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Teaching Innovation Projects

Volume 3
Article 4
Issue 1 National Special Issue

6-26-2013

Effective Use of Logbooks in Engineering
Education: Enhancing Communication through
Short Design Activities
Libby Osgood
University of Prince Edward Island, eosgood@upei.ca

Follow this and additional works at: http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/tips
Part of the Curriculum and Instruction Commons, and the Engineering Commons

Recommended Citation
Osgood, Libby (2013) "Effective Use of Logbooks in Engineering Education: Enhancing Communication through Short Design
Activities," Teaching Innovation Projects: Vol. 3: Iss. 1, Article 4.
Available at: http://ir.lib.uwo.ca/tips/vol3/iss1/4

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logbooks are an ideal way to enhance students’ ability to communicate effectively. Participants in the workshop will sample an interactive activity that is recommended to teach students the importance of logbooks. logbooks are sometimes used as legal records in professional liability. Many engineering educators require their students to use logbooks in active learning projects. logbooks. a renewed focus on logbooks is often necessary to reconsider what to record as pertinent information and when is an appropriate time to do so. For participants who are currently supervising design activities.Effective Use of Logbooks in Engineering Education: Enhancing Communication through Short Design Activities Summary For engineering educators who employ active learning techniques such as design projects. and graduate students to consider interactive methods to teach proper logbook use. meeting agendas and meeting minutes are typical items recorded in a logbook. students are expected to write effective reports and produce design documentation (Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board. Activities such as precursory analysis. incidental writing Creative Commons License This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3. & Culley. a renewed look at logbooks will assist them in asserting the importance of logbook use in design activities. merely requiring the use of logbooks without providing regular guidance or training is irrational. However. This article is available in Teaching Innovation Projects: http://ir. Furthermore. paper based products that are bound in such a way as to ensure that pages cannot be removed. 2008). Logbooks are primarily used in the engineering profession as a way to document an individual’s progress with a particular project. Participants in the workshop will learn the importance of a logbook. intellectual property and project scope disputes (McAlpine. Logbooks are typically hardback. Hicks. students must have regular practice. Logbooks are an excellent repository for design documentation and encourage regular use. Huet. reflections of past work. In order to fully develop these documentation skills. and discussion will follow. define which activities should be recorded in a logbook and state the necessary elements to record in a logbook. design activities. consequently. professors. task lists. programmatic issues. However.0 License.ca/tips/vol3/iss1/4 .uwo. it will also enhance their own communication skills and the skills of the students they supervise. after regular use. Keywords engineering instruction. Instruction. 2006).lib. Design projects present an ideal situation to employ logbooks to enhance communication skills (Yang. This workshop is intended for instructors. brainstorming. In industry. initial sketches. 2009).

