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cooking in the moment

Reus_9780307463890_1p_fm_r1.indd 1 8/2/10 8:31 AM
cooking
in the
moment
A Year of Seasonal Recipes

andrea reusing

Clarkson Potter/Publishers
New York
cooking
in the
moment
A Year of Seasonal Recipes

andrea reusing

Clarkson Potter/Publishers
New York
For Mac, Oona, and Arthur

Copyright © 2011 by Andrea Reusing
Photographs copyright © 2011 by John Kernick
All rights reserved.
Published in the United States by Clarkson Potter/Publishers,
an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of
Random House, Inc., New York.
www.crownpublishing.com
www.clarksonpotter.com
CLARKSON POTTER is a trademark and POTTER with
colophon is a registered trademark of Random House, Inc.
Library of Congress ­Cataloging-­in-­P ublication Data
Reusing, Andrea.
  Cooking in the moment / Andrea Reusing. — 1st ed.
    p. cm.
 Includes index.
1. Cookery (Natural foods).  2. Menus. I. Title.
  TX741.R49 2010
  641.5'636—dc22     2010018532
ISBN 978-0-307-46389-0
Printed in China
Design by Marysarah Quinn
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
first edition

Reus_9780307463890_1p_fm_r1.indd 4-5 8/2/10 8:31 AM
For Mac, Oona, and Arthur

Copyright © 2011 by Andrea Reusing
Photographs copyright © 2011 by John Kernick
All rights reserved.
Published in the United States by Clarkson Potter/Publishers,
an imprint of the Crown Publishing Group, a division of
Random House, Inc., New York.
www.crownpublishing.com
www.clarksonpotter.com
CLARKSON POTTER is a trademark and POTTER with
colophon is a registered trademark of Random House, Inc.
Library of Congress ­Cataloging-­in-­P ublication Data
Reusing, Andrea.
  Cooking in the moment / Andrea Reusing. — 1st ed.
    p. cm.
 Includes index.
1. Cookery (Natural foods).  2. Menus. I. Title.
  TX741.R49 2010
  641.5'636—dc22     2010018532
ISBN 978-0-307-46389-0
Printed in China
Book design by Marysarah Quinn
Jacket design by Marysarah Quinn
Jacket photographs by John Kernick
10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
first edition
contents
introduction 8

spring 13 summer 65 fall 145 winter 207
sources 264
acknowledgments 267

index 268
contents
introduction 8

spring 13 summer 65 fall 145 winter 207
sources 264
acknowledgments 267

index 268
spring
spring
grilled broccoli with
parsley, garlic, and anchovies
Delicate fresh broccoli and cauliflower from a garden or small farm don’t resemble the useful
California sorts that are a fixture in our produce drawer the rest of the year, and so we enjoy them
while we can. But because broccoli and cauliflower do travel and keep exceptionally well, I make
these recipes year-­round, just allowing for slightly longer cooking times when dealing with more
mature vegetables.
serves 4

2 small bunches of tender broccoli
2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for serving
6 anchovy fillets, minced (if whole salt-­packed, filleted and rinsed)
2 garlic cloves, mashed to a paste
Grated zest of 1 lemon
⅓ cup finely chopped fresh flat-­leaf parsley leaves
2 teaspoons chile flakes, or to taste

Prepare a hot fire in a charcoal grill.
Cut the broccoli lengthwise to make long florets with all of the tender stem attached.
Blanch in well-­salted boiling water for just 15 to 20 seconds, a little longer if the broccoli
is very mature. Drain well, transfer to a medium bowl, and toss with 1 tablespoon of the
oil. When the flame has died down and the coals are completely covered with ash, grill the
broccoli to slightly char it all over. It should get a bit crunchy on the outside yet stay a little
firm at the center.
Mix the anchovies, garlic, lemon zest, parsley, remaining 1 tablespoon oil, and chile
flakes in a bowl. Add the grilled broccoli, toss well, and serve with olive oil at the table for
drizzling.

s pr i n g | e n d o f m a r c h | 1 9
grilled broccoli with
parsley, garlic, and anchovies
Delicate fresh broccoli and cauliflower from a garden or small farm don’t resemble the useful
California sorts that are a fixture in our produce drawer the rest of the year, and so we enjoy them
while we can. But because broccoli and cauliflower do travel and keep exceptionally well, I make
these recipes year-­round, just allowing for slightly longer cooking times when dealing with more
mature vegetables.
serves 4

