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Diabetes Overload in Children

Breina Brinkley

Health Communication and Advocacy

HLTH 634 B01

June 4, 2017
Introduction
Diabetes is a disease that occurs due to a defect in the bodys ability to produce or use
insulin. Diabetes is a disease that once occurred mainly in adults but children are increasingly
becoming affected with diabetes.1 Between 2008 and 2009, the annual incidence of diagnosed
diabetes in youth was estimated at 18,436 with type 1 diabetes and 5,089 with type 2 diabetes.
About 208,000 Americans under the age of 20 are estimated to have been diagnosed with
diabetes.2 Type 1 diabetes is the leading cause of diabetes in children of all ages and accounts for
5% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes accounts for almost all diabetes in
children less than 10 years old.3 Diabetes is a well-known disease and individuals facing the
challenges associated with diabetes do not have to face them alone. Diabetes affects everyone
differently and the Diabetes Overload in Children plans to make sure that children and parents
affected with diabetes have a resource to go to when needing educational information, support
and treatment options.
Diabetes Overload in Children will provide educational information, support and
treatment options for children and parents of children affected with diabetes. Diabetes Overload
in Children will be available to all individuals to help alleviate the increase of diabetes among
children. The literature review will describe the purpose of the Diabetes Overload in Children
health communication intervention, provide selected criteria used to support the purpose of the
Diabetes Overload in Children health communication intervention, compare and contrast the
selected references and summarize the main contributions of the references to support the
purpose of the Diabetes Overload in Children health communication intervention. The selection
criteria for the resources used in the literature review were based upon accuracy and relevance
pertaining to supporting the purpose of the Diabetes Overload in Children health communication
intervention. The Diabetes Overload in Children plans to make a difference in the lives of
children and parents dealing with diabetes.
Body of Evidence
Diabetes affects childrens quality of life, sense of control and psychological wellbeing.
Diabetes management can only be successful if the child can manage their diabetes by practicing
self-care. It is important to understand the impact diabetes has on a child, the impact diabetes has
on a childs daily living activities and the process a child has to go through to accept that they
have the disease.4 The average age of type 2 diabetes diagnosis in youth is around the age of 13
years old and predominantly seen in females. Diabetes screening in high-risk groups is
recommended to start at the age of 10 years old or when puberty starts, if it is sooner than that.5
Diabetes not only affects a child but the parents of a child living with diabetes are also affected
by the disease. Up to one third of parents stress was associated with the level of parental
responsibility for or the involvement of daily diabetes care of a child, the parents beliefs about
their ability to manage their childs illness and parental fear of hypoglycaemia. The
responsibility for diabetes management falls heavily on the mother according to recent findings.
Many families affected with diabetes do not receive outside child care assistance and parents
experience high levels of stress.6 Children and parents may feel as if they do not have a support
system or anyone to lean on in times of despair and need when dealing with diabetes.
The fundamental aspect of diabetic care is to provide skills and information that are
required for the best daily diabetes management. Education is a cost-effective element for
effective disease management and provides the opportunity to avoid expensive medical
treatment. It has been proven by several studies that proper diabetes education has significant
impact on decreasing diabetes complications and its related cost.7 Diabetes Overload in Children
will provide educational information about diabetes to children and parents who are seeking
proper and credible information sources to help manage their diabetes. Diabetes Overload in
Children will also provide easy and adaptable healthy diet and lifestyle change options for
children living with diabetes. A simple change in the diet of children affected with diabetes can
make a huge difference. Eliminating sugary drinks and food with high fat or caloric content is
critical to reducing caloric intake to promote weight maintenance or weight loss. It is important
that children and parents can read food labels to understand the nutritional value of consumed
foods. This will be a helpful tool to help reduce fat intake, reduce sugar intake and increasing
fiber intake to help manage diabetes.5
The dietary recommendations for children with diabetes is also suitable for the entire
family which will help alleviate the stress parents may experience trying to adapt to diabetes
nutritional management. Nutrition recommendations should consider the cultural, ethnic and
family traditions of the child.8 Education is fundamental to inform individuals about behaviors
that can be prevented or managed. Inadequate patient education is the most important factor in
patients poor knowledge and poor performance managing their diabetes. Most individuals with
diabetes do not receive proper education in diabetes.7 Diabetes Overload in Children will be
available to anyone seeking information about diabetes in children. The health communication
intervention will also focus on helping lower the risk of diabetes in children. The food that we
eat is turned into glucose so that our bodies can use it for energy. Most teens who get type 2
diabetes weigh too much and to help lower their chance of getting diabetes, it is important to lose
weight by being active and making healthy food choices. Physical activity and healthy food