  • produce  a  sample  logbook  entry  for  a  design  exercise.  a  renewed  focus  on  logbooks  is   often   necessary   to   reconsider   what   to   record   as   pertinent   information   and   when   is   an   appropriate  time  to  do  so.  students  must  have  regular  practice.  However.  2008).   logbooks   are   sometimes   used   as   legal   records   in   professional   liability.       KEYWORDS:  engineering  instruction.   students   are   expected   to   write   effective   reports   and   produce   design   documentation  (Canadian  Engineering  Accreditation  Board.  Participants  in  the  workshop  will  sample   an  interactive  activity  that  is  recommended  to  teach  students  the  importance  of  logbooks.     This   workshop   is   intended   for   instructors.   logbooks   are   an   ideal   way   to   enhance   students’   ability   to   communicate   effectively.   task   lists.   2006).   paper   based   products   that   are   bound   in   such   a   way   as   to   ensure   that   pages   cannot   be   removed.   programmatic   issues.   and   discussion   will   follow.  logbooks.   Activities   such   as   precursory   analysis.       Design   projects   present   an   ideal   situation   to   employ   logbooks   to   enhance   communication   skills  (Yang.  In  order  to  fully  develop   these  documentation  skills.  However.  after  regular  use.   brainstorming.  &  Culley.  Huet.  University  of  Prince  Edward  Island  and  Dalhousie  University     SUMMARY   For  engineering  educators  who  employ  active  learning  techniques  such  as  design  projects.   initial   sketches.   consequently.  Furthermore.  For  participants  who  are  currently  supervising  design  activities.   Participants   in   the   workshop   will   learn  the  importance  of  a  logbook.   and   graduate   students   to   consider   interactive  methods  to  teach  proper  logbook  use.  it  will  also  enhance  their  own  communication  skills  and  the   skills  of  the  students  they  supervise.  incidental  writing     LEARNING  OBJECTIVES   By  the  end  of  this  workshop.  intellectual  property  and  project  scope  disputes  (McAlpine.  Logbooks  are  typically  hardback.  2009).       Logbooks   are   primarily   used   in   the   engineering   profession   as   a   way   to   document   an   individual’s   progress   with   a   particular   project.   • identify  which  design  activities  to  record  in  a  logbook.  define  which  activities  should  be  recorded  in  a  logbook   and  state  the  necessary  elements  to  record  in  a  logbook.  and     • incorporate  the  necessary  information  on  each  page  of  a  logbook.  Hicks.   Instruction.   meeting   agendas   and   meeting  minutes  are  typical  items  recorded  in  a  logbook.  merely  requiring   the  use  of  logbooks  without  providing  regular  guidance  or  training  is  irrational.   reflections   of   past   work.   a  renewed  look  at  logbooks  will  assist  them  in  asserting  the  importance  of  logbook  use  in   design  activities.   professors.  Many  engineering  educators  require  their  students  to  use  logbooks  in   active  learning  projects.  Logbooks  are  an  excellent   repository  for  design  documentation  and  encourage  regular  use.  participants  will  be  able  to:   • explain  why  logbooks  are  necessary  for  engineers. Osgood: Effective Use of Logbooks in Engineering Education     Effective   Use   of   Logbooks   in   Engineering   Education:   Enhancing   Communication   through  Short  Design  Activities   Libby  Osgood.   Published by Scholarship@Western.   In   industry. 2013 1 .  design  activities.

 meeting  notes.   test   plans.  graphs.   • bound  pages.   changes   to   the   design   solution. 3 [2013].  are  the  epitome  of  the  engineering  logbook.   • the  range  of  dates  contained  in  the  logbook.   The   two   most   frequently   selected   uses   were:  1)  as  a  personal  work  record.   This   article   presents   a   series   of   guidelines  for  the  content  that  logbooks  should  contain.  memorandums.   30-­‐35.   discussions.  and.   McAlpine   et   al.  so  they  cannot  be  removed.  and  2)  as  a  reminder  of  work  in  progress  (>70%).  sketches.   From   a   list   of   seven   possible   reasons..   • mistakes  crossed  out  with  a    single  line.  including:  written  notes.   The   lists   included   in   this   article   regarding   the   typical   content   and   use   of   logbooks   shapes   the   lecture  in  part  two  of  this  workshop  and  the  information  on  the  handout  that  participants   receive.  this  article  describes  the  typical  content  of  logbooks  as  follows:  provides  rationale   for   decision   making. Iss.  27.ca/tips/vol3/iss1/4 2 .   and.  external  documents.   This   includes   alternative   design   solutions.   Retrieved   from   http://www.   The   article   outlines   26   types   of   information  typically  recorded  in  logbooks.  which  contain  detailed  information   and  sketches.   the   frequency   of   logbook   use.   records   meeting   minutes.   maintains   a   legal   record   of   events.  (2011).  (2006).     Additionally.  Hicks.     Kelley.  calculations.  62%   of   respondents   reported   that   they   use   their   logbooks   and   stated   that   the   main   method   of   data   location   was   browsing   through   the   pages   (61%).org/Publications/ttt.  G.   participants   were   asked   to   choose   three   answers.   70(7).  al  note  that  Leonardo  da  Vinci’s  notebooks.   http://ir.  &  Culley.       In  a  follow-­‐up  investigation  of  sixteen  logbooks.   and.  Design  Studies.htm     Engineers   must   process   information   as   they   develop   their   design   and   should   record   anything   that   is   relevant   to   the   design   problem   in   a   notebook. Vol.uwo.  The  remainder  of  the  article  discusses  methods  of  computerizing   logbooks  for  dissemination  and  retention  of  data  since  much  of  the  data  in  a  logbook  does   not   appear   in   formal   reports.   Further.  J.  over  30%  of  the  logbooks  consist  of  written   notes  and  meeting  notes.  Huet.  H.  J.  The  Technology  and     Engineering   Teacher. Teaching Innovation Projects.   up   to   80%   of   design   is   adaptive   and   not   original.   states   successes   and   failures.   • legible  writing.   documents   the   results   of   analyses. 4     REFERENCE  SUMMARIES   McAlpine.lib.   conduct   a   study   of   fifty   participants   from   academia   and   industry  to  determine  the  following:  what  their  primary  purpose  is  for  keeping  a  logbook.   what   content   is   contained   within   their   logbook.  which  include:   • a  table  of  contents.  B. Art.         McAlpine  et.   describes   notes   on   the   customer.   analyses.   test   results   and   reflective   thoughts   related   to   the   design.  Engineer’s  notebook:  A  design  assessment  tool.  contact   details.  S.   • passages  written  in  permanent  ink.  481-­‐504.  T.  though  not  necessarily  neat.. 1.    An  investigation  into  the  use  and       content  of  the  engineer's  logbook..iteaconnect.  Using  da  Vinci’s  notebooks  as  an   example.   their   preferred   method   for   locating   information.

