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Chapter 1

THE PROBLEM AND ITS BACKGROUND

Introduction

At this pace of our changing society and economy a lot of challenges should be

addressed especially by educators who are being asked to do more with fewer resources

due to evolving technologies and ongoing shifts in global economy and in ASEAN

Economic Community. A successful education system will need to be of paramount

importance in the government and its ultimate goal is to provide its people an access to a

better life or opportunity as a contributing factor of human development for the

multicultural society to succeed and prosper in the future

Sen. Edgardo J. Angara reiterated that the K to 12 Program aimed to strengthen

our educational system which is not only timely, but long overdue. Other countries like

Singapore have 11 years of compulsory education, but have 12 to 14 years of pre-

university education depending on the track. Philippines is the last country in Asia, and

one of only three countries (the two others are Angola and Djibouti) left with, a 10-year

pre-university cycle around the world. To improve the quality of workmanship and

employment we need to upgrade our Basic Education System (BEC) so as qualified

professionals will not be treated like second-rate workers.

The new curriculum intends to alleviate our economic level for providing better

job opportunities and wider option for the graduates because it is found to be the
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adequate period for learning under basic education. It is also a standard for recognition of

students and/or professionals abroad (i.e. the Bologna Process for the European Union

and the Washington Accord for the United States). The new curriculum is one possible

actions to economic crisis underemployment, unemployment and to other issues about

education in our country.

The K to 12 which is known as K to 12 Enhanced Basic Education

Curriculum, is mandated by the law recognized as Republic Act 10533 otherwise known

as Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013. The program covers Kindergarten and 12

years of basic education (six years of primary education, four years of Junior High

School, and two years of Senior High School (SHS) to provide sufficient time for

mastery of concepts and skills, develop lifelong learners, and prepare graduates for

tertiary education, middle-level skills development, employment, and entrepreneurship.

The Universal Kindergarten started in SY 2011-2012 and the curriculum for

Grade 1 and Grade 7 (High School Year 1) was implemented in SY 2012-2013 and will

progress in the succeeding school years. Grade 11 (HS Year 5) will be introduced in SY

2016-2017, Grade 12 (HS Year 6) in SY 2017-2018. The first batch of students to go

through K to 12 will graduate in 2018.

It is undeniable fact that there seems to be problems arising as we implement the

program such as lack of government budget, teachers, classrooms, school supplies as well

as facilities. Senator Trillanes believes that the problem doesnt depend in the curriculum

nor with the length of years of Basic Education Program. He believes that the Basic

Education Curriculum is not the problem since there are OFWs who are in demand

because of their skills, they will not be looked-for if we are not satisfying the
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requirements of employers overseas. He likewise said that he, along with other public

officials, were products of the 10-year basic education program and that they turned out

fine. According to Trillanes lack of teachers, backlog of classrooms and other basic

requirements should be solved before starting talking about other innovations.

STATUS OF COMPLIANCE OF SELECTED SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN

THE DIVISION OF MARINDUQUE IN RELATION TO K TO 12

IMPLEMENTATION OF SECTION 14 OF REPUBLIC ACT NO. 10533 OTHERWISE

KNOWN AS

ENHANCED BASIC EDUCATION ACT OF 2013

According to Section 14 of Republic Act No. 10533 otherwise known as

Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013 (RA 10533) a Mandatory Review should be

conducted at the end of School Year 2014-2015, but Obama said in one of his speech

Change will not come if we wait for some other person or some other time. We are the

ones we've been waiting for. We are the change that we seek The action should be done

now especially that Grade 9 was implemented in the school year 2014-2015 and the full

implementation of Senior High School will be done next school year 2016-2017.

Among all these issues the major concern here is how can we fill the gaps and

how much will K to 12 costs? According to the DepEd, an estimated 150 billionPhp will

be needed to procure all resources and close the gaps in basic education. This amount

would cover hiring of 103,599 more teachers, building of 152,569 new classrooms,

procurement of 95.6 million more books and 13.2 million seats (DepEd Briefer, 2010). In

a document entitled Financial Forecast for the K to 12 Model provided by the DepEds
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Office of Administration and Finance, the preliminary estimated capital cost of the

additional two years (senior high) in public school.

The initial implementation of the new curriculum started since 2012 but planning

and preparations for next grade level especially senior high schools are still on going.

Currently the new curriculum is on its fourth year of operation nationwide but only few

changes are apparent as of end of school year 2014-2015. A lot of plans and statement

had been said but what is really the current situation? What is the Status of Compliance

of K to 12 Enhanced Basic Education Curriculum in relation to its provisions stipulated

in the Implementing Rules and Regulation?

In the Division of Marinduque, preparation includes selection of SHS providers.

Initially six pilot schools were identified to offer SHS namely Marinduque National

High School in Boac, Landy National High School in Sta Cruz, Buenavista National

High School, and Matuyatuya National High School but at present there are 27 public

schools that will offer SHS Program. The selected schools and initial programs like tracks

and strands to be offered were listed below.

List of Senior High School Providers in the Division of Marinduque as of December 2015

MUNICIPALITY SCHOOL NAME MUNICIPALITY


1. Mogpog Balanacan National High School TVL
2. Gasan Bangbang National High School STEM, TVL
3. Gasan Bognuyan National High School ABM, TVL
4. Torrijos Bonliw National High School GAS, TVL
5. Santa Cruz Botilao National High School GAS
6. Buenavista Buenavista National High School STEM, TVL
7. Buenavista Buenavista National High School - Bagacay Annex GAS
8. Santa Cruz Dolores National High School GAS
9. Santa Cruz Hupi National High School GAS, TVL
10. Boac (Capital) Ilaya National High School GAS, TVL
11. Santa Cruz Kilo-Kilo National High School GAS, TVL
12. Santa Cruz Landy National High School STEM, HUMSS, TVL
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13. Santa Cruz Makapuyat National High School STEM, TVL


14. Santa Cruz Makapuyat National High School - Masaguisi Annex GAS, TVL
15. Torrijos Maranlig National High School GAS, TVL
16. Boac (Capital) Marinduque National High School STEM, TVL
17. Santa Cruz Matalaba National High School GAS, TVL
18. Torrijos Matuyatuya National High School ABM, TVL
19. Mogpog MogpogNchs ABM, TVL
20. Santa Cruz Mongpong National High School GAS
21. Gasan Paciano A. SenaMem. Hs (Tabionan National High School) GAS, TVL
22. Torrijos Poctoy National High School (Bonliw NHS-Poctoy Annex) TVL
23. Torrijos SHS IN Torrijos, Marinduque GAS, TVL
24. Santa Cruz Punong National High School GAS
25. Torrijos Sibuyao National High School GAS
26. Torrijos Tigwi National High School GAS, TVL
27. Buenavista Yook National High School GAS

The design of the curriculum is indeed a systematic way to produced graduates

equipped with the 21st century skills for lifelong learning, however how can we produce

quality graduates if problem about teachers, classroom, books, seats and other learning

facilities still exist. The success of the program still depends on strict execution of plans

and implementation of rules under Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR).

Thus knowing the status of compliance of selected secondary schools in the

division of Marinduque in relation to K to 12 implementation of section 14 of the K to 12

Enhanced Basic Education Act would give the education department the real picture of

how the program is being implemented.

Statement of the Problem

This paper will assess the status of compliance of selected secondary schools in

the division of marinduque in relation to K to 12 implementation of section 14 of


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Republic Act No. 10533 otherwise Known As Enhanced Basic Education Act Of 2013

(RA 10533)

Specifically this study sought to answer the following questions:

1. What is the level of compliance of selected Secondary Schools in the

Division of Marinduque in relation to Republic Act No. 10533 Section 14 per

1.1. teachers

1.2. classrooms

1.3. Textbooks/Teaching Learning Materials

1.4. seats

1.5. sanitation facilities

1.6. other learning facilities including, computer and science laboratories,

libraries and library hubs, and sports, music, arts and workshops needs;

2. What actions are made to comply with the standard and fill the gap?

3. How effective are the actions made by the school heads in addressing the

gaps?

Scope and Delimitations of the Study

This study focus on the Status of Compliance of Enhanced K to12 Basic

Education Program after its three years of implementation in the Division of Marinduque.

This study is based on Section 14 of RA 10533 otherwise known as Enhanced Basic

Education Act of 2013.The aspects that will look into are the (a) teachers; (b)

classrooms; (c) textbooks; (d) seats; (e) toilets; and (f) Other learning facilities including,

computer and science laboratories, libraries and library hubs, sports, music, arts and

workshops needs, which are important in the implementation of the program. The study
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will only cover the Status of Compliance from 2012 up to March 2015 as stated in the

mandatory review.

Significance of the Study

This study will be beneficial to the following entities:

School Administration. The result of the study will guide the school

administrators in designing an effective strategy and interventions in filling the gap in the

present situations.

Teachers-The results may provide qualitative information that helps faculty

determine how they might improve courses and/or programs through changes in

curriculum, teaching methodologies, course materials, or other areas. When integrated

into the planning cycle for curriculum development and review, assessment results can

provide a powerful rationale for securing support for curricular and other changes.

Students- The result of the study will help the students in their choice of strands

to take up in senior high school based on the available resources and capability of the

different schools. Most importantly, this study is a tool that leads to a continuous cycle to

improved student learning.

Community-The school is part of the community so every parents of the learner

must know what the problems of the school are. They should understand what is

happening and what actions can they offer.

External Stakeholders-This refers to the alumni, parents, local leaders, retired

teachers, youth leaders. They will be motivated to help and create a community

environment that supports childrens enjoyment of their right to quality education and

other rights.
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Government Agencies who are concerned with the development of young minds

specially the Department of Education which continuously shapes the countrys future. In

this study, the agency is benefited for it will gain wisdom in providing quality service to

everybody particularly to the secondary students through the realization of the K to 12

program.

Other Researchers. This study will add to the growing body of information in the

field of educational research. The result of the study will serve as a guide of other

researches for the new education curriculum together with the improvement.
Chapter 2

REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE AND STUDIES

As stipulated in RA 10533 otherwise known as K to 12 Enhanced Basic Education

Act, Section 14 also known as Mandatory Evaluation and Review,. By the end of School

Year 2014-2015, the DepED shall conduct a mandatory review and submit a midterm report to

Congress as to the Status of Compliance of implementation of the K to 12 programs in terms of

closing the following current shortages: (a) teachers; (b) classrooms; (c) textbooks; (d) seats; (e)

toilets; and (f) other shortages that should be addressed. This will also include (f ) teachers

welfare and training profiles; (g) adequacy of funding requirements; and (h) other learning

facilities including, but not limited to, computer and science laboratories, libraries and library

hubs, and sports, music and arts.

The Concept and Meaning of Curriculum

The encyclopedia of educational research (1969) gives the following definitions of

curriculum as all the experience a leaner has at school under the guidance of the teacher. To him

the teacher plays a vital role in translating curriculum objectives. The dictionary of education

defines curriculum as the total learning activities or educative experience offered by an

institution through its total institutional programmers designed to achieve the prescribed

objectives.

Curriculum Implementation
Implementation is an interaction between those who have created the program and those

who are in charged to deliver it. Adamu in his blog cited Alonsabe cited Sarason (2009), the

main reason for the failure is the lack of understanding of the culture of the school Successful
implementation of curriculum requires understanding the power relationships, the traditions, the

roles and responsibilities of individuals in the school system. Implementers (whether they be

teachers, principals, and education officers) should be well-versed with the contents of the

curriculum. Education officers) should be well-versed with the contents of the curriculum.

The success of the implementation of the curriculum also depends on its resources. In

implementing the curriculum the prescribed subjects should be thought however it will not be

possible and it will not be offered due to lack of teachers, workshops for practical works and

further notes that there were teachers whos delivery is usually theorized because of lack of

competence on the part of the teacher or due to lack of equipment, thus students graduate

without any hands on experience.

Fajardo (2012) and TV patrol news (May 30, 2014) similarly states that aside from the

education system, important issues must also be addressed. Secondary and elementary public

schools especially in metro manila are still congested they adopts 2 to 3 shifts of classes per day

to deal with the shortage in classrooms. North Fairview High School in Quezon City applies

weekend classes where in student will only come to school every Saturday and Sunday the

subjects thought for 5 days will only be discuss for two days. Teacher to student ratio is also

problematic as many schools have 1:70-95 ratio. Also, not all schools applies schools have a 1:1

student-to-textbook ratio; some even have 1:5 ratio.

School Proponents of the K to 12 program in the country failed to recognize these

problems as possible reasons for low quality of education and low competency of students and

graduates. Moreover, reasons for these may also include personal circumstances the students are

in. For instance, the Philippines Midterm Progress Report on the Millennium Development

Goals (2007) stated that:


Aside from school factors (school buildings, teachers, and textbooks) there are also

non-school factors that contributed to the low or non-participation and completion of the school-

age children. These include: social conditions such as poverty which force children to work;

family-related factors such as children of broken families where parents work abroad; parents

attitude towards education, especially those who have not undergone schooling; and children in

conflict situation, among others.

Teachers

Theoretical Constructs Eisner & Vallance (1974), Schubert (1986), Tanner & Tanner

(1995), McNeil (1996), discuss the relationship between a teachers beliefs and his/her

decisions about the curriculum. Quality and quantity of teaching staff to meet the expectations

of pupils and the society is another impediment. Teachers are the most important human

resource in curriculum implementation since they are the ones who adopt and implement the

ideas and aspirations of the designers. This implies that success of the curriculum depends on

the teachers (Okello and Kagoire 1996).

OWEN, J. G. (1968) cited that teachers are the front liner of every curriculum they play

a very important part in the success of every program. No matter how good a program is the

possibility of success is zero without them. Every individual involved in public education brings

with them a set of beliefs as to the very nature and purpose of education.

According to the Data Projection Tool Annex B the number of required teachers come

from total classroom requirement which is derived from the number of students by grade/year

level in a given School Year. The standard ratio of 5:3 is used in computing the required

teacher.
Formula:
( )( 5)
Number of required teachers = 3
Example:
(50)( 5)
Number of required teachers = 3 = 83.3383
From the actual computation:
(50.4)( 5)
Number of required teachers = = 84
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Teacher Education and Training

To ensure that the enhanced basic education program meets the demand for quality

teachers and school leaders, the DepEd, CHED, and TESDA shall conduct teacher education

and training programs, in collaboration with relevant partners in government, academe,

industry, and non-governmental organizations. Such professional development programs shall

be initiated, conducted and evaluated regularly throughout the year to ensure constant upgrading

of teacher skills. Teacher education and training programs shall include, but shall not be limited

to:

In-service Training on Content and Pedagogy

DepEd teachers who will implement the enhanced basic education curriculum but have

not undergone pre-service education that is aligned with the enhanced basic education

curriculum shall be trained to meet the content and performance standards of the K to 12

education curriculum. The DepEd shall ensure that private educational institutions shall be

given the opportunity to avail of such training.

Standard Facilities.

Classrooms
The standard classroom to student ratio (CSR) in the Philippines is one classroom for

every 45 students as prescribed by Republic Act 7880 entitled An Act Providing For the Fair

and Equitable Allocation of the Department of Education, Culture and Sports' Budget for

Capital Outlay." The prescribed classroom size for a classroom student ratio of 1:45 is about 7m

by 7m for rural areas or a 7m x 9m classroom for suburban areas. The 7m x 9m classroom shall

also be the standard size for all public secondary schools, regardless of location and class size.

For a class of 45 students, this classroom size is believed to provide a conducive environment

for learning and where a teacher could interact freely with his/her students and exercise order

and control.

According to data projection tool of DepEd the Classrooms requirements for Grades 11-

12 in Public Senior High Schools is forty. The minimum standard for SHS classrooms is 40

students per room.

Formula:
Projected JHS Enrolment SY 20162017
number of required classrooms = 40
Example:
2016
number of required classrooms = 40 = 50.450

The minimum furniture and equipment requirements for a regular classroom are:
FURNITURE QUANTITY
Tablet Armchairs with all wood/or non-wood based materials 50 units
Teachers Table with chair 1 set
Chalkboard, framed, wall type with ledge 4 ft. x 8 feet) 3 units
Teachers cabinet 1 unit
Hand washing facility 1 unit
Drinking jar/container, with faucet 1 unit
Water pail 1 unit
Divan (with storage space for cleaning materials) 1 unit
Trash can 1 unit
QUANTITY
FURNITURE
Filing/Storage cabinet 1 unit
DepED Forms Rack 1 unit
Utility box 1 unit
Chart stand 1 unit
First Aid Cabinet 1 unit

Textbooks/Teaching Learning Materials

A textbook or course book is a manual of instruction in any branch of study. Textbooks

are produced according to the demands of educational institutions. Although most textbooks are

only published in printed format, many are now available as online electronic books.

Production and Development of Materials.

The production and development of locally produced teaching and learning materials

shall be encouraged. The approval of these materials shall be devolved to the regional and

division education unit in accordance with national policies and standards.

The library holdings shall be adequate to meet the curricular, instructional, research, and

recreational needs of its clientele. The collection shall consist of up-to-date and relevant books,

serials, pamphlets, documents and non-book materials, and electronic resources (used with

computers). The provision of textbooks is not the responsibility of the library but a maximum of

five (5) copies of frequently used materials shall be provided. In the matter of reserve books, a

provision of at least one copy for every twenty-five (25) students is deemed sufficient.

Seats

According to the Educational Facilities Manual of DEPED revised 2007 classroom must
have 50 sets of armchair that only means to determine the standard required seats multiply the
number of required classroom by fifty.

Standard Seats = (Number of Classroom )( 50)

Toilets
In the report of Bolido (2012) in Philippine daily Inquirer cited that the toilet-pupil ratio

is 1:55 in the elementary level and 1:93 in high school, based on statistics from the Department

of Educations Basic Education Information System. And that is literally one toiletnot one

room with several cubicles. The numbers alone in this report indicate the sad state of sanitation

facilities in Philippine public schools.The numbers are lower than the global standards set by the

World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Childrens Fund (Unicef) of 1:50 for

males (if urinals are present) and 1:25 for females, and even lower than the norm set by the

Philippine Sanitation Code, which is also 1:50 for boys and 1:30 for girls.

Library Standard

Human resources

For the first 500 students: One full time professional librarian and two full time clerical

staff. For every additional 1000 students: 1 additional full time professional librarian and I full

time clerical plus other support staff

Physical facilities

Physical facilities shall be the place to create a learning environment conclusive to

learning. In order to produce quality Education and to we should equip our students improve in

the field Science and Technology, both teachers and students should always be prepared in

accepting and enjoying the programs to be implemented by the Department of education to be

globally competent in the modern world of technology advances. It should be maintained and

improved to achieve optimum results for access to quality education.

Facilities is the responsibility of educators in every state to ensure that every child had

access to a quality education in school facilities that provide an educational setting that was
suited for teaching and learning. Implementing policies that resulted in high quality, high-

performing, well-designed and maintained school facilities had a direct and indirect impact on

the teaching and learning process (BEST, 2005). There was a growing research literature that

there is a relationship between student achievement and the conditions of school buildings

(Buckley, Schneider, & Shang, 2004a; Earthman, 2002; Lemasters, 1997; Lewis, 2000; Filardo,

2008 Hunter, 2006; Jago& Tanner, 1999; Schneider, 2003b).

The school facilities consist of all types of buildings for academic and non-academic

activities, equipment for academic and non- academic activities, areas for sports and games,

landscape, farms and gardens including trees, roads and paths.

Others include furniture and toilet facilities, lighting, acoustics, storage facilities and

parking lot, security, transportation, ICT equipment, cleaning materials, food services, and

special facilities for the physically challenged persons.

Gandhis position learning can take place under the trees diminishes the importance of

physical environment. Outdoor learning may be a viable expedient for newly emerging country,

but for country elsewhere indicates that the no building actions is unsatisfactorily for an

emerging industrial and political power, particularly more schools are located in noisy urban

neighborhoods. Thus it leads to poor attendance and those who attend are inclined to have poor

academic performance.

Stoner, Freeman and Gilbert (1996) described the environment of an organization as all

elements relevant to its operation and they include direct and indirect action elements. School

facilities, constitute thPe major components of both direct and indirect action elements in the

environment of learning. Several studies have shown that a close relationship exists between the

physical environment and the academic performance of students.


Nwagwu (1978) and Ogunsaju (1980) maintained that the quality of education that

children receive bears direct relevance to the availability or lack thereof of physical facilities

and overall atmosphere in which learning takes place.Knezevich (1975, p.563) emphasized that

the physical needs are met through provision of safe structure, adequate sanitary facilities, a

balanced visual environment, appropriate thermal environment, and sufficient shelter space for

his work and play. His emotional needs are met by creating pleasant surroundings, a friendly

atmosphere, and an inspiring environment.

Facilities are materials designed to serve specific purposes. In the school system, there

are multiplicity of facilities, which facilitate teaching and learning. They are used;(1) To

illustrate concepts(2) Provide opportunity for firsthand experience(3) For experimentation and

demonstration(4) For scientific investigation and discovery(5) To provide diversity of

thoughts(6) For observation and inquiry(7) For development of scientific attitudes and skills(8)

To protect the individual and also provide comfort

Computer/Computer Laboratory

Moreno (2009) cited that to exploit innovations and trends to achieve educational goals

the institution must provide ICT literacy. Technology has become global standard all over the

world even in developing countries like Philippines. A classroom equipped with IT will bring

about more students equipped with 21st century skills like independent, experiential, reflective,

authentic, holistic, constructive, cognitive and democratic.

The ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access was computed by

dividing the total number of students in public schools by the total number of instructional

computers with or without Internet access in all public schools (i.e., including schools with no
Internet access). In 2001, the ratio of students to instructional computers with Internet access in

public schools was 5.4 to 1, an improvement from the 12.1 to 1 ratio in 1998, when it was first

measured. According to many experts the level of access corresponds to the 4 to 5 students-per-

computer ratio is considered more reasonable for effective use of computers in schools

(President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology 1997).

