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10.17.

1 Overview of 1D meshing

Tutorial

This step-by-step activity demonstrates how to create a 1D beam mesh, assign a cross section to it, and orient the cross section.

1D Mesh lets you create a mesh of one-dimensional elements that are associated with geometry. You can create or edit one-dimensional elements along
curves or polygon edges.

One-dimensional elements are two-node elements that, depending on type, may or may not require an orientation component. A one-dimensional element
is one in which the properties of the element are defined along a line or curve. Typical applications for the 1D element include beams, stiffeners, and truss
structures.

Choosing a 1D meshing tool


The software provides several tools for creating and defining 1D elements, depending on the problem you are modeling:

Use 1D Mesh to define a mesh along geometry, for example, to create a beam model.

Use 1D Connection to connect discrete meshes or geometry using 1D elements (for example, to create a spider mesh). See 1D Connection for more
information.

Use Spot Weld to create a 1D connection mesh by projecting a curve or points between two faces. See Creating a series of spot weld connections for
more information.

You can also create 1D elements manually to create beam models not associated with any geometry. See Manually creating elements.

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Ensuring that 1D elements are oriented consistently
When you use the 1D Mesh command to create beam elements on selected edges or curves, the directions of those edges or curves control the orientation of
the beam elements. If the directions of the edges or curves are not consistent, the orientations of the resulting beam elements will not be consistent. For
more information, see Ensuring consistent 1D element orientation.

Defining cross section shapes for 1D elements


You can use the 1D Element Section command to create cross sections and assign them to a mesh of 1D bar or beam elements. For more information, see
Beam cross section overview and Create a standard cross section.

Defining end releases for Nastran and ANSYS beam elements


When using Nastran, ANSYS, or LS-DYNA as your solver, you can define a release at the ends of beam and bar elements to model hinged or pinned
connections. End releases remove connections between a node and selected degrees of freedom. For more information, see End releases for 1D elements.

Where do I find it?

Simulation NavigatorFE Model noderight-clickNew Mesh1D

Advanced Simulation toolbar1D Mesh

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10.17.2 Create a 1D mesh

1. Click 1D Mesh .

2. Select the object to mesh. If you select a curve or polygon edge, the software generates a 1D mesh along that curve or edge. If you select a polygon
face, the software generates a 1D mesh on each edge of the face.

Note To create 1D elements between selected nodes, points, or mesh points, use the 1D Connection command. See 1D Connection.

3. Make sure the displayed directions of the selected curves or edges are consistent. The temporary arrow graphics should point in the same direction
along a chain of edges or curves. If the directions are not consistent, hold down the Shift key and deselect the edges where the previewed direction is
incorrect and either:

o Select the Auto Chain Selection option and re-select the edges. The software uses the direction of the first edge or curve you select to set the
direction of the other edges or curves in the selection.

o Re-select the edges, making sure to click your mouse closest near the opposite end of the curve.

For more information, see Ensuring consistent 1D element orientation.

4. Select an element type.

5. Specify the destination mesh collector:

o Select Automatic Mode to have the software create a new destination mesh collector for you. This mesh collector uses the default physical
properties and inherits the material and cross section properties of the model.

o To use an existing mesh collector, clear the Automatic Mode check box and select a collector from the Mesh Collector list.

o To create a new destination collector, clear the Automatic Mode check box and click New Collector .

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For steps to define cross section dimensions, orientation, and offsets, see Beam cross section workflow.

6. From the Mesh Density by list, select either Number or Size and enter a value:

o If you select Number, enter the number of elements. If you enter 9 for example, and select an edge, the software will distribute nine elements
along the selected edge.

o If you select Size, enter a size in model units.

7. Choose Apply or OK. 1D elements are built along or between the objects you selected for meshing

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10.17.3 Ensuring consistent 1D element orientation
In the 1D Mesh dialog box, you can use the Auto Chain Selection option to ensure that the beam elements are:

Correctly oriented.

Properly connected from start to end so that the B node of one element connects to the A node of the next element.

Numbered sequentially.