 without  gaps.  S.  instructors  should  insist  that  students  write  short  passages  at  regular  intervals.   this   study   considers   logbooks  as  an  assessment  technique  and  attempts  to  correlate  the  maturity  of  drawings  to   the   corresponding   design   result.   Students   were   expected   to   write   research   papers   based   on   records   from   their   logbook   in   order   to   activate   the   meta-­‐cognition   of   the   design   activity.   such   as   through   logbooks.   provide  written  feedback  with  no  associated  grade.  20(1).  125-­‐133.   Although   Yang   does   not   find   a   statistically   significant   correlation.  Active  learning  and  reflection  in  product  development  engineering     education.  Coney.         Yang.     Research  In  Engineering  Design.  Using  this  article.   and   forces   students   to   write  on  a  regular  basis.   and   provide   a   description   of   work   throughout   the   design   process.  Incidental  writing  in  the  engineering     classroom.  which  reinforces  the  need  to  enhance  their  skills.       This   article   provides   an   example   of   how   to   seamlessly   incorporate   logbooks   into   an   engineering   design   activity.   By   reflecting   on   the   design   activity   on   a   regular   basis.  this  article  suggests  that  logbooks  can  be  limiting  to   the  learning  process  when  students  only  use  their  logbooks  before  major  reports  are  due  or   when   instructors   criticize   students’   skills   rather   than   provide   instruction   or   encouragement.   Students   record   calculations..  &  Bystrom.   improves   problem-­‐solving   skills..  K.  M.  and   • entries  recorded  consecutively.  Furthermore.   students   are   more   aware   at   each   stage   in   the   design   process.  the  article  suggests   that  in  order  for  students  to  be  successful  at  incidental  writing  (through  the  specific  use  of   logbooks).   This   also   allows   for   reflective   cognition.  (1996).  B.  E. Osgood: Effective Use of Logbooks in Engineering Education     • the  corners  of  external  documents  taped  with  signature  and  date  on  tape.   fabrication   plans.   As   an   informal   method   of   writing.  27-­‐33.   the   article   does   determine   that   logbooks   are   usually   maintained   with   varying   degrees   of   detail   based   on   the   time   requirement   required   by   the   project.  Journal  of  Engineering  Education.       This  article  provides  an  example  of  an  active  learning  course  in  New  Zealand  that  required   the   use   of   logbooks   to   achieve   the   communication   learning   outcome.  and  date  on  every  page.  A.     Incidental   writing   captures   the   thoughts   that   occur   during   the   design   process. 2013 3 .  32(2).  I  have  included  reflection  as  a  component  of  the  recommended   content  list  for  logbooks  and  included  these  findings  into  the  lecture.  (2007).  M.  concentrate  on  the  content  rather  than   Published by Scholarship@Western.  page  number.   sketches.  Observations  on  concept  generation  and  sketching  in  engineering  design.  (2009).  Consequently.  1-­‐11.   • a  title.   Based   on   a   study   of   two   design   classes   with   a   total   participation   rate   of   fifty-­‐seven   students.  85.   The   article   also   reports   that   students   often   feel   intimidated   by   the   act   of   writing.       Hawkins.  signature.   This   workshop   uses  Yang’s  guidelines  about  the  types  of  design  activities  that  should  be  recorded  as  part  of   the  lecture  and  accompanying  handout.     Shekar.  European  Journal  Of  Engineering  Education.   logbooks   are   one   method   to   attain   this   knowledge.     These  guidelines  are  included  in  the  lecture  and  used  to  form  the  sample  questions  for  the   evaluation  in  part  three.

