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CONTACT LENS BRAND DEMOGRAPHICS:

A GUIDE TO WHO WANTS WHICH BRANDS

A White Paper for Contact Lens Fitters

By David M. Pearce, Responsible Marketing Consulting Services. ©2007 David M. Pearce and Responsible Marketing Consulting Services
TABLE OF CONTENTS

Executive Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

The Problem: Guessing Who to Target Just Doesn’t Work. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Segmentation, Targeting and Positioning: Getting More Bang for Your Buck . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

The Solution: A Revolutionary Marketing Tool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

Acuvue Oasys. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Acuvue 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10

Proclear Spheres . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

Night & Day. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Focus Dailies. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13

Acuvue Advance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

O2Optix . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Biomedics 55 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

1-Day Acuvue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

PureVision . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Bonus Pick 1 – FreshLook Colored Contacts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Bonus Pick 2 – Nike MaxSight . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19

Acknowledgements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Important Disclaimer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

If you’ve ever conducted an advertising or marketing campaign for contact lenses, you were probably not over-
whelmed with the results of your efforts. While there were likely a number of factors that may have contributed
to the campaign’s poor performance, this white paper will address one of the most important reasons why con-
tact lens marketing campaigns fail: an improperly targeted audience.

Historical demographic information about contact lens wearers focused primarily on the entire population and
is very broad in scope (see Chart 1). This paper breaks the boundaries of “proprietary” contact lens wearer
demographics and offers contact lens fitters never before reported demographic information about
consumers who conduct contact lens-related keyword searches. The demographics from these groups
more accurately reflect interest in a particular brand of contact lens compared to traditional purchaser demo-
graphics, which are heavily influenced by what is being prescribed. Armed with the knowledge of who, by sex
and age, is conducting online searches for branded contact lens products (Acuvue Oasys, Acuvue 2, Proclear,
Night & Day, Focus Dailies, Acuvue Advance, O2Optix, Biomedics 55, 1-Day Acuvue and PureVision), contact
lens fitters/marketers can significantly improve campaign conversion rates, reduce acquisition costs
and increase return on investment.

Chart 1:
Historically available
contact lens wearer
demographic information.

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THE PROBLEM: GUESSING WHO TO TARGET JUST DOESN’T WORK

Until now, ECPs have not been able to readily access demographic information for consumers who express an
interest in a particular brand of contact lenses. This meant that if practitioners wanted to narrow down the
target audience for a particular contact lens brand offering, they had to guess the target demographic.

In reality, this usually meant blasting out a broad offer to everybody (not a targeted message explaining the fea-
tures and benefits of a particular brand of contact lens), expecting a 10% response rate and being very disap-
pointed that the campaigned failed to meet your expectations. Too many ECPs have made this mistake, decided
that direct marketing is too expensive or just doesn’t work and given up trying to promote contact lens wear in
their practice through ongoing marketing activities.

The fundamental problems here are a lack of understanding customer segmentation, its relationship to targeted
marketing and lack of benchmark demographic data to use as a target. This paper will explain the importance
of customer/patient segmenting and why targeting improves marketing results (Return On Investment – ROI).
Most importantly, this paper gives ECPs the tools to be able to drill-down to a highly focused consumer
demographic for a specific contact lens brand promotion without having to play the “guessing game.”

3
SEGMENTATION, TARGETING AND POSITIONING:
GETTING MORE BANG FOR YOUR BUCK

Imagine you have $1000 to spend on a direct mail campaign. For simplicity’s sake we’ll assume your cost per
piece is $1.00. Thus you have 1000 letters to mail. If you mail 1000 pieces (all the same) to the first 1000 patient
names in your mailing list, you should not expect more than 10 appointments (a 1%-2% response rate with a
50% conversion rate). This means each appointment costs $100.

If you segment your mailing list to meet certain target market criteria (sex, age, Rx) and create three or four highly
targeted, product specific direct marketing pieces, a response rate of 10% is not uncommon. Applying the same
50% appointment conversion rate yields 50 appointments, each costing only $20. Sure, segmenting and tar-
geting takes more work (which is why most small business owners/marketers don’t do it), but this example high-
lights the benefits of completing the task.

Segmentation

Customer Segmentation is the subdivision of a market into discrete customer groups that share similar charac-
teristics. Customer Segmentation can be a powerful means to identify unmet customer needs. Companies that
identify underserved segments can then outperform the competition by developing uniquely appealing offers.

Customer segmentation procedures include: deciding what data will be collected and how it will be gathered;
collecting and integrating data from various sources; developing methods of data analysis for segmentation; es-
tablishing effective communication among relevant business units (such as marketing and customer service)
about the segmentation; and implementing applications to effectively deal with the data and respond to the in-
formation it provides.

