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NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations
NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations

NOTICE: These budget justifications are prepared for the Interior, Environment and Related Agencies Appropriations Subcommittees. Approval for release of the justifications prior to their printing in the public record of the Subcommittee hearings may be obtained through the Office of Budget of the Department of the Interior.

the Office of Budget of the Department of the Interior. BUDGET The United States Department of

BUDGET

The United States Department of the Interior

JUSTIFICATIONS

and Performance Information Fiscal Year 2018

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

the Interior JUSTIFICATIONS and Performance Information Fiscal Year 2018 U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY Printed on Recycled Paper

Printed on

Recycled Paper

Table of Contents

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY

FY 2018 BUDGET JUSTIFICATION

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Organization

Organization Chart and Regional Structure

vi

A Executive Summary Overview

A-1

Budget Highlights

A-3

National Priorities and Areas of Importance

A-4

Our Nation's Natural Resources

A-4

Land and Water Stewardship

A-5

Tribal Nations

A-6

Public Safety and Security

A-6

USGS Infrastructure

A-7

Management and Efficiencies

A-8

Fixed Costs

A-8

B Technical Adjustments and Internal Transfers Climate and Land Use Change/Land Resources Mission Area Budget Restructure

B-1

Coastal and Marine Geology Program Name Change

B-5

Internal Transfers

B-6

C USGS Science Collaboration Introduction

C-1

Examples of USGS Science Coordination and Collaborations

C-2

D 2018 Budget at a Glance

2018

Budget at a Glance Table

D-1

E Program Changes

2018

Program Changes Table

E-1

Ecosystems

E-2

Land Resources

E-5

Energy and Mineral Resources

E-8

Environmental Health

E-8

Natural Hazards

E-10

Water Resources

E-13

Core Science Systems

E-17

Science Support

E-18

Table of Contents

F Ecosystems

2018

Request Table

F-1

Summary of Program Changes Table Activity Summary

F-2

 