lib. Teaching Innovation Projects.     [10]   Section  1A:  Design   Explain  to  the  participants:     • They   will   be   given   a   particular   design   problem   labeled   with  the  letter  A.  B.   Problem   statement  B  goes  into  a  separate  pile.   • Ask   participants   to   take   one   of   the   papers   documenting   http://ir.   the   third   person   could   do   a   much   better   job   determining   if   the   design   adequately   solves  the  problem.  Encourage  participants  to  replicate  this     activity   in   their   own   classrooms   but   to   keep   the   intended   purpose   of   the   activity   30   hidden  from  the  students  to  ensure  they  produce  the  same  amount  of  detail  they   would   normally.   • Return  the  papers  documenting  the  design  to  the  pile  at   the   front. 3 [2013]. Vol.   distribute   the   problem  statements  and  sheets  of  blank  paper. Iss.       Purpose:   Having   participants   design   something   in   a   short   amount   of   time   promotes   the   importance   of   keeping   good   records.uwo.   The  papers   are  then  exchanged  with  a  third  person  that  will  evaluate     the   design.   [3]   Section  1B:   Ask  the  participants  to  stop  and:   Exchange  Papers   • Record   their   problem   statement   letter   at   the   top   of   the   paper. 1.   • They   should   work   in   silence   to   design   a   solution   to   ‘solve   the  problem’.  etc.   • Return  the  problem  statements  to  the  front  of  the  room.   This   section   focuses   on   the   workshop’s  first  learning  objective.  This  article  is  a  helpful  tool  to  boost  knowledge  of  the  writing  process   and  reinforce  the  importance  of  meta-­‐cognition  and  the  reflective  process. Art.   This   activity   focuses   on   good   logbook   practice   (which   comes   later)  in  order  to  promote  the  recognition  that  if  the  participants  had  taken  more   time   to   write   the   initial   problem   or   include   the   necessary   design   constraints.   It   is   important   that   all   the   participants   with   problem   statement   A   put   the   papers   in   pile   1.   Inform   participants   that   this   activity   is   recommended   in   order   to     elucidate  the  need  for  effective  logbooks. 4     the  grammar  and  spelling.  and  encourage  students  to  take  risks  with  their  writing  style  to   improve  the  quality.     Once   you   have   explained   the   activity.     Note:   Consult   Appendix   A   for   a   list   of   sample   design   problems  to  assign  students.  or  C.ca/tips/vol3/iss1/4 4 .  which  is  being  able  to  explain  why  logbooks   are  necessary  for  engineers.       CONTENT  AND  ORGANIZATION   Duration   Subject   Activity   [min]       Section  1:  Short  Design  Activity     Open   the   workshop   by   asking   participants   to   design   a   solution   for   a   given     problem   and   then   exchange   papers   with   another   participant   who   then   adds   to     the  design.

  • Define  the  analyses  and  tests  that  one  could  perform  to   ensure  the  success  of  the  design.         Purpose:   This   section   focuses   on   learning   objective   two.  Sample  questions  include:   • For   the   paper   you   are   reviewing.     Ideally.   Discussion   have  a  discussion  on  the  aspects  of  the  documentation  that   made   it   easier   to   understand   what   the   problem   was   and   how  it  was  solved.  take  from  A.     • If  you  were  B.  Then. Osgood: Effective Use of Logbooks in Engineering Education     the  design  from  a  different  problem  statement  pile. 2013 5 .   Consequently.  take  from  B.  take  from  A.   it   should   be   possible   to   determine   if   the   problem   can  be  resolved  using  the  proposed  design  solution.   being   able   to   identify   Published by Scholarship@Western.   is   there   a   problem   statement?   • What  are  some  techniques  to  explain  the  design?   • Is  there  a  sketch?   • Are  there  annotations  on  the  sketch?     This  part  of  the  discussion  solidifies  the  need  for  improved   written  communication  in  logbooks.   [5]   Section  1E:   Request  that  participants:   Evaluate  the   • Read  the  work  that  has  been  documented  on  their  sheet.     Although   some   pages   will   have   the   problem   statement   written   down.     • If  you  were  A.   Solution   • Define   the   problem   statement   and   evaluate   whether   or   not   the   design   and   analysis/tests   will   resolve   the   problem.  take  from  B.   [5]   Section  1C:   Request  that  participants:   Analysis  and  Test   • Read  the  work  that  has  been  documented  on  their  sheet.     • If  you  were  B.   section   two   focuses   on   what   25   components  should  be  included  in  good  logbook  instruction.  take  from  C.     Section  2:  Discussion  and  Lecture     Following   the   completion   of   section   one.   • If  you  were  C.   • If  you  were  A.   [2]   Section  1D:   Ask  the  participants  to  stop  and:   Exchange  Papers   • Return  the  papers  documenting  the  design  to  the  pile  at   Again   the  front  in  separate  piles.  take  from  C.   most   will   not.     [5]   Section  1F:  Class   Ask  participants  to  describe  the  problem  statements.   • If  you  were  C.   • Take   one   of   the   papers   documenting   the   design   from   a   different  problem  statement  pile.   participants   will  need  to  use  the  information  provided  in  the  logbooks.