ECPs essentially collect all the pertinent customer data already: age, sex, and prescription. Additional information
can be garnered from a patient’s intake history and/or lifestyle questionnaire (income range, family status, etc.).
The most common problem for ECPs is accessing this patient data in order to create segments.

If you are still running your practice with paper files, the first thing you need to do is purchase or create a cus-
tomer/patient management database (this can usually be created by a high school student – the child of a staff
member – on a part-time basis). The more data points for each patient you can capture, the more accurately you
will be able to drill down to find the perfect segment, that on paper, should ideally meet your target group criteria.

Targeting

Traditional targeting follows an analysis of your customer base to find your most profitable segments and target
those segments for your marketing campaigns. Reverse engineered targeting follows an analysis of the prof-
itable/growing consumer segments and targeting the prospects that should respond similarly to the current
market trends based on shared similarities.

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This paper focuses on analyzing current consumer trends and creating key consumer profiles that you can use
as a “target” profile for your marketing efforts.

Mr. Jones, a hypothetical 38-year old spectacle-wearing patient, was recently online researching Night
& Day contact lenses. If you knew this and proactively marketed Night & Day contact lenses to him, the
chances he would respond favorably to your direct marketing communications highlighting the benefits
of Night & Day contact lenses would be very high.

Knowing that 70% of the online searches for the keyword phrase “Night & Day contact lenses” were
conducted by a male searcher and that the top two age brackets were 35-49 (23%) and under 18
(21%), significantly narrows down the potential target audience for proactive marketing communications.

A focused, targeted marketing campaign will have a higher success rate and higher return on investment than
a broad, throw a message at everybody and see what sticks approach.

Positioning

Once you’ve completed the tasks of analyzing your target market and segmenting your customers/prospects, the
next step is to position your offer. Positioning is an attempt to show a product or service in a manner that meets
certain desired wants or needs of your target audience. For example, a post-menopausal female daily disposable
wearer is probably more interested in the benefits of comfort and moisture as opposed to a teenage daily dis-
posable wearer who is more interested in the ease and convenience of a wear-once-and-throw-away modality.

The goal of positioning is to underscore one or two characteristics that make a product or service stand out in
the minds of consumers as the answer to their wants/needs. Positioning should be the result of in-depth con-
sumer market research – what do consumers want and how does a product/service meet those needs.

While most independent ECPs don’t have the resources to conduct their own market research, the bulk of the
consumer research has already been done by the contact lens manufacturers. Look at their various marketing
and advertising campaigns to see how they position their products to various segments. Combine that informa-
tion with what you know to be common sense and position each offer appropriately.

Segmenting, targeting and positioning should all work together in concert with each other. If you have specific
questions concering how to employ these tactics into your practice’s marketing plan, contact David Pearce at
dpearce@resmarkconsulting.com or 518-314-1585.

5
THE SOLUTION:
A REVOLUTIONARY MARKETING TOOL

Access to specific, targeted demographic information has typically been a guarded secret that offered its holder
competitive advantages. While purchaser demographics provide information about the existing customers, online
searcher demographics offer leading insights into not only who is purchasing, but also who is researching prior
to making a purchase decision. In any case, owners of such information are usually reluctant to share it as no
one wants their competitors to know the demographic make-up of their customer-base to then be able to actively
target. This is particularly true when it comes to the contact lens industry. This report is going to change that.

A new tool developed by Microsoft Labs is designed to offer demographic information about online searchers.
According to Microsoft, you can use this tool to predict a customer’s age, gender, and other demographic in-
formation according to his or her online behavior—that is, from search queries and web page views.

Granted, this tool is still in beta form and the data may not be 100% precise, but considering the source and
the sampling I have run to date, I am quite comfortable that the demographics predicted are more accurate and
reliable than any other free source of consumer demographic information available to contact lens retailers today.

Throughout the balance of this paper, contact lens retailers will find demographic information about the
searchers of the top 10 contact lens branded products based on the number of search queries conducted in July
of 2006 (See Chart 2).

I have included additional commentary for the key target segments for each of the top 10 contact lens branded
products reviewed in this paper. All commentary stems from my own research and analysis of available infor-
mation and is not sanctioned by any of the referenced contact lens manufacturers. Use this commentary at your
own discretion.

