Alaska Statewide

Telephone Survey of
1004 Voters
March 22 to April 2, 2017
Table of Contents

§  A Profile of Alaska Voters
§  The PFD’s impact on and benefits for Alaskans
§  Alaskans use the PFD for essentials and savings
§  Alaskans endorse the universality of PFDs
§  Most Alaskans opt for tax hikes over halving PFDs
§  PDF’s effect on work ethic & financial risk-taking
§  The changing economy’s effects on Alaskans
§  The best case for protecting full PFDs
A profile of
Alaska voters
Profile of Alaska Voters by Partisan and Ideological Metrics

Dems Independent / Others Republicans
Party Registration 14% 57% 29%
Other
Democrats Independent / DK Republicans
Party Self ID 27% 31% 37%

Liberals Moderates Conservatives
Ideology 8% 42%
24% 26%

Negative Neutral Positive
Feelings toward Trump / DK
49% 13% 38%

Positive Neutral / DK Negative
Feelings toward Walker 38% 33% 29%
Walker Feelings:
Latino
Democrats 56% Positive 13% Negative
Independents 36% Positive 25% Negative
Republicans 26% Positive 44% Negative
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
4 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Profile of Socio-Economic Status of Alaska Voters

High School Some
or Less College AA Degree BA Degree Post Grad

Education 26 15 18 23 17
Under $50 to $75 to $100 to $150K Unsure
$50K 75K $100K $150K or more /Refused

Family Income 23 18 14 18 14 12
Lower Working Middle Upper Mid.
Income Class Income Income Wealthy
Neighborhood /
9 28 42 18 2
SES label
Retired Employed Employed ** Other *
/ Disabled Part Time Full Time - below
Employment
Status
25 14 47 13

Employed: 3% Unemployed
Paid Hourly 31% 5% Homemaker
Salaried 22% 5% Student
Paid by job 10%
/project Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
5
/commission March 22 – April 2, 2017
Demographic Profile of Alaska Voters

18-29 30-39 40-49 50-59 60-69 70 years
years years years years years or more
Age 17 21 17 17 18 10
Never Single Widow/
Married Partner Married Divorced
Marital Status 18 8 61 12
Live with children Do not live with children
Children age 18 or
younger in Home
37 62
10 years 11-20
or less years Over 20 years Lifelong
Residency in
Alaska
14 16 46 24
Kenai Fair Juneau Bush
Anchorage Mat-Su /Kodiak -banks TV /Rural
Geography 39 12 11 13 11 14
Native Alaskans Latino/ Other/
/ Am. Indians Asian/Black White Refused
Ethnicity 23 11 59 6
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
6 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Alaskans confirm the PFD makes
a significant difference in their
lives and for the state
By a ratio of 11-to-1, Alaskans feel positively rather than
negatively toward the Permanent Fund
I'd like you to rate your feelings toward – The Permanent Fund – as very positive,
somewhat positive, neutral, somewhat negative, or very negative.
Negative
We asked those Feelings \
‘not positive’ to
Fund, why? 7%

Neutral
/ Unsure
Very Total Positive
15% 78%
Positive
Somewhat Feelings
Positive 59%
19%

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
8 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Those who are neutral or negative toward the Permanent Fund
volunteer the following reasons for why they are not positive toward it
What are the main reasons you don’t feel positive toward the Permanent Fund?

GOVERNOR / LEGISLATURE / POLITICS (NET) 54%
It’s become too political 15%
Governor / legislature taking it away 15%
The money is set aside for Alaskans / the people 14%
Using fund for budget deficit / not doing their job 13%
It got cut last year 9%
SHOULDN’T BE AN ENTITLEMENT (NET) 35%
Some people / low income too dependent on it 15%
It’s free money / not something people earn 12%
Shouldn’t feel entitled in general 10%
Not everyone needs it 6%
BETTER USES / FUND STATE GOV'T (NET) 32%
Better to use if needed to fund government 13%
Should use to benefit all / not special interests 9%
Not used for the right things in general 8%
UNCERTAINTY / IMPERMANENT FUND (NET) 31% Responses
Uncertainty about purpose / sustainability 13% mentioned by
Don’t believe it will always be there / earning less 12% 6% or more
Alaska Voters Telephone
areSurvey
shown
Depends on oil / oil companies 9 9% March 22 – April 2, 2017
Fourth-fifths of Alaskans say the PFD makes at least some difference in
their lives, including two-fifths who say it makes a lot of difference
Honestly speaking, how much of a difference have the yearly PFD dividends
made in your life over the past five years or so?