 (McAlpine  et  al.   analyses. Iss.   By   producing   a   high-­‐quality  example  of  how  to  document  a  design.  producing  a  sample  logbook  entry  for  a  design  exercise.  participants  are  more  likely   to   employ   high-­‐quality   logbook   techniques   in   the   future.   [10]   Section  2B:  Class   Discuss   the   reasons   an   engineer   requires   a   logbook   as   a   Discussion   large   group.     Section  3:  Effectively  Documenting  Designs     Following   from   section   2.  participants  will  be   able  to  further  solidify  the  elements  that  should  be  included  in  logbooks.   which   is   incorporating   the   necessary   information   on   each   page   of   a   logbook.     This   component   explains   why   logbooks   are   necessary   for   engineers   and   identifies   which   design   activities   should   be   recorded  in  a  logbook. Vol.ca/tips/vol3/iss1/4 6 .     • analyses   and   tests   to   verify   the   design   addresses   the   problem.   [5]   Section  3A:   Ask  participants  to  choose  one  of  the  problem  statements   Documentation   from  part  A  and  document  a  solution.   • sample  logbook  activities.       Lead   a   discussion   identifying   the   types   of   activities   each   reason   would   need   to   be   recorded:   meeting   minutes   and   agendas. 1.  which  is  being   able   to   produce   a   sample   logbook   entry   for   a   design   exercise.   Record   reasons   on   the   board   as   participants   share  their  responses.     Purpose:  Section  3A  focuses  on  learning  objective  number  three.   Section   3B   focuses   on   learning   objective   number   four. Teaching Innovation Projects. Art.  They  should  include:   • the  design  problem.  and   • further   work   that   should   be   performed   to   ensure   the   design  is  successful.uwo.   [10]   Section  2C:  Lecture   Provide  participants  with  a  handout  (Appendix  B)  and   present  a  short  lecture  outlining  the  following  information:   • necessary  elements  on  every  page  in  a  logbook.   and   reflections.  2006).   By   incorporating   the   necessary   information  on  each  page  and  then  evaluating  other’s  work.  Ask  participants  to  evaluate   http://ir..lib. 4     which  design  activities  should  be  recorded  in  a  logbook.   schedules.   [5]   Section  2A:  Small   Ask   the   participants   to   brainstorm   in   small   groups   (3-­‐5   Group  Discussion   people)  the  reasons  that  engineers  need  a  logbook. 3 [2013].     • a  list  of  what  should  be  included  for  each  of  the  activities.  and  learning  objective   three.   This   section   concludes   with   a   30   section  on  how  to  effectively  incorporate  logbook  instruction  into  the  classroom.   • the  design  solution.   [5]   Section  3B:   Instruct  the  participants  to  exchange  their  logbook  entries   Evaluate   with  the  person  next  to  them.   • activities  that  require  logbook  documentation.   section   3   includes   a   second   activity   that   encourages     participants   to   employ   good   logbook   practice.   design   drawings.