Summary

of Budget Request

F-2

Overview

F-2

Program Performance

F-5

Strategic Actions Planned Through 2018

F-5

Status and Trends Program

F-7

Fisheries Program

F-11

Wildlife Program

F-15

Environments Program

F-19

Invasive Species Program

F-23

Cooperative Research Units Program

F-25

G Land Resources

2018

Request Table

G-1

Summary of Program Changes Table

G-2

Activity Summary Summary of Budget Request

G-2

Overview

G-3

Program Performance

G-6

Strategic Actions Planned Through 2018

G-7

National Land Imaging Program

G-9

Land Change Science Program

G-13

National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers

G-19

H Energy and Mineral Resources, and Environmental Health

2018

Request Table

H-1

Summary of Program Changes Table

H-2

Activity Summary Summary of Budget Request

H-2

Overview

H-2

Program Performance

H-6

Strategic Actions Planned Through 2018

H-7

Energy and Minerals Mineral Resources Program

H-9

Energy Resources Program

H-13

Environmental Health Contaminant Biology Program

H-17

Toxic Substances Hydrology Program

H-21

Table of Contents

I Natural Hazards

2018

Request Table

I-1

Summary of Program Changes Table

I-2

Activity Summary Summary of Budget Request

I-2

Overview

I-3

Program Performance

I-4

Strategic Actions Planned Through 2018

I-5

Earthquake Hazards Program

I-9

Volcano Hazards Program

I-13

Landslide Hazards Program

I-17

Global Seismographic Network

I-21

Geomagnetism Program

I-23

Coastal-Marine Hazards and Resources Program

I-25

J Water Resources

2018

Request Table

J-1

Summary of Program Changes Table

J-2

Activity Summary Summary of Budget Request

J-2

Overview

J-3

Program Performance

J-4

Strategic Actions Planned Through 2018

J-5

Water Availability and Use Science Program

J-7

Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program

J-11

National Water Quality Program

J-13

Water Resource Research Act Program

J-17

K Core Science Systems

2018

Request Table

K-1

Summary of Program Changes Table

K-1

Activity Summary Summary of Budget Request

K-2

Overview

K-2

Program Performance

K-5

Strategic Actions Planned Through 2018

K-5

National Geospatial Program

K-9

National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program

K-13

Science Synthesis, Analysis, and Research

K-17

L Science Support

2018

Request Table

L-1

Summary of Program Changes Table

L-1

Activity Summary

Table of Contents

Summary of Budget Request

L-1

Overview

L-2

Program Performance

L-2

Strategic Actions Planned Through 2018

L-5

Administration and Management

L-7

Information Services

L-11

M Facilities 2018 Request Table

M-1

Summary of Program Changes Table

M-1

Activity Summary Summary of Budget Request

M-1

Overview

M-1

Strategic Actions Planned Through 2018

M-4

Rental Payments and Operations and Maintenance

M-5

Deferred Maintenance and Capital Improvements

M-9

N USGS Working Capital Fund Working Capital Fund Overview

N-1

Appropriation Language and Citations

N-3

Program and Financing

N-5

Balance Sheet

N-6

Object Classification

N-7

Employment Summary

N-7

O - USGS Exhibits Appropriation Language

O-1

Appropriation Language and Citations

O-2

Expiring Authorizations

O-3

Administrative Provisions Language

O-4

Administrative Provisions Language and Citations

O-5

Summary of Requirements

O-6

USGS Justification of Fixed Costs and Internal Realignments

O-8

P Account Exhibits Summary of Requirements by Object Class

P-1

Program and Financing

P-3

Object Classification

P-6

Employment Summary

P-8

Q Sundry Exhibits Funding of U.S. Geological Survey Programs (Obligations)

Q-1

Special and Trust Fund Receipts

Q-11

Program and Financing

Q-11

Table of Contents

Object Classification

Q-12

Employment Summary

Q-13

Employee Count by Grade

Q-14

Section 403 Compliance

Q-15

DOI Working Capital Fund Revenue Centralized Billing

Q-15

DOI Working Capital Fund Revenue Direct Billing

Q-21

Payments to Other Federal Agencies

Q-23

Shared Program Costs

Q-23

R - Appendix Acronyms

R-1

Table of Contents

U.S. Geological Survey

Chief of Staff Director Associate Director – Office of Budget, Director – Office of Science
Chief of Staff
Director
Associate Director – Office of Budget,
Director – Office of Science
Quality and Integrity
Director – Office of International
Programs
Planning, and Integration
Deputy Director
Associate Director – Office of
Communications and Publishing
Director – Office of Diversity and
Equal Opportunity
Chief – Office of Enterprise Information
Associate Director – Ecosystems
Associate Director –
Natural Hazards
Associate Director –
Energy and Minerals
Associate Director –
Administration
Associate Director – Climate and
Associate Director – Water
Land Use Change
Associate Director –
Environmental Health
Associate Director –
Core Science Systems
Regional Director –
Northeast
Regional Director –
Alaska
Regional Director –
Northwest
Regional Director –
Southeast
Regional Director –
Midwest
Regional Director –
Southwest
Regional Director –
Pacific

USGS Regional Structure

Southwest Regional Director – Pacific USGS Regional Structure vi U.S. Geological Survey 2018 Budget Justification

Executive Summary

Executive Summary

Executive Summary

Executive Summary

Total 2018 Budget Request (Dollars in Thousands)

 
   

2017

CR

 

Budget Authority

2016

Actual

Annualized

2018

Request

Current

 

1,062,000

1,059,981

 

922,168

Permanent

 

1,031

 

696

 

565

Operation & Maintenance of Quarters

 

49

 

52

 

52

Contributed Funds

 

982

 

644

 

513

Total Current and Permanent

 

1,063,031

1,060,677

 

922,733

   

2017

CR

 

FTE

2016

Actual

Annualized

2018

Request

Direct

 

4,923

 

4,923

 

4,114

Reimbursable

 

2,799

 

2,799

 

2,519

Working Capital Fund

 

152

 

152

 

152

Allocation Account

 

72

 

72

 

72

Contributed Funds

 

5

 

5

 

5

USGS Total

 

7,951

 

7,951

 

6,862

Overview

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the scientific arm of the Department of the Interior, was established in 1879 (43 U.S.C. 31) for “the classification of the public lands and examination of the geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the national domain.”