Chart 2:
Searches Conducted Rank Count Keyword(s)*
in July 2006
on Yahoo.com 1 7,317 Acuvue Oasys
(Source: Overture) 2 4,738 Acuvue 2
3 4,184 Proclear
4 3,590 Focus Night & Day
5 3,518 Focus Dailies
6 3,135 Acuvue Advance
7 2,710 O2Optix
8 2,559 Biomedics 55
9 2,082 1-Day Acuvue
10 1,754 PureVision

*Includes variations

7
ACUVUE OASYS

Vistakon has done a good job of promoting their Acuvue branded products, and their Acuvue Oasys is no ex-
ception. People conduct specific “branded” keyword searches on terms they recall. As the leader of the pack
of branded contact lens products searched for, you have to concede that Vistakon’s advertising efforts have
paid off. It is interesting to note that the incorrectly spelled product name – “Oasis” – accounted for approxi-
mately half of the search volume.

Key target segment for the Acuvue Oasys is the 25-34 year old, non-astigmatic, female spectacle-wearing pa-
tient. Women in this group who are office workers or frequent travelers should respond well to marketing mes-
sages that mimic those of the product’s manufacturer.

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

20.0%

10.0%

0.0%

SEX SEARCHERS BASE

Female 73.0%

Male 27.0%

Age 25-34 48.9% 27.2%

Age 18-24 28.9% 26.8%

Age 35-49 17.8% 23.0%

Age 50+ 4.4% 13.2%


Age <18 – 9.8%

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ACUVUE 2

Acuvue 2’s search popularity is more a function of its widespread current use than its potential for future growth.
“Acuvue” as a search term accounted for more than 70,000 searches in July of 2006. This huge search volume
attests to the fantastic job Vistakon has done promoting the Acuvue brand and is reflective of Acuvue’s market
share. I believe many of the searchers keying in “Acuvue” as their search term are indeed looking to purchase
Acuvue 2 contact lenses online or get information about Vistakon’s newer Acuvue contact lens offerings.

Key target segment for the Acuvue 2 contact lenses is female and in the 18-24 year old age group. I would
advise against conducting any proactive marketing campaigns focused on promoting Acuvue 2 contact lenses.
Acuvue 2 contact lenses are a solid all-purpose contact lens, but they are not a lens I would want to promote
as the “best the contact lens industry has to offer.” Your competitors sure won’t be saying that.

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

20.0%

10.0%

0.0%

SEX SEARCHERS BASE

Female 69.0%

Male 31.0%

Age 25-34 22.2% 27.2%

Age 18-24 36.1% 26.8%

Age 35-49 22.2% 23.0%

Age 50+ 5.6% 13.2%


Age <18 13.9% 9.8%

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PROCLEAR COMPATIBLES

Proclear Spheres / Compatibles are another branded contact lens product where search volume is more di-
rectly impacted by existing wearers looking to purchase online as opposed to potential contact lens wearers
seeking product information. “Proclear” as a sole search term also benefits from the strength of the brand and
consumer confusion following the product’s name change.

Key target segment for Proclear Spheres / Compatibles is the 25-34 year old, non-astigmatic female needing
vision correction. While CooperVision believes this product offers benefits comparable to silicone hydrogel lenses,
I would advise against conducting any proactive marketing campaigns focused on promoting Proclear contact
lenses. If CooperVision truly believed this product offered all the benefits of silicone hydrogel lenses, they likely
would not be launching their own SiHy product.

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

20.0%

10.0%

0.0%

SEX SEARCHERS BASE

Female 69.0%

Male 31.0%

Age 25-34 44.6% 27.2%

Age 18-24 15.4% 26.8%

Age 35-49 27.7% 23.0%

Age 50+ 9.2% 13.2%


Age <18 3.1% 9.8%

11
FOCUS NIGHT & DAY

Analysis of the Night & Day contact lens search queries proved more complicated than most of the other
branded contact lens terms. Part of the problem relates to the name change from “Focus Night & Day” to simply
“Night & Day” contact lenses. The new name also doubles as the name of a 1946 play that featured Frank
Sinatra as well as a song title recorded by pop band U2. There were roughly 7200 search queries for “night and
day” and “day and night” during July of 2006 that I am forced to ignore due to the uncertainty of what the
searchers actual target subject was.

Key target segment for the keyword phrase “Focus Night & Day” reveals a female orientation heavily in the
25-34 year old age bracket. For the less popular search term “Night & Day contact lenses” there was a dramat-
ically different profile that I would also target: 70% male with the 35-49 year old segment leading the way at
23%. Only one other branded product in this study had more men than women searchers – PureVision (another
30-day continuous wear lens).