2 small bunches of tender broccoli
2 tablespoons olive oil, plus more for serving
6 anchovy fillets, minced (if whole salt-­packed, filleted and rinsed)
2 garlic cloves, mashed to a paste
Grated zest of 1 lemon
⅓ cup finely chopped fresh flat-­leaf parsley leaves
2 teaspoons chile flakes, or to taste

Prepare a hot fire in a charcoal grill.
Cut the broccoli lengthwise to make long florets with all of the tender stem attached.
Blanch in well-­salted boiling water for just 15 to 20 seconds, a little longer if the broccoli
is very mature. Drain well, transfer to a medium bowl, and toss with 1 tablespoon of the
oil. When the flame has died down and the coals are completely covered with ash, grill the
broccoli to slightly char it all over. It should get a bit crunchy on the outside yet stay a little
firm at the center.
Mix the anchovies, garlic, lemon zest, parsley, remaining 1 tablespoon oil, and chile
flakes in a bowl. Add the grilled broccoli, toss well, and serve with olive oil at the table for
drizzling.

s pr i n g | e n d o f m a r c h | 1 9
campfire bacon and eggs in a bag
I ate this magical meal at Girl Scout camp when I was seven years old, then thought about it for
the next thirty-­odd years until I got to have it again when we went camping in the mountains near
Joe’s. It’s a full breakfast in a paper bag, easy to make if you already have a campfire burning (or
hot embers in a charcoal grill or fireplace), portable, and delicious. As the bacon in the bottom
of the paper bag renders and becomes crispy-­chewy, the fat protects the paper from burning and
gently steams the egg. This cannot be prepared in advance: after the eggs are cracked, the bags
should be dangling over the hot embers within a minute.
serves 6

6 lunch-­size paper bags

6 thick slices bacon, cut in half crosswise
6 large eggs
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Prepare a campfire or a fire in a fireplace or charcoal grill. Let the flames die down and the
coals become completely covered with ash. (Don’t attempt this on a gas grill—they don’t
have the firepower to render the bacon before the eggs soak the bags.)
Lay 2 bacon halves across the bottom of each bag so that it is completely covered. Reach
into each bag and carefully crack an egg over the bacon. Season with salt and pepper.
Securely fold down the top of each bag three times and poke a hole through the fold with
a sharp skewer. Thread a long, green stick through the hole and hold each bag so that the
bottom is as close to the hot embers as possible—but without touching them and nowhere
near any open flame. Cook for about 10 minutes, until the egg white is cooked all the way
through.

s pr i n g | e a r ly a p r i l | 2 9
campfire bacon and eggs in a bag
I ate this magical meal at Girl Scout camp when I was seven years old, then thought about it for
the next thirty-­odd years until I got to have it again when we went camping in the mountains near
Joe’s. It’s a full breakfast in a paper bag, easy to make if you already have a campfire burning (or
hot embers in a charcoal grill or fireplace), portable, and delicious. As the bacon in the bottom
of the paper bag renders and becomes crispy-­chewy, the fat protects the paper from burning and
gently steams the egg. This cannot be prepared in advance: after the eggs are cracked, the bags
should be dangling over the hot embers within a minute.
serves 6

6 lunch-­size paper bags

6 thick slices bacon, cut in half crosswise
6 large eggs
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Prepare a campfire or a fire in a fireplace or charcoal grill. Let the flames die down and the
coals become completely covered with ash. (Don’t attempt this on a gas grill—they don’t
have the firepower to render the bacon before the eggs soak the bags.)
Lay 2 bacon halves across the bottom of each bag so that it is completely covered. Reach
into each bag and carefully crack an egg over the bacon. Season with salt and pepper.
Securely fold down the top of each bag three times and poke a hole through the fold with
a sharp skewer. Thread a long, green stick through the hole and hold each bag so that the
bottom is as close to the hot embers as possible—but without touching them and nowhere
near any open flame. Cook for about 10 minutes, until the egg white is cooked all the way
through.

s pr i n g | e a r ly a p r i l | 2 9
grilled spanish mackerel
with green sauce
The fact that our great-­grandchildren may never eat a real seafood dinner gives those of us who
still eat fish a responsibility not to put blue cheese on it. I like to serve this with the pickled beets
and potato salad that follow. This treatment would work for almost any flavorful, rich fish.
serves 4

4 (8-ounce) Spanish mackerel fillets, skin on
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Finely ground dried red chiles, such as de árbol
Extra virgin olive oil
Green Sauce (recipe follows)