8%
The yearly PFD dividends make: 25%
12%
a great deal of difference in my life: 25% 25% 16%
15%

or, quite a bit of difference to me: +15% 40% 23%

or, fair amount of difference to me: +23% 63%

or, only some difference to me: +16% 79%

or, just a little difference to me: +12% 91%
---------------------------------------------------
makes no difference to me: 8%

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
10 March 22 – April 2, 2017
The PFD makes the most difference in the lives of women who are
lower SES and more exposed economically
How much of a difference have the yearly PFD dividends made in your life?
Great Deal / Quite a Bit Fair Amount / Some Just a Little / None
All Voters 40% 39% 20%
Living Comfortably 28% 46% 25%
Getting By 50% 34% 15%
Barely Surviving 70% 19% 11%
Impacted a lot by changing economy 50% 30% 19%
Whites 40% 39% 21%
Native Alaskans / Am. Indians 45% 35% 18%
Men 33% 41% 24%
Women 47% 37% 15%
Unmarried Women 51% 31% 17%
Moms living with kids under age 19 55% 36% 9%
Women w/ family income under $50K 63% 26% 10%
Women without a BA 52% 35% 12%
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
Native Alaskan Women 11
56% 30%
March 22 – April 13%
2, 2017
The vast majority of households are drawing at least two PFDs, and half are
drawing three or more dividends -- thus typically totaling $4k to $6k a year
Not counting any roommates, how many people in your household living with you got the
Permanent Fund dividend payment last year – counting yourself?

Five One
or More Person
13% 16%
Four
People
17% Two
People
Three 34%
People
17%

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
12 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Alaskans react to statements on spending
Permanent Fund Dividend monies
I’d like to know the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following statements.

% Agree % Mixed/Unsure % Disagree
How people spent their Permanent Fund
checks should not determine whether or not 87 9 4
the dividend program continues
1984 Adult Survey: 87% Agree, 10% Disagree
Many people spend a large part of their
Permanent Fund dividends on basic needs 85 8 7

The Permanent Fund dividend checks are
an important source of income for people in 79 10 11
my community
1984 Adult Survey: 48% Agree, 47% Disagree
Many people have wasted a large part of
their Permanent Fund checks on such 43 25 32
things as liquor or drugs

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
13 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Alaskans decidedly see PFDs as having a constructive impact upon
virtually every individual and aggregate dimension tested
Let me ask about the possible impact of Permanent Fund Dividends on various factors.
For each one, please tell me if the PFD dividends help, have no real impact, or harm.
% Diff:
% Dividends Help % No Impact % Harm Help-Harm

Conditions for those living in the Bush 86 5 +81
Alaska’s economy 85 54 +81
Your quality of life 81 17 +80
Conditions for Alaska Natives 72 9 8 +64
Savings for college 67 23 +66
Your household budget 67 30 +66
The level of poverty in Alaska 68 19 7 +61
Savings for retirement 57 36 +56
Your sense of security 56 40 +54
The income gap between the rich and the poor 37 49 6 +31
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey+5
People’s work incentive or willingness to work 21 14 55 March 22 – April
16 2, 2017
Alaskans use the PFD for
essentials and longer term savings
Nearly even opposing 1/4ths report Saving vs. Spending most of their PFDs,
while a plurality report paying off debt – itself actually a form of savings

Honestly speaking, most years when you have gotten the Permanent Fund dividend,
which one of the following best describes how you have dealt with it?