Sports Facility and Sport Equipment

Mapacpac (2012) mentioned in a report that to cultivate the spirit, teamwork, unity,

discipline, and excellence sports activities should be conducted and actively participated by the

students from the different year levels.

Playground areas shall be considered together with classrooms as learning

environment for educational growth. They shall be developed and planned extensively

not only for the sole purpose of an improved physical education program but also for the

use of pupils/students and teachers in all other educational activities.

Basic sports/Playground Facilities

1. Volleyball Court
2. Softball Diamond
3. Baseball Diamond
4. Jumping Pit
5. A standard track oval with a distance of 400 meters or less
6. Basketball Court
7. Gymnastics Floor Area
8. Football Field
9. Swimming Pool
10. Taekwondo
11. Archery
12. Boxing
13. Dart
14. Arnis
15. Sipa
16. Sepak Takraw
17. Badminton
18. Table tennis

Basic Equipment for Locomotor Skills Development and Introductory Sports Skill
Acquisition
1. Drawing Stick (Wand)
2. Rattan Hoop
3. Bean Bag
4. Bench
5. Rope
6. Whistles
7. Colored Chalk
8. Tape Measure
9. Hurdles
10. Dama Set
11. Jigsaw Puzzle
12. Chess Set
13. Tape recorder set and set of tapes of music of different time signature
14. Scrabble Set
15. Balance Beam
16. Sungkaan
17. Chinese Checker Set
18. Stop Watch
19. Horizontal Ladder

In planning and developing playground areas, provisions shall be considered for their

use by the community as well as for recreation purposes during off-school hours. Trends in

physical education programs require more space as well as greater variety of space designs for

playground areas. Spontaneous play shall be emphasized to a greater degree than the more

formal exercise, such as calisthenics, marching and other drills.


Funding Requirements

Budget plays an important part in the implementation of the curriculum. The teachers

group is demanding that the government allocates six percent of the countrys Gross Domestic

Product (GDP) to education, amounting to P884.6 billion ($20 billion). The group said that to

follow the UN standards, the government should allot at least P590 billion ($13 billion) more to

basic education. However, the average share of DepEds budget from the GDP is only 2.2

percent.

The group also lambasted the increase in the budget of DepEds GASTPE (Government

Assistance to Students and Teachers to Public Education) program. According to Castro, for this

year, the government targets to allocate P7 billion ($165 million) for one million grantees.

Conceptual Framework

It is very important for every Filipino citizen to know the real and current Level of

Compliance of the Implementation of K to 12 Enhance Basic Education Program. The

implementation of the new curriculum will serve as our superhighway to compete globally. The

success of the program doesnt depend only with the government nor with the education

administrators, its triumph lies on every one of us. Even an ordinary individual plays an

important role by just being informed and being an informer can be a big help. The success of

the program within one community can be a big help, successful graduates means opportunity,

opportunity mean jobs and jobs means money.

Knowing the Status of Compliance and assessing it using standards to determine the

gaps will result to a higher probability of success. If we will be able to determine the gaps then

each one of us should work hand in hand to achieve the full realization of the program.
INPUT PROCESS OUTPUT

1. Compliance of six selected


Secondary Schools in relation
to IRR (Mandatory Review) Standards of Level
provisions as to the actual,
standard and gap per
IRR(Mandatory of
Review)
(a) Teachers Compliance
(b) Classrooms
(c) Textbooks Perception of
(d) Seats Respondents
(e) Sanitation Facilities
(f) Other learning facilities

Figure 1. Conceptual
The Conceptual Paradigmas shown in Figure 1 illustrates the independent and dependent
Paradigm

variables that will be used in the study. To determine the present Status of Compliance of the

Implementation of K to 12 Enhance Basic Education Program the researcher uses data including

teacher, classroom, textbooks, seats, toilets, participation, retention rate, completion, rate

teachers welfare and training profiles adequacy of funding requirements and learning facilities.

These data are basic requirement in the implementation of the curriculum.

Definition of Terms

Academic Performance. Refers to the academic achievement of the pupils as evidenced

by test results or marks given by the teacher based from the criteria such as: periodical test,

written outputs, and participation or recitation.

Gap. A Pertains with the difference between the standard and the actual. Positive Gap

indicates surplus and negative gap indicates shortages.

Gap Analysis A process through which the researcher compares the actual

performance/inventory to its expected or standard, to determine whether it is meeting expectations


and using its resources effectively. Gap analysis seeks to answer the questions "where are we?"

(current state) and "where do we want to be?"(target state).

Gap Rate. Absolute value of the Percentage of the gap in relation to the standard.

Gap Analysis. This refers to the breaking down of ideas into small particles to be studied

critically.

Comprehension. Refers to the capability of understanding or perceiving something

particularly about the additional program implemented by the Department of Education.

K to 12. Letter K refers to kindergarten and 12 refers to the additional two (2) years

in the basic education. It is the additional years after fourth years in secondary schooling.

Perception. Refers to what is conceived to be true which is subjective. It refers to the

specific perception of the teachers with regards to the affectivity of the actions made by the

schools heads in addressing the gaps in the given provisions in the Mandatory Review.

Status of Compliance. Descriptive value of the gap rate. Classified as Not Complied,

Initially Complied, Partially Complied Fully Complied and Exceeds the Standards.

Not Complied. The absolute value of gap rate is 100 %

Initially Complied. The absolute value of gap rate is between 50.5%- 98.5 %

Partially Complied. The absolute value of gap rate is between 50.5%- 99.5 %

Fully Complied. The absolute value of gap rate is 0 %

Exceeds the Standards. If the gap is positive.


Programs. Refer to the listing of the order of the pertinent activities or plan by the

Department of Education which is essentials for the development of the department as well as

the learners.

QualificationA. group of competencies packaged from the supermarket of competency.

Depending on the breadth, depth and scope of competency, a qualification may fall under

National Certificate Level I, II, III, or IV. A required training to teach Tech-Voc Strands.

Rationale. Denote the underlying principle of a certain program. In this study it refers to

the basis of the creation of K 12 program.

Sources. Refers to the basis and foundation where the K 12 program was been known

to the parents of Grade VII students. This can be through media such as television, radio,

newspaper, journals and non-media such as forum.

Theories. Are principles or idea made in writing that is applicable in different times and

individuals for this is what is expected to happen.

Tracka path leading to the specialization. Tracks for K to 12 are Academic,

TechVoc/TVL, Arts and Design and Sports

Workshop.A training facility, must be of concrete structure. Based on the class size of

25 students/trainees, the space requirements for the teaching/learning and circulation areas

includes Lecture/Demo Area, Student/trainee working space, Laboratory, Learning Resource

Area, Facilities/Equipment/Circulation Area. Workshop are prescribed in the Training

Regulations provided by TESDA and varies accordingly with the Qualification under the

different Strands in TechVoc/TVL Track


Chapter 3

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

Research Design

Data Triangulation was used as a data analysis approach to cross-check findings from

multiple sources. The triangulation approach began with identifying important issues from the

review of related literature. Methodological Triangulations will be used to interpret and analyze

sufficient data related to the study since this involves the use of multiple qualitative and/or

quantitative methods to study the program. This will give a vivid description about the Status of

Compliance of the initial implementation of K to 12 Enhanced Basic Education Program in the

Division of Marinduque.

Research Locale

This study was conducted within the Division of Marinduque, Region IV B-

MIMAROPA, particularly in the six identified big schools for each municipality that will offer

the Piloting of Senior High School Program namely: Marinduque National High School in

Boac, Buenavista National High School inBuenavista, Landy National High School-Sta

Cruz, Makapuyat National High SchoolinTorrijos, BognuyanNational High SchoolinGasan,

andMogpogNational Comprehensive High Schoolin Mogpog. These schools are selected not

only because they will offer early implementation program but they also represent the different

municipalities in the Division.


List of Pilot Schools to offer Senior High School in the Division of Marinduque

Pilot Schools Providers Tracks To Offer


1. Marinduque National High School Academic, TechVoc/TVL Arts & Design, Sports
2. Buenavista National High School Academic, TechVoc/TVL
3. Landy National High School Academic, TechVoc/TVL
4. Matuyatuya National High School Academic, TechVoc/TVL
5. Bangbang National High School Academic, TechVoc/TVL
6. Mogpog National Comprehensive High School Academic, TechVoc/TVL

Figure 2. Map of Public Schools Senior High School Providers in Marinduque

The map above shows the forty five public secondary schools and private schools in the

Division of Marinduque. The map also shows a legend of the five selected Senior High School

Providers for the early implementation.


Figure 3 Map of Pilot Senior High School or SHS Early Implementation in the Division of
Marinduque

The figure shows the location of identified public schools that will offer Pilot Senior

high school or SHS Early Implementation in the Division of Marinduque which also represents

the locale of the study.

The choice of locale is due to the concern of the researcher to determine the Initial

Implementation of K to 12. The Input data are just basic requirements of the curriculum but its
very essential since this will be a baseline and it will help the institution to determine the gap. If

basic requirements cannot be closed how much more the needed tools, materials and

equipments for the SHS program especially that Piloting will be done next school year 2015.

Population and Sample

Among forty five Secondary schools in the division the researcher will only use six

identified secondary schools that will offer pilot senior high school for the purpose of this study.

The six identified schools represents each municipality in the Division or Province of

Marinduque. The respondents of the study were six school heads and selected 30 % of the

teachers of each selected schools in the division. Teachers were selected using simple random

sampling

The distribution of population and sample is shown in the list below.

List of Respondent of the Study

Municipality School School Heads Teacher


f % Actual f %
(n)
Boac Marinduque National High School 1 100% 35 11 30%
Buenavista Buenavista National High School 1 100% 35 11 30%
Sta. Cruz Landy National High School 1 100% 23 7 30%
Torrijos Matuyatuya National High School 1 100% 117 35 30%
Gasan Bognuyan National High School 1 100% 20 6 30%
Mogpog Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 1 100% 19 6 30%
Total 6 100% 249 76

Research Instruments
The research instruments used in the study was researcher-made questionnaires and can

be verified using the EBEIS. There were three sets of questionnaires used in the study. The first

questionnaire designed by the researcher was used to elicit information from the school heads

regarding actual inventory of the Provisions of the Mandatory Review. This information was

used to determine the actual, standard and gap for each provision. The second questionnaire was
used to elicit information about the interventions or actions made by the school heads in filling

the gaps or shortages. The third and the last questionnaires were for secondary

The first question in the statement of the problem will be answered using checklist

wherein the respondent will only answer the questions by checking the corresponding answer.

The items included in question number one are number of classrooms; textbooks; seats and

toilets.

The EBEI is a form that will be answered by school head that consist of the questions

regarding books, chairs number of teachers (can be retrieve online) and inventory of facilities,

equipment and other learning materials available.

Data Gathering Procedure

At the start of the study, the researcher delivered a letter of request to conduct a study to

the Division office and principals of the identified high schools within the division. After the

approval of the request, the researcher distributed and gatheredthe instrument.

Informal interviews, direct observation, collective discussions, analyses of personal

documents produced within the group, self-analysis, results from activities undertaken off- or

on-line, and life-histories were utilized in the study.

Statistical Treatment

The data collected from the study were tabulated, counted and tallied. The gap rates

were obtained by getting the difference between the standard and the actual. Positive gap

indicates that there is a shortage and negative gap indicates surplus.Frequency and percentage

were used in order to come up with the result of the study. Information and response was
processed and subjected to statistical treatment wherein the Arithmetic Mean of the aggetevial

equivalent rate of effectiveness was computed.


Chapter 4

PRESENTATION, ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA

This chapter describes the analysis of data followed by the discussion of the research

findings. The data were gathered organized and processed using scientific methods to obtain the

required information. The discussion of the results are presented and arranged according to the

Statement of the Problem in Chapter 1.

The following shows the result of assessment of the Status of Compliance of

Mandatory Review provisions as to the actual, standard and gap per teachers, classrooms,

textbooks, seats, toilets other learning facilities including, computer and science laboratories,

libraries and library hubs, and sports, music, arts and workshops needs.

Table 1

Status of Compliance of Teachers

Number of
Teachers Gap Level of
Rate Compliance
Name of School Standard Actual Gap
Bognuyan National High School 35 35 0 0.0% Fully complied
Buenavista National High School 42 35 -7 16.0% Partially Complied
Landy National High School 27 23 -4 13.8% Partially Complied
Marinduque National High School 127 117 -10 7.6% Partially Complied
Matuyatuya National High School 22 20 -2 7.7% Partially Complied
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 20 19 -1 5.0% Partially Complied
As of March 2015

Table 1 shows the Status of Compliance of teachers in the six (6) selected schools in the

Division of Marinduque. The schools were assessed based on the gap rate in relation to the

actual and standard number of teachers from the enrollment.


As revealed the table registered Buenavista National HighSchoolas initially complied,

with thirty five (35) secondary school teachers. The standard required teachers fitted for their

enrollment is forty two (42) which results to seven (7) gaps equivalent to 16 %gap rate. This is

due to budget constraints since the plantilla item was not enough. The enrollment in School

Year 2014-2015 reaches to 1,016. The enrollment is continuously increasing due to some

students who opt to enroll in Buenavista NHS despite the fact that there are Barangay High

Schools or annexes available in their area like Buenavista NHS -Sihi Annex, Buenavista NHS

Buenavista NHS -Daykitin Annex, Buenavista NHS -Bagacay Annex, Buenavista NHS

Buenavista -NHS Lipata Annex and Yook National High School. When parents were asked

about their school preference and the reason the common answer given was: they want their

children to experience to commute to the town proper and they wanted to have a different

environment.

It is a common factor that shortages are getting bigger mostly in some urban centers.

And the reason is migration or centralization. The centralization of the population is the reason

why in the rural areas classrooms are becoming less and less occupied.

The school has two (2) programs viz. Science Class and Regular Class or K to 12 Basic

Education Program therefore the specialization of teachers must also be considered. They

cannot just combine classes with different program.

Ranked second highest gap rate is Landy National High School with twenty three (23)

secondary school teachers. The standard required teachers fitted for their enrollment is twenty

seven (27) resulted to four (4) gaps equivalent to 13.8 %. This is due to budget constraints, the

plantilla item was not enough. The increase in the enrollment from 521 in year 2011 and 588 in

2014 which is equivalent to 67. The school has three (3) programs, namely Special Education
(SPED), Science Class and Regular class, also known as K to 12 Basic Education Curriculum

hence the students cannot just be merged and the specialization of teachers must also be

considered.

Ranked third highest gap rate is Matuyatuya National High School with twenty (20)

secondary school teachers. The standard required teachers fitted for their enrollment is twenty

two (22) resulted to two (2) gaps equivalent to 7.6 % gap. This is due to budget constraints.

Three new teacher items arrived in School Year 2014-2015 but still not enough to fill the gap.

The increase in the enrollment from 470 in SY 2011-2012 and 516 in SY 2013-2014 which is

equal to 46. This makes the school a larger school, with 251 more students than the average

school and 303 more students than the average school in Torrijos. The increase in the

enrollment was not properly projected.

Ranked fourth highest gap rate is Marinduque National High School with one hundred

seventeen (117) secondary school teachers. The standard required teachers fitted for their

enrollment is one hundred twenty seven (127) resulted to ten (10) gaps equivalent to 7.6 % gap

rate. This is due to an increase in the enrollment from 3055 in the school year 2013-2014 to

3276 school year 2014-2015 which is about 221 students. New teacher item arrived, but still not

enough to fill the gap. Marinduque NCHS is the biggest school in the Division of the

Marinduque.

Since Boac is the Capital of Marinduque it is expected that they have the largest

enrollment in the whole province. The common factor is that shortages located in are getting

bigger mostly in some urban centers. And the reason is a migration or centralization. The

centralization of the population is the reason why in the rural area classrooms is becoming less
and less occupied. The school has two (2) programs viz. Science Class and Regular Class or K

to 12 Basic Education Program.

Ranked fifth highest gap rate is Mogpog National Comprehensive High School with

nineteen (19) secondary school teachers. The standard required teachers fitted for their

enrollment is twenty (20) resulted to one (1) gap equivalent to 5 %. This is due to decrease in

the enrollment from 579 in the school year 2008-2009 to 508 in the school year 2014-2015,

which is about 71. One plantilla item borrowed by Ilaya National High School was returned to

the school. Based on the record the number of teachers in the school was just enough since the

average class size was just 37 and the bigger class size is 50. Despite of the decrease in the

enrollment the school principal does not allow teachers to be transferred to other schools that

needs additional teachers, hence they maintain to have a small gap in the teacher provision.

Ranked sixth is Bognuyan National High School thirty-five (35) secondary school

teachers which is also equal to the standard required teachers (35) fitted for their enrollment

resulted with no gap. It is the only school among the six selected respondents that was able to

comply with the standard. It is one of the oldest school and very much established. It has fiscal

autonomy hence the needs can be addressed easily through proper planning.

The problems with the shortages of teachers, classrooms, textbooks, seats, and toilets are

not yet resolved all over the country and this is also true in the Division of Marinduque.

Before the start of the classes last June 2013 more than 50 teachers were hired in the

secondary schools but there were still numbers of volunteer teachers or locally paid teachers in

the division as of year 20. The Junior High School started last June 2012 but some modules or

work text arrived before the end of second quarter for school year 2013 -2014.
Table 2.
Status of Compliance for Classroom
Number of
Gap
Classroom Level of Compliance
Rate
Name of School Standard Actual Gap
Bognuyan National High School 21 19 2 10% Partially complied
Buenavista National High School 25 22 3 12% Partially complied
Landy National High School 16 15 1 6% Partially complied
Marinduque National High School 76 70 6 8% Partially complied
Matuyatuya National High School 13 14 -1 0% Exceeds
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 12 14 -2 0% Substantially Exceeds
As of March 2015

Table 2 displays the Status of Compliance of classroom in the six (6) selected schools in

the Division of Marinduque. The schools were ranked accordingly based on the gap rate in

relation to the actual and the standard number of classroom based on the enrollment.

Ranked first is Buenavista National High School (Buenavista NHS) with 22 available

instructional rooms. The standard required rooms fitted for their enrollment is twenty five (25)

resulted to three (3) gaps equivalent to 12 %. This is due to budget constraints, no additional

funds were given and aside from that they shared the budget with the annexes. The school has

no buildable space that is why in the initial planning it was not selected as one of the SHS

provider instead it was Daykitin National High School. The school has no strong link with the

stakeholders. They were able to asked support from the Philippine Chinese Chamber of

Commerce, they received one storey building with two classrooms.

.Ranked second highest gap rate was Bognuyan National High School with nineteen

(19) available instructional rooms. The standard required rooms fitted for their enrollment is

twenty one (21) resulted in a gap of two (2) or equivalent to 10%. This is due to no available

funds. Since the school has no buildable space they divided the standard classroom into two.

Despite of the small area the school was able to receive additional classroom in the school Year

2014-2015. The school had tried to look for other sources and still working on it.
Ranked third highest gap rate is Marinduque National High School with seventy (70)

instructional rooms. The standard required classrooms fitted for their enrollment is twenty seven

(27) resulted to four a gap of six (6) equivalent to 8%. This is due to budget constraints, no fund

available. No buildable space available. Fire gutted 18-room, 2-story building on August 2007,

although it was replaced but not enough for their increasing enrollment.

Ranked second highest gap rate was Landy National High School with fifteen (15)

available instructional rooms. The standard required rooms fitted for their enrollment is sixteen

(16) resulted in a gap of two (1) or equivalent to 6%. This is due no additional budget was

given. The school has no buildable space available, but the school has strong linkages with the

stakeholders, particularly with their alumni hence the maintenance of their classrooms is not a

problem. Classrooms are not used as additional or other facilities.

Tie on Rank 5.5 were Matuyatuya National High School and Mogpog National High

School. They met the standard and even surpass to that standard with an excess of 1 and 2

rooms consecutively.

Matuyatuya NCHS has 14 instructional rooms, the standard required classrooms fitted

for their enrollment is just 12 resulted to an excess of 2.

Mogpog NCHS has 14 instructional rooms, the standard required classrooms fitted for

their enrollment is just 13 resulted in an excess of 1.

This is because Matuyatuya NHS has 2 new buildings, one from DEPED and the other

one donated by the LGU. Mogpog National Comprehensive High School has buildings

donated by the Philippine Chinese Chambers of Commerce, Department of Labor and

Employment thru the reactions made by the Parent Teachers Association; one reason for the

excess was the decrease in enrollment corresponding to two classes.


Buenavista NHS and Mogpog NCHS both received building from PCCC but due to

different trends in the enrolment it yield different results, shortage for Buenavista NHS and

excess room for Mogpog NCHS.

These records imply that there are still huge gaps in the classroom. Information

gathered, exposed that shortages still distresses Deped Division of Marinduque. The result is

supported by the different articles in the newspaper and surveys.

Despite of the Deped claims several reports showed that there were schools which

classrooms are jam-packed with students. ACT Teachers Party Rep. Antonio Tinio in 2013

reported that during his morning visit in some Quezon City public schools, he observed that the

standard classroom was divided into two, school corridors were converted into makeshift

classrooms, some classrooms have no blackboards and chairs, other facilities such as covered

courts are converted into classrooms, chairs are still lacking and some students were relegated to

the home study program. The situation of schools in the Division of Marinduque is not far from

other Divisions.

According to IBON Foundation the severe lack of education facilities inevitably reflects

on Filipino students poor performance. The results of the National Achievement Test (NAT)

for elementary supposedly showed improved students performance from previous years, but

with a low achievement rate of 68% in school year 2009-2010 and 68.9 MPS in SY 2012-2013

percentage score was still 6 percentage points away from the targeted 75 percent

NAT results in the secondary level show even poorer performance with a 45.6% in

school year 2009-2010 and 51.4 MPS in SY 2012-2013 achievement rate. The national mean

percentage score was 23 percentage points away from the set target.
Table 3

Status of Compliance of Learning Materials

Number of Learning
Materials
Gap
Gap Level of Compliance
Name of School Standard Actual Rate
Bognuyan National High School 12,495 4,918 -7,577 60.64% Initially complied
Buenavista National High School 15,240 5,435 -9,805 64.34% Initially complied
Landy National High School 9,780 4,193 -5,587 57.13% Initially complied
Marinduque National High School 45,705 15,896 -29,809 65.22% Initially complied
Matuyatuya National High School 7,740 2,919 -4,821 62.29% Initially complied
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 7,125 3,186 -3,939 55.28% Initially complied
As of March 2015

Table 3 shows the Status of Compliance of learning materials among six selected

schools in the Division of Marinduque they were ranked accordingly based on the gap rate in

relation to actual and standard number of textbooks and the number of subjects and enrollment.