Every edge or curve has a defined mesh direction. When you create a mesh of 1D elements, the direction of the curve controls the direction in which the
software generates the 1D elements. When you select each edge or curve, the software uses temporary arrow graphics to indicate each curve's mesh
direction. This allows you to preview the direction in which the elements will be generated. If those temporary graphics point in conflicting directions, the
resulting beam elements will be both inconsistently oriented and numbered.

When you select the curves or edges manually, the location at which you click your mouse along the geometry controls the direction in which the
elements will be generated. The software draws the arrow to point away from of the end of the curve that is closest to your selection point (the point
on the curve where you actually clicked the mouse). If you want the elements to be generated in the direction opposite to the previewed direction,
click the Reverse Direction button in the 1D Mesh dialog box.

Below, the red circle indicates the location at which the mouse was clicked. Notice how the direction of the arrow changes depending upon the location
of the selection point.

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When you use area selection to select a group of edges or curves, the directions along that geometry may be oriented in inconsistent directions (A).
When you generate the mesh on those curves, the beam elements are oriented inconsistently (B).

When you select the Auto Chain Selection option and then select the edges or curves, the software uses the direction of the first curve or edge in the
selection to control the direction of all others. With the option selected, the directions along the geometry are now oriented consistently (C), so any beam
elements generated along that geometry are also oriented consistently (D).

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10.17.4 Beam cross section overview

Tutorial

This step-by-step activity demonstrates how to create a beam mesh, assign a cross section to it, and orient the cross section.

You can create a cross section and assign it to a mesh of 1D bar or beam elements. To create a cross section, you can:

Choose from a list of solver-specific standard sections and specify the section dimensions.

Create a cross section from the face of a solid.

Create a cross section from sketch geometry.

After you create a section, you assign it to a 1D mesh in the physical property table for the mesh collector.

You can orient the cross section on the bar or beam mesh by specifying an orientation vector and offsets in the Mesh Associated Data dialog box.

Note For LS-DYNA, offsets are valid only when Element formulation (ELFORM) is set to 1 Hughes-Liu in the SECTION_BEAM physical property table.

For ABAQUS, see your solver documentation for the types of sections that support offsets.

Element orientation on the cross section


By default, you orient the Y-axis of the 1D element on the cross section, but you can also choose to orient the Z-axis. In either case, you orient the element
to a direction in the absolute coordinate system, or you can infer the direction by selecting a vector on the model.

In the following NX Nastran example, the thick yellow arrow represents the section orientation vector. In the first picture, the element Y-axis (1) is aligned
with the Y-axis of the absolute coordinate system (2).

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In the next picture, the element Y-axis (1) is aligned with the Z-axis of the absolute coordinate system (2).

Note Different solvers use different axis labels:

Nastran and Ansys: X, Y, Z

ABAQUS: t, n1, n2

LS-DYNA: r, s, t

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The direction of the 1D element X-axis is determined by the first node selected in the creation of the element. If you defined the element on an edge, the
software uses the end closest to where you selected the edge to determine the first node of the element. For Abaqus, t is aligned with the element axis and
runs from the first node to the second node. The n1 axis is the first beam section axis and n2 is the normal to the beam.

The direction of the X-axis is important when you orient section types that are not symmetrical, such as the L section. In the two examples below, (1)
represents the first node selected in the creation of the 1D element and (2) represents the second node.

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Section properties are associative
The cross section properties are associative, including dimensions, orientation, and offset. This means the software updates the section properties whenever
changes are made to the data from which they are derived.

For example, suppose you create a cross section using the Face of Solid method to define its dimensions based on the face of solid geometry. Later, you

change the dimensions of that geometry in the Modeling application. Then, in the FEM, after you click Update Finite Element Model , the beam
section dimensions are updated to match the new dimensions of the geometry.

Beam post-processing
For information about beam post-processing, see Beam post-processing.

Where do I find it?

On the Advanced Simulation toolbar, click 1D Element Section .