Save Save All or Most
Spend Nearly All 27%
Nearly All 15% Save
Spend All or Most 18% Most
24%
Spend 6% 11%
Most
Save Half &
Pay off Credit Spend Half
Cards / Debt 15%
30%

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
16 March 22 – April 2, 2017
As expected, the more struggling groups report less direct savings and
more paying down credit cards and debt with their PFDs

Save All or Most Pay off Credit Cards
Save Half & Spend Half Spend All or Most

All Voters 27% 15% 30% 24%
Living Comfortably 35% 18% 21% 22%
Getting By 18% 15% 37% 26%
Barely Surviving 17% 49% 28%
Whites 29% 16% 30% 22%
Native Alaskans / Am. Indians 20% 12% 32% 32%
Men 28% 13% 28% 27%
Women 26% 18% 31% 22%
HH Income Under $50K 18% 13% 35% 29%
HH Income $50-100K 23% 16% 33% 24%
HH Income $100K or more 34% 17% 23% 22%
In serious financial trouble 13% 6% 51% 27%
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
17 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Savings from PFD are mostly for the future, and least for non-essentials
(Volunteered question asked only of those voters who save half, most or all of PFD)

And what specific purpose do you have in mind when you save money from your PFD?

College 22%
Savings Savings generally 14%
for the
Future
Retirement 11%
61% Future 9%
Long term savings 4%
Investments generally 2%
Emergency Unexpected expenses / unknown 16%
Funds Rainy day fund / safety net 2%
21%
Medical / health care 2%
For Essentials Children / family 5%
12% Debt pay-off / pay-off credit cards 2%
Heating fuel / fuel oil / propane / wood 2%
Appliances / big purchases / computers 2%
Responses
Home improvements / purchase 1% mentioned by
Car repairs / replacement 1% 1% or more of
For Non-Essentials Trip / vacation 5% PFD ‘savers’
Alaska Voters Telephone
are shown Survey
7% Charities / good causes 182% March 22 – April 2, 2017
Spending of PFD funds is devoted heavily to recurring expenses and major
purchases – and relatively little to non-essentials like travel and luxuries
To the extent that you spend your dividend, what specifically do you tend to spend it on?

Recurring Pay off bills 26%
Expenses: Normal everyday living expenses 16%
65%
Debt pay-off / pay-off credit cards 13%
Heating fuel / fuel oil / propane / wood 8%
Children / family 8%
Pay taxes 6%
Major Home improvements / purchase 7%
Purchases: Car repairs / replacement 6% Asked of all voters
25% College / children’s education 5% regardless of their
prior reported
Unexpected / emergency expenses 4%
savings or
Appliances / big purchases / computers 4% spending of PFDs
Non- Travel / vacations 9%
Essentials: Treat to things can’t normally afford 8%
20% Responses
Recreation equipment 3% mentioned by
Savings / Long term savings 3% 3% or more
Charity: Savings generally 3% are shown; multiple
Alaska Voters Telephoneallowed.
responses Survey
9% Charities / good causes 19 3% March 22 – April 2, 2017
Most Alaskans see their neighbors’ PFD spending and saving patterns as
similar to their own, although one-third see themselves as saving more
Compared to your neighbors generally, do you think you save more than your neighbors,
do you spend more, or do you spend and save about like your neighbors?
Neighbors’ usage of PFD by
All Voters Their own PFD Usage:
Spend More Same Save More
Spend
More
All Voters 33% 58% 9%
9% Save
More Than
Neighbors Save Most or All 51% 44%
33%
Pay Off Credit
Spend & Save 13% 66% 21%
Cards/Debt
Like Neighbors
Save Half &
58% 9% 52% 39%
Spend Half

Spend Most or All 12% 65% 23%

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
20 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Alaskans endorse the universality
and longevity of the Permanent
Fund and PFDs
By a 2-to-1 margin, a majority of Alaskans prefer the Permanent Fund
principal never be touched, not even during hard times or a crisis
Do you think of the Permanent Fund principal money as a kind of rainy-day fund for Alaska
to tap into during a crisis or really hard times – or, do you think of the Permanent Fund
principal as something that should never be touched and only earnings on it can be used?

