Present Perfect Simple – Present Perfect Progressive

Exercises and Tests

Form
Present Perfect Simple
irregular verbs: form of 'have' + 3rd column of irregular verbs
Example: I / you / we / they have spoken he / she / it has spoken I / you / we / they have been speaking he / she / it has been speaking Example:

Present Perfect Progressive
form of 'have' + been + verb + ing

regular verbs: form of 'have' + infinitive + ed
Example: I / you / we / they have worked he / she / it has worked

Exceptions Exceptions when adding 'ed' :  when the final letter is e, only add d
Example: love - loved

Exceptions when adding 'ing' :  silent e is dropped. (but: does not apply for -ee) Example: come - coming aber: agree - agreeing  after a short, stressed vowel, the final consonant is doubled Example: sit - sitting  after a vowel, the final consonant l is doubled in British English (but not in American English). Example: travel - travelling

 after a short, stressed vowel, the final consonant is doubled
Example: admit - admitted

 final l is always doubled in British English (not in American English)
Example: travel - travelled

 final ie becomes y.  after a consonant, final y becomes i (but: not after a Example: lie - lying vowel)
Example: worry - worried but: play - played

See also explanations on Present Perfect Simple and Present Perfect Progressive

Use
Both tenses are used to express that an action began in the past and is still going on or has just finished. In many cases, both forms are correct, but there is often a difference in meaning: We use the Present Perfect Simple mainly to express that an action is completed or to emphasise the result. We use the Present Perfect Progressive to emphasise the duration or continuous course of an action.

Result or duration?
Do you want to express what has happened so far or how long an action has been going on yet?

Present Perfect Simple
Result (what / how much / how often)
I have written 5 letters. / I have been to London twice.

Present Perfect Progressive
Duration (how long)
I have been writing for an hour.

Certain verbs
The following verbs are usually only used in Present Perfect Simple (not in the progressive form).  state: be, have (for possession only) Example: We have been on holiday for two weeks.  senses: feel, hear, see, smell, taste, touch Example: He has touched the painting.  brain work: believe, know, think, understand Example: I have known him for 3 years.

Emphasis on completion or duration?
Do you want to emphasise the completion of an action or its continuous course (how has somebody spent his time)?

Present Perfect Simple
Emphasis on completion

Present Perfect Progressive
Emphasis on duration
I have been doing my homework. (Meaning: That's how I have spent

I have done my homework. (Meaning: My homework is completed my time. It does not matter whether the homework is completed now.) now.)

Result or side effect?
Do you want to express that a completed action led to a desired result or that the action had an unwanted side effect?

Present Perfect Simple
desired result

Present Perfect Progressive
unwanted side effect
Why are you so wet? - I have been washing the car. (side effect: I became wet when I was washing the car. It does not matter whether

I have washed the car. (Result: The car is clean now.)

the car is clean now.)

Time + negation: last time or beginning of an action?
In negative sentences: Do you want to express how much time has past since the last time the action took place or since the beginning of the action?

Present Perfect Simple
since the last time

Present Perfect Progressive
since the beginning

I haven't played that game for years. (Meaning: It's years ago that I I haven't been playing that game for an hour, only for 10 minutes. last played that game.) (Meaning: It's not even an hour ago that I started to play that game.)

Permanent or temporary?
If an action is still going on and we want to express that it is a permanent situation, we would usually use the Present Perfect Simple. For temporary situations, we would prefer the Present Perfect Progressive. This is not a rule, however, only a tendency.

Present Perfect Simple
permanent
James has lived in this town for 10 years. (Meaning: He is a permanent resident of this town.)

Present Perfect Progressive
temporary
James has been living here for a year. (Meaning: This situation is only temporary. Maybe he is an exchange student and only here for one or two years.)

Signal words
Present Perfect Simple
  how often ... times   

Present Perfect Progressive
how long since for

Present Perfect Simple - Present Perfect Progressive
Exercise 10
Put the verbs into the correct tense (Present Perfect Simple or Present Perfect Progressive).

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

A: (you / take) B: I (work)
þÿ þÿ

þÿ

the dog for a walk yet? all day. I (come / just) the time yet to walk the dog.
þÿ þÿ þÿ

home from work and I

(have / not)

A: How long (the dog / be)

home alone? the dog for a long time. Don't you

B: For about 6 hours. You (walk / not) want to go? A: Well, I (laze / not)
þÿ

about all day either, you know. I have a very
þÿ þÿ þÿ

important meeting tomorrow and I still (finish / not) B: Okay, I will go then. Where (you / put)

my presentation. collar and leash? anything yet? If not,

A: They are in the kitchen. By the way, (you / eat) could you get us something from the supermarket?