President Theodore Roosevelt declared in a 1907 State of the Union address that conservation (of forests, wildlife, mineralsincluding energy minerals, and water) was "the fundamental problem which underlies almost every other problem of our national life" and established the doctrine that science is the proper tool to discharge conservation policy. This principle underpins USGS science to this day, as the USGS has developed a reputation as a source of sound, unbiased science for natural resource development and conservation.

Today, the USGS leads the Nation in providing unbiased Earth science research and integrated assessments of natural resources and hazards; supporting the stewardship of public lands and waters; as well as promoting science to protect public safety, health, property, and U.S. economic prosperity.

Executive Summary

The Nation faces unprecedented challenges: increasing demand for limited energy and mineral resources, losing critical and unique ecosystems, changing land resources, increasing vulnerability to natural hazards, growing uncertainty of water security and availability, and emerging diseases threatening wildlife and human health. The USGS provides the science to support exploration and development of energy and mineral resources; sustain healthy fish and wildlife populations; monitor changes to land resources; improve resilience to natural hazards and enhance community safety and well-being; improve water resource decision making; and provide accurate, high-resolution geospatial data.

The 2018 President’s budget request includes $922.2 million for the USGS, a decrease of $137.8 million over the 2017 annualized Continuing Resolution. The USGS budget emphasizes developing and delivering tools and scientific information needed by the public and by land and resource managers to make the most effective decisions. The investments in this 2018 budget request advance several priorities, such as developing the ground system for Landsat 9; assessing the availability of energy and critical mineral resources; tackling water challenges; supporting disaster alerting and rapid response; conducting research on land resources; producing high-resolution geospatial data; tracking risks to the health of humans, other organisms, and ecosystems; and addressing new and emerging invasive species and disease.

Scientific coordination and collaboration within Interior and across the government is central to the USGS mission. By leveraging across Federal, State, local, and tribal governments, the private sector, and non- governmental organizations, the USGS is able to provide science and information that is thorough, accurate, and tailor-made to address some of the most pressing challenges of the 21st century. The diversity of USGS scientific expertise enables the bureau to carry out large-scale, multi-disciplinary investigations and provide impartial scientific information to resource managers and planners, emergency response officials, and the public.

While the 2018 budget request includes reductions to many programs, it continues to reflect a commitment to the core mission of the USGS, focuses on conducting important research, and provides impartial scientific data to key stakeholders and decision makers that helps promote the health, safety, and prosperity of the Nation. With this budget request, the USGS is streamlining its operational scope in support of national priorities: energy and mineral resources; science to protect public safety, health, property, natural hazard preparedness and mitigation responses; and land and water stewardship.

Executive Summary

Budget Highlights

Budget Change Summary

 

($ in Thousands)

2017

CR Annualized

$1,059,981

Program Change

-$159,590

 

Fixed Costs

+$21,777

2018

Budget Request

$922,168

 

2018 Budget Request

 

( Dollars in Thousands)

Budget Authority

     

2018

   

2018

 

Surveys, Investigations, and Research

2016

Fixed

Program

2018

Enacted

2017 CR

Costs

Changes

Request

Ecosystems

$160,232

$159,927

$1,748

-$29,547

$132,128

Land Resources

$139,975

$139,709

$602

-$25,987

$112,847

Energy and Minerals, and Environmental Health

$94,511

$94,331

$1,221

-$5,519

$91,510

Natural Hazards

$139,013

$138,748

$1,479

-$22,116

$118,111

Water Resources

$210,687

$210,287

$2,661

-$39,906

$173,042

Core Science Systems

$111,550

$111,339

$1,021

-$19,391

$92,969

Science Support

$105,611

$105,410

$1,082

-$17,124

$89,368

Facilities

$100,421

$100,230

$11,963

$0

$112,193

USGS Total

$1,062,000

$1,059,981

$21,777

--159,590

$922,168

The 2018 USGS budget request supports Interior’s mission for energy and mineral development; promoting science to protect public safety, health, property; supporting land and water stewardship; supporting tribal nations; and supporting infrastructure development.