choices are important behavioral interventions to consider when trying to eliminate the chance of
getting diabetes.9
Diabetes management currently focuses on lowering glucose as safely as possible. The
complexities associated with the management of diabetes requires ongoing parental involvement
in care throughout childhood with developmentally appropriate family teamwork between the
growing child or teen and parent to maintain the disease and prevent deterioration in glycemic
control. Accurate diagnosis of diabetes is critical to ensure proper treatment regimens,
educational approaches and dietary counseling.10 Diabetes is increasingly affecting children and
research shows that there is an increased need to focus attention on the disease and the
prevalence among children. Education places a significant role in the diagnosis and treatment of
diabetes. Individuals are not receiving the proper education to help maintain their diabetes.
Education can be a key contributor to help alleviate the prevalence of diabetes among children.
Nutrition places a significant role in diabetes due to sugary drinks and foods with high fat
content. Management and treatment of diabetes is critical to consider because nutritional
recommendations, educational approaches and proper treatment methods need to be properly
analyzed to supply sufficient treatment.
The references focused on the importance of diabetes among children and the affects
diabetes has on a parent caring for a child with diabetes. The references focused on the primary
audience. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the American Diabetes Association listed
the same statistical evidence for the annual incidence of diabetes and the prevalence of diabetes
among children. The references were different because each reference focused on a specific area
of interest such as the importance of educating individuals about the importance of diabetes and
how to manage diabetes.
Summary and Conclusions
Diabetes has been increasingly affecting our youth in the last several years. Children and parents
living with diabetes face many challenges associated with diabetes. The selected references used
in the literature review discussed the importance of diabetes in children and how important
education, support and treatment of diabetes are in making an impact in the lives of children
living with diabetes. Children are usually diagnosed with diabetes around the age of 13 and those
at risk should be screened for diabetes around the age of 10 or when puberty starts, if it is sooner
than that. The world needs to be aware of the increased risk of diabetes among our youth. Flynn
described the importance of considering parents who are taking care of a child living with
diabetes. It is important to consider the daily hassles children and families face living with
diabetes. Future research can focus on the importance of educating individuals diagnosed with
diabetes to help keep those diagnosed with diabetes to receive proper care and treatment to make
diabetes more manageable to live with.
Education is essential to help inform individuals of the severity of diabetes in children.
Lifestyle factors and physical activity play a significant role in the diagnosis of diabetes among
children. Flynn mentioned the lack of child care assistance for the majority of families affected
with diabetes. The overall research findings prove that the Diabetes Overload in Children health
communication intervention will help serve individuals seeking educational information, support
and treatment options for children living with diabetes and parents taking care of a child living
with diabetes. Research proved that education is a key component in the diagnosis of diabetes
and individuals are not properly educated when diagnosed with diabetes. Diabetic death rates
could be high due to improper diabetic education. Diabetes Overload in Children will help
families who are receiving child care assistance by providing child care assistance to those in
need. Diabetes Overload in Children will establish a relationship with the community and meet
the needs of children seeking diabetic help and parents seeking diabetic help for their child.
References:
1. FDA. How is Diabetes Treated in Children? U.S. Food and Drug Administration.
Available at:
https://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm276191.htm#What_Is_Diabet
es_ Last Updated: July 25, 2015. Accessed: June 4, 2017.
2. ADA. Statistics About Diabetes. American Diabetes Association. Available at:
http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/ Last Updated: April 5, 2017.
Accessed: June 4, 2017.
3. NDEP. Overview of Diabetes in Children and Adolescents. National Diabetes Education
Program. Available at: https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-
communication-programs/ndep/living-with-diabetes/youth-teens/diabetes-children-
adolescents/Documents/overview-of-diabetes-children_508_2016.pdf July 2014.
Accessed: June 4, 2017.
4. Sparapani V, Jacob E, Nascimento L. What Is It Like to Be a Child with Type 1 Diabetes
Mellitus? Pediatric Nursing. January 2015;41(1):17-22. Available at:
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5. Samaan M. Management of Pediatric and Adolescent Type 2 Diabetes. International
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6. Flynn R. Coping with children with diabetes: Is this burden too great for parents to bear?
Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism & Diabetes of South Africa. June 2013:82, 85.
Available at:
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9. NIH. Tips for Teens: Lower Your Risk for Type 2 Diabetes. National Institute of
Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. Available at:
https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-communication-
programs/ndep/living-with-diabetes/youth-teens/tips-lower-
risk/Pages/publicationdetail.aspx February 2010. Accessed: June 4, 2017.
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