
This refers to the strike prices that are above the current share price. ITM Put options have the lowest breakeven 
levels but also have the highest premium cost (due to the Intrinsic Value). Profit, although leveraged, is not as 
strong as the OTM Put option, however, the risk is also lower 
Example: 
QQQQ currently at 
$51.07 
Call  Strike 
Put 
Options  Price  Options 

ITM 

ATM 

OTM 

46.00 
47.00 
48.00 
49.00 
50.00 
51.00 
52.00 
53.00 
54.00 
55.00 
56.00 

OTM 

ATM 

ITM

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 6 of 7 

Volatility – Long Put
·  Volatility refers to the degree of unpredictable change over time of a certain variable.
·  Historical volatility is the volatility of a financial instrument based on historical returns, while Implied 
Volatility is the volatility that, given a particular pricing model, yields a theoretical value for the option 
equal to the current market price.
·  The more volatile a stock, the greater the time value is likely to be, due to the increased uncertainty of 
where the share price might be in the future.
·  Long Put option takers (buyers) should look for low Volatility on the position they are evaluating. 

Greeks 
Delta: negative, ranging between 0 and ­1. OTM calls are closer to 0, ATM calls are around ­0.5, and ITM calls 
are closer to ­1. Delta decreases towards ­1 as the underlying rises and the put moves further/closer ITM. 
Gamma: positive. It is highest around the ATM option, especially as the option approaches expiration. 
Theta: negative, as the option contract will lose time decay each day. The closer the number to 0, the better. 
The value of the position will decrease as the option loses time value. 
Vega: an increase in Vega should find an increase in the options’ change in value. Vega varies depending on 
whether it is an OTM/ATM/ITM option, as well as when time to expiry decreases. The value of the position 
will tend to rise if implied volatility increases. Vega will be highest the closer the underlying is to the strike 
price, and the longer the time to maturity.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved. 

Page 7 of 7 

Trading Plan 
To use the Long Put strategy, you need to have a Plan. For a higher probability of profiting from this strategy, 
FMR Analysts recommends you practice, or Paper Trade, before you begin using real capital in the markets. 

1) Make a decision that you expect the underlying (market/stock) is going to fall in value 
2) Outline how much you expect the underlying might fall 
3) Choose a time­frame in which you expect this will occur 
4) Evaluate the option to see if it meets the criteria you want 
5) Establish your entry and exit rules 
6) Enter position 

There are a number of points you should consider before entering this strategy. FMR Analysts have outlined 
some of the questions you should consider:
·  How bearish are you? Do you believe there is a strong probability the underlying will move to your 
targeted price? This strategy requires a directional move downwards.
·  Money Management. How much money are you willing to risk? Remember to diversify
·  What is the volatility of the underlying?
·  Do you intend to exercise the option?
·  Will your views be realized before expiry of the option?
·  What is the liquidity of the option?
·  Does the option meet your criteria? You need to have established a benchmark criteria for what has a 
stronger probability of achieving your trading/investing goals.
·  Establish your Entry and Exit rules. From your practice (Paper Trading) experience, you should have 
outlined criteria to highlight what position to enter, and when you should exit.
·  Are you sticking to your Trading Plan? Deviation from what you have practiced is most likely to lead to 
increased losses.

© Copyright FMRAnalysts, 2007.  All rights reserved.