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10.17.5 Beam cross section workflow
Step Summary Detailed steps

Create a standard cross section

Create a cross section from the


face of a solid
1. Create the beam cross
In the 1D Element Cross Section dialog box, define the beam cross section. Create a cross section from a
section.
sketch

Create a cross section by


entering properties

2. Assign the cross section to In the Physical Property Table Manager dialog box for the 1D mesh, assign the Assign a cross section to a beam
the 1D mesh. cross section. mesh

3. Orient the cross section on


In the Mesh Associated Data dialog box, orient the cross section on the 1D mesh. Define cross section orientation
the 1D mesh.

In the Mesh Associated Data dialog box, use an offset to adjust the distance of
4. Define offsets. Offset a cross section
the cross section relative to the 1D mesh.

For information about beam post-processing, see Beam post-processing.

Note When you define the solution for models containing beams, be sure to request Force results in the output requests for your solution. For information
about post-processing beam results, see Beam post-processing

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10.17.6 Create a standard cross section

Video

This video demonstrates how to create a standard cross section and assign it to a 1D mesh.

This topic describes how to create a cross section for a 1D mesh using one of the solver-specific standard sections.

1. Edit the physical property table for the 1D mesh.

2. In the physical property table dialog box, next to Fore Section, click Show Section Manager .

3. In the Beam Section Manager dialog box, click Create Section .

4. In the Beam Section dialog box, from the Type list, select the section type to create.

5. Under Dimensions, enter the dimensions for the section.

For details about the properties of standard cross sections, see your solver documentation.

6. (Optional) Click Evaluate Section Properties to view a report of the section properties and stress recovery points.

7. (Optional) Select the Preview check box to preview the cross section with the dimensions you defined.

8. Click OK to return to the physical property table dialog box.

9. (Optional) If this is a tapered beam, follow these additional steps:

a. In the physical property table dialog box, from the Section Type list, select Tapered.

b. Repeat steps 28 to define the Aft section.

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10.17.7 Create a cross section from the face of a solid

Video( 10.17.6 Video)

This video demonstrates how to create a beam cross section from the face of a solid body.

This topic describes how to create a cross section for a 1D mesh using the dimensions of a planar face of your solid geometry. If the solid geometry is later
changed, the cross section will be updated automatically.

1. Edit the physical property table for the 1D mesh.

2. In the physical property table dialog box, next to Fore Section, click Show Section Manager .

3. In the Beam Section Manager dialog box, click Create Section .

4. In the Beam Section dialog box, in the Type list, choose Face of Solid.

5. In the graphics window, select a planar face to represent the cross section, as shown in the following example at .

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Note In this example, the solid beam geometry is split into two separate bodies. One body has been hidden to expose a planar face to use for creating
the cross section. You can also use the end face of an extruded solid, or use the Section Curve command in the Modeling application and use the
resulting curves as a planar face.

6. Selection of a planar face defines the plane of the section, but not the orientation. You can define either the horizontal or vertical axis. In the
Reference Vector group, from the Define Axis list, select Horizontal or Vertical.

7. Define the horizontal or vertical axis using the standard NX vector tools, or click Inferred and then select an edge on the solid geometry to infer
the horizontal or vertical axis of the section.

In the example, the horizontal axis is inferred by selecting the edge at .

An arrow indicates the horizontal direction.

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8. In the Beam Section dialog box, select the Preview check box to see the cross section. In this example, the horizontal direction is Z and the normal is
X. The software determined the vertical direction.

9. Expand the Stress Recovery Points group. Note that default stress recovery points are provided.

10. (Optional) To add an additional stress recovery point, click Create Point .

11. In the Cross Section Preview window, select the first stress recovery point.

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12. Click Done .

The Y-Z coordinates for the C stress recovery point appear in the dialog box.

13. Repeat the above steps to define the remaining stress recovery points.

14. (Optional) Click Evaluate Section Properties to view a report of the section properties and stress recovery points. Close the Information window.

15. Click OK.

Example channel beam section (shown in green) and solid geometry (shown in gray)

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10.17.8 Create a cross section from a sketch
This topic describes how to create a cross section for a 1D mesh using the dimensions of a sketch. For more information about sketches, see the Sketching
online Help.