% Never Touch Principal % Rainy Day
All Voters 62 31
Rainy Day Anchorage / Mat-
59 34
Su
In Crisis
Never Touch Juneau / Kenai /
31% Kodiak
68 22
Principal
62% Fairbanks / Bush 62 32
Unsure
Democrats 54 40
7%
Independents 62 29

Republicans 66 27

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
22 March 22 – April 2, 2017
While Alaskans strongly favor the universality of PFDs, there is noticeably
less intensity of support for wealthy and new resident recipients of PFDs
Let me read you a few features of the Permanent Fund dividends. For each, please tell
me if it is something you strongly favor, mildly favor, mildly oppose, or strongly oppose.
% Strongly Favor % Mildly Oppose
% Mildly Favor % Strongly Oppose

Children from infants to teenagers
79 14 93 6
living in Alaska get it

Everyone who is basically a full-time
72 18 90 7
resident of Alaska gets it

Millionaires and multi-millionaires
50 24 74 23
living in Alaska get it

Newer residents who have lived in
Alaska for the past year-and-a-half 42 29 71 27
get it

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
23 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Alaskans react to statements on the Permanent Fund and entitlement

I’d like to know the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following statements.

% Agree % Mixed/Unsure % Disagree
As owners of the Alaska Permanent Fund,
Alaska residents are entitled to an equal
share of the earnings of the Fund
84 11 5

1984 Adult Survey: 78% Agree, 12% Disagree
Giving money directly to Alaska residents is
better than letting the Alaska legislature
75 16 9
decide how to spend it

1984 Adult Survey: 75% Agree, 16% Disagree
Considering the possible uses of the money
spent on the Permanent Fund dividend
program, the dividend program is the best
68 21 11
use of the money

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
24 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Majorities of Alaskans increasingly
want to protect full PFDs even if it
means taxing others or themselves
Alaskans’ preferences have grown since 2008 for using a state sales or
income tax instead of the Permanent Fund to pay for government services
To pay for government services in Alaska, if you had to choose between using part of
the Alaska Permanent Fund – or paying a state tax such as a sales or income tax,
which would you prefer?

% Use Permanent Fund to Pay for Government Services
% Use a State Tax to Pay for Government Services
+31
+22
58
52

30 27

November 2008 March 2017
Voter Survey by AARP Voter Survey
12% Neither (Vol.) 10% Neither (Vol.)

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
26 March 22 – April 2, 2017
A majority of voters in 2017 prefer to pay a state income or sales tax rather
than pay for government services using the Permanent Fund
To pay for government services in Alaska, if you had to choose between using part of the
Permanent Fund, or paying a state tax such as sales or income tax, which would you prefer?
% Use Permanent Fund to Pay for Services
% Neither of these options (Volunteered response)
% Use a State Tax to Pay for Services
All Voters 27 10 58
Anchorage / Mat-Su 30 7 59
Juneau / Kenai / Kodiak 23 12 57
Fairbanks / Bush 26 13 58
Democrats 27 68
Independents 24 14 57
Republicans 30 12 54
Whites 30 8 57
All Non-Whites 23 13 61
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
27 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Since 1984, Alaskans’ preferences have switched dramatically, and now they
much prefer to keep the PFD and collect income taxes for state services
Some people believe that by about 2020, Alaska will not have enough money for current levels
of state government services. If that happened, would you prefer the state keep the dividend
program and collect income taxes, or end the dividend program and not collect income taxes?
May 1984 U.A.
ISER Adult Survey * March 2017 Voter Survey

Keep PFD, End PFD,
Collect Keep PFD, Do Not
End PFD,
Income Taxes Collect Collect
Do Not
29% Income Income Taxes
Collect
Taxes 36%
Income Taxes
64%
71%

*1984: “Some people believe that by the end of the 1980’s…”

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
28 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Alaskans’ current preference for keeping the PFD and collecting income taxes
includes sizable majorities of Democrats, Independents and Republicans

% Keep Dividends, Collect Taxes
% End Dividends, Not Collect Taxes
All Voters 64 36
Living Comfortably 62 38
Getting By 63 37
Barely Surviving 82 18
Democrats 67 33
Independents 69 31
Republicans 58 42
Whites 63 37
Native Alaskans / Am. Indians 67 33
Men 62 38
Women 66 34
HH Income under $50K 72 28
HH Income $50-$100K 65 35
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
HH Income $100K or more 5829 42 22 – April 2, 2017
March
Majorities of Alaskans prefer a variety of tax increase alternatives
to halving the PFD annual amount
Largely due to lower oil prices & production, state government is facing an ongoing
budget deficit. To help solve this budget deficit, here a few pairs of policy choices…
Would you choose [read item] -- or cutting the
normal PFD yearly dividend amounts in half? % For Tax Increase % Halve PFD