The 2018 USGS budget request maintains critical monitoring networks that provides for the safety of the American public and the resilience of the Nation’s infrastructure; these include the core earthquake and volcano monitoring networks, and the national streamgage program. In addition, this 2018 budget request provides a foundation for USGS prioritized research efforts that support management decisions within Interior bureaus and other Federal agencies that depend on that information.

The 2018 budget request includes an estimated workforce reduction of 16 percent, from 4,923 to 4,114 Full Time Equivalents (FTE; this number does not include reimbursable FTEs). In addition to appropriated funding, the USGS receives funding through reimbursable agreements with other Federal agencies. However, funding reductions across the Federal government will

likely reduce the reimbursable funding that the USGS receives.

The USGS current reimbursable

Executive Summary

workforce is estimated to reduce by an additional 10 percent, from 2,799 to 2,519 FTE. The USGS will evaluate any reductions to our reimbursable programs as the impacts to its partners become known.

Our Nation’s Natural Resources

The USGS produces topographic and geological maps, geophysical and geochemical surveys, together with scientific research on water, energy, and mineral resources to produce resource assessments vital to understanding the natural wealth of the Nation. These analyses inform decision makers about the Nation’s resource assets as well as those outside our borders that may impact our economy and security. The USGS’s assessments increasingly include economic analysis. Private industry and government alike utilize USGS data to make informed decisions about energy and mineral resource management. A variety of USGS programs provide science to support energy and mineral resource management, including oil, gas, coal, geothermal, uranium, and gas hydrate energy resource activities. The USGS also provides critical information about mineral resource potential, production, and consumption, which is important to the economic stability and the national security of the United States. The USGS maintains the core functions related to energy and mineral resource assessments, including the underlying geological, geophysical and geochemical research and mapping capability that underpins accurate assessment results, while also yielding valuable information on the impacts of energy development.

The USGS maintains other bureau programs and activities including: biological and water resource studies related to energy production. In support of the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) and Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE), the bureau also maintains surveys and studies of marine-hazards to assess risk to offshore energy infrastructure and operations, as well as biological studies requests by BOEM. In 2018, the USGS would continue to conduct science to distinguish real versus perceived impacts of byproducts of energy development; create targeted and detailed geologic surveys and mapping of Western basins containing large natural gas fields; and conduct surface and subsurface three-dimensional geologic mapping for energy, mineral, and oil and gas assessments. The USGS would continue to provide critical information supporting the development of energy and mineral resources while minimizing health risks due to potential contaminant and pathogen exposures on fish and wildlife species of high interest for conservation or that are Interior Trust obligations.

The USGS would also continue to conduct monitoring, assessments, and research in order to understand and predict changes in the quality and quantity of water resources in response to land-use and management scenarios. The USGS advances understanding and integrated modeling of processes that determine water availability. The USGS would synthesize and report information at regional and national scales, with an emphasis on compiling and reporting the information in a way that is useful to States and others responsible for water management and natural resource issues. The USGS would continue to support these assessments of surface water and ground water resources for America’s water stewardship by providing high-resolution elevation and hydrography datasets and detailed geologic maps.

Executive Summary

Land and Water Stewardship

The USGS provides science on the complex human, economic, and ecological dimensions of land and water stewardship to help decision makers balance economic development with the Nation’s conservation ethos regarding resources such as fish and wildlife, clean and abundant water, and thriving communities. In 2018, the USGS would continue to produce multi-resource assessments to provide information for decision makers who seek to balance multiple uses and understand trade-offs, particularly on public lands.