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

20.0%

10.0%

0.0%

SEX SEARCHERS BASE

Female 64.0%

Male 36.0%

Age 25-34 63.6% 27.2%

Age 18-24 9.1% 26.8%

Age 35-49 18.2% 23.0%

Age 50+ 9.1% 13.2%


Age <18 – 9.8%

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FOCUS DAILIES

As daily disposable contact lenses make up such a small percent of the current contact lens wearing population,
it was somewhat of a surprise to see Focus Dailies as the 5th most popular searched for contact lens brand (1-
Day Acuvue comes in a #9 which means daily disposables hold two of the top 10 search spots). It is interesting
to note that despite CIBA’s current ad campaigns targeting the teenage market with this product, that group as
yet does not seem to be responding. As this tool is dynamic, it will be worth following to see if there is any in-
crease in the percent of teenage searchers over time.

Key target segment for Focus Dailies is the professional (working), spectacle wearing, non-astigmatic female
in the 35-49 age category. This target will respond favorably to the ease and convenience of a daily disposable,
will appreciate the fresh, everyday comfort and will not mind the premium pricing of a daily disposable. This tar-
get market is also likely to have teenage children who may also make good daily disposable candidates.

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

20.0%

10.0%

0.0%

SEX SEARCHERS BASE

Female 74.0%

Male 26.0%

Age 25-34 25.9% 27.2%

Age 18-24 11.1% 26.8%

Age 35-49 40.7% 23.0%

Age 50+ 14.8% 13.2%


Age <18 7.4% 9.8%

13
ACUVUE ADVANCE

Acuvue Advance was Vistakon’s entrée into the silicone hydrogel contact lens market in 2003. Because of Vis-
takon’s focus on the traditional spherical contact lens wearer where their Acuvue and Acuvue 2 products held
significant market share leadership positions, Vistakon has been highly successful in transitioning many of those
wearers into its Acuvue Advance product. I believe search trends reflect a high percentage of existing wearers
price shopping for an online purchase.

Key target segment for Acuvue Advance is female in orientation with the 25-34 year old bracket currently lead-
ing the search volume. As Vistakon has launched its new generation silicone hydrogel product – Acuvue Oasys
– I would advise against conducting a campaign to promote Acuvue Advance. I would recommend promoting
Acuvue Advance for Astigmatism (#17 on the most-searched list). This target demographic is evenly split 50%
male, 50% female with 25-34 year-olds accounting for 43.8% of the searches.

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

20.0%

10.0%

0.0%

SEX SEARCHERS BASE

Female 71.0%

Male 29.0%

Age 25-34 38.2% 27.2%

Age 18-24 22.4% 26.8%

Age 35-49 28.9% 23.0%

Age 50+ 6.6% 13.2%


Age <18 3.9% 9.8%

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O 2 OPTIX

CIBA Vision’s recently launched O2Optix “Love” campaign should serve to drive prospect interest. Take advan-
tage of manufacturer’s large-scale advertising efforts and piggyback your own campaigns on them. Consider
these manufacturer programs an artillery barrage to “soften the shores” for your much more intimate and per-
sonal invitation to try these “state-of-the-art” new contact lenses.

The searcher age dispersion for O2Optix contact lenses is reflective of the general “base” search population. With
a 60% female, 40% male dispersion, this group is slightly more male than the average contact lens wearer pop-
ulation (35% male). With that being said, I would target a fairly even mix of males/females between the ages
of 18 and 34 years old. Suspect conversion rates to be slightly lower as this is a broader target group, but based
on search query data, this lens has broad age/sex appeal.

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

20.0%

10.0%

0.0%

SEX SEARCHERS BASE

Female 60.0%

Male 40.0%

Age 25-34 29.2% 27.2%

Age 18-24 27.8% 26.8%

Age 35-49 23.6% 23.0%

Age 50+ 13.9% 13.2%


Age <18 5.5% 9.8%

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BIOMEDICS 55

Biomedics 55 contact lenses are another conventional hydrogel lens product that made the top 10 list of this
paper primarily as the result of existing wearers conducting searches to find an online seller.

Key target segment for Biomedics 55 is the 35-49 year-old female audience. It is also interesting to note the
50+ and under-18 categories searched at rates significantly higher than their base rates. Understanding the
market lifecycle of conventional hydrogel contact lenses and the trend towards silicone hydrogel materials, I
would not recommend actively promoting Biomedics products to existing or future contact lens wearers. Promote
the best the industry and your practice has to offer.

100.0%

80.0%

60.0%

40.0%

20.0%

0.0%

SEX SEARCHERS BASE

Female 90.0%

Male 10.0%

Age 25-34 20.2% 27.2%

Age 18-24 17.8% 26.8%

Age 35-49 24.9% 23.0%

Age 50+ 20.9% 13.2%


Age <18 16.2% 9.8%

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1-DAY ACUVUE

1-Day Acuvue searcher demographics are interestingly different from the other daily disposable contact lens
covered in this study (Focus Dailies – #5).