Ranked first is Marinduque National High School with 15,896 available learning

materials, the standard required learning materials fitted for their enrollment is 45,705

resultedto a gap of 29,809 equivalent to 65.22 %. This is because Marinduque NHS is the

biggest school in the Division with an enrollment of 3047. It is expected that they have a huge

gap. The supplies of the books come from the central office school administrator lacks control

over the supply of learning materials.

Rank third is aMatuyatuya National High School with 2,919 available learning

materials; the standard required learning materials fitted for their enrollment is 7,740 resulted in

a gap 4,821 equivalent to 62.29%. Matuyatuya NHS was not able to receive the complete

learning materials for all subjects same situation with other school. The learning materials for

grade seven are not yet complete.

Actions made by the School Head to comply with the classroom gap.
Rank fourth is a Bognuyan National High School with 4,918 available learning

materials; the standard required learning materials suited for their enrollment is 12,495 resulted

in a gap 7,577 equivalent to 60.64%. Bognuyan NHS was not able to receive the complete

learning materials, especially for Grade Seven, same situation with other school.

Ranks fifth is Landy National High School with 4,193 available learning materials, the

standard required learning materials fitted for their enrollment is 9,780 resulted in a gap 5,587

equivalent to 57.13%. Landy NHS was not able to receive the complete learning materials for

all subjects same situation with other school. The Landy NHS school used the school resources

to produce additional copies of learning materials like their own internet connection and printer.

Rank sixth is Mogpog National Comprehensive High Schoolwith 3,186 available

learning materials, the standard required learning materials fitted for their enrollment is 7,125

resulted to a gap 3,939 equivalent to 55.28% gap rate. This is because to it has the smallest

enrollment of 475; the school has its own photocopy machine and printer which is used for the

reproduction of the learning materials like curriculum guide and teaching guide. If there were

only one copy or no hard copy available, teachers can request few copies for the students and

for themselves.

In the Division of Marinduque the only available modules are TLE, Mathematics 8,

Science 8, EdukasyonsaPagpapakato 8, and Music 8. The teachers spent so much money from

their pocket to photocopy the learning materials for their students or sometimes they copy every

reading material in Manila paper.

In an article published in gmanetwork.com on June 12, 2014, Conrado Contreras, head

of LakanDula High Schools Music, Arts, Physical Education and Health (MAPEH)

department, said the lack of learning materials, facilities and manpower were among the
problems teachers are facing in the implementation of K to 12. He said that the problem with K

to 12 is the distribution or delivery of Learning Materials because of that teacher's shoulder the

shortages like paying the photo copy of additional copies. Yung

ibangangteachersnagdadalangsarilinilang overhead projectors. E

saannamankukuninngmgateachersangperakundisasarilinilangbulsa? He added

Table 4

Status of Compliance of Seats

Number of Seats
Level of
Name of School Gap Gap Rate
Standard Actual Compliance

Bognuyan National High School 1050 840 -210 20.00% Partially complied
Buenavista National High School 1250 1047 -203 16.24% Partially complied
Landy National High School 800 450 -350 43.75% Initially complied
Marinduque National High School 3800 3201 -599 15.76% Partially complied
Matuyatuya National High School 650 483 -167 25.69% Partially complied
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 600 650 +50 Exceeds
As of March 2015

Table 4 uncover the Status of Compliance of seats among six selected schools in the

division of Marinduque they were ranked accordingly based on the gap rate in relation to actual

and standard number of seats based on the enrollment.

Ranked first is Landy National High School with 450 available seats, the standard

required seats for their enrollment is 800 resulted to a gap of 350 corresponding to 43.75 %.

This is because chairs really need replacement; their available chairs are just being repaired.

There was an increased in the enrollment, from 521 in year 2011 and 588 in 2014 but no

additional supply of chairs arrived. They split the big class and puts additional classroom to

make the class size smaller, since the standard number of chairs is fifty pieces per classroom.

The needed chairs based on the enrollment are not projected properly. The procedure on

procurement of chairs took quite long.


Rank second is Matuyatuya National High School with 483available seats, the standard

required seats for their enrollment is 650 resulted to a gap of 350 corresponding to 43.75 %.

This is due to the increase in the enrollment from 167 in SY 2011-2012 to 516 in SY 2014-

2015. With the present enrollment this makes the school a larger school, with 251 more students

than the average school in Marinduque and 303 more students than the average school in

Torrijos. Other chairs are not recorded to receive additional chairs for the preparation of

incoming students in senior High school.

Rank third is Bognuyan National High School with 483available seats, the standard

required seats for their enrollment is 650 resulted to a gap of 350 Since the school has a higher

enrollment they also need more chairs. The computation of the standard number of chairs

depends on the number of standard rooms.

Rank fifth is Marinduque National High School with 483 available seats, the standard

required seats for their enrollment is 650 resulted to a gap of 350 corresponding to 43.75 %.

This is a little lower compared to enrollment. The school acquires chairs through MOOE. The

School Head noted that the gaps were basically because there were no additional budget.

Table 5.1

Status of Compliance for Sanitation facility (Toilets)

Number of Toilets Gap Level of


Name of School Standard Actual Gap Rate Compliance
Bognuyan National High School 19 19 0 0 Fully complied
Buenavista National High School 22 26 0 0.0% Fully complied
Landy National High School 14 24 0 0.0% Fully complied
Marinduque National High School 62 40 -22 35.7% Partially complied
Matuyatuya National High School 10 17 0 0.0% Fully complied
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 10 9 -1 6.6% Partially complied
As of March 2015
Table 5.1 disclosed the Status of Compliance of toilets among six selected schools; the

Status of compliance are rated based on the gap and gap rate in relation to actual and standard

number of toilets, urinals and hand washing facilities.

Two schools were not able to comply with the standard for toilet. Marinduque National

High School ranked first with a gap of 22 at 35.7 % because of very large enrolment. The

projects of stakeholders were diverted into other projects such as speech laboratory, computer

laboratory, sports materials and other needs.

Mogpog National Comprehensive High School Ranked second highest gap rate with a

gap of one (1) with 6.6% rate. This is because it is not the top priority of advisers and

stakeholders such as PTA, due to lack of water supply. Only Grade nine and Grade seven

classrooms have comfort rooms.

The remaining four schools namely Bognuyan National High School, Buenavista

National High School, Landy National High School and Matuyatuya National High School

were able to comply with the standards. In Landy National High School all classrooms has its

own comfort room, most of them were project of stakeholders such as PTA and alumni. Alumni

plays important role in the progress of Landy NHS they visits or communicate with the school

administrators and offered or asked about their needs.

Table 5.2.

Status of Compliance for Sanitation facility (Urinals)


Number of Urinals Gap Level of
Name of School Standard Actual Gap Rate Compliance
Marinduque National High School 31 4 -27 87% Initially complied
Buenavista National High School 11 2 -9 82% Initially complied
Bognuyan National High School 10 2 -8 79% Initially complied
Landy National High School 7 2 -5 72% Initially complied
Matuyatuya National High School 5 2 -3 61% Initially complied
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 5 2 -3 59% Initially complied
As of March 2015
Table 5.2 disclosed thepicture out that Status of compliance for urinals among six selected

schools; the Status of compliance are rated based on the gap and gap rate in relation to actual

and standard number of toilets, urinals and hand washing facilities. The gap rate in all schools

were more than 50% and the levels of compliance were just Initially Complied.

This proves that the result is the same as the report of Bolido (2012) in Philippine daily

Inquirer cited that the toilet-pupil ratio is below the Global Standards

Table 5.3.

Status of Compliance for Sanitation facility (Hand Washing Facility)

Table 6
Number of Hand
Gap Level of
Name of School Washing Facility
Rate Compliance
Standard Actual Gap
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 3 5 -2 37% Partially complied
Matuyatuya National High School 2 5 -3 61% Initially complied
Marinduque National High School 10 30 -20 67% Initially complied
Landy National High School 2 7 -5 69% Initially complied
Bognuyan National High School 2 8 -6 76% Initially complied
Buenavista National High School 2 10 -8 80% Initially complied
As of March 2015

Table 5.3 revealed that all schools have enormous gap with urinals because the toilets

are shared toilets same goes thru with hand washing facility they use lavatory instead. This only

explained that all school does not follow standards.

In a study entitled A Review of Sanitation Policies and Programs in Philippine Public

Elementary Schools it was stated that the Philippines is not lacking in policies regarding health

and sanitation. However, the implementation of such policies on a national level remains weak,

sporadic, and inconsistent. DepEd currently implements a toilet pupil ratio (TPR) incompatible

with the standard set forth in the Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) of the Sanitation

Code (PD 856). The IRR specifies a TPR of at least 1 toilet bowl per 49 male students and 1

toilet bowl and 1 lavatory per 29 female students. The Department of Health (DOH) does not
monitor the implementation of PD 856 in public schools, nor does it properly disseminate new

provisions. Neither are toilets were prioritized as important educational facilities by the LGUs

that are tasked to enforce PD 856. Instead, it is the principals, teachers, parents, donor agencies,

and volunteers from civil society groups that play an active role in improving public school

infrastructure through programs. Not all of these programs, however, supports the construction

or maintenance of sanitation facilities.

According to IBON Foundation Shortages are still blatant. There is a shortage of more

than 150,000 water and sanitation facilities which is the same situation with the six selected

schools.

Table 6

Status of Compliance of Computer Laboratory

Number of Computer
Gap Level of
Laboratory
Rate Compliance
Name of School Standard Actual Gap
Landy National High School 12 1 -11 92% Initially complied
Buenavista National High School 5 1 -4 80% Initially complied
Matuyatuya National High School 4 1 -3 75% Initially complied
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 3 1 -2 70% Initially complied
Marinduque National High School 3 1 -2 70% Initially complied
Bognuyan National High School 2 1 -1 52% Initially complied
As of March 2015

Table 6 shows the Status of Compliance of computer laboratory among six selected

schools; they were rank accordingly as to the gap rate in relation to actual and standard number

of computer laboratory based on the enrollment and curriculum offering. Each of the six schools

has their own laboratory

Rank First is Marinduque National High School with 1 computer laboratory, the

standard required laboratory for their enrollment is 12 resulted to a gap of 11 corresponding to

92 %. This is due to its very large enrollment. As expected it is the biggest school with only one

computer laboratory. One of their Tech-Voc strands is Information and Communication


Technology (ICT) that requires computer units and IT workshop. Computer laboratory needs

huge amount of budget and there is no available fund. Each schools in the division was only

given fifty (50) sets of computer good for one laboratory only. MOOE cannot be used to

purchase computer units since it is considered as capital outlay: the procedure on procurement

of computer took quite long. The process of acquiring computer lab/computer is a very tedious

process. It requires counterpart of the school and PTA such as laboratory room (tables, grills,

air-condition unit etc). The school first received computer from Department of Trade and

Industry but they were not able to maintain it. The school has fast internet connection since it is

located in Boac. Most of its student are digital natives especially those who were born in

municipal areas of Boac.

Rank second is MogpogNational Comprehensive High School with 1 (one)

computer laboratory, the standard required laboratory for their enrollment is 5 resulted to a gap

of 4 corresponding to 80 %. This is due to its enrollment. No funds available to procure

computer units. With the registration of 475 and with only one computer laboratory the school

really needs additional computer units and laboratory. Mogpog NCHS also offers Computer

Hardware Servicing that requires computer units and IT workshop. One computer laboratory is

not enough to cater all students. Before the implementation of K to 12 the school teaches

Computer subject for Third Year and Fourth year but at presents it is only use for Computer

Hardware Servicing (CHS) Workshop. The MOOE cannot be used to purchase computer units

since it is considered as capital outlay. The procedure on procurement of computer took quite

long. The process of acquiring computer lab or computers is a very tedious process. The school

used only the old computer units donated by the Department of Trade Industry and Commission
on Information and Communication Technology. The computer units really need replacement or

updates to adapt with the brusque development in ICT.

Another problem of the school is the internet access. The speed given by We Are IT

Philippines Incorporated (WIT) is just 54 kbps hence only one computer can access the internet

because of its very low bandwidth. This only implies that the students and teachers have

difficulty in accessing information through information superhighway (INTERNET). Both the

teachers and the students have to pay their own internet access to obtain the resources needed.

Students from of Mogpog NCHS from different Barangays need to go to the town proper to

have their research works or computer related assignments. This only means that aside from

computer rentals the parents need to shoulder transportation cost which is additional burden for

the family.

Rank third is Buenavista National High School with 1 computer laboratory, the

standard required laboratory for their enrollment is 4 resulted to a gap of 3 corresponding to 75

%. This is due to its enrollment. With the enrollment of 1016 and with only one computer

laboratory the school really needs additional computer units. The school has no available fund.

MOOE cannot be used to purchase computer units since it is considered as capital outlay. The

administration cannot withstand the cost of technical service for the maintenance of computers.

The procedure on procurement of computer took quite long. The process of acquiring computer

lab or computers is a very tedious process. It requires counterpart of the school and PTA such as

laboratory room (tables, grills, air-condition unit etc). One computer laboratory is not enough to

accommodate all students. Only First Section and Science Classes were able to have computer

class.
Tie on rank four point five (4.5) are Bognuyan National High School and Landy

National High School with 1 computer laboratory, the standard required laboratory for their

enrollment is 3 resulted to a gap of two (2) gaps or equivalent to 70%. This is because both

schools have no available fund. One computer laboratory is not enough to cater all students.

Only first section and science classes were able to have computer subject. MOOE cannot be

used to purchase computer units since it is considered as capital outlay. The procedure on

procurement of computer took quite long. It is a very long process and requires counterpart of

the school and PTA such as laboratory room (tables, grills, air-condition unit etc). Landy NHS

also offers Computer Hardware Servicing that requires computer units and IT workshop.

Rank sixth is Matuyatuya National High School with 1 computer laboratory, the

standard required laboratory for their enrollment is 3 resulted to a gap of two (2) gaps or

equivalent to 52%. Even though Matuyatuya NHS ranked last the gap rate are still high and it

has the same situation with all secondary schools in the Division.

Table 7.

Status of Compliance of Science Laboratory

Number of Science Laboratory Gap Level of


Name of School Standard Actual Gap Rate Compliance
Bognuyan National High School 1 1 0 0% Fully complied
Buenavista National High School 1 1 0 0% Fully complied
Landy National High School 1 1 0 0% Fully complied
Matuyatuya National High School 1 1 0 0% Fully complied
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 1 0 1 100% Not complied
Marinduque National High School 3 1 2 67% Initially complied

Table 7 shows the Status of Compliance of Science Laboratory among six selected

schools, they were rank accordingly as to the gap rate in relation to actual and standard number

of computer laboratory based on the enrollment and curriculum offering. Mogpog National

Comprehensive High School and Marinduque National High School were the only two schools
they were not able to comply with the standard. Mogpog NCHS ranked first with 100% gap

rate because it is the only school that has no Science Laboratory; it is the youngest school

among the selected schools. The instructional room of Grade 10 was used as stockroom/science

room. The administration has other priorities.

Marinduqe NHS ranked number two with 67 % because with the enrollment of the

school it really requires at least three science labs. No buildable space. Lack of funds no

additional budget was given. One laboratory is not enough for their big population of students.

On the contrary the computer laboratory of Marinduque National High School is the most

sophisticated science lab and has the latest equipment and materials all over Marinduque. As the

biggest school in the division and since they will offer Academic Track with Science

Technology Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) strand putting additional science laboratory

is a requirement for the school.

First, sough the support of the stakeholder to obtain the building and JAICA granted

their request. Second, sough the support of alumni for materials. Laboratory tables, chairs and

demo table were donated by Mr. Rodolfo Mascarenas in the Year 2014 for the science lab.

Third, used the excess room as the target science laboratory, hence the excess room became

one.

Four schools were able to comply with the standard with the help of its stakeholders

with zero gap Bognuyan National High School, Buenavista National High School, Landy

National High School and Matuyatuya National High School.

Landy National High School has a standard size laboratory with standard equipment,

tables and chairs it was acquired through the Secondary Education Development Program

(SEDP). The School Head converted the science classrooms as Chemistry Room, Physics
Room, Biology Room each rooms are equipped with basic materials and tools needed for the

specific subjects like convertible/multifunctional board and other modeling devices the funds

are from the income of School Canteen.

The three remaining schools namely Bognuyan National High School, Buenavista

National High School, Landy National High School and Matuyatuya National High School

converted the regular classroom into science laboratory.

Table 8.

Status of Compliance of Library and Library Hub

Number of Library and


Library Hub Gap Level of Compliance
Name of School Standard Actual
Bognuyan National High School 1 1 0 Fully Complied
Buenavista National High School 1 1 0 Fully Complied
Landy National High School 1 1 0 Fully Complied
Marinduque National High School 1 1 0 Fully Complied
Matuyatuya National High School 1 1 0 Fully Complied
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 1 1 0 Fully Complied

Table 9 shows the Status of Compliance of Library and Library Hub among six selected

schools as to the gap rate in relation to actual and standard number of library and library hub.

All schools were able to comply with library and library hub because each school has one

library and only one library hub is required for the entire division this was already provided by

the Marinduque Division Office.

Sports Facilities

Table 7.1.

Status of Compliance of Sports Facilities

Number of Sports Facilities Gap Level of


Name of School Standard Actual Gap Rate Compliance
Bognuyan National High School 19 4 15 79% Initially complied
Buenavista National High School 19 4 15 79% Initially complied
Matuyatuya National High School 19 12 15 79% Initially complied
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 19 12 15 79% Initially complied
Landy National High School 19 4 14 74% Initially complied
Marinduque National High School 19 12 7 37% Partially complied
As of March 2015

The schools with the highest gap rate were Bognuyan National High School,

Buenavista National High School, Landy National High School, Matuyatuya National High

School, Mogpog National Comprehensive High School. The school has no standard sports

facility they only provide improvise court for each sports as needed arise especially during

Intramural or Cluster Meet. The only available are balls and net for sports namely volleyball,

sepak, table tennis and basketball. For softball ball, bat and incomplete set of gloves sometimes

the protective gear is damaged or substandard.

Ranked last was Marinduque National High School it has twelve (12) out of (19) sports

facilities. They were able to comply in almost all facility provisions specifically Volleyball

Court, Softball Diamond, Baseball Diamond, Taekwondo, Boxing Arnis, Sipa, SepakTakraw,

Badminton, and Table tennis. They still lack Jumping Pit, a standard track oval with a distance

of 400 meters or less, gymnastics floor area, football field, swimming pool and archery despite

of the fact that it is the biggest and first established secondary school in Marinduque.

Marinduque NHS is one of the oldest schools since it was founded in the year 1914 but still the

amenities and educational facilities are still lacking.

Table 9.2.

Status of Compliance of Music Room

Number of Music Room Gap Level of


Name of School Standard Actual Gap Rate Compliance
Marinduque National High School 1 1 0 0% Fully Complied
Bognuyan National High School 1 0 1 100% Not Complied
Buenavista National High School 1 0 1 100% Not Complied
Landy National High School 1 0 1 100% Not Complied
Matuyatuya National High School 1 0 1 100% Not Complied
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 1 0 1 100% Not Complied
As of March 2015
Only Marinduque National High School was able to complied in Music room. Five

schools namely Bognuyan National High School, Buenavista National High School, Landy

National High School, Matuyatuya National High School, Mogpog National Comprehensive

High Schoolwere not able to comply. The schools have no music room and no available music

instruments and materials. Only one school were able to comply with the music room.

Table 9.3.

Status of Compliance of Arts Room

Number of Arts Room Gap Level of


Name of School Standard Actual Gap Rate Compliance
Marinduque National High School 1 1 0 0% Fully Complied
Bognuyan National High School 1 0 1 100% Not Complied
Buenavista National High School 1 0 1 100% Not Complied
Landy National High School 1 0 1 100% Not Complied
Matuyatuya National High School 1 0 1 100% Not Complied
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 1 0 1 100% Not Complied

The school with no gap rate is Marinduque National High School it is the only school

that has music and arts room, However the music and art room are also used as regular

classroom therefore it is also counted in the number of available instructional room.

Marinduque National High School is the only school in the Division that has a speech

laboratory.It is equipped with all high tech tools and equipment which were all donated by

MNHS Batch 1977. However the music and art room were just convertedthese were not the

standard facility the rooms are also used as a regular instructional room. Marinduque NHS has

strong linkages among its alumni.


The five schools namely Bognuyan National High School, Buenavista National High

School, Landy National High School, Matuyatuya National High School, Mogpog National

Comprehensive High Scho ol have no art room and no available instruments and materials.

Table 10

Status of Compliance of Workshop Needs

Number of Workshop Needs Gap Level of


Name of School Standard Actual Gap Rate Compliance
Mogpog National Comprehensive High School 40 0 -40 100% Not Complied
Matuyatuya National High School 15 4 -8 70% Initially Complied
Landy National High School 30 4 -29 97% Initially Complied
Marinduque National High School 163 4 -159 98% Initially Complied
Bognuyan National High School 62 1 -61 99% Initially Complied
Buenavista National High School 62 1 -61 99% Initially Complied
As of March 2015

Table 10 shows the Status of Compliance of workshop needs; the Status of compliance

are rated based on the gap and gap rate in relation to actual and standard number of workshop

facilities.

The table shows that Mogpog National Comprehensive HighSchoolhas the highest gap

rate withno (0) available workshop. The standard required workshop for the number of students

and curriculum offering is (40) which results to forty (40) gaps equivalent to 100% gap rate.