Note If LS-DYNA is your selected solver, you cannot create a cross section from a sketch using this method.

1. Turn on the Sketch Curves option:

a. In the Simulation Navigator, right-click the FEM and choose Edit, and then click Geometry Options.

b. In the Geometry Options dialog box, select the Sketch Curves check box, and click OK.

2. Edit the physical property table for the 1D mesh.

3. In the physical property table dialog box, next to Fore Section, click Show Section Manager .

4. In the Beam Section Manager dialog box, click Create Section .

5. In the Beam Section dialog box, in the Type list, choose General Geometry.

6. From the Sketch List, select the sketch to use.

Note You must select a closed-loop sketch.

7. Expand the Stress Recovery Points group. Note that default stress recovery points are provided.

8. (Optional) To add an additional stress recovery point, click Create Point .

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9. In the Cross Section Preview window, select the first stress recovery point.

10. Click Done .

The Y-Z coordinates for the C stress recovery point appear in the dialog box.

11. Repeat the above steps to define the remaining stress recovery points.

12. (Optional) Click Evaluate Section Properties to view a report of the section properties and stress recovery points. Close the Information window.

13. Click OK.

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10.17.9 Create a cross section by entering properties
This topic describes how to create a custom cross section for a 1D mesh by entering the cross section properties.

1. In the Beam Section Manager dialog box, click Create Section .

2. In the Beam Section dialog box, in the Type list, choose User Defined Properties.

3. Under the Dimensions group, enter the appropriate value for each cross section property. Property names vary according to the solver you are using.
For more information, see Beam Section dialog box.

4. Expand the Stress Recovery Points group.

5. Click Create Point .

6. In the Cross Section Preview window, select the first stress recovery point.

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7. Click Done .

The Y-Z coordinates for the C stress recovery point appear in the dialog box.

8. Repeat the above steps to define the remaining stress recovery points.

9. Click OK.

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10.17.10 Assign a cross section to a beam mesh
1. Edit the physical property table for the beam or bar mesh.

2. In the physical property table dialog box, next to Fore Section, choose the cross section to apply or click Show Section Manager to create a new

cross section.

3. Click OK to return to the physical property table dialog box.

4. (Optional) If this is a tapered beam, follow these additional steps:

a. In the physical property table dialog box, from the Section Type list, select Tapered.

b. Repeat the previous steps to define the Aft section.

By default, the cross section displays as a solid in the graphics window; for information about changing the display, see Displaying beam cross sections.

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10.17.11 Define cross section orientation

Video ( 10.17.6 )

This video demonstrates how to orient a 1D mesh on a cross section.

After assigning a cross section to the mesh, you may need to change the orientation of the mesh on the cross section.

In the following example, suppose the goal is to orient the beam mesh such that the cross section is aligned with the solid geometry that it represents.

(1) Solid geometry; (2) beam section


You can orient a beam mesh using one of these methods:

Orientation Vector

Orientation Node

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Orientation Vector method
The Orientation Vector method lets you orient the Y-axis or Z-axis of the beam mesh to an axis of the absolute coordinate system or to a direction inferred
from geometry. In Abaqus, the axes are n1 or n2.

1. In the Simulation Navigator, right-click the beam mesh and choose Edit Mesh Associated Data.

The beam editing display shows you:

o Beam section curves, displayed at the ends of the mesh.

o Element coordinate system.

o Beam mesh, including ball graphics that represent the ends of each element.

o Orientation vector.

(1) orientation vector; (2) element coordinate system (3) beam mesh (4) section curves

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2. In the Mesh Associated Data dialog box, accept the default Method of Orientation Vector.

3. From the Define Element Axis list, choose Y.

This selection specifies the axis of the element coordinate system to orient.

4. Next to Specify vector to project, select an axis of the absolute coordinate system to which to orient the cross section.

For example, to orient the element Y-axis to the X-axis of the absolute coordinate system, select XC-axis .

Or, click Inferred Vector to infer the axis by selecting geometry in the graphics window.

For example, you can select a face in the solid geometry that is normal to the intended direction of the cross section orientation axis. In the example,

the top face at is selected.