Scale back $1 billion tax credits for oil & gas
companies 72 17

Start income tax for AK families making over
$500,000 per year 61 28

Start state sales tax on purchases except food
and Rx drugs 60 31
Raise state tax on power plants burning coal,
oil, gas - raise electricity cost & encourage 51 34
wind & solar power

Raise the state tax on gasoline and diesel 51 37

Start income tax for AK families making over
$100,000 per year 50 37

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
30 March 22 – April 2, 2017
All tax hike alternatives to halving the PFD elicit majority support from Democrats and
Independents; most alternatives draw majority or plurality support from Republicans

Would you choose [item] -- or cutting the Preferences by
normal PFD yearly dividend amounts in half? % For Tax Increase % Halve PFD Partisanship:

Scale back $1 billion tax credits for oil & gas Dems 81 - 14
companies 72 17 Inds 79 - 8
Reps 58 - 28

Start income tax for AK families making over Dems 79 - 17
$500,000 per year 61 28 Inds 66 - 26
Reps 43 - 39

Dems 61 - 34
Start state sales tax on purchases except
food and Rx drugs 60 31 Inds 66 - 25
Reps 55 - 34

Raise state tax on power plants burning Dems 58 - 34
coal, oil, gas - raise electricity cost & 51 34 Inds 62 - 25
encourage wind & solar power Reps 36 - 46

Dems 56 - 38
Raise the state tax on gasoline and diesel 51 37 Inds 56 - 31
Reps 44 - 42

Dems 62 - 30
Start income tax for AK families making over Inds 58 - 29
$100,000 per year 50 31 37
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
March 22 –Reps
April 2,35 - 51
2017
Alaskans react to statements about the PFD and income

I’d like to know the extent to which you agree or disagree with the following statements.

% Agree % Mixed/Unsure % Disagree

To help ensure that most Alaskans continue
to get a full PFD amount in the coming
years, we should no longer pay it to 33 16 51
households with incomes over $500,000 a
year

Rather than have the PFD amount vary from
about $1000-$2000 a year, I would prefer if
the dividend were always kept at a fixed
29 20 51
amount every year – like $1500

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
32 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Today’s PDF is seen as having no
discernible effect on work ethic, though
it does have some incremental effect on
financial risk-taking
As tested here among employed Alaskans, even a PFD of $6,000 per person would
make an incremental but very marginal impact upon their own inclination to work
At some amounts the Permanent Fund dividend might prompt some people to work less
– like working fewer hours, cutting back to a part-time, not moonlighting, etc….
Would a regular yearly dividend amount of [$ per person] make you work less, or not?

Would Not
Work Less

Unsure 2%
77%

90% 20% Would
97% 97% Work Less
8%
1% – 1% –
Asked only of the
$2,000 per $3,000 per $6,000 per $12,000 per 61% of voters who
person person person person are employed

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
34 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Notably, a $2000 PFD appears to create a small receptivity to financial risk on
the part of employed Alaskans, and much larger PFDs multiple that inclination
Depending on the amount, getting a Permanent Fund dividend might cause some people to
take a financial risk or choice – like quitting a job, starting a business, retiring sooner, etc.
Would a regular yearly dividend amount of [$] prompt you to take a financial risk, or not?

46%
Would not
Take Risk
51%
63%
Unsure
34%
82%
87% Would
17%
11% Take Risk

Asked only of the
$2,000 per $3,000 per $6,000 per $12,000 per 61% of voters who
person person person person are employed

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
35 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Alaskans clearly feel the effect of
the changing economy — mostly
seen as a change for the worse
Very few Alaskan voters describe their own economic situation as ‘barely
surviving,’ while about half say they are ‘living comfortably’
Which one of the following three statements best sums up your own personal economic
situation these days: Living comfortable, Getting by, or Barely surviving?
Living Comfortably Getting By Barely Surviving
All Voters 52% 39% 7%
Whites 56% 35% 8%
Native Alaskans /Am. Indians 44% 48% 8%
Men 50% 40% 9%
Women 54% 39% 6%
Married 60% 35% 5%
Unmarried 41% 46% 12%
High School or less 45% 43% 11%
Some College 49% 42% 9%
BA Degree 58% 36% 5%
Post Grad or more 64% 32% 4%
Employed 54% 39% 6%
Retired /Disabled 54% 37% 9%
HH Income Under $50K 24% 55% 21%
HH Income $50-100K 49% 44% 6%
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
HH Income $100K or more 75%
37 24% 1%
March 22 – April 2, 2017
About half of Alaska voters report being unable to save money these days

And which one of the following best sums up your savings or debt these days?

