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8.

3 Magnetic forces do NO work


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https://www.reddit.com/r/Physics/comments/bvxah/can_magnetic_fields_do_
work/
https://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/listing.php?id=17176
https://www.reddit.com/r/Physics/comments/1b97gt/magnetic_fields_do_no_
work_but_magnetic_cranes/

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More problems of chapter 8
More problems of chapter 8
Problem 8.14 An infinitely long cylindrical tube, of radius a, moves at constant speed v
along its axis. It carries a net charge per unit length , uniformly distributed over its
surface. Surrounding it, at radius b, is another cylinder, moving with the same velocity
but carrying the opposite charge (-). Find:
(a) The energy per unit length stored in the fields.
(b) The momentum per unit length in the fields.
(c) The energy per unit time transported by the fields across a plane perpendicular to
the cylinders.

-
v

v
More problems of chapter 8

Hint:
More problems of chapter 8
Problem 8.17 Picture the electron as a uniformly charged spherical shell, with chargee and
radius R, spinning at angular velocity .
(a) Calculate the total energy contained in the electromagnetic fields.
(b) Calculate the total angular momentum contained in the fields.
(c) According to the Einstein formula (E = mc2), the energy in the fields should contribute to
the mass of the electron. Lorentz and others speculated that the entire mass of the electron
might be accounted for in this way: Uem = m.c2. Suppose, moreover, that the electrons spin
angular momentum is entirely attributable to the electromagnetic fields: Lem = h/2. On these
two assumptions, determine the radius and angular velocity of the electron. What is their
product, wR? Does this classical model make sense?

Hint: From Eqn. 5.70 and Prob. 5.37


More problems of chapter 8
Problem 8.18 Work out the formula for u, S, g and in the presence of magnetic
charge. {hint: start with the generalized Maxwell equations (below (i)-(iv)) and Lorentz
force law (below(v) from problem 7.38), and follow the derivation in 8.1.2, 8.2.2 and
8.2.3.
(a) The energy per unit length stored in the fields.
(b) The momentum per unit length in the fields.
(c) The energy per unit time transported by the fields across a plane perpendicular to
the cylinders.
(Proof that the formula u, S, g and remain unchanged )

(v)
More problems of chapter 8

Problem 8.21 Because the cylinders in example 8.4 are left rotating (at angular
velocity a and b, say) there is actually a residual magnetic field, and hence
angular momentum in the fields, even after the current in the solenoid has been
extinguished. If the cylinders are heavy, this correction is negligible, but it is
interesting to do the problem without making that assumption.
(a) Calculate (in terms of a and b) the final angular momentum in the fields.
[Define = , so a and b could be positive or negative.]
(b) As the cylinders begin to rotate, their changing magnetic field induces an extra
azimuthal electric field, which, in turn, will make an additional contribution to
the torques. Find the resulting extra angular momentum, and compare it with
your result in (a). [Answer: 0Q2 b(b2 a2)/4l ]
More problems of chapter 8
More problems of chapter 8
More problems of chapter 8
Problem 8.24 A circular disk of radius R and mass M carries n point charges (q),
attached at regular intervals around its rim. At time t = 0 the disk lies in the xy
plane, with its center at the origin, and is rotating about the z axis with angular
velocity w0 , when it is released. The disk is immersed in a (time-independent)
external magnetic field

where k is a constant.
(a) Find the position of the center if the ring, z(t), and its angular velocity, w(t), as
functions of time. (Ignore gravity.)
(b) Describe the motion, and check that the total (kinetic) energy-translational
plus rotational-is constant, confirming that the magnetic forces does no work.