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The software orients the element Y-axis to the normal of the selected face.

You can then click Reverse Direction if necessary.

Orientation Node method


You can orient the cross section using a third node that, along with the first and second nodes of the element,
defines the orientation vector for the section.

1. Select InsertNodeCreate to create a node to use as the orientation node.

The orientation vector is created from the first node in the beam element to the orientation node.

In this example, the node is inserted on the geometry at .

2. Click OK to close the Node Create dialog box.

3. In the Simulation Navigator, right-click the 1D mesh and choose Edit Mesh Associated Data.

4. In the Mesh Associated Data dialog box, in the Method list, choose Orientation Node.

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5. Select the node you created in the previous step.

In the example, the node at is selected.

The X-Y plane of the cross section orientation is defined by the vector from the first node in the beam element to the orientation node that you
specified.

In the example, this is the vector from to .

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10.17.12 Offset a cross section

Video 10.7.6

This video demonstrates how to offset a cross section. The demonstration uses a step ladder as an example.

This topic describes how to offset a cross section from a 1D mesh.

Note When Abaqus is the selected solver, you can offset an I-beam or trapezoidal section using the d or l properties in the section definition. For more
information, see Beam Section dialog box.

In this example, suppose the goal is to define an offset to align the cross section with the beam mesh. The beam mesh is aligned with the back wall of the
solid geometry.

Solid geometry (1); beam mesh (2); cross section (3)

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Select a reference point
You offset the cross section from the beam mesh according to a reference point on the cross section. By default, this point is the section centroid (for ANSYS
and LS-DYNA) or the shear center (for Nastran), but you can select a different reference point on the section.

Note If ANSYS is the selected solver, the default offset reference point is the section centroid in NX. However, when you solve the model, NX adjusts the
offset to be a distance from the section origin, which is how the ANSYS solver expects the offset.

1. In the Simulation Navigator, right-click the 1D mesh and choose Edit Mesh Associated Data.

The beam mesh is shown along with a reference line indicating the placement of the section. In the example, there is an existing offset in the
Z-axis.

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2. In the Mesh Associated Data dialog box, under the Section Offsets group, click Pick point on section .

3. In the Cross Section Preview window, note the default offset reference point represented by a small sphere . To change the offset reference point,
select the new point in the Cross Section Preview window.

The default offset reference point is (the example shown is for Nastran, which offsets the section to the shear center by default). In this example,
it will be easier to align the cross section with the beam mesh if you change the offset reference point to the back wall of the cross section (indicated

by ).

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4. Click Done .

In the graphics window, the new offset reference point is indicated by a small sphere ( ).

Next, you must specify the target position of the cross section. You can do this graphically by selecting curves, points, or other geometry, or by entering
offset values manually.

Specify the offset target point graphically

1. In the Mesh Associated Data dialog box, from the Section Placement Method list, select Graphical.

2. Next to Specify Section Location, choose the appropriate point constructor tool to help you select the point to which the cross section should be
offset.

For example, click Inferred Point to infer the point by selecting geometry.

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3. In the graphics window, select the point to which the cross section should be offset.

For example, if you use the Inferred Point tool, on the solid geometry, select the arc circle of the hole ( ).

This selection aligns the offset reference point on the cross section to the center of the hole.

4. (Optional) To apply a different offset to the two ends of the cross section, clear the Offset End B = Offset End A check box. Then, in the End B group,
repeat the previous steps to define a separate offset for end B of the section.

5. Click OK to dismiss the Mesh Associated Data dialog box.

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Specify an offset by entering values
Instead of using the graphical method described previously, you can enter values to offset the section as a distance in the X, Y, and Z directions of the
element coordinate system from the specified point on the section.

1. In the Mesh Associated Data dialog box, follow the steps in Select a reference point.

2. In the Offset to Point on Section group, enter values in model units to offset the section in the X, Y, and/or Z directions of the element coordinate
system.

Offset Along Element refers to the 1D element X-axis.

Note ANSYS does not support offsets along the element X-axis.