Getting Further
Into Debt \ 5%
7%

Able to
Save Money
Not Saving
But Not 47%
Going Further
into Debt
41%

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
38 March 22 – April 2, 2017
A slim majority of Alaskans see the gap between rich and poor as getting
larger, but they are divided on the fairness of the distribution of wealth
Do you feel that the distribution of Over the past 15 years or so, do you
money and wealth in Alaska is fair, or do think the gap between the rich and the
you feel that the money and wealth in poor in Alaska is getting larger, getting
Alaska should be more evenly smaller, or has stayed the same?
distributed among more people? Gotten
Smaller \
5%
Gap Has
Should be Stayed the Gap Between
More Evenly Distribution of Same Rich & Poor
Distributed Wealth is Fair 27% Getting
36% 44% Larger
51%
Unsure
Unsure 17%
20%

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
39 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Three-fourths of Alaskans perceive a great deal or quite a bit
of change in the economy over the past 25 years
Compared to 25 years ago, how much do you think the economy has changed –
a great deal, quite a bit, just somewhat, or not much at all?

Not
At All
9% Economy
Just Has
Somewhat Changed
15% a Great
Deal
Quite 51%
A Bit
22%

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
40 March 22 – April 2, 2017
A three-fifths majority of Alaskans report that the changing economy
has affected them a lot or some
And how much impact do you think the changing economy has had on you – has it
affected you a lot, some, a little, or hardly any?

Hardly Any
Affect on Me Affected Me
20% A Lot
30%
Affected
Me A Little
16% Affected Me
Some
31%

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
41 March 22 – April 2, 2017
The changing economy has affected Alaskans from all walks of life,
especially those with lower household incomes
% Affected a Lot / Some
% Affected Little / Hardly Any
All Voters 61 37
Whites 63 35
Native Alaskans / Am. Indians 62 32
Men 58 40
Women 64 33
Difference Great Deal / Quite a Bit 71 28
PFD Makes Fair Amount / Some 60 38
in Lives:
Just Little / None 47 49
HH Income under $50K 68 31
HH Income $50-$100K 61 36
HH Income $100K or more 56 42
Employed 61 37
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
Retired / Disabled 42 63 36
March 22 – April 2, 2017
Volunteered positive effects of a changing economy include increased
income and opportunities, but half the voters can’t volunteer an improvement
In what specific ways do you think the changing economy has affected you for the better?

POSITIVE COMMENTS (NET) 48%
Subnet: Increased Income / purchasing power 27%
Increased income / wages / investments 10%
Better off in general 8%
Subnet: More / Better Opportunities 24%
Work is more available / job opportunities 8%
Housing market more accessible 6%
Security / able to save / better financial choices 5%
More conscientious / smarter / careful spending 5%
More leisure time / family time / made life easier 5%
Subnet: Sustainable Economy 18%
More stores / shopping / better marketplace 6%
Some industries have done well 5%
NEUTRAL COMMENTS (NET) 24%
Little / no effect from changed economy 12% Responses
mentioned by
None / nothing in particular 8%
5% or more
NEGATIVE COMMENTS (NET) 25% are shown
Has not affected me favorably / worse off 15% Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
Some things more expensive 43
6% March 22 – April 2, 2017
The changing economy has meant increased costs of living and diminished
opportunities for good jobs and incomes – with 3/4s able to volunteer its downsides
In what specific ways do you think the changing economy has affected you for the worse?