USGS science serves to protect and conserve our Nation’s fish and wildlife heritage. The USGS bridges the gap between science and management for at-risk species and species of management concern. In 2018, the USGS would continue to work with a vast array of partners to provide science support to management agencies designed to sustain the hunting, fishing, and wildlife-related sporting and recreation needs of the public. The USGS data and science supports the hunting and recreational fishing sectors that contribute $144 billion in expenditures and 480,000 American jobs (2017 National Recreation Economy Report, Outdoor Industry Association). The USGS would continue to identify conservation measures designed to preclude the need for listing species as endangered or threatened; recover listed species; prevent or control invasive species and wildlife disease outbreaks; and apply decision science so that management and policy actions will be transparent and durable. This work would be supported by accurate and up-to-date digital geospatial data and maps, biogeographic (animals, plants, and microbes) data, and map-on-demand services to the American people via The National Map and the Protected Areas Database of the United States (PAD-US).

In 2018, the USGS would continue to collaborate with its Interior partners to inform managers and the public about conditions of natural resources. Streamflow information on the USGS Web page at waterdata.usgs.gov provides invaluable information for emergency managers, water resource decision makers, paddlers, and anglers. Additionally, a new mobile-friendly Web site was created that would allow users to quickly locate USGS streamgages that measure rainfall, streamflow, stream height or lake levels so that users can get up-to-date information on water conditions near where they are located for safety and situational awareness, water management decisions, and recreation.

The USGS would also continue to conduct monitoring, assessments, and research in order to understand and predict changes in the quality and quantity of water resources in response to land-use and management scenarios. The USGS advances understanding and integrated modeling of processes that determine water availability. The USGS would synthesize and report information at regional and national scales, with an emphasis on compiling and reporting the information in a way that is useful to States and others responsible for water management and natural resource issues. The USGS would continue to support these assessments of surface water and ground water sources for America’s water stewardship by providing high-resolution elevation and hydrography datasets and detailed geologic maps.

The USGS also delivers data, tools, techniques, and analyses that advance our understanding of landscapes, the forces that shape them, and the interactions of plants, animals, and the people that live among them. Land managers use USGS science to understand and detect changes that affect resources and processes that are essential to our Nation’s economic growth and societal well-being. The resulting data and research products provide a scientific foundation for decisions about the management of natural

Executive Summary

and built landscapes and how they might be adapted to secure the Nation’s interests. In addition, the USGS applies capabilities in marine geology, geochemistry and oceanography to provide information and research products critical to the management of the Nation's ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes environments.

In 2018, the USGS would also provide science to support understanding of potential health threats to workers and visitors on public lands from environmental contaminants and pathogens. Examples include helping understand occurrences, origins, and health implications of contaminants (such as harmful algal toxins, metals, and other compounds) and pathogens in waters, rocks, soils, and dusts on public lands. Key to this work would be increased collaborations between the USGS and health and safety officials from other Interior offices and bureaus.

Tribal Nations

In 2018, the USGS would continue to work with Tribes to provide unbiased scientific information to meet DOI Tribal Trust Responsibilities. The USGS also would provide information used by tribal managers to address such topics as water rights, water supply, flood-warning predictions, contamination, and disease mitigation to protect the health of Native populations, and sustainability of critical habitats and health ecosystems. For example: monitoring within an extensive network of USGS streamflow gages and groundwater monitoring stations; training; data management; Geographic Information Systems (GIS); quality control; fish and wildlife assessment and monitoring; development of models and decision- making tools; and scientific research on how natural, climatic, land use, water use, and other human factors can affect the water cycle, water quantity, and quality.

USGS science would continue to help inform efforts to protect the health of Native populations, and the fish and wildlife they rely on, from environmental contaminants and pathogens. The USGS would also provide science to support understanding of potential health threats to workers and visitors on public lands from environmental contaminants and pathogenskey to this work would be increased collaborations between the USGS and health and safety officials from other Interior Offices and Bureaus.