This is due to budget constraints, no available facilities were put up. The school offered Six

different qualifications or specialization under the TechVoc/TVL strands for Junior High

School. For Grade 9 and 10 the school offers Computer System Servicing, Contact Center

Services, Housekeeping, Food (Fish) Procesing, Cookery and Shielded Metal Art Works. Each

qualificationhas different required workshops and prescribed in the training regulation from the

Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA).

Bognuyan National High School and Buenavista National High School obtained the

second hihest gap ratewithone (1) available workshop. The standard required workshop for the
number of students and curriculum offering is (62) which results to sixty one (61) gaps

equivalent to 99% gap rate. This is due to budget constraints, no available facilities were put up.

The only available in the school is the Home Economics Room (HE) which can be used as one

laboratory.

Ranked fourth highest gap rate is, Marinduque National High School withfour (4)

available workshop. The standard required workshop for the number of students and curriculum

offering is (163) which results to forty (159) gaps equivalent to 98% gap rate. This is due to

budget constraints, no available facilities were put up. The school has Home Economics Room

(HE), welding shop and Computer lab.

Ranked fifth highest gap rate isLandy National High School withone (1) available

workshop The standard required workshop for the number of students and curriculum offering

is (30) which results to forty (29) gaps equivalent to 97% gap rate. This is due to budget

constraints. The school has canteen and HE they have a very functional TLE laboratory which

generates big income. They produced bread and pastry products which is profitable. Hey

received orders from different clientele.

Ranked sixth isMatuyatuya National High School withone (1) available room that can

be converted into four workshops. The standard required workshop for the number of students

and curriculum offering is (12) which results to forty (8) gaps equivalent to 70% gap rate. This

is due to budget constraints. The school was able to have one new room donated by the

stakeholders they also have one Home Economics Room.

The schools offered four different qualifications under the TechVoc/TVL strands. Each

qualifications have different required workshop prescribed in the training regulation from the

Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA). The shortages in needed
workshop are not different from other provisions. This is totally afar from the message of the

Philippine President Benigno (Pinoy) Aquino Jr. mentioned in State of the Nation Address last

July 27, 2015.

In an article published in deped.gov.ph, datedJune 26, 2015 Secretary Br. Armin Luistro

FSC shared the triumphs of the education reform in a formal gathering of partners and

stakeholders held in Cebu City. He presented the current situation of the K to 12 roll-out, such

as the decrease of out-of-school children and the departments update on the basic inputs --

learner materials, school seats, teacher hiring, classroom construction, among others. He also

explained the Senior High School (SHS) Program and the vital role of the industry partners in

the implementation of SHS.

It is true that there were additional teachers and learning materials arrived but these are

not enough to fill the gap. Teachers and modules are not enough to provide quality education.

The required workshop needs were based from the tracks strands and qualification offered by

the school. In the given report the buildings being built were just for classroom and not for

Tech-Voc workshops.
2. ACTIONS MADE BY THE SCHOOL HEADS IN ADDRESSING THE GAPS BASED ON
TEACHERS PERCEPTION
Table 11.
Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Teachers Gap

Actions Buenavi Bognuy Landy Marindu Matuyat Mogpog


sta NHS an NHS NHS que uya NCHS
NHS NHS
1. Requests additional teachers from the
Division Office
2. Always persistent to follow up request.
3. Introduces proper projection.
4. Includes the request to the Annual Budget
and School Improvement Plan.
5. Revises the School Programs in order to
address overlapping of works and schedule.
6. Distributes the excess load to available
teachers resulting to overloading.
7. Minimizes the break time to meet the eight
periods per day.
8. Takes the item borrowed by other school
9. Maintains the bigger class size.

Table11 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the teachers gap.
Data revealed that common actions to the problems were requesting additional teachers from the
Division Office, being persistent to follow up request, including the request to the Annual
Budget and School Improvement Plan and distributing the excess load to available teachers
resulting to overloading.

Actions made by the School Head to comply with the teachers gap.

In order to address the gap or shortages of teachers the School Head of

Buenavista National High Schoolintroduced these strategies:

First, every year the School Head requested teachers from the Division Office and

follow up request persistently. Second, the principal included the request to the annual budget

and annual procurement plan. Third, maintain a bigger class size, with an average of 46 per
class. Fourth, the subjects were distributed among the teachers that resulted to six to seven

classes a day per teachers.

Actions made by the School Head to comply with the teachers gap.

In order to address the gap or shortages of teachers the School Head of Landy

National High School introduced these strategies:

First, every year the School Head requested teachers from the Division Office and

follow up request persistently they received two (2) additional teachers for the School Year

2014-2015 but still not sufficient to meet the gaps. Second, the principal included the request to

the annual budget and annual procurement plan. Third, the administrator distributed the excess

load to available teachers resorting to overloading and bigger class size.

Actions made by the School Head to comply with the teachers gap.

In order to address the gap or shortages of teachers the School Head ofMatuyatuya

National High Schoolintroduced these strategies:

First every year the School Head requested teachers from the Division Office this

resulted in three (3) additional teachers for the School Year 2014-2015 but still not sufficient to

meet the gaps. Second introduced proper projection and follow up request from the Division

Office. Third revision of School Programs has made in order to address Overlapping of works

and schedule.

In order to address the gap or shortages of teachers the School Head of Marinduque

National High Schoolintroduced these strategies:


First, every year the School Head requested teachers from the Division Office and the

school requested by the Division Office and received seven (7) additional teachers for the

School Year 2014-2015. The items were already included in the table, but still not sufficient to

meet the gaps. Second, distributed the students to available classrooms and teachers, bigger

class size of 47. Third, requested from the Division Office and included additional teacher item

in the school improvement plan.

In order to address the gap or shortages of teachers the School Head of Mogpog

National Comprehensive High School introduced these strategies:

First, every year the School Head requested teachers from the Division Office and

follow up request persistently by lobbying request. Second, instead of dividing grade 8 classes

into four they just maintain three sections with the biggest class size of 50 to avoid overload of

subjects. Third, took the item borrowed by Ilaya National High School. Fourth minimizes the

break time to meet the eight subject periods schedule per day for a more convenient schedule

both for teachers and students.

In order to address the gap or shortages of teachers the School Head of Matuyatuya

National High Schoolintroduced these strategies:

First every year the School Head requested additional teachers from the Division.

Second, always persistent to follow up request.

Generally, each school received the plantilla item from the Division Office (DO) except

for the Marinduque National High School since it is the biggest school with complete

administrative and promotional staff which is responsible for hiring processes. The DO selects
and hires the teachers. The School Head s can request and follow-up for additional teachers,

but the decision and approval still lie in the hands of the Division Superintendent.

The most common reasons as to the Status of compliance of teachers per school were

proven in a study of Mkandawire S. B. (2010) one of the impediments in implementing the new

curriculum is the shortage of teachers. We cannot deny the fact that human resource in

curriculum implementation is very important since they are the ones the adopt and implement

the ideas and aspirations of the designers. This implies that the success of the curriculum

depends on the teachers (Okello and Kagoire 1996). A sufficient supply of trained teachers is,

therefore, needed if the implementation of the curriculum is to be effective. According to Jesus

Mateo, DepEd assistant secretary, said that the shortage is due to the lack of budget for the

salaries of new teachers.

When a school does not have enough teachers, the few are overstretched/overloaded; in

the case of high schools, for example, where there is specialization in terms of teaching

subjects, some subjects are taught by Non Major because of trained teachers in those subjects

are not available; this also results in multiple subject preparation for teachers hence they are

overworked which in return affects their capacity to teach effectively. Such hindrances are also

found in all schools which is also true in the study of Mkandawire.

In an article Malipot stated that in a policy paper published on October 5 in time for

2014 World Teachers Day (WTD) celebration, UNESCO, said that chronic lack of trained

teachers remains a challenge in achieving the Education For All (EFA) goals and without

action, it will be impossible to get all children into school by 2030.

Despite of the press released of DEPED that there will be no shortages in the end of SY

2014-2015 a shortage of more than 200,000 classrooms and 100,000 teachers faces students in
elementary and high schools this coming school year 20152016 with the implementation of the

K to 12 program, a lawmaker said.

In an article published in Manila Standard on May 21, 2015, Kabataan Party-list Rep.

Terry Ridon said that with over 21 million basic education students in all Statuss expected to

enroll for school year 2015-2016, the Philippines will still need a total of 209,539 classrooms,

given the ratio of one classroom per 30 students.

Table 12.

Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Classroom Gap.

Actions Buena Bognu Landy Marin Matuy Mogp


vista yan NHS duque atuya og
NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
1. Coordinates properly with the PTA Officers and members for
projects.
2. Includes in the School Improvement Plan and Senior High
School Projection Tool for budgeting.
3. Proper coordination with stakeholders thru report and regular
PTA meeting and asking 100 % support.
4. Asks the support or donation from of different stakeholders like
Philippine Chamber of Commerce and Industries, and
government agencies like DPWH and DOLE
5. Requests additional classroom from the Division Office
6. Requests additional classroom from the Division Office thru
Parent Teacher Associations.
7. Sends letter and reactions to linkages like private companies in
Manila as for possible donations.
8. Distributes the student to available classroom resulting to bigger
class size.
9. Split or divided classrooms into two
10. Uses covered court and loose board as divider to have
classroom

Table12 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Classroom
Gap. Data revealed that the common practices of school heads were coordinating properly with
the PTA Officers and members for projects, included in the School Improvement Plan and
Senior High School Projection Tool for budgeting, requested additional classroom from the
Division Office, distributed the student to available classroom resulting to bigger class size.

Actions made by the School Head to comply with the gap for seats.
In order to address the gap or shortages of the seats School Head of Bognuyan
National High School introduced these strategies:
First, requested chairs from DEPED and included chairs in the Annual Procurement
Plan. Second repaired chairs.
Rank fourth is Buenavista National High School with 483 available seats, the standard
required seats for their enrollment is 650 resulted to a gap of 350 corresponding to 43.75 %. The
school only borrowed excess chairs from other annexes like Sihi Annex. Some of their chairs
are not in good condition like lacking strips of wood no arm chairs etc.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the seats School Head of Landy National
High School introduced these strategies:
First Requested chairs from DEPED through the annual procurement plan. Second,
repaired some chairs through the assistance of the PTA. Third used the income from the
canteen to buy other needs of the school such as chairs.
The shortages of chairs become plastic gap because those chairs which were repaired
and bought outside MOOE were not included in the inventory.
Actions made by the School Head to comply with the gap for seats.
In order to address the gap or shortages of the seats School Head of Matuyatuya
National High School introduced these strategies:
First, requested chairs from DEPED and included chairs in the Annual Procurement
Plan. Second repaired chairs.
In order to address the gap or shortages of the seats School Head of Buenavista
National High School introduced these strategies:
First, requested chairs from DEPED and included chairs in the Annual Procurement
Plan. Second repaired chairs.Third borrowed chairs from Sihi Annex.
In order to address the gap or shortages of the seats School Head of Marinduque
National High School introduced these strategies:
First, requested chairs from DEPED and included chairs in the Annual Procurement
Plan. Second, asked the support of parents to repair chairs . Third presented the problems to the
stakeholders through meetings and Alumni Homecoming the alumni granted their request.
Table 13.
Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Learning Materials Gap.

Actions Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog


NHS NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
1. Appropriate and give enough school supplies
like manila paper, marker and ink, paper, pencil

and other needed materials as support to the
teachers to use substitute
2. Allows teachers to use the photocopier in the
school to have additional copies of learning
materials
3. Allows teachers to search online based on the
curriculum guide, utilizing their own internet
connection and printer donated by the alumni.
4. Encourages students to photocopy the learning

materials or module if needed.
5. Allows teachers to use the available copies
issued by DEPED and acquire additional photo
copies as projects of students
6. Supports the used of multimedia tools and

equipment in the classrooms.
7. Supports teachers to use Manila Paper or
blackboard to copy important information from
the teachers guide.
8. Motivates teachers and students towards
independent learning by giving advance topics
to their students as assignment.
9. Supports the concepts of diversity among
learners by the used of multimedia tools and

equipment in the classrooms and other learning
activities suited for learners.
10. Strengthen linkages to different stakeholders

for other possible book donors.
11. Asks the help of Children International for

donations of books as reference materials
12. Motivates and acknowledges the initiative of
the teachers in finding available resources like

borrowing materials from other Division and
photocopy it.
13. Solicits support from stakeholders to acquire

additional reference books.

The table 13 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the learners
materials gap. Data exposed that the common practices of school heads were allows teachers to
search online based on the curriculum guide, utilizing their own internet connection and printer
donated by the alumni, encourages students to photocopy the learning materials or module if
needed; allows teachers to use the available copies issued by DEPED and acquire additional
photo copies as projects of students; supports the used of multimedia tools and equipment in the
classrooms; supports teachers to use Manila Paper or blackboard to copy important information
from the teachers guide or learners materials; and motivates teachers and students towards
independent learning by giving advance topics to their students as assignment.
These actions made by the school heads only shows that teachers were all involve. The
teachers play important role in the learning process and in finding resources especially with
regards to educational materials.

In order to address the gap or shortages of learning material the School Head ofLandy

National High School introduced these strategies:

First, allowed teachers to search online based on the curriculum guide, utilizing their

own internet connection and printer donated by the alumni.

Second, encouraged students to photocopy the learning materials or module if needed.

Third, encouraged teachers to use technology like laptops to show important information

or activities to their students.

Fourth, motivated teachers and students towards independent learning by giving

advance topics to their students as assignment. Many students in Landy NHS have their own

laptop and internet connection, therefore students research the topic on their own.

Fifth, make use of substitute reference like old textbooks that contains the same

competencies to achieve 1:1 ratio.

In order to address the gap or shortages of classroom the School Head of Matuyatuya

National High School introduced these strategies:

First, allowed teachers to use the available copy issued during the training and a few

copies delivered from DEPED.

Third, teachers made use of technology like laptops and projectors to show important

information or activities to their students. Fourth, permits teachers to use a substitute reference

like old textbooks that contains the same competencies. Fifth, permitted the used by other
available reference like old textbooks. Sixth, supports the used of multimedia tools and

equipment in the classrooms.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the learning materials School Head of

Marinduque National High School introduced these strategies:

First, encouraged students to photocopy the needed learning materials or module.

Second, reminded teachers to use ICT by searching online for the topics or lessons based

on the curriculum guide.

Third, advised teachers used technology like laptops to show important information or

activities to their students.

Fourth, permitted the used by other available reference like old textbooks.

Fifth, encouraged students and teacher to adopt independent learning using technology

and to become resourceful.

Sixth, supports the used of multimedia tools and equipment in the classrooms.

In order to address the gap or shortages of classroom the School Head of Mogpog

National Comprehensive High School introduced these strategies:

First, advised teachers to use the photocopier in the school to have additional copies of

learning materials. That is for free since the operational cost and the machine were from the

payment of the test paper.

Second, motivates and acknowledge the initiative of the teachers in finding available

resources like borrowing materials from other Division and photocopy it.
Third, inspired teachers to utilize and maximized the use of technology by being a good

example and providing the technology by purchasing printers, LCD projectors. LED large

screen TV and Multimedia player.

Fourth, supports the concepts of diversity among learners by the used of multimedia

tools and equipment in the classrooms and other learning activities suited for learners.

Fifth, supports the needs of the teachers by providing enough supplies of Manila paper,

inks, markers, bond paper, pen and other school/office supplies

Sixth, solicited the support of NGO to acquire reference books. Childrens International

granted the requested books of the School Head of Mogpog NCHS which is about 20,000 pcs

or one truck. The transportation expenses of the books were shouldered by the Division office

of Marinduque. Some books were distributed to other schools. The donated books were not part

of the inventory and it can only use as a substitute or additional reference, hence it cannot fill

the gap since there are specific books for each curriculum or subjects.

It is noticeable that there is a massive gap for the textbooks or learning materials in all

selected schools with an average of 60.82 % gap rate. During the time of study and after the

third year of implementation the learning materials of Grade 7 are not yet complete there are no

modules for English Grade 7 to 9. There are no available learners' materials (LM) for TLE 9 and

10, the teachers/trainers are encouraged to make their own LM. The percentage of gap rate is

very much close to one another. During seminars and trainings, teacher shares the same burden

like they shoulder the cost of printing and photocopy of materials needed for their lessons.

Teachers bought a laptop and internet modem to find the required resources. Based on the

curriculum guide, teachers search online for the topics or lessons and pay the expenses on their
own. They are using old reference materials or any materials that can be used as substitute

reference especially in Filipino.

The most common reasons as to the Status of compliance of the School Head per

school were also stated in the reports in Philippine Daily Inquirer. During the school year 2013-

2014, the workbooks for Lakan Dula High School in Tondo, Manila, arrived during the 3rd and

4th quarters. Before these arrivals, teachers had to photocopied materials and distribute these to

their students. The unavailability of learning materials is just one of the problems still hounding

the countrys new basic education program, K to 12, in the three years of its implementation.

Yen Paunan, a Grade 7 Filipino teacher at Caloocan High School, said they are utilizing

Kayumanggi, a textbook used in the previous curriculum, in their classes due to the absence

of reference materials from DepEd. This situation is very similar to the schools in the Division

of Marinduque.

In the same article Dr. Elvin Uy, K to 12 program coordinators of the Department of

Education, admitted that there have been delays in the past in the delivery of learning materials

such as activity sheets and modules for the students. Last year, they were targeting to deliver

them during the first week of classes but they still failed. Uy admitted that there were really

situations where in the materials were not received by the schools.

Table 14. Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Seats Gap.
Actions Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduq Matuyatu Mogpog
NHS NHS ue NHS ya NHS NCHS
1. Presents the problems to the stakeholders
through meetings and Alumni Homecoming
to ask support for the project
2. Requests chairs from DEPED
3. Repairs damaged chairs thru as a project
or as a requirement.
4. Repairs some chairs through the
assistance of PTA.
5. Requests for additional chairs is included in
the Annual Procurement Plan
6. Borrows chairs from other school
The table 14 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the teachers gap.

Actions made by the School Head to comply with the gap for seats.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the seats School Head of Bognuyan

National High School introduced these strategies:

First, requested chairs from DEPED and included chairs in the Annual Procurement Plan.

Second repaired chairs.

Rank fourth is Buenavista National High School with 483 available seats, the standard

required seats for their enrollment is 650 resulted to a gap of 350 corresponding to 43.75 %. The

school only borrowed excess chairs from other annexes like Sihi Annex. Some of their chairs

are not in good condition like lacking strips of wood no arm chairs etc.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the seats School Head of Landy National

High School introduced these strategies:

First Requested chairs from DEPED through the annual procurement plan. Second,

repaired some chairs through the assistance of the PTA. Third used the income from the canteen

to buy other needs of the school such as chairs.

The shortages of chairs become plastic gap because those chairs which were repaired and

bought outside MOOE were not included in the inventory.

Actions made by the School Head to comply with the gap for seats.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the seats School Head of Matuyatuya

National High School introduced these strategies:

First, requested chairs from DEPED and included chairs in the Annual Procurement Plan.

Second repaired chairs.


In order to address the gap or shortages of the seats School Head of Buenavista

National High School introduced these strategies:

First, requested chairs from DEPED and included chairs in the Annual Procurement

Plan.

Second repaired chairs.Third borrowed chairs from Sihi Annex.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the seats School Head of Marinduque

National High School introduced these strategies:

First, requested chairs from DEPED and included chairs in the Annual Procurement

Plan.

Second, asked the support of parents to repair chairs . Third presented the problems to

the stakeholders through meetings and Alumni Homecoming the alumni granted their request.

Table 15

Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Sanitation Facility Gap.

Actions Buenavista Bognuyan Landy NHS Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog


NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
1. Presents the problems to the PTA
through meetings and request to them
as their project.
2. Presents the problems to the Alumni
and asked for possible donations
3. Charges materials and labor from
MOOE
4. Uses income from Canteen to buy the
appropriate materials for sanitation
facility

Table 15 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Sanitation

Facility Gap. Data exposed that presenting the problems to the stakeholders through meetings

and Alumni Homecoming to ask support for the project is very effective The actions provided

by the School Heads were basically the same they utilize stake holders to generate funds and put

sanitation facilities.
Table 16.

Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Computer Laboratory Gap.

Actions Made by the School Heads to Buenavis Bognuya Landy Marinduq Matuyatu Mogpog
Comply with the Computer Laboratory Gap. ta NHS n NHS NHS ue NHS ya NHS NCHS
1. Makes the necessary preparations to have
computer laboratory for the incoming sets of
computer
2. Request computers to support ICT
Integration from different Local Government
and other National Government Agencies
3. Used the old computer laboratory as the

counterpart of the school.
4. Provides short but meaningful hands-on
exercises by using relevant and up to date

software such as Power Director and
others.
5. Divides the TLE subjects class into two
groups to maintain 1:1 ratio of student to
computer inside the lab
6. Offer Computer subjects for all Grade 9 and
Grade 10 students to ensure that all

students are ICT Literate before going to
College
7. Uses the computer fee for the maintenance
and other expenses related to ICT
maintenance.
8. Selected students like Science Class were

only given Computer subjects

Table 16 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Sanitation

Facility Gap. The information provided by the school heads were made the necessary

preparations to have computer laboratory for the incoming sets of computer, requested

computers to support ICT Integration from different Local Government and other National

Government Agencies. The actions once again prove that stake holders are important partners in

the implementation of the Education Curriculum.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the computer laboratory and access to
technology School Head of Marinduque National High School introduced these strategies:
First, requested computer units from DepEd. Received new E-classroom Package with

latest software such as Microsoft Office 2013 and with the required specification.

Secondary E-classroom Package:


Eight (8) Host PC,
Forty Two (42) Monitors,
42 Access Terminals / Desktop Virtualization Kits,
8 UPS,
1 Printer,
1 switch
Second, the School Head made used of the old computer laboratory as counterpart of

the school as required by the DEPED.