Prepare a fire in a charcoal grill.
Season both sides of each fillet generously with salt, pepper, and chile. Drizzle both sides
with a little olive oil.
When the grill is very hot but the flame has died down and the coals are completely
covered with ash, put the mackerel, skin side down, on the grill. Cook for at least 2 minutes
before moving it at all. In the meantime, watch for flare-­ups, extinguishing them with a little
water from a squirt bottle (beer works, too). It will take 4 to 6 minutes to cook the skin side.
When the skin is crispy and deep golden brown, gently flip the fillets with a spatula. Grill
for 2 to 3 minutes, until just cooked through. Serve with green sauce.

s pr i n g | j u n e | 5 7
grilled spanish mackerel
with green sauce
The fact that our great-­grandchildren may never eat a real seafood dinner gives those of us who
still eat fish a responsibility not to put blue cheese on it. I like to serve this with the pickled beets
and potato salad that follow. This treatment would work for almost any flavorful, rich fish.
serves 4

4 (8-ounce) Spanish mackerel fillets, skin on
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Finely ground dried red chiles, such as de árbol
Extra virgin olive oil
Green Sauce (recipe follows)

Prepare a fire in a charcoal grill.
Season both sides of each fillet generously with salt, pepper, and chile. Drizzle both sides
with a little olive oil.
When the grill is very hot but the flame has died down and the coals are completely
covered with ash, put the mackerel, skin side down, on the grill. Cook for at least 2 minutes
before moving it at all. In the meantime, watch for flare-­ups, extinguishing them with a little
water from a squirt bottle (beer works, too). It will take 4 to 6 minutes to cook the skin side.
When the skin is crispy and deep golden brown, gently flip the fillets with a spatula. Grill
for 2 to 3 minutes, until just cooked through. Serve with green sauce.

s pr i n g | j u n e | 5 7
summer
summer
fried okra with indian spices
and hot tomato relish
serves 4 as a small appetizer

1 teaspoon coriander seeds
¼ teaspoon fennel seeds
1 clove
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
Vegetable oil, for frying
1 large egg
¼ cup buttermilk
1 medium serrano chile, finely chopped
2 tablespoons chickpea flour
2 tablespoons all-­purpose flour
½ teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 pints okra (just under a pound), stems removed
Sea salt, for serving
Hot Tomato Relish (recipe follows)

In a small pan over medium heat, lightly toast the coriander, fennel, and clove until fragrant,
1 to 2 minutes. Allow to cool completely; then grind and set aside. Toast the cumin seeds in
the same fashion and add them to the ground spices.
Fill a deep, heavy stockpot with about 3 inches of oil. Heat the oil over medium-­high
heat until a deep-­fat thermometer reads 350°F.
Beat the egg in a small bowl and whisk in the buttermilk and serrano chile. In a medium
bowl, combine the chickpea flour, all-­purpose flour, salt, pepper, and spice mixture.
Cut the okra on a sharp diagonal into long ¼-­inch-­thick slices. Put the okra slices into
the bowl with the flour mixture and combine, leaving a light dusting on each piece. Pour the
egg mixture on top and mix with your hands, making sure to coat all surfaces. In batches,
use a large slotted spoon to carefully lay loosely formed handfuls of 6 to 8 slices into the hot
oil and cook for about 2 minutes, turning as necessary until the okra is golden brown and
uniformly crisp. Drain on a clean brown paper bag, season with sea salt, and serve with the
tomato relish.

10 8 | cooking in the moment
fried okra with indian spices
and hot tomato relish
serves 4 as a small appetizer

1 teaspoon coriander seeds
¼ teaspoon fennel seeds
1 clove
1 teaspoon cumin seeds
Vegetable oil, for frying
1 large egg
¼ cup buttermilk
1 medium serrano chile, finely chopped
2 tablespoons chickpea flour
2 tablespoons all-­purpose flour
½ teaspoon kosher salt
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
2 pints okra (just under a pound), stems removed
Sea salt, for serving
Hot Tomato Relish (recipe follows)