Offset to shear center (Nastran)


If you are using Nastran, you can offset the beam mesh to the cross section shear center in terms of the nodal displacement coordinate system (which is, by
default, the absolute coordinate system).

1. In the Mesh Associated Data dialog box, from the Section Placement Method list, choose Language-Specific.

2. Next to Specify Section Location, select the appropriate point constructor tool to help you select the point to which the cross section should be offset,
as described in step 2 in the previous section.

3. (Optional) In the Offset in Nodal Displacement CSYS group, enter displacement values in model units to further offset the section in the X, Y, and Z
directions of the nodal displacement coordinate system.

4. Click OK to dismiss the Mesh Associated Data dialog box.

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10.17.13 End releases for 1D elements
When using Nastran, ANSYS, or LS-DYNA as your solver, you can define end releases on beam and bar elements to model hinged or pinned beam ends (rather
than welded, continuous ends). End releases are referred to as pin flags in Nastran.

End releases remove connections between a node and selected degrees of freedom. The degrees of freedom are defined in the element coordinate system.

In the following beam example, a force is defined on the horizontal span. Because end releases are defined at the ends of the bracing beams, the solver does
not transfer the moment load from the horizontal beam to the bracing beams. The moments are transferred across the other elements in the horizontal
span.

Bridge model. (1) and (2) represent the end releases


Note For information about displaying the end release icons on the model, see Displaying beam cross sections.

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You can define end releases in the Mesh Associated Data or Element Associated Data dialog box.

Nastran
You can set DOF1 DOF6 to On to disconnect the following forces for end A and/or end B of the element:

DOF1 axial force in Plane 1

DOF2 shearing force in Plane 1

DOF3 shearing force in Plane 2

DOF4 axial torque in Plane 2

DOF5 moment in Plane 2

DOF6 moment in Plane 1

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As shown in the picture below, Plane 1 is the XY plane formed by the X and Y axes in the element coordinate system. Plane 2 is the XZ plane formed by the
X and Z axes.

CBEAM element planes


In the bridge example, DOF6 is set to On at the ends of the bracing beams (the model is shown in the XY plane).

Ansys
You can set the degrees of freedom to On to disconnect the following forces for end I and/or end J of the element:

UX Displacements in the X direction.

UY Displacements in the Y direction.

UZ Displacements in the Z direction.

ROTX Rotations in the X direction.

ROTY Rotations in the Y direction.

ROTZ Rotations in the Z direction.

LS-DYNA
You can set the degrees of freedom to On to disconnect the following forces for end A (N1) and/or end B (N2) of the element:

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LS-DYNA variable (*ELEMENT_BEAM keyword) DOF1 DOF2 DOF3 DOF4 DOF5 DOF6

RT1,RT2 EQ.0 Off Off Off

RT1,RT2 EQ.1 On Off Off

RT1,RT2 EQ.2 Off On Off

RT1,RT2 EQ.3 Off Off On

RT1,RT2 EQ.4 On On Off

RT1,RT2 EQ.5 Off On On

RT1,RT2 EQ.6 On Off On

RT1,RT2 EQ.7 On On On

RR1,RR2 EQ.0 Off Off Off

RR1,RR2 EQ.1 On Off Off

RR1,RR2 EQ.2 Off On Off

RR1,RR2 EQ.3 Off Off On

RR1,RR2 EQ.4 On On Off

RR1,RR2 EQ.5 Off On On

RR1,RR2 EQ.6 On Off On

RR1,RR2 EQ.7 On On On

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10.17.14 Displaying beam cross sections
There are several options for controlling the persistent display of cross sections for 1D meshes:

Persistent solid display of cross sections.

Persistent wireframe display of cross sections.

Individual display controls for cross section orientation, end releases, and orientation vectors.

You control these display options for 1D meshes on the Mesh Display dialog box.

Persistent solid cross section display


When you choose Solid from the Display Section list on the Mesh Display dialog box, the software renders beam elements as 3D
solids, extruding section geometry along the length of the element.