Exercise 10
Put the verbs into the correct tense (Present Perfect Simple or Present Perfect Progressive).

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

A: Have you taken

the dog for a walk yet? the

B: I have been working all day. I have just come home from work and I have not had time yet to walk the dog. A: How long has the dog been home alone? B: For about 6 hours. You have not walked

the dog for a long time. Don't you want to go?

A: Well, I have not been lazing about all day either, you know. I have a very important meeting tomorrow and I still have not finished my presentation. B: Okay, I will go then. Where have you put collar and leash? anything yet? If not, could you get A: They are in the kitchen. By the way, have you eaten us something from the supermarket?

Present Perfect Simple - Present Perfect Progressive
Exercise 11
Put the verbs into the correct tense (Present Perfect Simple or Present Perfect Progressive).

1. 2. 3.

A: I (call) are your clothes so dirty? B: I (tidy)
þÿ þÿ

þÿ

for you for half an hour. Where (be) up the shed in the garden.

þÿ

? And why

A: (you / find) for ages.

a box with old photos there? I (look)

þÿ

for it

4. 5.

B: I (discover / not)
þÿ þÿ

þÿ

it yet, but I (work / not) in to eat something. anything yet because I (talk)

þÿ

for a long

time yet. I (come / just) A: I (cook / not) neighbour.

þÿ

to our

Exercise 11
Put the verbs into the correct tense (Present Perfect Simple or Present Perfect Progressive).

1. 2. 3. 4.

A: I have been calling for you for half an hour. Where have you been clothes so dirty? B: I have been tidying up the shed in the garden. A: Have you found a box with old photos there? I have been looking

? And why are your

for it for ages.

come

B: I have not discovered it yet, but I have not been working for a long time yet. I have just in to eat something. A: I have not cooked anything yet because I have been talking to our neighbour.

5.

Exercise 8
Put the verbs into the correct tense (Present Perfect Simple or Present Perfect Progressive).

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.
now.

I (play / not)

þÿ þÿ
þÿ

the computer for half an hour, only for about 5 minutes. a car for eight years. on holiday for three years. for 40 minutes yet - there are still 10 minutes left.
þÿ

Bob (drive / not) Carla (go / not) We (run / not)

þÿ

They (smoke / not) I (eat / not)
þÿ

for 10 days now. anything since two o'clock.

Anna (work / not) I (read / not)
þÿ

þÿ

here for five years, but for seven years. for a long time - just 10 minutes, not more.

You (cycle / not)

þÿ þÿ

for two hours. It was only about one hour. French for 10 years, so her French isn't very good

Catherine (speak / not)

Exercise 8

Put the verbs into the correct tense (Present Perfect Simple or Present Perfect Progressive).

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

I have not been playing Bob has not driven Carla has not gone

the computer for half an hour, only for about 5 minutes.

a car for eight years. on holiday for three years. for 40 minutes yet - there are still 10 minutes left. for 10 days now. here for five years, but for seven years. for two hours. It was only about one hour. French for 10 years, so her French isn't very good now.

We have not been running They have not smoked I have not eaten

anything since two o'clock. for a long time - just 10 minutes, not more.

Anna has not been working I have not been reading Catherine has not spoken You have not been cycling

Present Perfect Continuous
FORM
[has/have + been + present participle] Examples:
• • •

You have been waiting here for two hours. Have you been waiting here for two hours? You have not been waiting here for two hours.

Complete List of Present Perfect Continuous Forms

USE 1 Duration from the Past Until Now

We use the Present Perfect Continuous to show that something started in the past and has continued up until now. "For five minutes," "for two weeks," and "since Tuesday" are all durations which can be used with the Present Perfect Continuous. Examples:

They have been talking for the last hour.

• • • • •

She has been working at that company for three years. What have you been doing for the last 30 minutes? James has been teaching at the university since June. We have been waiting here for over two hours! Why has Nancy not been taking her medicine for the last three

days?