NEGATIVE COMMENTS (NET) 72%
Subnet: Reduced Income / Purchasing Power 48%
Harder to pay bills / meet daily expenses 16%
Everything is more expensive 13%
Income hasn’t kept up with increased costs of living 10%
Have to work more / overtime to make ends meet 9%
Housing market more expensive / rent is high 8%
Insurance rates / health care costs increased / high 8%
Less cash on hand / disposable income 8%
Utility rates / fuel costs have gone up 7%
Subnet: Fewer Opportunities 40%
Low paying / minimum wage jobs / pay cuts 15%
Fewer good paying jobs 12%
Uncertainty about the future 8%
Higher education less accessible / too expensive 7%
Budget cuts / loss of government safety net 6%
Subnet: Failing Economy 20% Responses
Government too political / benefit corporations 7% mentioned by
Industries changing / layoffs / dependent towns lose 6% 6% or more
NEUTRAL: Little / no effect from changed economy 12% are shown
POSITIVE: Not affected worse / better off 13% Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
44 March 22 – April 2, 2017
Fully two-thirds of Alaskans anticipate a declining financial future
for today’s children, becoming worse off than their parents
When children today in our country grow up, do you think they will be better off or worse
off financially than their parents?
% Better off % Worse Off

Better All Voters 17 67
Off
Children White Men 23 62
17%
Today Will Be
Same / Worse Off White Women 9 75
Unsure Than Their
16% Native Alaskans /
Parents Am. Indians
14 67
67% Dads w/kids under
age 19
21 57
Moms w/kids under
age 19
14 71
In Serious
Financial Trouble
10 77

Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
45 March 22 – April 2, 2017
On most dimensions tested, Alaskans tend to see the changing economy
as making things worse – especially on the personal financial front
A changing economy has altered some things for the better, some things for the worse, and
not altered some things. I’m going to read you various aspects and, for each one, please tell
me if you think things have gotten …better …worse, or not really changed either way.
%Diff’l: % Better % No Change % Worse
Keeping up w/ technology at your job +34 50 28 16
Being productive at work +5 30 40 25
The way employers treat employees -3 28 33 31
Having leisure time -17 24 33 41
Being able to afford consumer items -18 26 28 44
Having the opportunity to get ahead -27 22 26 49
Having job security -36 18 22 54
Making ends meet -36 19 23 55
Finding a good-paying job -42 16 21 58
Having retirement security -50 15 15 64
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
46
Being able to afford college -62 10 12 72
March 22 – April 2, 2017
The best case for defending the
PFD from being reduced
Voters value the Permanent Fund most for helping struggling families
and for treating all Alaskans equally and fairly
Let me read you some reasons…for protecting the Permanent Fund dividend from any
future reductions in the dividend amount. Tell me how persuasive it is on a 0-10 scale.
The best thing about the PFD is… % Saying 10 % Saying 9-7
it helps struggling families – whether it’s
with kids, setbacks, or retirement
37 74

it treats all of us Alaskans equally 37 70
it is the fairest way to distribute earnings
from the Permanent Fund
34 65

it helps the poor and needy the MOST 33 60
it reimburses us Alaskans for oil that’s
rightfully ours
33 59

that every Alaskan gets it 31 57

it’s something we can count on every year 22 48
the funds basically come from the oil
companies
17 39
it partly levels the growing income gap 48
Alaska Voters Telephone Survey
between rich and poor
9 24 March 22 – April 2, 2017
The sanctity of protecting full PFD dividends is volunteered as resting upon
its being dedicated to the Alaskan people as its rightful beneficiaries
Based on everything we’ve discussed, what do you think are the best reasons to pro-actively
protect the PFD system and the dividends from any future reductions in amount?
BELONGS TO /BENEFITS THE PEOPLE (NET) 49%
To help poor / low income Alaskans 12%
PFD provides security for Alaskans / rely on it 12%
Belongs to the people 11%
Helps our economy 9%
Security / saving for children and future 8%
Offsets cost of living increases / food prices 8%
All Alaskans benefit equally / same amount 8%
PROTECTING PFD (NET) 36%
Need to keep PFD hands off to politicians 14%
The dividends don’t belong to the government 12%
Leave alone / protect for future generations 10%
Protect in general / constitution provides for it 8%
GOVERNMENT / BUDGET ISSUES (NET) 36%
State government needs to cut spending / waste 17%
Responses
Other ways to fix budget / increase revenue 12% mentioned by
Politicians / legislature will take / tapped once 8% Alaska Voters Telephone
8% or more
Survey
INTENT / STRUCTURE OF FUND (NET) 49 are shown
19% March 22 – April 2, 2017
Alaska Statewide
Telephone Survey of
1004 Voters
March 22 to April 2, 2017