2013 7 .engr.  D.  Engineering  logbooks.ca/~llye                              /logbook.  (2005).p df       Law.  Retrieved  from:  http://www.ca/~design/engg251/First%20Year%20Files/eng_records.  page  number.  J.  small  and  large  group  discussion  and  independent  reflection.ee.uidaho.  (2003).  M.  Some  considerations  include:   • Is  name.  (2008).ca/e/files/report_ceab_08_txt   _only.  L.  C.   2011).  Engineer’s  log-­‐book.pdf Published by Scholarship@Western.  Retrieved  from:  http://www.  Accreditation  criteria  and  procedures     2008.   Total  Time:  85  minutes     PRESENTATION  STRATEGIES   This   is   an   interactive   workshop   that   uses   a   combination   of   different   strategies   such   as   lecture.     ADDITIONAL  REFERENCES   Canadian  Engineering  Accreditation  Board.  Reiterate   the   need   to   be   diligent   in   helping   students   improve   their   communication  skills.  Retrieved  from:     http://people.    Sample  questions  include:   • Could   these   two   activities   be   beneficial   in   logbook   instruction?   • How  would  you  adapt  this  for  your  class?   [5]   Part  3B:  Conclusion   Invite   any   closing   questions   or   remarks.  &  Johnston.  Engineering  records.     Appendix  A  and  Appendix  B  are  designed  specifically  in  support  of  this  workshop:  appendix   A  provides  a  comprehensive  list  of  problem  statements  while  appendix  B  is  a  handout  for   students.  (2002).edu/ee     /power/jlaw/COURSES/CAPSTONE/F05/handouts/EngineeringLogbooks082205.engineerscanada.  date  and  title  on  every  page?     • Is  there  a  sketch  of  the  design  solution?   • Are  there  annotations  on  the  sketches?   • Is  it  legible  and  in  pen?   • Is  there  a  reflection  regarding  the  design?   • Is   future   work   defined   so   the   person   can   proceed   at   a   later  date?   [15]   Part  3C:  Reflection   Ask  participants  to  work  in  pairs  or  alone  to  identify  ways   they   can   incorporate   logbook   instruction   into   their   courses.   Retrieved   from:   www.ucalgary.pdf     Caswell.mun.p df     Lye.   Ask   participants   to  share  ideas  that  arose  during  the  brainstorm. Osgood: Effective Use of Logbooks in Engineering Education     the   entries   based   on   what   they   have   learned   (Kelley.

  If   there   are   an   odd   number   or   participants.   carry  the  towel  and  clothes.     The  following  are  tips  for  the  different  steps.   I   need   an   indoor   sorting   system   to   help   me   organize   the   different   receptacles  and  also  help  me  remember  where  to  put  that  cereal  box  versus  the  shipping   box  or  plastic  milk  jug  versus  the  bag  inside  a  cereal  box.   Stress   that   all   the   information   provided   is   on   the   page. 1.   ensure   there   are   different   problem   statements  at  the  table  to  prevent  the  participants  from  working  together.  This  is  to  ensure  that  they  do  not  discover   what  the  other  problem  statements  are.  pendants. Art.   I   want   a   device   that   is   easy   to   travel  with  and  can  handle  a  varying  number  of  necklaces.lib.       Section  1A   • Distribute   an   equal   number   of   problem   statements.   ten   should   receive   problem   statement   B.  a  5ft   x   3ft   towel.   For   example.   It   is   easiest   to   call   all   of   the   participants   with   problem   statement   A   to   return   their   paper.   Problem  B:  I  never  know  what  type  of  boxes  and  plastics  go  into  compost.  recycling  bag  1   or   2. 4   APPENDIX  A:  Problem  Statements  for  Design  Problems     Although   any   basic   design   problem   is   adequate.     Problem  C:  I  enjoy  cycling  and  hot  yoga.   if   there   are   30   participants.   Repeat   for   C.   Participants   should   not   have   enough   time   to   fully   complete  any  portion.     • Do   not   answer   any   questions   regarding   problem   statements.ca/tips/vol3/iss1/4 8 .   You   do   not   want   the   participants   with   other   problem  statements  to  overhear  any  discussion.  and  make  it  easy  to  transport  on  a  bicycle.   and   ten   should   receive   problem   statement   C.   Then   ask   A   to   retrieve   a   paper   with   problem   statement  C. Vol.  However.   • Logbooks   pages   must   be   put   in   separate   piles.  my  necklaces  are  all  constantly  getting  tangled  and  I  spend   too   much   time   trying   to   get   the   little   knots   out   of   the   chains. 3 [2013]. Teaching Innovation Projects. Iss.   When   the   participants   with  problem  statement  B  return  their  papers.         http://ir.   the   design   problem   should   be   self-­‐ contained   with   enough   information   for   the   participant   to   work   independently   without   asking  questions.   or   the   trash.   and   a   change   of   clothes   on   a   bicycle.  they  should  bring  back  a  paper  with   problem   statement   A.  labeled  by  section  and  step.         Section  1B  and  1D   • Ensure   all   of   the   problem   statements   are   returned   so   participants   cannot   share   information.     Problem  A:  In  my  jewelry  box.  and  types  of  chains.   one   participant   may   have   to   use   a   paper   with   a   problem   statement  they  saw  before.   ten   should   receive   problem   statement   A.uwo.   Design   something   to   protect   the   yoga   mat.   • Be   strict   with   the   time   limits.   • If   participants   are   sitting   at   tables   together.  it  is  hard  to  transport  the  yoga  mat.   • Stress  that  the  participants  work  alone.