USE 2 Recently, Lately

You can also use the Present Perfect Continuous WITHOUT a duration such as "for two weeks." Without the duration, the tense has a more general meaning of "lately." We often use the words "lately" or "recently" to emphasize this meaning. Examples:
• • • • • •

Recently, I have been feeling really tired. She has been watching too much television lately. Have you been exercising lately? Mary has been feeling a little depressed. Lisa has not been practicing her English. What have you been doing?

IMPORTANT
Remember that the Present Perfect Continuous has the meaning of "lately" or "recently." If you use the Present Perfect Continuous in a question such as "Have you been feeling alright?", it can suggest that the person looks sick or unhealthy. A question such as "Have you been smoking?" can suggest that you smell the smoke on the person. Using this tense in a question suggests you can see, smell, hear or feel the results of the action. It is possible to insult someone by using this tense incorrectly.

REMEMBER Non-Continuous Verbs/ Mixed Verbs
It is important to remember that Non-Continuous Verbs cannot be used in any continuous tenses. Also, certain non-continuous meanings for Mixed Verbs cannot be used in continuous tenses. Instead of using Present Perfect Continuous with these verbs, you must use Present Perfect. Examples:

Sam has been having his car for two years. Not Correct

Sam has had his car for two years. Correct

ADVERB PLACEMENT
The examples below show the placement for grammar adverbs such as: always, only, never, ever, still, just, etc. Examples:
• •

You have only been waiting here for one hour. Have you only been waiting here for one hour?

ACTIVE / PASSIVE
Examples:
• •

Recently, John has been doing the work. ACTIVE Recently, the work has been being done by John. PASSIVE

Verb Tense Exercise 7
Present Perfect / Present Perfect Continuous
Using the words in parentheses, complete the text below with the appropriate tenses, then click the "Check" button to check your answers. Robin: I think the waiter (forget)
þÿ

us. We (wait)
þÿ

þÿ

here

for over half an hour and nobody (take)

our order yet.

Michele: I think you're right. He (walk) He probably thinks we (order, already)

þÿ

by us at least twenty times. .

þÿ

Robin: Look at that couple over there, they (be, only)

þÿ

here for five

or ten minutes and they already have their food.

Michele: He must realize we (order, not)
þÿ

þÿ

yet! We (sit)

here for over half an hour staring at him.

Robin: I don't know if he (notice, even)
þÿ

þÿ

us. He (run)

from table to table taking orders and serving food.

Michele: That's true, and he (look, not)

þÿ

in our direction once.

Robin: I think the waiter (forget) has forgotten us. We (wait) have been waiting here for over half an hour and nobody (take) has taken our order yet. Michele: I think you're right. He (walk) has walked by us at least twenty times. He probably thinks we (order, already) have already ordered. Robin: Look at that couple over there, they (be, only) have only been here for five or ten minutes and they already have their food. Michele: He must realize we (order, not) haven't ordered yet! We (sit) have been sitting here for over half an hour staring at him. Robin: I don't know if he (notice, even) has even noticed us. He (run) has been running from table to table taking orders and serving food. Michele: That's true, and he (look, not) hasn't looked in our direction once.

1.

Judy: How long (be)
þÿ

þÿ

in Canada? here for more than three years.

Claude: I (study)

2. I (have) the same car for more than ten years. I'm thinking about buying a new one. 3. I (love) chocolate since I was a child. You might even call me a "chocoholic." 4. Matt and Sarah (have)
þÿ þÿ þÿ

þÿ

some difficulties in their

relationship lately, so they (go) to a marriage counselor. I hope they work everything out. 5. John (work) for the government since he graduated from Harvard University. Until recently, he (enjoy)
þÿ þÿ

his work, but now he is talking about retiring.
þÿ þÿ

6. Lately, I (think)

about changing my career dissatisfied with the conditions

because I (become) at my company. 7. I (see)
þÿ

Judy for more than five years and during
þÿ

that time I have (see) personality.

many changes in her

Present Perfect vs. Present Perfect Progressive - Lesson + Exercise
PRESENT PERFECT: have/has + __(past participle)__ Use PRESENT PERFECT: -for actions not happening now -for actions already finished at this time Sam has played tennis with two different teams. Is Sam playing tennis right now? 1. Yes - he's playing now. 2. No - he's not playing now. PRESENT PERFECT PROGRESSIVE: have/has + been + _(verb) ing Use PRESENT PERFECT PROGRESSIVE: -for CONTINUING actions -for actions not finished at the moment -for actions in the recent time period Shaq has been playing for The Lakers since 1996. Does Shaq still play for the Lakers? 1. Yes, he does. (The action is continuing.) 2. No, he doesn't. (The action is finished.)