You can use a solid cross section display to quickly and intuitively identify issues with beam orientation or section definitions. Solid
cross section displays also provide a more realistic rendering of models incorporating beam meshes for documenting and presenting
your analysis.

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Persistent wireframe cross section display
When you choose Curves from the Display Section list, the software creates a persistent wireframe display showing cross section geometry at each node of
your mesh.

Displaying cross section orientation, end releases, and orientation vectors


You can turn off and on the display of symbols indicating a number of beam attributes:

Display Section Orientation displays the current orientation of 1D elements on beam sections using an XYZ triad at each node.

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Display End Releases represents end releases (also called pin flags) using a symbol at each end of each beam where an end release is defined.
Translational end releases are shown as +, rotational releases as 0, and combined releases as *.

Display Orientation Vector displays defined orientation vectors using a line segment labeled V extending in the vector direction from each node.

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Turn these settings on to confirm beam orientation and attributes, and to identify any issues. Turn these settings off for a less cluttered display.

Where do I find it?


Application Advanced Simulation

Prerequisite An active FEM file that contains 1D elements with defined cross sections and associated data.

Menu PreferencesMesh Display. From the Type list, choose 1D Mesh.

In the FEM, right-click the 1D mesh collector or 1D mesh and choose Edit Display.

Simulation Navigator In the Simulation file, right-click the 1D mesh collector or 1D mesh and choose Create Display Override or Edit Temporary Display.

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10.17.15 Reusable beam cross sections
Use the Define Reusable Object command in Advanced Simulation to save a frequently used standard, General Geometry, or Face of Solid type of beam
cross section from your FEM as a reusable object template in the NX Reuse Library.

Note For more information about the NX Reuse Library, see the Reuse Library online Help.

For the General Geometry and Face of Solid types of cross sections, the reusable object includes the cross section and the user-defined stress recovery
points. Values are converted to the units of the FEM in which the section is reused, and all association with the original sketch or solid face is removed.

When you reuse a Face of Solid type of cross section, the type is changed to General Geometry.

Where do I find it?


Saving a cross section as a reuse object:

Application Advanced Simulation

Prerequisite Cross section type must be standard, General Geometry, or Face of Solid.

Toolbar Reuse LibraryDefine Reusable Object

Menu ToolsReuse LibraryDefine Reusable Object

Right-click library nodeDefine Reusable Object


Reuse Library navigator

Using a cross section reuse object in another part file:

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Application Advanced Simulation

Reuse Library navigator Member Select groupclick Beam Section Template

Search groupenter name of reuse object and click Search in tree above

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10.17.15.1 Define a beam cross section reusable object
1. Open the FEM that contains the beam cross section that you want to define as a reusable object.

2. Choose ToolsReuse LibraryDefine Reusable Object.

3. In the Reusable Object dialog box, in the Object group, click Show Section Manager .

4. From the Cross Section List, select the cross section to define as reusable.

This must be a General Geometry, Face of Solid, or standard solver cross section.

5. Click Close.

6. In the Reusable Object dialog box, in the Folder View group, select the library folder where you want to store the reusable object.

7. In the Preview Image group, click Define Image to use the cross section preview as the image to be associated with the reusable object in the
reuse library.

A preview image of the reusable object appears in the preview panel.

8. Click OK.

For steps to reuse this object in another part, see Reuse a beam cross section in another part.

[Date] 43
10.17.15.2 Reuse a beam cross section in another part
These steps assume a reusable beam cross section has already been created in the Reuse Library.

1. Open the FEM in which you want to reuse the cross section.

2. Open the Reuse Library navigator .

3. In the Member Select group, in the second list, select Beam Section Template .

4. In the Search group, in the search box, type the name of the cross section reusable object and click Search in tree above .

The reusable object appears in the list.

5. In the list, right-click the reusable object and select Insert.

The Beam Section Manager appears. The cross section is now available in the Cross Section List.

6. In the Beam Section Manager, select the new cross section. If necessary, you can click Edit Section to make changes to the dimensions and stress
recovery points.

7. Click Close to close the Beam Section Manager.

Now you can assign the cross section to your beam mesh by editing its physical property table.

[Date] 44