In a small pan over medium heat, lightly toast the coriander, fennel, and clove until fragrant,
1 to 2 minutes. Allow to cool completely; then grind and set aside. Toast the cumin seeds in
the same fashion and add them to the ground spices.
Fill a deep, heavy stockpot with about 3 inches of oil. Heat the oil over medium-­high
heat until a deep-­fat thermometer reads 350°F.
Beat the egg in a small bowl and whisk in the buttermilk and serrano chile. In a medium
bowl, combine the chickpea flour, all-­purpose flour, salt, pepper, and spice mixture.
Cut the okra on a sharp diagonal into long ¼-­inch-­thick slices. Put the okra slices into
the bowl with the flour mixture and combine, leaving a light dusting on each piece. Pour the
egg mixture on top and mix with your hands, making sure to coat all surfaces. In batches,
use a large slotted spoon to carefully lay loosely formed handfuls of 6 to 8 slices into the hot
oil and cook for about 2 minutes, turning as necessary until the okra is golden brown and
uniformly crisp. Drain on a clean brown paper bag, season with sea salt, and serve with the
tomato relish.

10 8 | cooking in the moment
tomato sandwich
Alex and Betsy Hitt were the first farmers to sell heirloom tomatoes at the Carrboro farmers’
market almost thirty years ago, and each summer in mid-­June they post a sign above their stand
that reads: “Get your bread and mayonnaise ready—the tomato flood is coming!” A tomato
sandwich–thick slices of dead-­ripe tomatoes well seasoned with salt and pepper between slices of
soft white sandwich bread spread with rich mayonnaise—is pure joy. Any attempt to “improve”
it—toasting the bread, adding lettuce or, god forbid, basil—will only distract from perfection.
tomato sandwich
Alex and Betsy Hitt were the first farmers to sell heirloom tomatoes at the Carrboro farmers’
market almost thirty years ago, and each summer in mid-­June they post a sign above their stand
that reads: “Get your bread and mayonnaise ready—the tomato flood is coming!” A tomato
sandwich–thick slices of dead-­ripe tomatoes well seasoned with salt and pepper between slices of
soft white sandwich bread spread with rich mayonnaise—is pure joy. Any attempt to “improve”
it—toasting the bread, adding lettuce or, god forbid, basil—will only distract from perfection.
garlic and black pepper
soft-­shell crabs
serves 4

Vegetable oil, for frying
3 cups rice flour
3 teaspoons kosher salt
¼ cup freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup minced garlic
½ cup fish sauce
8 large soft-­shell crabs, preferably jumbo or “whale” size, dressed and cut in half crosswise

Fill a deep, heavy pot with a lid about one-­third full with oil, and heat it until a deep-­fat
thermometer reads 375°F.
In the meantime, combine the rice flour, salt, pepper, and garlic in a medium bowl. Put
1 tablespoon of the fish sauce in a small bowl. Dip each piece of crab very briefly into the
fish sauce, gently shaking off excess, and then into the rice flour mix. Roll the crab over and
shake off any extra flour. Set aside. Repeat this process, until all the crab halves are dredged.
When the oil reaches 375°F, gently lay the crabs, top side down, in the oil. Don’t crowd
the pot—if necessary, fry them in batches—and use the lid as needed when the crabs are
first added to the oil to avoid splattering. After 1 to 2 minutes, when the crabs are golden
brown, turn them over and cook for another 2 minutes. Drain on clean brown paper bags
and eat hot.

s u m me r | s e p t e m b e r | 1 2 3
garlic and black pepper
soft-­shell crabs
serves 4

Vegetable oil, for frying
3 cups rice flour
3 teaspoons kosher salt
¼ cup freshly ground black pepper
¼ cup minced garlic
½ cup fish sauce
8 large soft-­shell crabs, preferably jumbo or “whale” size, dressed and cut in half crosswise

Fill a deep, heavy pot with a lid about one-­third full with oil, and heat it until a deep-­fat
thermometer reads 375°F.
In the meantime, combine the rice flour, salt, pepper, and garlic in a medium bowl. Put
1 tablespoon of the fish sauce in a small bowl. Dip each piece of crab very briefly into the
fish sauce, gently shaking off excess, and then into the rice flour mix. Roll the crab over and
shake off any extra flour. Set aside. Repeat this process, until all the crab halves are dredged.
When the oil reaches 375°F, gently lay the crabs, top side down, in the oil. Don’t crowd
the pot—if necessary, fry them in batches—and use the lid as needed when the crabs are
first added to the oil to avoid splattering. After 1 to 2 minutes, when the crabs are golden
brown, turn them over and cook for another 2 minutes. Drain on clean brown paper bags
and eat hot.

s u m me r | s e p t e m b e r | 1 2 3
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Cooking in the Moment
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