Jeff has been thinking about changing his Jeff has already finished his field of study. homework. Is he still considering changing it? Is Jeff doing his homework right now? 1. Yes, he is. (The action is continuing.) 1. Yes, he is. (The action is 2. No, he isn't. (The action is finished.) continuing.)

2. No, he isn't. (The action is finished.)

They have been practicing English for many years. Peter and Paul have already cleaned Do they still practice English? their room. 1. Yes, they do. Are they cleaning right now? 2. No, they don't. 1. Yes (The action is continuing.) 2. No (The action is finished.)
PLEASE NOTE: Sometmes it's possible to use words like WORK, PLAY, STUDY, LIVE, in either tense with no change in meaning. Compare: -Mr. Sanchez has taught English for 6 years. -Mr. Sanchez has been teaching English for 6 years.

-ICE SKATERS1) Nancy Kerrigan is a professional ice skater. She ____ since she was a child. A) has skated þÿ 2) Nancy ____ many awards for her skating. In fact, she won an Olympic medal. þÿ A) has won B) has been winning C) both possible 3) Suriya Bonaly is also an Olympic ice skater. She's from France, but she ___ in Pennsylvania and Massachussetts in the United States. A) has also lived þÿ 4) Robin Cousins, a former ice skater and current commentator said this about new skater Mikkeline Kierkgaard, "She is one to watch for the future. She ___ everyone with the quality of her skating." A) has surprised
þÿ

B) has been skating

C) both tenses possible

B) has also been living

C) both possible

B) has been surprising

C) both possible

5) In addition to ice skating, Mikkeline Kierkgaard ___ high school. She gets very good marks, and she even won a prize for being the most serious student at her school, for being able to handle school and skating at the same time. A) has attended B) has been attending C) both possible

þÿ
6) Brian Boytano, a 1988 Olmypic Gold medalist, ____ lately that upon retirement he will move to a farm in Napa Valley, grow grapes, and ice skate only occasionally. A) has said B) has been saying C) both possible

þÿ

7) Brian ___ about opening a restaurant after he retires from skating, but he hasn't mentioned those plans lately.

A) has also talked þÿ

B) has also been talking

C) both possible

8) Scott Hamilton is another famous ice skater. He ____ since he was 9 years old. þÿ A) has skated B) has been skating C) both possible 9) Scott was treated for testicular cancer in 1997. He successfully beat the cancer and he ____ cancer-free since that time. A) has remained þÿ 10) Scott's focus ___ from skating in competitions to being the commentator at ice shows and sporting events, but he still performs in shows occasionally. þÿ A) has changed B) has been changing C) both possible B) has been remaining C) both possible

Welcome to this week's writing lesson from

MyEnglishTeacher.net
It Has Been Raining All Day . . . Lesson Topic: Using The Present Perfect Progressive And The Difference Between The Present Perfect Progressive And The Present Perfect.
Let's say that your friend calls you up and wants to take you out for dinner. You really don't feel like going because it started to rain early in the morning, and now it is very wet outside. It is too wet to go out. You are afraid of driving when the roads are so wet and slippery. You do not know the exact time the rain started, but you want to tell your friend that the rain started in the past (in this situation, early in the morning) and is still continuing. It is still raining. You would probably say It has been raining all day, and the streets are too wet to go out now. This grammar is called the present perfect progressive. It is used to say that something started in the past, and it is still happening. It is often used to answer how long questions with for and since. So, how do you make the present perfect progressive? Good question! Here's how you make it: has been have subject + or + been + has It raining verb with -ing

book recommendation Action Grammar: Fast, Easy Answers on Everyday Usage and Punctuation The author, Joanne Feierman, focuses on the grammar most of us need in everyday life, from "Five Lies Your English Teacher Told You" to "Simple Business Verbs You Should Know." She also includes helpful sections on memos, letter writing, and e-mail etiquette, as well as an appendix of troublesome words and phrases, and words that are easy to misspell. Click here for more information. Again, the present perfect progressive is used when an activity started in the past and continues until now. For example, you may ask a college professor you met at a conference, "How long have you been teaching?" Professor Brown can answer, "I have been teaching for 23 years." If you read our lesson on the present perfect, you would know that the present perfect cannot use a specific time, like yesterday (if you haven't read it, you can read it now). The

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful