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Case Study 1: Singapore's21st-CenturyTeachingStrategies(Education

EverywhereSeries)byEdutopiahttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_pIK7ghGw4

A. What is the nature of the case - Ngee


Ann Secondary School (1 of 7 Future Schools)
in Singapore presented the need for students to be engaged and interested,
which is when true learning occurs because it is fun.
B. Describe how you know the students are learning - Students in the video who are using
2.0 technology (wikis, Facebook, blogs) demonstrate lots of participation and
interaction on their devices; by talking, writing, their body language, and their
facial expressions.
C. What elements of the lesson (pedagogy, modeling, questioning techniques, etc) did you learn
from observing the lesson? - I learned the importance of using 2.0 technology to
engage students because my students are the 21st century digital natives.
Instead of seeing technology as a distraction, Id like to determine how to use
technology as tool they use to learn deeper about different content/subject
matter.
D. Could you potentially use this lesson? - Yes, this lesson demonstrated TPACK! I could
use blogs for journals of the learning process; other back channels/windows to
have students post questions, comments, concerns, answers, etc.; and, get
student more excited about learning because theyd be using tools they have
familiarity with.
E. Rate the lesson 1-5 (low to high). - 5, it motivated me to not be afraid to use student
devices (including personal ones, i.e., cellular phones) in the classroom.

Case Study 2: PBL-ProjectsThatHaveBeenPuttotheTestbyEdutopia


https://www.edutopia.org/article/projects-have-been-put-test-anne-lise-halvorsen-nell-duke

A. What is the nature of the case - Integrated


Literacy and Social Studies project-based
lessons (PBL) were created by researchers then were taught by teachers who
participated in a study with the goals of (1) closing the achievement gap, (2)
connecting students with their communities, and (3) having students learn with
real purposes and authentic audiences. Two groups of elementary school
teachers across 48 different classrooms in 20 schools were involved in this
study: those who taught the PBL lessons aligned to the 2nd-Grade Common
Core State Standards (CCSS)and those who taught the traditional Social Studies
and Literacy curricula.
B. Describe how you know the students are learning - During the lessons, the PBL students
in the video showed active engagement: writing in their journals, talking with
classmates, leaning in during conversations, pointing at objects during
observations, etc. Eventually, the studies outcome resulted in PBL students
attaining higher score levels on reading and social studies assessment given at
the end of the year in comparison to the students taught using the traditional
curricula.
C. What elements of the lesson (pedagogy, modeling, questioning techniques, etc) did you learn
from observing the lesson? - Through the video and downloaded lessons, I learned
more about PBL pedagogy, lesson creation, modeling, questioning techniques,
and expected timing for each lesson as well as the number of lessons.
D. Could you potentially use this lesson? - Yes, I would show the video and the lessons to
my 4th grade PLC so we could collaborate to adapt these PBL lessons to our
grade level ELA and Social Studies CCSS. We would then determine the pacing
of these lessons for our school year.
E. Rate the lesson 1-5 (low to high). - 5, especially because of the modeling it presented.
To access the four units and other resources for implementation, please see the
Project PLACE units.

Case Study 3: Flipped-Learning Toolkit: Flipping the Non-flippable Classes by Edutopia


https://www.edutopia.org/blog/flipping-the-non-flippable-classes-jon-bergmann

A. What is the nature of the case - This


page shows the many ways and tools for
Flipped-Learning and how it can be applied to a variety of classes/subject
matters; not just for ELA, Math, Science, and Social Studies.
B. Describe how you know the students are learning - The webpage provides a variety of
ways to create and apply formative assessments to determine if students are
learning as well as the level they are performing at toward mastery.
https://www.edutopia.org/blog/five-steps-formative-assessment-jon-bergmann
C. What elements of the lesson (pedagogy, modeling, questioning techniques, etc) did you learn
from observing the lesson? - I watched flipped-learning videos about PE and dance
instruction. It helped me see how I can create similar instructional videos so my
students can learn the basic movements outside of the classroom in order for all
of us to use the class time putting the moves together with all students
participating in the choreography rather than just the dance step(s) itself.
D. Could you potentially use this lesson? - Yes, the annual, culminating 4th grade Spring
Arts Festival Salsa/Ballroom Performance can be potentially taught through this
flipped-learning model, which could allow more dances to be performed!
Differentiated instruction would also occur because students who needed to
preview/review the movement could do so at their own pace and schedule.
E. Rate the lesson 1-5 (low to high). - 5; this flipped model of learning could be used
across the curriculum. Im so excited to apply this lesson for the next round of
PE/Salsa classes!