Third, limits the use of computer laboratory. The new Computer laboratory is being used

by the Junior High School TechVoc/TVL Track such as Contact Center Services (CCS) and

Computer Hardware Servicing (CHS). It is also use for Basic Computer for the Science Class

and Grade 7 and 8 Exploratory subjects in ICT under Technology and Livelihood Education

subject. However other students who do not belong to any of these will not be able to use

computer and might not be able to acquire basic computer skills.

Fourth, placed six sets of computer with internet connection in the library which can be

used by students during their library period in order for them to have access to information and

be equipped with ICT skills

Fifth, acknowledged the effort of the teachers in using the available resources in the

vicinity or at home to encourage students for their research work. The location of the school is

very strategic for the access of information through Internet because there is several internet

providers available which offers fastest connection unlike other schools. There are many

internet shops or kiosks that offer computer services with a very reasonable price and

sometimes offer student promo like 2+1 which means there is a free one (1) hour for every two

hours rental.
Sixth, took advantage of the characteristics of the students being digital natives

especially those who were born in municipal areas of Boac, thus the school staff particularly

the teachers used this as an advantage to equip their students with Media and Information

Literacy skills.

Seventh, recognized the effort of teachers who still consumed their own salary to

provide the needed technology for their students like bringing their own laptop and buying or

availing internet access in school and at home.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the Computer Laboratory And Access To

Technology School Head of Mogpog National Comprehensive High School introduced

these strategies:

First, Strengthen linkages with stakeholders. Mogpog NCHS received 10 units from

Department of Trade Industry during the school year 2001-2002 and 21 units from Commission

on Information and Communication Technology in the school year 2007-2008. Even the units

are a little bit old maintenance of computers is one of key factor why the school has 14 available

workstation or computers as of the start of school year 2015. The rest of the non-functional

computer units are being used for computer assembly and disassembly.

Second, requested computer units and was granted with a complete set of E-classroom

Package but not yet delivered.

Third, made the necessary preparations for the incoming sets of computer. Acquiring

computers and computer laboratory requires collaborative effort and partnership with all stake

holders hence the School Head prepared for their counterpart such as Laboratory room,

computer tables, mono chairs, sufficient lighting, windows and doors with iron grills, proper
electrical wirings with circuit breaker and proper electrical grounding, standard electrical outlets

with appropriate load capacity.

Fourth the School Head coordinated with the Barangay Captain for the assistance of

Barangay Officials for security mechanism and assigned one Barangay Police as Security at

night.

Fifth, found donor for two stand fan and still looking for stakeholders or linkages for the

air-condition unit. The stand fan or air-condition unit are requirements for laboratory to

maintain proper ventilation.

Sixth, acknowledged the initiative of the ICT Coordinator who maintains and trouble

shoot computers to prolong the lives of computer.

Seventh, executed the following measures to answer the need to have ICT Integration

and 21st Literacy skills the school particularly Basic Computer skills:

i. For the old curriculum known as Revised Basic Education Curriculum (RBEC),

administrator divided TLE subject for the Third and the Fourth year students into

two clusters the Computer Class and Cookery Class. They have to attend both

subjects as scheduled. With this program students of Mogpog NCHS graduated as

computer literate.

ii. For K to 12 Basic Education Curriculum (K to 12) the administrator scheduled 2

hours a week computer class for Grade 7 and Grade 8. This serve as special class

program since in K to 12 TLE teachers should specifically follow the curriculum

guide; teachers/trainers cannot just alter the content and competencies. Although

Basic Computer based on workplace or job requirement is part of TLE TecVoc

Track Specialized subjects for Grade 9 to 12 they still opt to provide computer class.
School Head encouraged teachers to support ICT Integration Program of the Division

Office not just by using technology in teaching but by reinforcing skills by integrating the

acquired knowledge to develop informations

In order to address the gap or shortages of the computer laboratory and access to

technology School Head of Buenavista National High School introduced these strategies:

First, requested computer units and was granted with a complete set of E-classroom

Package but not yet delivered.

Second, made the necessary preparations for the incoming sets of computer.such as

Laboratory room, computer tables, mono chairs, sufficient lighting, windows and doors with

iron grills, proper electrical wirings with circuit breaker and proper electrical grounding,

standard electrical outlets with appropriate load capacity.

Third, obtained a strong linkage with Philippine Long Distance Telephone Company

(PLDT). PLDT provided an opportunity for trainings and seminars. The School Head and

ICT Coordinator of BNHS together with other ICT Coordinator of other schools were able to

attend a three days free training program in Networking and Fundamental Operations in

Computer. They were also able to attend a Pay tribute to teachers in Manila courtesy of PLDT

through the initiative of the school of Buenavista NHS.

Fourth, the School Head together with BNHS Supreme Student Government (SSG)

conducted a signature campaign entitled Star Ng Pasko 2014. This project helped the school

acquire Multimedia Package. They were able to procure a sound system, microphone and

multimedia player which can help students to develop their Multimedia Literacy and address

Diversity of Learners.
Fifth, received an Acer LED projector a donation from their Alumna, which completes

the Multimedia Package of the school.

Sixth, executed the following measures to answer the need to have ICT Integration:

i. To provide students with the Basic Computer skills the administrator scheduled

Computer Subject for the Science Class and Fourth year classes for four days a

week.

ii. Took advantage on the available resources aside from WIT, like 3G technologies

where internet connection is quite good and fast. Students who live in central or

downtown areas have better chances to acquire gadgets such as laptop, smart

phones, modem or pocket Wi-Fi they have a choice to look for other internet

provider but due to availability of funds the administration together with the

teachers just provide students activities that will engage them to use their computer

skills.

iii. The administration and the parents made an agreement that students can bring their

own gadgets like laptops especially during computer class. The parents and the

teachers are willing to shoulder their own expenses for the accessibility of the

technology. This is one of the reasons why most of the students and teachers are

research oriented especially the science classes.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the computer laboratory and access to

technology School Head of Bognuyan National High School introduced these strategies:

First, requested computer units from DepEd. Their request was granted but not yet

delivered. Second, solicits support of different stakeholders for other materials needed for the

computer laboratory. Third, conducted consultation and planning with school officials and
personnel to solicit ideas and support to solve problems. Fourth, scheduled regular meeting with

stakeholders such as PTA, Barangay Official and other volunteers.

Fifth, involve stakeholders on relevant school activities to solicit more supports. Sixth,

used the computer fee for the maintenance and other expenses related to computer. Seventh,

executed the following measures to answer the need to have ICT Integration:

i. For Basic Computer skills the administrator scheduled Computer Subject for the

Science Classes and Fourth year classes for four days a week.

ii. Provided short but meaningful hands-on exercises by using relevant and up to date

software such as Power Director and others.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the computer laboratory and access to

technology the School Head of Landy National High School introduced these strategies:

First, requested computer units from DepEd.

Second, solicited support of different stakeholders for other materials needed for the

computer laboratory as a result they received 11 computer units from Department of Education

Computerization Program Batch 6 and 1 unit from Hon. Gina Reyes

Third, asked the support of alumni and received one HP printer from them.

Fourth, executed the following measures to answer the need to have ICT Integration:

i. Scheduled Computer Subjects for all Grade 10 students and Grade 8 Science class.

ii. Used the laboratory for Computer Hardware Servicing Workshop.

iii. Allowed students to bring their own laptop and other gadgets for their school

activities. Encourage teachers and students to engage in ICT Literacy or ICT

Integration.

Fifth, acknowledge the effort of teachers who shoulder their own expenses to access

technology in order for them to provide meaningful learning experience for the students.
Sixth, acknowledge the support of the stakeholders specially the parents in proving the

needs of the learner. Promote

Seventh, promoting BrigadaEskwela to achieve 100 % participation of stakeholders

In order to address the gap or shortages of the computer laboratory and access to

technology the School Head of Matuyatuya National High School introduced these

strategies:

First, requested computer units from DepEd.

Second, solicited support of different stakeholders

Third, executed the following measures to answer the need to have ICT Integration:

i. Scheduled Computer class for TLE Exploratory subjects Grade 7 and Grade 8. They

divide the program as laboratory and lecture to fit in the schedule.

ii. Used the laboratory for Computer Hardware Servicing Workshop.

iii. Allowed teachers to bring their own laptops.

Fourth, Promote Year Round BrigadaEskwela to achieve 100% participation of

stakeholders

Information and Communications Technologies (ICT) education is basically our

societys efforts to teach its current and emerging citizens valuable knowledge and skills around

computing and communications devices. ICT is the heart and hands of education in this

generation.

The technology includes computer laboratory, computers or smart phones, internet

connection, software that operates them, applications that run on them and systems that are built

with them. Without these tools learning process will not be realistic since these are the

important components for ICT or Digital Literacy.


Today, everyone needs a basic understanding of ICT and how to use it productively.

Students should know how are they deployed, assembled, managed and maintained to create

productive outputs or systems. How they are used in specific business and industry settings.

They should understand the underlying science and technologies behind them and how might

those be developed to advance ICT fields.

ICT curriculum standards for K-12 schools in the Philippines will serve as a framework

for technology integration in various academic content area instructions from kindergarten

through grade 12, function as a guide for curriculum decisions by providing student

performance expectations in the areas of knowledge, skills and attitudes, and provide examples

of classroom activities and instructional strategies utilizing ICT that will guide teachers as they

design instruction to help their students meet learning expectations.

As the data disclosed there is very huge gap in Computer Facilities. Even all schools

have internet access the bandwidth is not enough to provide the services and speed needed to be

able to use the technology efficiently. This data is justified by the research conducted by Tinio

in 2002 which is also supported by other articles.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the science laboratory and access to

technology the School Head of Mogpog National Comprehensive High School introduced

these strategies:

First, monitored tools, equipment and materials available.

Second, realigned MOOE fund to purchase the needed construction materials for the

science lab.

Third, used the excess room as the target science laboratory, hence the excess room

became one.
In order to address the gap or shortages of the science laboratory and access to

technology the School Head of Marinduque National High School introduced these

strategies:

Table 17.

Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Science Laboratory Gap

Actions Buenavi Bognuya Landy Marindu Matuyat Mogpog


sta NHS n NHS NHS que uya NHS NCHS
NHS
1. Solicits donations from different
Stakeholders like Alumni
2. Uses MOOE fund to purchase
the needed construction
materials for the science lab.
3. Uses the excess room as the
target Science Laboratory

Table 17 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the computer
laboratory gap. Since only two were not able to comply with Science Laboratory few actions
were taken.
Table 18

Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Gap in Sports Facilities and Equipment

Actions Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog


NHS NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
1. Uses MOOE fund to purchase the needed sports
materials
2. Solicits donation from different Stakeholders
a. PTA
b. Alumni
c. Municipal (LGU)
d. NGO
e. Private Individual
Table 18 pertains to the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the sports
facilities and equipment gap.
Data exposed Uses MOOE fund to purchase the needed sports materials is very
effective with aggetivial equivalent of 3.49 while soliciting donation from private individual
got the lowest registered aggitivial equivalent of 3.00 which is effective.
Table 19. Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Gap in Music Room
Actions Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog
NHS NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
1. Uses MOOE fund to purchase the needed
sports materials
2. Solicits donation from different Stakeholders
a. PTA
b. Alumni
c. Municipal (LGU)
d. NGO
e. Private Individual

Table 19 provides the data on the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the
sports music room gap.
Data exposed Uses MOOE fund to purchase the needed sports materials is effective
with aggetivial equivalent of 3.41 while soliciting donation from private individual got the
lowest registered aggitivial equivalent of 2.45 which is effective.
Table 20.
Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Gap in Arts Room

Actions Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog


NHS NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
1. Used MOOE fund to purchase the
needed materials
2. Solicits donation from different
Stakeholders like
a. PTA

b. Alumni
c. Municipal (LGU)
d. NGO
e. Private Individual

Table 20 contains the results of actions made by the School Heads to comply with the

gap in arts room. Results indicates that Arts Room is not at the top priority of the School Heads.

Table 21.

Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Gap in Workshops

Actions Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog


NHS NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
1. Used MOOE fund to purchase the needed
materials
Solicits donation from different Stakeholders like
a. PTA
b. Alumni
c. Municipal (LGU)
d. NGO
e. Private Individual
Table 21contains the results of actions made by the School Heads to comply with the

gaps forworkshops.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the Educational Facilities the School Head

of Landy National High School introduced these strategies:

First, strengthen linkages and open communication with the alumni. Second, promotes

the products in the school canteen for additional income, which can be used for the procurement

of materials. Third, supports the activities of the TLE teachers specifically in Foods to be more

innovative, productive and income generated. Fourth, used MOOE to purchased materials.

In order to address the gap for Educational Facilities the School Head of Bognuyan

NHS National Comprehensive High School had implemented the following:

First, strengthen linkages and open communication with the alumni. Second, looked for

other sources by looking for linkages outside Marinduque.Third, used MOOE for purchased

materials.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the Educational Facilities the School Head

of Benavista National High School introduced these strategies:

First, strengthen linkages and open communication with the alumni and stakeholders for

possible donations. Second, looked for other sources by looking for linkages outside

Marinduque. Third, used MOOE to purchased materials. Fourth, conducted income generated

project to purchase the needed materials.

In order to address the gap or shortages of the science laboratory and access to

technology the School Head of Marinduque National High School introduced these

strategies:
First, strengthened linkages and maintained an open communication with the alumni.

Second, they conduct yearly anniversary or reunion for their alumni and this promotes

partnership between them. Their alumni always support their needs the evidences are visible

with their facilities. Third, scheduled different activities like to promote camaraderie and

partnership among its stakeholders. Fourth engaged Alumni in meetings and decision making.

Fifth, used MOOE to purchased materials needed.

Almost all school do not have sports facilities for educational development and this is

due to no available funds. Schools depend only with its stakeholders as it is being enforced to

the School Head as an action to the bloating gap or shortages.

Landy National HighSchoolintroduced these strategies:

1. First, Requested from the division office.

2. Second, sough the support of the stakeholders

In order to address the gap or shortages for the needed workshop the School Head of

Bognuyan National High School and Buenavista National High School introduced these

strategies:

In order to address the gap for educational facilities the School Heads of all the six

schools have implemented the same strategies since they were advised to strengthen

partnershipwith the stakeholders.


4. EFFECTIVENESS OF ACTIONS MADE BY THE SCHOOL HEADS IN
ADDRESSING THE GAPS BASED ON TEACHERS PERCEPTION
Table 22.

Effectiveness of Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Teachers Gap
Actions Made by the School Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog MEAN
Heads to Comply with the NHS NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS Effectiveness
Teachers Gap
1) Requests additional 3.80 3.69 4.18 3.68 4.00 3.20 3.80 Very Effective
teachers from the Division
Office
2) Always persistent to follow 3.71 3.23 3.73 3.59 3.58 3.00 3.53 Very Effective
up request.
3) Introduces proper 3.69 3.31 4.00 3.52 3.40 3.00 3.51 Very Effective
projection.
4) Includes the request to the 3.47 3.23 3.70 3.52 3.10 3.20 3.40 Effective
Annual Budget and School
Improvement Plan.
5) Revises the School 3.44 3.31 3.90 3.33 3.00 3.00 3.35 Effective
Programs in order to
address overlapping of
works and schedule.
6) Distributes the excess load 3.48 2.69 3.82 3.27 2.82 2.80 3.20 Effective
to available teachers
resulting to overloading.
7) Minimizes the break time to 3.50 3.23 3.50 3.10 3.09 1.80 3.15 Effective
meet the eight periods per
day.
8) Takes the item borrowed 3.60 2.75 3.00 3.28 2.91 3.00 3.09 Effective
by other school
9) Maintains the bigger class 2.98 3.00 3.00 2.55 2.86 2.40 2.84 Effective
size.

Table 22 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the teachers gap.
Data revealed that requesting additional teachers from the Division Office is very effective with
aggetivial equivalent of 3.8, while maintaining bigger class size got the lowes registered
aggitivial equivalent of 2.84 which is effective.
This only proves that under normal condition and in all process, still the needed item or
shortage should be address to the Division Office as a standard operating procedures and
protocols. At the least the decissio in filling the gap is still vested on the proper appointing
authority.
Table 23.

Effectiveness of actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Classroom Gap.
actions Made by the School
Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog
Heads to Comply with the MEAN Effectiveness
NHS NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
Classroom Gap
1. Coordinates properly with
the PTA Officers and 3.83 3.62 4.30 4.27 3.91 3.40 3.99 Very Effective
members for projects.
2. Includes in the School
Improvement Plan and
Senior High School 3.87 3.54 4.36 4.00 3.64 4.20 3.90 Very Effective
Projection Tool for
budgeting.
3. Proper coordination with
stakeholders thru report
and regular PTA meeting 3.85 3.54 4.27 4.05 3.64 3.00 3.83 Very Effective
and asking 100 %
support.
4. Asks the support or
donation from of different
stakeholders like
Philippine Chamber of
3.36 3.23 3.91 3.73 3.45 4.20 3.82 Very Effective
Commerce and
Industries, and
government agencies like
DPWH and DOLE
5. Requests additional
classroom from the 3.52 3.38 3.09 3.55 3.36 3.40 3.40 Effective
Division Office
6. Requests additional
classroom from the
Division Office thru 3.71 3.25 3.00 3.45 3.55 3.25 3.35 Effective
Parent Teacher
Associations.
7. Sends letter and
resolution to linkages like
private companies in 3.35 3.23 2.91 3.45 3.45 2.80 3.24 Effective
Manila as for possible
donations.
8. Distributes the excess
load to available
3.53 2.92 3.36 3.27 2.91 3.20 3.20 Effective
classroom resulting to
bigger class size.
9. Always follow up request
from different companies 3.26 3.00 2.64 3.00 3.09 2.60 2.94 Effective
in Manila.
10. Split or divided two
2.96 2.92 3.00 2.38 2.60 1.40 2.62 Effective
classrooms

Table 23 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Classroom
Gap. Data revealed that coordinating properly with the PTA officers and member for projects
registerd as Very Effective with aggetivial equivalent of 3.99, while Spliting or dividing two
classrooms got the lowes registered aggitivial equivalent of 2.62 which is effective.
This only implies that Parent Teacher Association plays an important role in School
development programs. They immediately act or give remedy on problems. Splitting or dividing
classroom into two has the lowest equivalent rate since it has a negative effect on the learners.
Table 24.

Effectiveness of Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Textbook Gap.

Actions Made by the School Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog MEAN Effectiveness
Heads to Comply with the NHS NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
Textbook Gap.
1. Appropriate and give 4.01 3.77 4.00 4.05 3.91 4.20 3.97 Very Effective
enough school supplies
like manila paper, marker
and ink, paper, pencil and
other needed materials
as support to the
teachers to use substitute
2. Allows teachers to use 3.60 3.08 4.00 4.18 3.64 3.60 3.76 Very Effective
the photocopier in the
school to have additional
copies of learning
materials
3. Allows teachers to search 3.77 2.92 3.55 4.86 3.00 3.00 3.73 Very Effective
online based on the
curriculum guide, utilizing
their own internet
connection and printer
donated by the alumni.
4. Encourages students to 3.73 3.00 4.18 4.09 3.55 3.00 3.72 Very Effective
photocopy the learning
materials or module if
needed.
5. Allows teachers to use 3.74 3.15 4.09 4.05 3.55 3.20 3.70 Very Effective
the available copies
issued by DEPED and
acquire additional photo
copies as projects of
students
6. Supports the used of 3.83 3.31 4.00 3.90 3.36 3.25 3.69 Very Effective
multimedia tools and
equipment in the
classrooms.
7. Supports teachers to use 3.75 3.33 3.64 3.77 3.45 3.40 3.61 Very Effective
Manila Paper or
blackboard to copy
important information
from the teachers guide.
8. Motivates teachers and 3.80 3.31 3.82 3.77 3.45 3.00 3.59 Very Effective
students towards
independent learning by
giving advance topics to
their students as
assignment.
9. Supports the concepts of 3.69 3.46 4.09 3.45 3.55 2.80 3.54 Very Effective
diversity among learners
by the used of multimedia
tools and equipment in
the classrooms and other
learning activities suited
for learners.
10. Strengthen linkages to 3.45 3.33 3.64 3.27 3.18 3.00 3.30 Effective
different stakeholders for
other possible book
donors.
11. Asks the help of Children 3.58 3.00 3.64 3.23 3.36 3.20 3.29 Effective
International for
donations of books as
reference materials
12. Motivates and 3.54 3.25 3.18 3.55 2.73 3.40 3.28 Effective
acknowledges the
initiative of the teachers
in finding available
resources like borrowing
materials from other
Division and photocopy it.
13. Solicits support from 3.41 3.08 3.36 3.59 3.00 2.80 3.27 Effective
stakeholders to acquire
additional reference
books.

The table 23 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the teachers
gap. Data revealed that Appropriating and giving enough school supplies like manila paper,
marker and ink, paper, pencil and other needed materials as support to the teachers to use
substitute is very effective with aggetivial equivalent of 3.97, while Solicits support from
stakeholders to acquire additional reference books.got the lowest registered aggitivial
equivalent of 3.27 which is effective.
The result shows that the huge shortages in textbook proves that DEPED cant provide
the needed materials due to the different constraints like budget and mode of delivery. This
situation initiated the teachers and the school head to used alternative actions.

Table 24.

Effectiveness Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Seats Gap.

Actions Made by the Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog MEAN Effectiveness
School Heads to Comply NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
with the Seats Gap.
1. Presents the problems to 3.62 3.54 3.82 3.73 3.55 3.00 3.61 Very Effective
the stakeholders through
meetings and Alumni
Homecoming to ask
support for the project
2. Requests chairs from 3.61 3.69 3.82 3.68 3.27 3.20 3.59 Very Effective
DEPED
3. Repairs damaged chairs 3.51 3.46 3.45 3.86 3.55 4.00 3.54 Very Effective
thru as a project or as a
requirement.
4. Repairs some chairs 3.45 3.38 3.45 3.52 3.45 2.60 3.41 Effective
through the assistance of
PTA.
5. Requests for additional 3.64 3.23 3.50 3.62 2.82 3.20 3.35 Effective
chairs is included in the
Annual Procurement Plan
6. Borrows chairs from other 3.13 2.42 2.70 2.19 2.45 2.40 2.48 Somewhat
school Effective

The table 24 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the teachers
gap. Data exposed that presenting the problems to the stakeholders through meetings and
Alumni Homecoming to ask support for the project is very effective with aggetivial equivalent
of 3.61, while Borrows chairs from other school got the lowest registered aggitivial equivalent
of 2.48 which is somewhat effective.
The data affirmed that the Stakeholders like Alumni as proven by experience play
partners in achieving the goal or projects in every public school. Borrowing chairs form other
school is considered somewhat effective since it is not practiced by the school heads and not
long time or permanent solution to the gap.
Table 25

Effectiveness of Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Sanitation Facility Gap.

Actions Made by the


School Heads to Comply Buenavista Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog
Bognuyan MEAN Effectiveness
with the Sanitation NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
Facility Gap.
1. Presents the problems 3.70 3.62 3.82 3.91 3.64 3.60 3.74 Very Effective
to the PTA through
meetings and request
to them as their
project.
2. Presents the problems 3.56 3.46 3.64 3.82 3.64 3.40 3.60 Very Effective
to the Alumni and
asked for possible
donations
3. Charges materials and 3.71 3.15 3.55 3.59 3.45 3.20 3.47 Effective
labor from MOOE
4. Uses income from 3.16 2.92 3.45 3.29 2.91 2.60 3.13 Effective
Canteen to buy the
appropriate materials
for sanitation facility

Table 25 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Sanitation
Facility Gap. Data exposed that presenting the problems to the stakeholders through meetings
and Alumni Homecoming to ask support for the project is very effective with aggetivial
equivalent of 3.74, while Uses income from Canteen to buy the appropriate materials for
sanitation facility got the lowest registered aggitivial equivalent of 3.13 which is effective.
The data strongly implies that the Stakeholders like Alumni as proven by experience
play partners in achieving the goal or projects in every public school. In almost all schools their
sanitation facilities were basically from donations of alumni and parents.
Table 26. Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Computer Laboratory
Gap.
Actions Made by the School
Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog
Heads to Comply with the MEAN Effectiveness
NHS NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS
Computer Laboratory Gap.
1. Makes the necessary
preparations to have
computer laboratory for Very
4.22 3.67 4.30 3.55 4.00 3.40 3.92
the incoming sets of Effective
computer

2. Request computers to
support ICT Integration
from different Local
Very
Government and other 4.11 3.50 3.90 3.36 3.95 3.20 3.76
Effective
National Government
Agencies

3. Used the old computer


laboratory as the Very
4.00 3.50 3.78 3.36 3.60 3.20 3.60
counterpart of the school. Effective

4. Provides short but


meaningful hands-on
exercises by using
Very
relevant and up to date 4.11 3.42 3.67 3.36 3.53 3.20 3.58
Effective
software such as Power
Director and others.

5. Divides the TLE subjects


class into two groups to
maintain 1:1 ratio of
3.78 3.17 4.10 2.64 3.00 3.88 3.25 Effective
student to computer
inside the lab

6. Offer Computer subjects


for all Grade 9 and
Grade 10 students to
ensure that all students 3.78 3.17 3.63 3.25 2.75 4.0 3.23 Effective
are ICT Literate before
going to College

7. Uses the computer fee


for the maintenance and
other expenses related to 3.56 3.58 3.20 2.45 3.14 3.00 3.16 Effective
ICT maintenance.

8. Selected students like


Science Class were only
3.67 2.92 2.63 2.00 2.61 1.80 2.70 Effective
given Computer subjects
Table 26 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the computer
laboratory gap. Data exposed making the necessary preparations to have computer laboratory
for the incoming sets of computer is very effective with aggetivial equivalent of 3.74, while
Selecting students to be given Computer subjects got the lowest registered aggitivial equivalent
of 3.13 which is effective.
The data strongly implies that the Stakeholders and partnership is also the main source
of computer facility. The preparation of computer laboratory and the acquisition of computer
units will not be possible without strong linkages to the Stakeholders. PTA addresses issues that
are important to parents and public school administrators. We fight for full funding, quality
teachers, and capabilities for schools to thrive.
Regarding alumni experiences, prior research has revealed that university legacies,

alumni who have family members who have also graduated from their alma mater, are good

donor prospects (Okunade and Berl, 1997; Wunnava and Lauze, 2001; Clotfelter, 2003a;

Holmes, 2008). After graduating, alumni who attend university events more frequently,

specifically reunions, are also more likely to contribute financially compared to alumni who are

not as frequently involved

The information gathered also proves that the the National budget is not enough to cater
the ICT needs of the schools.

Table 27.

Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Science Laboratory Gap

Actions Made by the School Heads


to Comply with the Science Buenavista Bognuyan Landy Marinduque Matuyatuya Mogpog
MEAN Effectiveness
Laboratory Gap NHS NHS NHS NHS NHS NCHS

4. Solicits donations from different 3.67 3.67 3.90 3.27 4.00 2.60 3.70 Very
Stakeholders like Alumni Effective
5. Uses MOOE fund to purchase 3.56 3.42 3.67 3.55 3.86 3.20 3.65 Very
the needed construction Effective
materials for the science lab.
6. Uses the excess room as the 3.56 3.25 3.75 3.27 3.71 3.60 3.29 Effective
target Science Laboratory
Table 27 shows the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the computer
laboratory gap.
Data exposed that Soliciting donations from different Stakeholders like Alumni is very
effective with aggetivial equivalent of 3.70, while Uses the excess room as the target Science
Laboratory got the lowest registered aggitivial equivalent of 3.29 which is effective.

Table 28 Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Gap in Sports Facilities and
Equipment
Actions

Matuyatuya
Landy NHS

Effectivene
Buenavista

Marinduqu
Bognuyan

Mogpog

ss
e NHS

MEAN
NCHS
NHS

NHS

NHS
1. Uses MOOE fund to purchase the 3.34 3.42 3.45 3.68 3.70 3.25 3.49 Effective
needed sports materials
2. Solicits donation from different
Stakeholders
a. PTA 3.29 3.42 3.33 3.86 3.14 3.00 3.46 Effective
b. Alumni 3.04 3.42 3.50 3.65 3.25 2.75 3.36 Effective
c. Municipal (LGU) 3.17 3.25 3.33 3.47 3.13 3.00 3.25 Effective
d. NGO 2.98 3.25 3.33 3.26 2.75 3.00 3.11 Effective
e. Private Individual 3.07 3.25 2.60 3.17 2.86 2.67 3.00 Effective
Table 28 pertains to the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the sports
facilities and equipment gap.
Data exposed Uses MOOE fund to purchase the needed sports materials is very
effective with aggetivial equivalent of 3.49 while soliciting donation from private individual
got the lowest registered aggitivial equivalent of 3.00 which is effective.

Table 29.

Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Gap in Music Room

Actions Made by the School Heads to


Buenavista

Effectivene
Landy NHS

Marinduqu

Matuyatuy
Bognuyan

Comply with the Gap in Music Room


Mogpog

ss
e NHS

a NHS

MEAN
NCHS
NHS

NHS

Uses MOOE fund to purchase the needed 3.61 2.92 3.64 3.57 3.27 3.40 3.41 Effective
sports materials
Solicits donation from different Stakeholders
PTA 3.58 3.00 3.64 3.23 3.36 3.20 3.30 Effective
Alumni 3.41 3.08 3.36 3.59 3.00 2.80 3.29 Effective
Municipal (LGU) 3.54 3.25 3.18 3.55 2.73 3.40 3.28 Effective
NGO 3.45 3.33 3.64 3.27 3.18 3.00 3.27 Effective
Private Individual 2.67 2.69 2.00 2.58 2.78 2.00 2.45 Somewhat Effective
Table 29 provides the data on the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the
sports music room gap.
Data exposed Uses MOOE fund to purchase the needed sports materials is effective
with aggetivial equivalent of 3.41 while soliciting donation from private individual got the
lowest registered aggitivial equivalent of 2.45 which is effective.
Table 30.

Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Gap in Arts Room

Actions Made by the School Heads to

Matuyatu
Buenavis

que NHS
Bognuya

Effective
Mogpog
Marindu

ya NHS
ta NHS

n NHS

MEAN
NCHS
Comply with the Gap in Arts Room
Landy

ness
NHS
Used MOOE fund to purchase the 3.13 3.31 3.22 3.55 3.27 2.75 3.28 Effective
needed materials
Solicits donation from different
Stakeholders like
PTA 2.72 3.00 3.17 3.20 3.22 2.50 3.02 Effective
Alumni 2.95 2.85 3.00 3.19 3.11 2.50 2.98 Effective
Municipal (LGU) 2.66 3.08 3.00 2.95 2.89 2.50 2.88 Effective
NGO 2.74 2.62 3.00 3.00 2.67 2.50 2.77 Effective
Private Individual 2.67 2.69 2.00 2.58 2.78 2.00 2.55 Effective
Table 30 contains the results of actions made by the School Heads to comply with the

gap in arts room.This shows that using MOOE fund to purchase the needed sports materials is

very effective with aggetivial equivalent of 3.28 while soliciting donation from private

individual got the lowest registered aggitivial equivalent of 2.55

Table 21. Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the Gap in Workshops
Actions
Effectiveness
Marinduque
Landy NHS

Matuyatuya
Buenavista

Bognuyan

Mogpog

MEAN
NCHS
NHS

NHS

NHS

NHS

2. Used MOOE fund to purchase 3.67 3.50 3.50 3.27 3.67 2.75 3.53 Very Effective
the needed materials
Solicits donation from different Stakeholders like
f. PTA 3.38 3.25 3.40 3.11 3.40 2.50 3.30 Effective
g. Alumni 3.29 3.17 3.60 3.22 3.37 2.50 3.29 Effective
h. Municipal (LGU) 3.43 3.08 3.40 2.67 3.11 2.50 3.09 Effective
i. NGO 3.00 3.25 3.40 2.89 3.05 2.50 3.09 Effective
j. Private Individual 3.13 3.17 3.00 2.78 3.00 2.00 3.04 Effective
Table 21 contains the results of actions made by the School Heads to comply with the

gap workshops.

The data revealed that Uses MOOE fund to purchase the needed sports materials is very

effective with aggetivial equivalent of 3.53 while soliciting donation from private individual

got the lowest registered aggitivial equivalent of 3.04 which is effective.

Based on the survey result the school MOOE is being utilized to procure the needed

materials and truly serve its purpose but the amount is not enough to fill the entire gap. Even

thou the used MOOE perceived as effective it is still constrained due to some limitations like

the maximum amount of materials or tools to be purchased should not exceed 10,000 php.

In general despite of the existing gaps, the perception of the teachers was mostly very

effective since the actions took placed and implemented. According to the respondents the

reasons of the high rate were that the problems were addressed even though the main problems

were not fully solved. Teachers commitments to provide service are very high because they are

willing to sacrifice in order to address the gap. For them the actions provided are better than to

wait for additional teachers, supplies or budget to arrive.


CHAPTER FIVE 5
SUMMARY, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

This chapter presents the summary of findings, conclusions and recommendations based

on the data analyzed in the previous chapter. Some limitations have been identified.

SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS

This study is conducted to determine Status of compliance of six selected Secondary

Schools in the Division of Marinduque when relates to RA 10533 Rule IX, Section 14 also

known as Mandatory Evaluation and Review

It aims to determine the result of the of assessment about the Status of compliance of six

selected schools in relation to Mandatory Review provisions as to the actual, standard and gap

per teachers, classrooms, textbooks, seats, toilets other learning facilities including, computer

and science laboratories, libraries and library hubs, and sports, music, arts and workshops

needs.

The results exposed that there were enormous gaps in all provisions except library and

library hub. In spite of the fact that each school meets the standard number of library required

but the regular manpower such as librarian and other materials were not met.

Actions Made by the School Heads to Comply with the GAP

Teachers

1. For the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the teachers data revealed that
requesting additional teachers from the Division Office is very effective.
Classroom

2. For the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Classroom Gaprevealed that
coordinating properly with the PTA officers and member for projects registered as Very
Effective.
Textbook

3. For the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the textbookgap revealedthat
appropriating and giving enough school supplies like manila paper, marker and ink, paper,
pencil and other needed materials as support to the teachers as substitute learning materials
registered as very effective.
Seats
4. For the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the seats gap, presenting the
problems to the stakeholders through meetings and Alumni Homecoming to ask support for
the project is found to be very effective.
Sanitation Facilities
5. Among the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Sanitation Facility Gap.
Data exposed that presenting the problems to the stakeholders through meetings and Alumni
Homecoming to ask support for the project is very effective.
Learning Facilities
6. The study shows that among the actions made by the School Heads to comply with the
different learning facilities like laboratories, libraries and library hubs, sports room, music
room, arts room and workshops needs, presenting the problems to the stakeholders through
meetings and Alumni Homecoming to ask support for the project revealed as very effective.
In almost all schools their sanitation facilities were basically from donations of alumni and
parents.

CONCLUSION

The result of assessment about the leveStatusl of compliance of selected schools when

relate to Mandatory Review provisions as to the actual, standard and gap per Teachers

classrooms, textbooks, seats, sanitation facilities, other learning facilities including, computer

and science laboratories, libraries and library hubs, and sports, music, arts and workshops needs

including actions made by the school heads in addressing the gaps are found to be inadequate.
RECOMMENDATION

In view of the conclusion drawn from the findings of this study, the following

recommendations are offered:

Administrator

The gaps in different provision must be address properly. The School Heads may direct

the concerns or problems to the proper authority and may strengthen its linkages to the different

stakeholders like Parents Teacher Association, alumni and Local Government Unit. Public

information may be one of the actions to the enormous gaps among all provision. If they have

suggestion and clarification, they may give factual information especially to the parents and

alumni which maybe one of the best source of donations.

Teachers

In order to address or solve the gaps especially in facilities and equipment the teachers

may also support the aim of the school by tapping alumni parents and other stakeholder for

possible donations. Teachersawareness about the Status of Compliance of implementation

particularly about the updates of the curriculum offering maybe necessary since they serve as

the battery of the program. Their awareness may help them to get ready and make possible

adjustments as early as possible.

Stakeholders and other Partners

Promotion of BAYANIHAN spirit maybe requested or urged from stakeholders and

partners. The given gaps in the different provision may serve as an information vehicle to

achieve the common goal and that is to promote quality education among the youth or future

labor force.
The informations and findings on this study may be published for public information

that may lead to awareness and involvement specially parents other stakeholders and DEPED

employees.

The educational system in the Philippines is not a standalone body. The success of the

new curriculum lies in the hands of everyone. Linkagesmay play an important part in the

success of the curriculum it is one of the best alternative in bloating shortages in the

implementation of K to 12 Curriculum.

For Future Researchers

The future researchers may conduct a study regarding the actual implementation of the

K to 12 Enhance Basic Education Curriculum particularly on the same Status of Compliance

after two years of the first implementation or after the first batch of graduates of Senior High

School Program. They may facilitate a study on how to address the right tracking of courses

base on the interest of student, needs of the different agencies, local and global institutions, and

capacity of the school.


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http://www.edutopia.org/node/3951/results

The K to 12 BASIC EDUCATION PROGRAM. Retrieved November 12, 2013


http://www.gov.ph/k-12

Umil, A. (June 7, 2013) More Shortages Afflict Public School System Despite DepEd.
Retrieved 10 February, 2014 from http://bulatlat.com/main/2013/06/07/more-shortages-
afflict-public-school-system-despite-deped-claims

Students and Computer Access U.S. Department of Education Institute of Education


SciencesNational Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved April 17, 2014 from
https://nces.ed.gov/pubs2002/internet/4.asp ()
Appendix A. Letter to the School Division Superintendent
Appendix B. Questionnaire for Actual, standard and interventions made by the School heads
to comply with the gap

Name of School Head: ____________ School: ________________________________

Actual Standard Gap Interventions


1. Teachers
2. Classrooms
3. Textbooks/Teaching
Learning
Materials
4. Chairs
5. Toilets
6. Water And
Sanitation
7. Functional Hand
Washing Facilty
8. Computer Lab
9. Science Lab
10. Library
11. Music Room
12. Arts Room
13. Workshop Needs
14. Sports Facility

Sports Facility (Please Check if Available)


Volleyball Court Swimming Pool Sepak Takraw
Softball Diamond Taekwondo Badminton
Baseball Diamond Archery Table tennis
Jumping Pit Boxing Others____________
Basketball Court Dart Gymnastics Floor Area

A standard track oval with Arnis


a distance of 400 meters or
less

Suggestions:
Appendix C. Questionnaire for Teachers perception for the affectivity of actions made to
comply with the gap
Name: ___________________________________School: ____________________________Position_____________

Highly Very Somewhat


Actions made by the School Heads to comply with the teachers gap. Effective Ineffective
Effective Effective Effective
1. Always persistent to follow up request.
2. Distributes the excess load to available teachers resulting to overloaded
teachers and bigger class size.
3. Includes the request to the annual budget and annual procurement plan.
4. Introduces proper projection and follow up request from the Division Office,
5. Maintains the bigger class size.
6. Minimizes the break time to meet the eight periods per day.
7. Requests additional teachers from the Division Office
8. Revises the School Programs in order to address overlapping of works and
schedule.
9. Takes the item borrowed by other school

Highly Very Somewhat


Actions made by the School Heads to comply with the classroom gap. Effective Ineffective
Effective Effective Effective
Solicits support from stake holders like Philippine Chinese Chambers of
Commerce.
Includes in the school improvement plan and Senior High School Projection Tool.
Distributes the excess load to available classroom resulting to bigger class size.
Requests additional classroom from the Division Office thru Parent Teacher
Associations
Sends letter and resolution to linkages like private companies in Manila as for
possible donations.
Always follow up request from different companies in Manila.
Split or divided two classrooms
Asks the support of different stakeholders like Philippine Chamber of Commerce
and Industries, DPWH and DOLE.
Requests additional classroom from the Division Office thru Parent Teacher
Associations.
Proper coordination with stakeholders thru report and regular PTA meeting and
asking 100 % support.
Coordinates properly with the PTA Officers.

Highly Very Somewhat


Actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Textbooks gap. Effective Ineffective
Effective Effective Effective
Supports the used of multimedia tools and equipment in the classrooms.
Allows teachers to use the photocopier in the school to have additional copies of
learning materials
Allows teachers to search online based on the curriculum guide, utilizing their
own internet connection and printer donated by the alumni.
Allows teachers to use the available copy issued during the training and a few
copies delivered from DEPED.
Motivates teachers and students towards independent learning by giving advance
topics to their students as assignment.
Supports teachers to use Manila Paper or blackboard to copy important
information from the teachers guide.
Supports teachers to use Manila Paper by giving them enough school supplies
like manila paper, marker and ink, paper, pencil etc.
Supports the concepts of diversity among learners by the used of multimedia
tools and equipment in the classrooms and other learning activities suited for
learners.
Avails hard copy for teachers and request photo copies for the students.
Encourages students to photocopy the learning materials or module if needed.
Motivates and acknowledges the initiative of the teachers in finding available
resources like borrowing materials from other Division and photocopy it.
Solicits support from NGO to acquire additional reference books.
Strengthen linkages to different stakeholders for other possible donors.
Actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Seats gap. Highly Very Somewhat
Effective Effective Effective Effective Ineffective
Borrows chairs from other school
Requests for additional chairs is included in the Annual Procurement Plan
Presents the problems to the stakeholders through meetings and Alumni
Homecoming.
Repairs damaged chairs thru as a project or as a requirement.
Repairs some chairs through the assistance of PTA.
Requests chairs from DEPED
Uses the income from the canteen to buy other needs of the school such as
chairs.

Actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Sanitation Facility Highly Very Somewhat
Gap. Effective Effective Effective Effective Ineffective
Presents the problems to the PTA through meetings and request to them as their
project.
Presents the problems to the Alumni and asked for possible donations
Charges materials and labor from MOOE
Uses income from Canteen to appropriate sanitation

Actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Computer Highly Very Somewhat
Laboratory Gap. Effective Effective Effective Effective Ineffective
Solicits support from different LGU and other National Government Agencies
Makes the necessary preparations to have computer laboratory for the incoming
sets of computer.
Used the old computer laboratory as the counterpart of the school.
Uses the computer fee for the maintenance and other expenses related to ICT
maintenance.
Provides short but meaningful hands-on exercises by using relevant and up to
date software such as Power Director and others.
Divides the TLE subjects class into two groups to maintain 1:1 ratio of student to
computer inside the lab
Offers Computer subjects for Grade 9 and Grade 10 only
Computer subjects were only offered for Science Class

Actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Science Laboratory Highly Very Somewhat
Gap Effective Effective Effective Effective Ineffective
Solicits donation from different Stakeholders like Alumni
Realigns MOOE fund to purchase the needed construction materials for the
science lab.
Uses the excess room as the target Science Laboratory

Actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Gap Highly Very Somewhat
Sports Facilities and Equipment Effective Effective Effective Effective Ineffective
Solicits donation from different Stakeholders
Uses MOOE fund to purchase the needed sports materials
Solicits donation from different Stakeholders like
a Municipal (LGU)
b Alumni
c PTA
d NGO
e Private Individual

Actions made by the School Heads to comply with the Highly Very Somewhat
Gap n Music Room, Arts Room, Workshop Effective Effective Effective Effective Ineffective
Solicits donation from different Stakeholders
Uses MOOE fund to purchase the needed sports materials
Solicits donation from different Stakeholders like
a Municipal (LGU)
b Alumni
c PTA
d NGO
e Private Individual
Appendix D. Project Proposal for Urinals

PROJECT PROPOSAL FOR WATERLESS URINALS

I. PROJECT DESCRIPTION
Project Title: (Waterless Urinals)
Type of Project: Health and Sanitation
Project Beneficiaries: Students and Community
Budget Requirement: 20, 000.00 php

II. BACKGROUND/SITUATION ANALYSIS


In the concluded study about Status of Compliance of RA 10533 (Enhanced Basic Education Act
of 2013) Rule IX, Section 14 also known as Mandatory Evaluation and Review it was found out that
among the highest gap rate were workshops, sports facilities music room, arts room and sanitation
facilities. Among these provisions it is evident that Urinals is indeed on of the problems that needs to
resolve.

An education facility plays an important role in the life of students. School Sanitation and Hygiene
Education (SSHE) is a very attractive issue not only from the political but also from a social perspective.
It is based on the premise that children have a right to basic facilities such as school toilets, safe drinking
water, clean surroundings and information on hygiene. If these conditions are created, children come to
school, enjoy learning, learn better and take back to their families concepts and practices on sanitation and
hygiene. In this way, investment in education is more productive. Such conditions have an even greater
positive outcome for girls who often stay away from or drop out of schools which do not have toilet
facilities.

In most cases sanitation facilities problem always goes with the ample water supply. Hence this
proposal suggest for the use of Waterless Urinals. The project is one such solution for schools especially
for low or no water supply. This concept links human waste to food security, recognizing the value of
treated human waste for fertilizer or it is an efficient way to harness these resources. The collected urine,
simply needs about a month of storage before application to consumable crops.

III. PROJECT OBJECTIVES


1. Provide School Hygiene Education among students.
2. Promote the use of organic fertilizer
3. Provides practicum for Housekeeping Training

IV. DESIRED IMPACT AND OUTCOME OF THE PROJECT


The project will not only promote sanitation but most importantly it will promote an eco-friendly
environment.
The project may lead to other researches for Senior High school Program with the other uses or
benefits of urine products or human waste.
Researches on how to build or create their own proto type of Waterless sanitation facilities
The organic fertilizer from urine can be shared in the community for trial or other researches with
regards to food production.

V. IMPLEMENTING GROUP

Parents Teacher Association


VI. PROJECT WORK PLAN

PHASES OF THE ACTIVITIES PERSON IN RESOURCES Time


PROJECT (DATE) CHARGE NEEDED Frame

I. Orientation and Meeting with the Myra R. Ramos LCD Projector and March 2016
Planning PTA Officers Rafael Marciano Sound System
II. Construction (as PTA Officers and Myra R. Ramos Construction April to
Part of Brigada Parents Rafael Marciano Supplies May 2016
Eskwela)
III. Training for Meeting with the Myra R. Ramos June 8,
students PTA Officers Rafael Marciano 2016

Proponent:

(SGD) MYRA R. RAMOS


MAED Student

Images of Proposed___________________
Waterless Urinals

MYRA R.
RAMOS
Appendix E. Full text of REPUBLIC ACT NO. 10533 Enhanced Basic Education Act of
2013

Republic Act No. 10533


S. No. 3286
H. No. 6643

Republic of the Philippines


Congress of the Philippines
Metro Manila
Fifteenth Congress
Third Regular Session

Begun and held in Metro Manila, on Monday, the twenty-third day of July, two thousand twelve.

[REPUBLIC ACT NO. 10533]

AN ACT ENHANCING THE PHILIPPINE BASIC EDUCATION SYSTEM BY STRENGTHENING ITS CURRICULUM AND
INCREASING THE NUMBER OF YEARS FOR BASIC EDUCATION, APPROPRIATING FUNDS THEREFOR AND FOR
OTHER PURPOSES

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the Philippines in Congress assembled:

SECTION 1. Short Title. This Act shall be known as the Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013.

SEC. 2. Declaration of Policy. The State shall establish, maintain and support a complete, adequate, and integrated system of education
relevant to the needs of the people, the country and society-at-large.

Likewise, it is hereby declared the policy of the State that every graduate of basic education shall be an empowered individual who has
learned, through a program that is rooted on sound educational principles and geared towards excellence, the foundations for learning
throughout life, the competence to engage in work and be productive, the ability to coexist in fruitful harmony with local and global
communities, the capability to engage in autonomous, creative, and critical thinking, and the capacity and willingness to transform others and
ones self.

For this purpose, the State shall create a functional basic education system that will develop productive and responsible citizens equipped
with the essential competencies, skills and values for both life-long learning and employment. In order to achieve this, the State shall:

(a) Give every student an opportunity to receive quality education that is globally competitive based on a pedagogically sound curriculum that
is at par with international standards;

(b) Broaden the goals of high school education for college preparation, vocational and technical career opportunities as well as creative arts,
sports and entrepreneurial employment in a rapidly changing and increasingly globalized environment; and

(c) Make education learner-oriented and responsive to the needs, cognitive and cultural capacity, the circumstances and diversity of learners,
schools and communities through the appropriate languages of teaching and learning, including mother tongue as a learning resource.

SEC. 3. Basic Education. Basic education is intended to meet basic learning needs which provide the foundation on which subsequent
learning can be based. It encompasses kindergarten, elementary and secondary education as well as alternative learning systems for out-of-
school learners and those with special needs.
SEC. 4. Enhanced Basic Education Program. The enhanced basic education program encompasses at least one (1) year of kindergarten
education, six (6) years of elementary education, and six (6) years of secondary education, in that sequence. Secondary education includes
four (4) years of junior high school and two (2) years of senior high school education.

Kindergarten education shall mean one (1) year of preparatory education for children at least five (5) years old as a prerequisite for Grade I.

Elementary education refers to the second stage of compulsory basic education which is composed of six (6) years. The entrant age to this
level is typically six (6) years old.

Secondary education refers to the third stage of compulsory basic education. It consists of four (4) years of junior high school education and
two (2) years of senior high school education. The entrant age to the junior and senior high school levels are typically twelve (12) and sixteen
(16) years old, respectively.

Basic education shall be delivered in languages understood by the learners as the language plays a strategic role in shaping the formative
years of learners.

For kindergarten and the first three (3) years of elementary education, instruction, teaching materials and assessment shall be in the regional
or native language of the learners. The Department of Education (DepED) shall formulate a mother language transition program from Grade 4
to Grade 6 so that Filipino and English shall be gradually introduced as languages of instruction until such time when these two (2) languages
can become the primary languages of instruction at the secondary level.

For purposes of this Act, mother language or first Language (LI) refers to language or languages first learned by a child, which he/she
identifies with, is identified as a native language user of by others, which he/she knows best, or uses most. This includes Filipino sign
language used by individuals with pertinent disabilities. The regional or native language refers to the traditional speech variety or variety of
Filipino sign language existing in a region, area or place.

SEC. 5. Curriculum Development. The DepED shall formulate the design and details of the enhanced basic education curriculum. It shall
work with the Commission on Higher Education (CHED) to craft harmonized basic and tertiary curricula for the global competitiveness of
Filipino graduates. To ensure college readiness and to avoid remedial and duplication of basic education subjects, the DepED shall
coordinate with the CHED and the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA).

To achieve an effective enhanced basic education curriculum, the DepED shall undertake consultations with other national government
agencies and other stakeholders including, but not limited to, the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE), the Professional Regulation
Commission (PRC), the private and public schools associations, the national student organizations, the national teacher organizations, the
parents-teachers associations and the chambers of commerce on matters affecting the concerned stakeholders.

The DepED shall adhere to the following standards and principles in developing the enhanced basic education curriculum:

(a) The curriculum shall be learner-centered, inclusive and developmentally appropriate;

(b) The curriculum shall be relevant, responsive and research-based;

(c) The curriculum shall be culture-sensitive;

(d) The curriculum shall be contextualized and global;

(e) The curriculum shall use pedagogical approaches that are constructivist, inquiry-based, reflective, collaborative and integrative;

(f) The curriculum shall adhere to the principles and framework of Mother Tongue-Based Multilingual Education (MTB-MLE) which starts from
where the learners are and from what they already knew proceeding from the known to the unknown; instructional materials and capable
teachers to implement the MTB-MLE curriculum shall be available;

(g) The curriculum shall use the spiral progression approach to ensure mastery of knowledge and skills after each level; and
(h) The curriculum shall be flexible enough to enable and allow schools to localize, indigenize and enhance the same based on their
respective educational and social contexts. The production and development of locally produced teaching materials shall be encouraged and
approval of these materials shall devolve to the regional and division education units.

SEC. 6. Curriculum Consultative Committee. There shall be created a curriculum consultative committee chaired by the DepED Secretary
or his/her duly authorized representative and with members composed of, but not limited to, a representative each from the CHED, the
TESDA, the DOLE, the PRC, the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), and a representative from the business chambers such as
the Information Technology Business Process Outsourcing (IT-BPO) industry association. The consultative committee shall oversee the
review and evaluation on the implementation of the basic education curriculum and may recommend to the DepED the formulation of
necessary refinements in the curriculum.

SEC. 7. Teacher Education and Training. To ensure that the enhanced basic education program meets the demand for quality teachers
and school leaders, the DepED and the CHED, in collaboration with relevant partners in government, academe, industry, and
nongovernmental organizations, shall conduct teacher education and training programs, as specified:

(a) In-service Training on Content and Pedagogy Current DepED teachers shall be retrained to meet the content and performance
standards of the new K to 12 curriculum.

The DepED shall ensure that private education institutions shall be given the opportunity to avail of such training.

(b) Training of New Teachers. New graduates of the current Teacher Education curriculum shall undergo additional training, upon hiring, to
upgrade their skills to the content standards of the new curriculum. Furthermore, the CHED, in coordination with the DepED and relevant
stakeholders, shall ensure that the Teacher Education curriculum offered in these Teacher Education Institutes (TEIs) will meet necessary
quality standards for new teachers. Duly recognized organizations acting as TEIs, in coordination with the DepED, the CHED, and other
relevant stakeholders, shall ensure that the curriculum of these organizations meet the necessary quality standards for trained teachers.

(c) Training of School Leadership. Superintendents, principals, subject area coordinators and other instructional school leaders shall
likewise undergo workshops and training to enhance their skills on their role as academic, administrative and community leaders.

Henceforth, such professional development programs as those stated above shall be initiated and conducted regularly throughout the school
year to ensure constant upgrading of teacher skills.

SEC. 8. Hiring of Graduates of Science, Mathematics, Statistics, Engineering and Other Specialists in Subjects With a Shortage of Qualified
Applicants, Technical-Vocational Courses and Higher Education Institution Faculty. Notwithstanding the provisions of Sections 26, 27 and
28 of Republic Act No. 7836, otherwise known as the Philippine Teachers Professionalization Act of 1994, the DepED and private education
institutions shall hire, as may be relevant to the particular subject:

(a) Graduates of science, mathematics, statistics, engineering, music and other degree courses with shortages in qualified Licensure
Examination for Teachers (LET) applicants to teach in their specialized subjects in the elementary and secondary education. Qualified LET
applicants shall also include graduates admitted by foundations duly recognized for their expertise in the education sector and who
satisfactorily complete the requirements set by these organizations: Provided, That they pass the LET within five (5) years after their date of
hiring: Provided, further, That if such graduates are willing to teach on part-time basis, the provisions of LET shall no longer be required;

(b) Graduates of technical-vocational courses to teach in their specialized subjects in the secondary education: Provided, That these
graduates possess the necessary certification issued by the TESDA: Provided, further, That they undergo appropriate in-service training to be
administered by the DepED or higher education institutions (HEIs) at the expense of the DepED;

(c) Faculty of HEIs be allowed to teach in their general education or subject specialties in the secondary education: Provided, That the faculty
must be a holder of a relevant Bachelors degree, and must have satisfactorily served as a full-time HEI faculty;

(d) The DepED and private education institutions may hire practitioners, with expertise in the specialized learning areas offered by the Basic
Education Curriculum, to teach in the secondary level; Provided, That they teach on part-time basis only. For this purpose, the DepED, in
coordination with the appropriate government agencies, shall determine the necessary qualification standards in hiring these experts.

SEC. 9. Career Guidance and Counselling Advocacy. To properly guide the students in choosing the career tracks that they intend to
pursue, the DepED, in coordination with the DOLE, the TESDA and the CHED, shall regularly conduct career advocacy activities for
secondary level students. Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 27 of Republic Act No. 9258, otherwise known as the Guidance and
Counselling Act of 2004, career and employment guidance counsellors, who are not registered and licensed guidance counsellors, shall be
allowed to conduct career advocacy activities to secondary level students of the school where they are currently employed; Provided, That
they undergo a training program to be developed or accredited by the DepED.

SEC. 10. Expansion of E-GASTPE Beneficiaries. The benefits accorded by or the Expanded Government Assistance to Students and
Teachers in Private Education Act, shall be extended to qualified students enrolled under the enhanced basic education.

The DepED shall engage the services of private education institutions and non-DepED schools offering senior high school through the
programs under Republic Act No. 8545, and other financial arrangements formulated by the DepED and the Department of Budget and
Management (DBM) based on the principles of public-private partnership.

SEC. 11. Appropriations. The Secretary of Education shall include in the Departments program the operationalization of the enhanced
basic education program, the initial funding of which shall be charged against the current appropriations of the DepED. Thereafter, the amount
necessary for the continued implementation of the enhanced basic education program shall be included in the annual General Appropriations
Act.

SEC. 12. Transitory Provisions. The DepED, the CHED and the TESDA shall formulate the appropriate strategies and mechanisms needed
to ensure smooth transition from the existing ten (10) years basic education cycle to the enhanced basic education (K to 12) cycle. The
strategies may cover changes in physical infrastructure, manpower, organizational and structural concerns, bridging models linking grade 10
competencies and the entry requirements of new tertiary curricula, and partnerships between the government and other entities. Modeling for
senior high school may be implemented in selected schools to simulate the transition process and provide concrete data for the transition
plan.

To manage the initial implementation of the enhanced basic education program and mitigate the expected multi-year low enrolment turnout for
HEIs and Technical Vocational Institutions (TVIs) starting School Year 2016-2017, the DepED shall engage in partnerships with HEIs and
TVIs for the utilization of the latters human and physical resources. Moreover, the DepED, the CHED, the TESDA, the TVIs and the HEIs
shall coordinate closely with one another to implement strategies that ensure the academic, physical, financial, and human resource
capabilities of HEIs and TVIs to provide educational and training services for graduates of the enhanced basic education program to ensure
that they are not adversely affected. The faculty of HEIs and TVIs allowed to teach students of secondary education under Section 8 hereof,
shall be given priority in hiring for the duration of the transition period. For this purpose, the transition period shall be provided for in the
implementing rules and regulations (IRR). SEC. 13. Joint Congressional Oversight Committee on the Enhanced Basic Educational Program
(K to 12 Program). There is hereby created a Joint Oversight Committee to oversee, monitor and evaluate the implementation of this Act.

The Oversight Committee shall be composed of five (5) members each from the Senate and from the House of Representatives, including
Chairs of the Committees on Education, Arts and Culture, and Finance of both Houses. The membership of the Committee for every House
shall have at least two (2) opposition or minority members.

SEC. 14. Mandatory Evaluation and Review. By the end of School Year 2014-2015, the DepED shall conduct a mandatory review and
submit a midterm report to Congress as to the status of implementation of the K to 12 program in terms of closing the following current
shortages: (a) teachers; (b) classrooms; (c) textbooks; (d) seats; (e) toilets; and (f) other shortages that should be addressed.

The DepED shall include among others, in this midterm report, the following key metrics of access to and quality of basic education: (a)
participation rate; (b) retention rate; (c) National Achievement Test results; (d) completion rate; (e) teachers welfare and training profiles; (f)
adequacy of funding requirements; and (g) other learning facilities including, but not limited to, computer and science laboratories, libraries
and library hubs, and sports, music and arts.

SEC. 15. Commitment to International Benchmarks. The DepED shall endeavor to increase the per capita spending on education towards
the immediate attainment of international benchmarks.

SEC. 16. Implementing Rules and Regulations. Within ninety (90) days after the effectivity of this Act, the DepED Secretary, the CHED
Chairperson and the TESDA Director-General shall promulgate the rules and regulations needed for the implementation of this Act.

SEC. 17. Separability Clause. If any provision of this Act is held invalid or unconstitutional, the same shall not affect the validity and
effectivity of the other provisions hereof.

SEC. 18. Repealing Clause. Pertinent provisions of Batas Pambansa Blg. 232 or the Education Act of 1982, Republic Act No. 9155 or
the Governance of Basic Education.
Act of 2001, Republic Act No. 9258, Republic Act No. 7836, and all other laws, decrees, executive orders and rules and regulations contrary
to or inconsistent with the provisions of this Act are hereby repealed or modified accordingly.

SEC. 19. Effectivity Clause. This Act shall take effect fifteen (15) days after its publication in the Official Gazette or in two (2) newspapers
of general circulation.

. IMPLEMENTING RULES AND REGULATIONS


OF THE ENHANCED BASIC EDUCATION ACT OF 2013

Pursuant to Section 16 of Republic Act No. 10533, entitled An Act Enhancing the Philippine Basic Education System by Strengthening Its
Curriculum and Increasing the Number of Years for Basic Education, Appropriating Funds Therefor and for Other Purposes, otherwise known
as the Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013, approved on May 15, 2013, and which took effect on June 8, 2013, the Department of
Education (DepEd), the Commission on Higher Education (CHED), and the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA),
hereby issue the following rules and regulations to implement the provisions of the Act.

RULE I. GENERAL PROVISIONS

Section 1. Title. These rules and regulations shall be referred to as the Implementing Rules and Regulations (IRR) of the Enhanced Basic
Education Act of 2013 (Republic Act No. 10533).

Section 2. Scope and Application. The provisions of this IRR shall primarily apply to all public and private basic educational institutions and
learning centers. This IRR shall also apply to Higher Education Institutions (HEIs), Technical-Vocational Institutions (TVIs), duly recognized
organizations acting as Teacher Education Institutions (TEIs), and foundations.

Section 3. Declaration of Policy. This IRR shall be interpreted in light of the Declaration of Policy found in Section 2 of the Act.

Section 4. Definition of Terms. For purposes of this IRR, the following terms shall mean or be understood as follows:

(a) Act refers to Republic Act No. 10533, entitled An Act Enhancing the Philippine Basic Education System by Strengthening Its Curriculum
and Increasing the Number of Years for Basic Education, Appropriating Funds Therefor and for Other Purposes, otherwise known as the
Enhanced Basic Education Act of 2013.

(b) Learning Center refers to a physical space to house learning resources and facilities of a learning program for out-of-school youth and
adults. It is a venue for face-to-face learning activities and other learning opportunities for community development and improvement of the
peoples quality of life. This may also be referred to as Community Learning Center authorized or recognized by the DepEd.

(c) Learner refers to a pupil or student, or to a learner in the alternative learning system.

(d) Mother Language or First Language (L1) refers to the language or languages first learned by a child, which he/she identifies with, is
identified as a native language user of by others, which he/she knows best, or uses most. This includes Filipino sign language used by
individuals with pertinent disabilities. The regional or native language refers to the traditional speech variety or variety of Filipino sign language
existing in a region, area or place.

(e) Non-DepEd Public School refers to a public school offering basic education operated by an agency of the national government other
than the DepEd, or by a local government unit.

Section 5. Basic Education. Pursuant to Section 3 of the Act, basic education is intended to meet basic learning needs which provides the
foundation on which subsequent learning can be based. It encompasses kindergarten, elementary, and secondary education as well as
alternative learning systems for out-of-school learners and those with special needs under Section 8 of this IRR.

Section 6. Enhanced Basic Education Program. For purposes of this IRR and pursuant to Section 4 of the Act, the enhanced basic
education program encompasses at least one (1) year of kindergarten education, six (6) years of elementary education, and six (6) years of
secondary education, in that sequence. Secondary education includes four (4) years of junior high school and two (2) years of senior high
school education. The enhanced basic education program may likewise be delivered through the alternative learning system.
Kindergarten Education is the first stage of compulsory and mandatory formal education which consists of one (1) year of preparatory
education for children at least five (5) years old as a prerequisite for Grade 1.

Elementary Education refers to the second stage of compulsory basic education which is composed of six (6) years. The entrant age to this
level is typically six (6) years old.

Secondary Education refers to the third stage of compulsory basic education. It consists of four (4) years of junior high school education and
two (2) years of senior high school education. The entrant age to the junior and senior high school levels are typically twelve (12) and sixteen
(16) years old, respectively.

The DepEd may allow private educational institutions flexibility in adopting the program provided that they comply with the DepEd-prescribed
minimum standards consistent with the Act.

Section 7. Compulsory Basic Education. It shall be compulsory for every parent or guardian or other persons having custody of a child to
enroll such child in basic education, irrespective of learning delivery modes and systems, until its completion, as provided for by existing laws,
rules and regulations.

Section 8. Inclusiveness of Enhanced Basic Education. In furtherance of Section 3 of the Act, inclusiveness of enhanced basic education
shall mean the implementation of programs designed to address the physical, intellectual, psychosocial, and cultural needs of learners, which
shall include, but shall not be limited to, the following:

8.1. Programs for the Gifted and Talented. These shall refer to comprehensive programs for the gifted and talented learners in all levels of
basic education.

8.2. Programs for Learners with Disabilities. These shall refer to the comprehensive programs designed for learners with disabilities which
may be home-, school-, center- or community-based.

8.3. Madrasah Program. This shall refer to the comprehensive program using the Madrasah curriculum prescribed by the DepEd, in
coordination with the Commission on Muslim Filipinos, for Muslim learners in public and private schools.

8.4. Indigenous Peoples (IP) Education Program. This shall refer to the program that supports education initiatives undertaken through
formal, non-formal, and informal modalities with emphasis on any of, but not limited to, the key areas of: Indigenous Knowledge Systems and
Practices and community history; indigenous languages; Indigenous Learning System (ILS) and community life cycle-based curriculum and
assessment; educational goals, aspirations, and competencies specific to the Indigenous Cultural Community (ICC); engagement of elders
and other community members in the teaching-learning process, assessment, and management of the initiative, recognition and continuing
practice of the communitys ILS; and the rights and responsibilities of ICCs.

8.5. Programs for Learners under Difficult Circumstances. This shall refer to the timely and responsive programs for learners under
difficult circumstances, such as, but not limited to: geographic isolation; chronic illness; displacement due to armed conflict, urban
resettlement, or disasters; child abuse and child labor practices.

Section 9. Acceleration. Acceleration of learners in public and private basic educational institutions shall be allowed, consistent with DepEd
rules and regulations.

RULE II. CURRICULUM

Section 10. Basic Education Curriculum Development. In the development of the Basic Education Curriculum, the DepEd shall be guided
by the following:

10.1. Formulation and Design. Pursuant to Section 5 of the Act, the DepEd shall formulate the design and details of the enhanced basic
education curriculum. The DepEd shall work with the CHED and TESDA to craft harmonized basic, tertiary, and technical-vocational
education curricula for Filipino graduates to be locally and globally competitive.

10.2. Standards and Principles. The DepEd shall adhere to the following standards and principles, when appropriate, in developing the
enhanced basic education curriculum:
(a) The curriculum shall be learner-centered, inclusive and developmentally appropriate;

(b) The curriculum shall be relevant, responsive and research-based;

(c) The curriculum shall be gender- and culture-sensitive;

(d) The curriculum shall be contextualized and global;

(e) The curriculum shall use pedagogical approaches that are constructivist, inquiry-based, reflective, collaborative and integrative;

(f) The curriculum shall adhere to the principles and framework of Mother Tongue-Based Multilingual Education (MTB-MLE) which starts from
where the learners are and from what they already know proceeding from the known to the unknown; instructional materials and capable
teachers to implement the MTB-MLE curriculum shall be available. For this purpose, MTB-MLE refers to formal or non-formal education in
which the learners mother tongue and additional languages are used in the classroom;

(g) The curriculum shall use the spiral progression approach to ensure mastery of knowledge and skills after each level; and

(h) The curriculum shall be flexible enough to enable and allow schools to localize, indigenize and enhance the same based on their
respective educational and social contexts.

10.3. Production and Development of Materials. The production and development of locally produced teaching and learning materials shall
be encouraged. The approval of these materials shall be devolved to the regional and division education unit in accordance with national
policies and standards.

10.4. Medium of Teaching and Learning. Pursuant to Sections 4 and 5 of the Act, basic education shall be delivered in languages
understood by the learners as language plays a strategic role in shaping the formative years of learners.

The curriculum shall develop proficiency in Filipino and English, provided that the first and dominant language of the learners shall serve as
the fundamental language of education. For Kindergarten and the first three years of elementary education, instruction, teaching materials,
and assessment shall be in the regional or native language of the learners. The DepEd shall formulate a mother language transition program
from the mother/first language to the subsequent languages of the curriculum that is appropriate to the language capacity and needs of
learners from Grade 4 to Grade 6. Filipino and English shall be gradually introduced as languages of instruction until such time when these
two (2) languages can become the primary languages of instruction at the secondary level.

10.5. Stakeholder Participation. To achieve an enhanced and responsive basic education curriculum, the DepEd shall undertake
consultations with other national government agencies and other stakeholders including, but not limited to, the Department of Labor and
Employment (DOLE), the Professional Regulation Commission (PRC), private and public schools associations, national student organizations,
national teacher organizations, parents-teachers associations, chambers of commerce and other industry associations, on matters affecting
the concerned stakeholders.

Section 11. Curriculum Consultative Committee. Pursuant to Section 6 of the Act, a Curriculum Consultative Committee shall be created,
to be chaired by the DepEd Secretary or his/her duly authorized representative, and with members composed of, but not limited to, a
representative each from the CHED, TESDA, DOLE, PRC, the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), and a representative from
business chambers such as the Information Technology Business Process Outsourcing (IT-BPO) industry association. The Consultative
Committee shall oversee the review and evaluation of the implementation of the enhanced basic education curriculum and may recommend to
the DepEd the formulation of necessary refinements in the curriculum.

RULE III. TEACHER QUALIFICATIONS, TRAINING AND CONTINUING PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

Section 12. Teacher Education and Training. To ensure that the enhanced basic education program meets the demand for quality teachers
and school leaders, the DepEd, CHED, and TESDA shall conduct teacher education and training programs, in collaboration with relevant
partners in government, academe, industry, and non-governmental organizations. Such professional development programs shall be initiated,
conducted and evaluated regularly throughout the year to ensure constant upgrading of teacher skills. Teacher education and training
programs shall include, but shall not be limited to:
12.1. In-service Training on Content and Pedagogy. DepEd teachers who will implement the enhanced basic education curriculum but
have not undergone pre-service education that is aligned with the enhanced basic education curriculum shall be trained to meet the content
and performance standards of the enhanced basic education curriculum.

The DepEd shall ensure that private educational institutions shall be given the opportunity to avail of such training.

12.2. Training of New Teachers. New graduates of the Teacher Education curriculum not aligned with the enhanced basic education
curriculum shall undergo additional training, upon hiring, to upgrade their competencies and skills to the content and performance standards
of the new curriculum. Furthermore, the CHED, in coordination with the DepEd and relevant stakeholders, shall ensure that the Teacher
Education curriculum offered in these TEIs will meet the necessary quality standards for new teachers. Duly recognized organizations acting
as TEIs, in coordination with the DepEd, CHED, and other relevant stakeholders, shall ensure that the curriculum of these organizations
meets the necessary quality standards for trained teachers.

For purposes of this subparagraph, the term duly recognized organizations acting as TEIs refers to organizations, other than schools or
HEIs, contracted out by the DepEd during the transition and for a fixed period, to provide teacher training for purposes of retooling the
graduates of the Teacher Education curriculum, and only in such areas where there is a shortage of trained teachers.

12.3. Training of School Leadership. Superintendents, principals, subject area coordinators, and other instructional school leaders shall
likewise undergo workshops and training to enhance their skills on their roles as academic, administrative, and community leaders.

12.4. Training of Alternative Learning System (ALS) Coordinators, Instructional Managers, Mobile Teachers, and Learning
Facilitators. ALS coordinators, instructional managers, mobile teachers, and learning facilitators shall likewise undergo workshops and
training to enhance their skills on their roles as academic, administrative, and community leaders.

Section 13. Hiring of Other Teachers. Notwithstanding the provisions of Sections 26, 27 and 28 of Republic Act No. 7836, otherwise known
as the Philippine Teachers Professionalization Act of 1994, the DepEd and private educational institutions shall hire, as may be relevant to
the particular subject:

13.1. Graduates of science, mathematics, statistics, engineering, music and other degree courses needed to teach in their specialized
subjects in elementary and secondary education with shortages in qualified applicants who have passed the Licensure Examination for
Teachers (LET). They shall also include graduates admitted by foundations duly recognized for their expertise in the education sector and
who satisfactorily complete the requirements set by these organizations; Provided, That they pass the LET within five (5) years after their date
of hiring; Provided, further, That if such graduates are willing to teach in basic education on part-time basis, the provisions of LET shall no
longer be required.

The term foundations, as used in this section, refers to non-stock, non-profit organizations, which are not operating as educational
institutions, contracted out by the DepEd for a fixed period, to provide volunteers to teach in basic education in areas where there is a
shortage of qualified teachers. The DepEd shall issue the guidelines and procedures for selection and eligibility of these organizations.

13.2. Graduates of technical-vocational courses to teach in their specialized subjects in the secondary education; Provided, That these
graduates possess the necessary certification issued by TESDA; Provided, further, That they undergo appropriate in-service training to be
administered by the DepEd or HEIs at the expense of the DepEd. The DepEd shall provide administrative support to private educational
institutions for the in-service training of their teachers on the enhanced basic education curriculum.

13.3. Faculty of HEIs to teach in their general education or subject specialties in secondary education; Provided, That the faculty must be a
holder of a relevant Bachelors degree, and must have satisfactorily served as a full-time HEI faculty;

13.4. The DepEd and private educational institutions may hire practitioners, with expertise in the specialized learning areas offered by the
enhanced basic education curriculum, to teach in the secondary level: Provided, That they teach on part-time basis only. For this purpose, the
DepEd, in coordination with the appropriate government agencies, shall determine the necessary qualification standards in hiring these
experts.

RULE IV. PRIVATE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS

Section 14. Reasonable Supervision and Regulation. As a matter of policy laid down in Article XIV, Section 5(1) of the 1987 Philippine
Constitution, the State recognizes the complementary roles of public and private institutions in the educational system and shall exercise
reasonable supervision and regulation of all educational institutions.
Section 15. Issuance and Revocation of Permits and/or Recognition of Private Senior High Schools. The DepEd shall regulate the
offering of senior high school in private educational institutions. Private educational institutions may only offer senior high school when so
authorized by the DepEd. The DepEd shall prescribe the guidelines on the issuance and revocation of permits and/or recognition of senior
high schools.

Section 16. Specializations in Private Senior High School. Private educational institutions may offer specializations in senior high school
that are essential to the economic and social development of the nation, region or locality. Local planning in the development of educational
policies and programs shall be encouraged consistent with the State policy to take into account regional and sectoral needs and conditions.

RULE V. CAREER GUIDANCE AND COUNSELING ADVOCACY

Section 17. Career Guidance and Counseling Programs. Consistent with Section 9 of the Act, to properly guide the students towards
becoming productive and contributing individuals through informed career choices, the DepEd, in coordination with the DOLE, TESDA, CHED,
PRC, NYC, industry associations, professional associations, and other relevant stakeholders, shall pursue programs that expose students to
the world and value of work, and develop the capability of career counselors and advocates to guide the students and equip them with the
necessary life skills and values.

Section 18. Career Advocacy Activities. Career advocacy activities refer to activities that will guide secondary level students in choosing
the career tracks that they intend to pursue. Career advocacy activities involve provision of career information and experiences, advising,
coordinating and making referrals, and may include, but are not limited to, career talks, career and job fairs, parents orientations, and
seminar-workshops on career decision-making.

Section 19. Career Advocates. Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 27 of Republic Act No. 9258, otherwise known as the Guidance
and Counseling Act of 2004, career advocates shall be allowed to conduct career advocacy activities for secondary-level students of the
schools where they are currently employed; Provided, That they undergo appropriate capacity building programs developed and implemented
by the DepEd, in coordination with the DOLE, TESDA, CHED, PRC, NYC, student organizations, industry associations, guidance and
counseling associations, professional associations, and other relevant stakeholders.

Career advocacy may be conducted by career advocates and peer facilitators. Consistent with Section 9 of the Act, career advocates refer to
career and employment guidance counselors who are not registered and licensed guidance counselors. Career advocates include homeroom
advisers and teachers of all learning areas who will implement career advocacy activities. Peer facilitators are secondary-level students
trained to assist career advocates in implementing career advocacy activities.

Section 20. Role of the DepEd. The DepEd shall:

(a) Integrate career concepts in the curriculum and undertake teaching in relevant learning areas;
(b) Conduct career assessments;
(c) Conduct regular career advocacy activities;
(d) Conduct continuous professionalization and capacity building of guidance counselors, career advocates, and peer facilitators;
(e) Develop or accredit training programs on career advocacy;
(f) Establish a career advocacy unit and provide adequate office space in high schools; and
(g) Designate guidance supervisors at the division level and career advocates at the school level.

RULE VI. E-GASTPE BENEFICIARIES AND OTHER FINANCING ARRANGEMENTS WITH PRIVATE EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS
AND NON-DEPED PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Section 21. Expansion of E-GASTPE Beneficiaries. Pursuant to Section 10 of the Act, the DepEd shall develop programs of assistance
that will extend the benefits accorded by Republic Act No. 8545, or the Expanded Government Assistance for Students and Teachers in
Private Education Act, to qualified students enrolled in senior high school.

Section 22. Criteria for Assistance to Qualified Students. The programs of assistance shall be made available primarily to students who
completed junior high school in public schools, taking into account the income background and financial needs of students, available
capacities of public, private and non-DepEd public schools in the locality, socio-economic needs of regions, overall performance of private and
non-DepEd public schools, as well as geographic spread and size of the student population.
The programs of assistance may also be made available to students who completed junior high school in private educational institutions,
whether these students are E-GASTPE beneficiaries or not, subject to compliance with the qualifications and guidelines to be determined by
the DepEd.

Section 23. Forms and Amount of Assistance. The forms of assistance that may be provided by the DepEd may include any of the
following:

(a) A voucher system, where government issues a coupon directly to students to enable them to enroll in eligible private educational
institutions or non-DepEd public schools of their choice under a full or partial tuition or schooling subsidy;
(b) Education Service Contracting (ESC), where the government enters into contracts with private educational institutions or non-DepEd
public schools to shoulder the tuition and other fees of high school students who shall enroll in private high schools under this program;
(c) Management contracts, where government enters into contractual arrangements with private educational institutions or non-DepEd public
schools to manage the day-to-day operations of public schools under agreed performance targets;
(d) Forms of assistance provided under Republic Act No. 8545; and
(e) Other forms of financial arrangements consistent with the principles of public-private partnership.

The DepEd shall take into account the ability of program beneficiaries to cover tuition differentials, if any, in setting the amount of the voucher,
ESC, or other forms of assistance. The amount of assistance to be given by the government shall not exceed the determined per student cost
in public schools.

Section 24. Participating Schools. Private educational institutions, non-DepEd public schools, and other potential providers of basic learning
needs that may be authorized to offer senior high school are eligible to participate in programs of assistance, as may be applicable, under the
E-GASTPE program and other financial arrangements formulated by the DepEd and DBM based on the principles of public-private
partnership. The continued participation of said providers in the E-GASTPE program and other financial arrangements is subject to their
meeting minimum requirements and standards, including student performance, as determined by the DepEd.

To promote partnership and greater cooperation between public and private educational institutions, government will take into account
existing and potential capacities of private educational institutions in expanding public school capacity.

Section 25. Implementation Mechanisms. The DepEd may enter into contractual arrangements or establish new mechanisms for the
design, administration, and supervision of programs of assistance or aspects thereof, subject to the approval of the appropriate government
agencies. For this purpose, the DepEd shall:

(a) Issue the appropriate guidelines for the implementation of the programs of assistance;

(b) Ensure transparency and accountability in the implementation of the programs of assistance;

(c) Implement information and advocacy programs to inform the general public and ensure greater participation and availment of the programs
of assistance; and

(d) Undertake periodic reviews of the program features and make adjustments, as necessary, to ensure the successful, effective and
sustainable implementation of the program. The program features shall include, among others, amount of subsidy, number of grantees,
eligibility requirements, and performance of participating schools.

Section 26. Funding Requirement. The budgetary requirement of the programs under this Rule shall be ensured by the national
government.

The DepEd shall encourage private and corporate donors to support the programs of assistance in this section under the framework of
Republic Act No. 8525, entitled, An Act Establishing An Adopt-A-School Program, Providing Incentives Therefor, And For Other Purposes,
and other relevant laws and policies.

Section 27. Timeframe. The DepEd shall implement the programs provided in this Rule no later than the start of School Year 2016-2017.

Section 28. Additional Beneficiaries. The DepEd may develop similar programs of assistance for kindergarten and elementary pupils and
alternative learning system learners in accordance with specific objectives, taking into account the need and capacities of public and private
educational institutions.
RULE VII. TRANSITORY PROVISIONS

Section 29. Private Basic Educational Institutions Transition to the Enhanced Basic Education Program. The DepEd shall ensure the
smooth transition of private elementary and high schools in the country that are not aligned with the enhanced basic education program.
Private educational institutions or a group thereof shall develop their plans detailing how to transition from their current basic education
system to the enhanced basic education program. The DepEd shall provide the appropriate guidelines on the evaluation of the transition
plans.

Private educational institutions offering twelve (12) to thirteen (13) years of basic education prior to the enactment of this Act shall submit to
the DepEd their transition plans within twelve (12) months from the effectivity of this IRR, subject to the guidelines that will be issued by the
DepEd.

Section 30. Implementation Mechanisms and Strategies. Pursuant to Section 12 of the Act, the DepEd, CHED and TESDA shall formulate
the appropriate strategies and mechanisms needed to ensure smooth transition from the existing ten (10) years basic education cycle to the
enhanced basic education program. The strategies may cover, among others, changes in physical infrastructure, human resource,
organizational and structural concerns, bridging models linking secondary education competencies and the entry requirements of new tertiary
curricula, and partnerships between the government and other entities. Modeling for Senior High School (SHS) may be implemented in
selected schools to simulate the transition process and provide concrete data for the transition plan following the guidelines set by the DepEd.
The results of the SHS modeling program may be considered in the nationwide implementation of the SHS program in School Year 2016-
2017.

30.1. Partnerships with HEIs and TVIs. To manage the initial implementation of the enhanced basic education program and mitigate the
expected multi-year low enrolment turnout for HEIs and TVIs starting School Year 2016-2017, the DepEd shall engage in partnerships with
HEIs and TVIs for the utilization of the latters human and physical resources, and issue relevant guidelines on such partnerships. Moreover,
the DepEd, CHED, TESDA, TVIs and HEIs shall coordinate closely with one another to implement strategies that ensure the academic,
physical, financial, and human resource capabilities of HEIs and TVIs to provide educational and training services for graduates of the
enhanced basic education program to ensure that they are not adversely affected. The faculty of HEIs and TVIs allowed to teach students of
secondary education under Section 8 of the Act, shall be given priority in hiring for the duration of the transition period.

30.2. Financing Framework for State Universities and Colleges During the Transition Period. The CHED and DBM shall review the
financing policy framework for State Universities and Colleges in light of the Act with the end in view of optimizing the use of government
resources for education, the results of which shall be covered by a joint administrative issuance.

30.3. Effects of Initial Implementation of the Enhanced Basic Education Program on Industry Human Resource Requirements. The
DOLE, CHED, DepEd, TESDA and PRC, in coordination with industry associations and chambers of commerce, shall develop a contingency
plan, not later than the start of School Year 2015-2016, to mitigate the effects of the enhanced basic education program with respect to a
potential reduction or absence of college graduates to meet the human resource requirements of industry. The plan shall contain mitigation
strategies for industries to adjust their employment policies as deemed necessary and expedient, and may include the adoption of other
relevant programs or appropriate qualifications.

Section 31. Labor and Management Rights. In the implementation of the Act, including the transition period, the rights of labor as provided
in the Constitution, the Civil Service Rules and Regulations, Labor Code of the Philippines, and existing collective agreements, as well as the
prerogatives of management, shall be respected. The DOLE, DepEd, CHED and TESDA shall promulgate the appropriate joint administrative
issuance, within sixty (60) days from the affectivity of this IRR, to ensure the sustainability of the private and public educational institutions,
and the promotion and protection of the rights, interests and welfare of teaching and non-teaching personnel.

For this purpose, the DOLE shall convene a technical panel with representatives from the DepEd, CHED, TESDA and representatives from
both teaching and non-teaching personnel organizations, and administrators of the educational institutions.

Section 32. Transition Period. The transition period shall be reckoned from the date of the approval of this IRR until the end of School Year
2021-2022.

RULE VIII. JOINT CONGRESSIONAL OVERSIGHT COMMITTEE

Section 33. Joint Congressional Oversight Committee on the Enhanced Basic Education Program. The Joint Congressional Oversight
Committee created under Section 13 of the Act shall be composed of five (5) members each from the Senate and from the House, including
Chairs of the Committees on Education, Arts and Culture, and Finance of both Houses. The membership of the Committee for every House
shall have at least two (2) opposition or minority members.

RULE IX. MANDATORY EVALUATION AND REVIEW

Section 34. Mandatory Evaluation and Review. By the end of School Year 2014-2015, the DepEd shall conduct a mandatory review and
submit a midterm report to Congress as to the status of implementation of the Enhanced Basic Education Program in terms of closing the
following current shortages: (a) teachers; (b) classrooms; (c) textbooks; (d) seats; (e) toilets; (f) other shortages that should be addressed.

The DepEd shall include among others, in this midterm report, the following key metrics of access to and quality of basic education: (a)
participation rate; (b) retention rate; (c) National Achievement Test results; (d) completion rate; (e) teachers welfare and training profiles; (f)
adequacy of funding requirements; and (g) other learning facilities including, but not limited to, computer and science laboratories, libraries
and library hubs; and sports, music and arts.

RULE X. COMMITMENT TO INTERNATIONAL BENCHMARKS

Section 35. Commitment to International Benchmarks. The DepEd shall endeavor to increase the per capita spending on education
towards the immediate attainment of international benchmarks. Towards this end, the DepEd shall seek to:

a) engage local government units to efficiently use the special education fund and other funds to advance and promote basic education;

b) implement programs that will enhance private sector participation and partnership in basic education; and

c) propose an annual budget allocation in accordance with these goals. The DepEd shall further develop a multi-year spending plan to ensure
that the UNESCO-prescribed standards on education spending are attained.

RULE XI. FINAL PROVISIONS

Section 36. Appropriations. Pursuant to Section 11 of the Act, the initial funding for the operationalization of the Enhanced Basic Education
Program shall be charged against the current appropriations of the DepEd. Thereafter, such sums which shall be necessary for the continued
implementation of the enhanced basic education program shall be included in the annual General Appropriations Act.

Section 37. Implementing Details. The DepEd, CHED and TESDA may issue such policies and guidelines as may be necessary to further
implement this IRR.

Section 38. Amendment. Amendments to this IRR shall be jointly promulgated by the DepEd Secretary, CHED Chairperson, and TESDA
Director-General.

Section 39. Separability Clause. Should any provision of this IRR be subsequently declared invalid or unconstitutional, the same shall not
affect the validity and effectivity of the other provisions.

Section 40. Repealing Clause. Pursuant to Section 18 of the Act, rules and regulations implementing the pertinent provisions of Batas
Pambansa Bilang 232 or the Education Act of 1982, Republic Act No. 9155 or the Governance of Basic Education Act of 2001, Republic
Act No. 9258, Republic Act No. 7836, and all other laws, decrees, executive orders and rules and regulations, contrary to or inconsistent with
the provisions of the Act are deemed repealed or modified accordingly.

Section 41. Effectivity Clause. This IRR shall take effect fifteen (15) days after its publication in the Official Gazette or in two (2) newspapers
of general circulation.

This IRR shall be registered with the Office of the National Administrative Register at the University of the Philippines Law Center, UP Diliman,
Quezon City.