Key target segments for 1-Day Acuvue differ from the leading daily disposable in that 1-Day Acuvue attracts
the age spectrum extremes (teenage and 50+) both at rates significantly higher than their respective base pen-
etrations. Additionally, searchers were almost exclusively female (98%). It is interesting to note that the two
daily disposables in this study draw complementary segments, indicating that there is interest for daily disposables
across all female age categories. Be sure to tailor key marketing messages to each age group and don’t make
the mistake of blanket marketing the same daily disposable message to all female patients.

100.0%

80.0%

60.0%

40.0%

20.0%

0.0%

SEX SEARCHERS BASE

Female 98.0%

Male 2.0%

Age 25-34 20.3% 27.2%

Age 18-24 17.6% 26.8%

Age 35-49 24.4% 23.0%

Age 50+ 20.2% 13.2%


Age <18 17.4% 9.8%

17
PUREVISION

PureVision is the second of two 30-day continuous wear silicone hydrogel lenses in this study and the only
Bausch & Lomb lens to make the top 10. More importantly, PureVision is the only branded contact lens whose
searchers were dominantly male oriented.

Key target segment for PureVision is the 35-49 year-old non-astigmatic, male spectacle wearer. As PureVision
is the only silicone hydrogel brand that has a sphere, toric and a multifocal product currently available, it would
not be a bad idea to make this 35-49 year-old male target group aware of that in your marketing messages. Be-
cause this age group is likely to have a significant presbyopic population, positioning PureVision Multi-Focal as
the healthiest bi/multifocal currently on the market is a great way to increase target penetration rates.

80.0%

70.0%

60.0%

50.0%

40.0%

30.0%

20.0%

10.0%

0.0%

SEX SEARCHERS BASE

Female 41.0%

Male 59.0%

Age 25-34 22.2% 27.2%

Age 18-24 25.9% 26.8%

Age 35-49 33.3% 23.0%

Age 50+ 14.8% 13.2%


Age <18 3.7% 9.8%

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BONUS PICK 1 – FRESHLOOK COLORED CONTACTS

Overture reported search volume for “FreshLook” related keywords at over 80,000 in July of 2006. That’s more
search volume than “Acuvue” got during the same month. This indicates there is a very high interest (demand)
for colored contact lenses and FreshLook, as the hands-down market leader, has become synonymous with col-
ored lenses.

Based on search demographics, the key target segment is the 25-34 year-old female. Based on the search vol-
ume, I would not limit marketing prospects to only contact lens wearers or even the vision corrected population.
Colored contact lenses can be a huge addition to your contact lens practice. However, marketing colored contact
lenses will certainly take a different approach than marketing contact lenses to correct vision. It is important to
position colored contacts as more of a fashion/beauty product than a device for vision correction.

With the recent addition of CIBA Vision’s FreshLook ONE-DAY colored daily disposable contact lenses, this creates
an easy upsell opportunity for your existing Focus Dailies wearers. Try giving away a pair of trials in two, three
or each of the four available colors as a teaser and then just wait for the orders to start coming.

BONUS PICK 2 – NIKE MAXSIGHT

Nike MaxSight sports contact lenses surprised me with their 12th place showing on the most searched brand
name list. Most ODs would agree that this is a very niche product and not one that most actively include in their
contact lens product portfolio. I believe interest in this product is not limited to current contact lens wearers.
However, I would focus my initial marketing campaigns for this product on existing contact lens wearers.

Searcher demographics for Nike MaxSight were almost evenly split between males and females (49% M / 51%
F). The leading age bracket, coming in with 40% of the searches was the 35-49 year-old group. This tells me
that there is considerable interest from your upper-middle class tennis or golf club member with above average
disposable income looking for a way to improve their game.

Try sending a patient out with a trial set to “test” along with a box or two at regular price. If the patient isn’t
satisfied with the functionality of the trials, have them return the trials and the unopened boxes for a full refund
of their product charges. This way the patient doesn’t get to simply keep and reuse the trial set indefinitely.

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IMPORTANT DISCLAIMER

The demographic information contained in this paper is time-sensitive and perishable. The information reported
here was obtained in August 2006 and was current at the time of collection. I have observed changes in the re-
ported demographics when comparing queries conducted in June 2006 and those reported in this paper. This
indicates that this demographics predictor tool is live and updates its data based on current searcher behavior
– effectively creating a tool to measure the “pulse” of the market in real-time.

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