  If   they   are   not  able   to   move   forward   in   the   discussion.  let  the  participants  lead  the  discussion  and  come  to  their   own   conclusions.   The   goal   is   to   help   the   participants  produce  a  high-­‐quality  logbook  entry.                                                       Published by Scholarship@Western.   This   will   reinforce   the   importance   of   documenting   details  of  the  design.   a   hot   yoga   towel   might   require   ventilation   after   a   class.   • Bring   up   aspects   of   the   design   that   should   have   been   considered.   necklaces   in   problem   statement   A   might   have   very   large   pendants   that   require   a   certain   encasement.   pose   one   of   the  suggested  questions.   For   example.     Section  3   • Allow   participants   to   talk   during   the   documentation   process.   If   participants   complain   that   there   is   not   enough   information.   Similarly.   • Answer  any  questions  they  may  have  regarding  high-­‐quality  logbook  techniques.   in   problem   statement   C.   assert   that   they   must   use  only  the  information  they  were  originally  provided  with.       Section  1F  and  Section  2   • During  class  discussions. 2013 9 . Osgood: Effective Use of Logbooks in Engineering Education     Section  1C  and  Section  1E   • Do   not   answer   any   questions   regarding   content   or   problem   statements.

 2003.     http://ir.  bad.   • Do  not  remove  pages. 4   APPENDIX  B:  Handout  for  “Logbook  101”     General  Guidelines   • Record  the  date  on  each  page  &  start  each  day  on  a  new  page.  2002.   • Record:   Name   of   speaker. Iss.   what   they   said.   • Label  each  entry  and  record  this  in  a  table  of  contents  (reserve  3-­‐4  pages  at  start).lib. 1.   implications   for   your   project.  Do  not  erase.  and  why?   • What   are   your   personal   action   items   before   the   next   meeting?   • Is  the  team  heading  in  the  right  direction?   Brainstorming   • Which  ideas  seem  most  feasible.uwo. Art.  and  ugly!     A  Meeting   • What  were  the  main  outcomes  of  the  meeting?   • Was  the  meeting  productive.  2005.  Delete  an  entry  by  neatly  drawing  a  single  line  through  it.   • Remember  to  include  everything  that  you  contribute  to:  good. Vol.   further   work  to  look  into   • Use  ink.ca/tips/vol3/iss1/4 10 .  Law. 3 [2013].  Lye. Teaching Innovation Projects.  and  why?   • Are  there  enough  good  ideas?   • How  could  better  ideas  be  developed  based  on  this  session?   Engineering   • What  were  the  governing  equations?   Analysis   • What  were  the  most  important  findings?   • What  do  the  results  mean  and  how  should  they  be  applied?   Drawings   • What   are   the   major   features/discoveries   and   why   are   these   significant?   • What   was   learned   about   the   problem   or   solution   possibilities?   • What   problems   were   resolved   and   what   still   needs   to   be   addressed?   • How  does  this  piece  integrate  with  the  whole?   Internet  Search   • What   key   information   did   I   find?   How   does   it   help   achieve   the  objectives?   • Are  there  other  sources/questions  that  should  be  pursued?     Examples  of  what  to  include  in  your  logbook   • Sketches/doodling   • Math  calculations   • Design  reviews     • Customer  needs  or   • Work-­‐in-­‐progress     • Decision  criteria   requirements   • Design  alternatives   • Design  process     • Class  notes     • Vendor  notes     • Rationale  for  decisions   • Project  objectives   • Research  findings   • Project  reflections     • Meeting  notes     • Sources  of  ideas     • Prof  development • Action  Items   • Evaluation  of   • Half-­‐baked  Ideas     data/results     REFERENCE:  Caswell  &  Johnston.  and  do  not  skip  pages.