The USGS recognizes the importance of Native knowledge and living in harmony with nature as complements to the USGS mission to better understand the Earth. Combining traditional ecological knowledge with empirical studies allows the USGS and Native American governments, organizations, and people to increase their mutual understanding and respect for this land. The USGS provides information to Tribes as part of the bureau’s basic mission of providing unbiased scientific information to the Nation and the Federal Trust Responsibility to Tribes.

Protect Public Safety, Health, and Property

The USGS protects public safety, public health, and property by effectively delivering natural hazards and environmental health science. In 2018, the USGS would continue to fulfill responsibilities for floods, earthquakes, tsunami, volcanic eruptions, landslides, coastal erosion, and wildfires. The USGS would also provide non-regulatory, objective science to protect public health from natural- and human-sourced disease agents in the environment. Every year, the United States faces natural and man-made disasters

Executive Summary

that threaten the Nation through loss of life and property, as well as threats to America’s national security and economic vitality. In such events, the Nation’s emergency managers and public officials look to USGS science to inform them of the risks hazards pose to human-built and natural systems and how to reduce losses, and improve response. Faced with rising expectations for rapid, robust information in response to these events, the USGS has the science and mapping capabilities to meet these needs both before and after disasters strike.

USGS natural hazards science informs a broad range of disaster planning, situational awareness and response activities at local to global levels. Responsibilities in natural hazards include issuing warnings and advisories for earthquakes, volcanic eruptions, landslides, and coastal erosion; informing warnings issued by other agencies for floods, tsunami’s, and wildfires; providing timely information to emergency managers and response officials, the media, and the public to inform and educate communities during and between crises. Supporting activities in natural hazards science include: improving the data systems that are critical to situational awareness; implementing 24x7 operations for critical monitoring efforts; developing the next generation of tools for rapid evaluation of hazards; improving internal hazards communication; evaluating our warning and response activities, involving the relevant communities; and fostering the next generation of hazard scientists and technicians.

In 2018, USGS environmental health programs would continue to inform local, State, and national public health protection efforts for threats posed by exposures of humans to emerging or complex mixtures of environmental contaminants and pathogens, including those encountered during occupational and recreational activities, and those contained in air, soil, food, and drinking water. For example, the USGS would continue to provide science related to the mitigation of harmful algal blooms and the impacts of harmful algal toxins in bodies of water across the Nation, and to understand the implications of contaminants and pathogens produced by disasters on the health of humans and other organisms. Furthermore, USGS science would contribute valuable insights to land and water managers responsible for decisions related to sources, treatment methods, and conveyance of wastewaters and drinking waters in public and private sites, including in our national parks. USGS ecological and environmental health science would also continue to inform public health protection efforts for zoonotic and vector-borne diseases, and diseases related to invasive species. For this public health work, the USGS would continue collaborations with Federal health agencies such as the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

USGS Infrastructure

The USGS owns 270 buildings, totaling about 1.3 million square feet. In addition to these buildings, the USGS also owns another 283 structures and 8 large research vessels. The breadth of USGS constructed assets is extraordinary, including satellite ground stations, volcano observatories, a nuclear reactor, 8,200 streamgages, 18,600 groundwater wells, 2,000 water quality stations, and thousands of seismic monitoring network locations across the United States, its territories, and beyond. Many of these assets are in remote locations, such as uninhabited islands and mountainous terrain, increasing the challenge of maintaining operation of critical networks and data collection. Approximately 60 percent of USGS- owned buildings are over 40-years old and many USGS-owned assets will require significant investment

Executive Summary

to modernize the infrastructure in order for the USGS to continue to produce world-class science. The USGS is in the process of developing modernization plans for its aging facilities portfolio.

Management and Efficiencies

The USGS is proposing to restructure the Climate and Land Use Mission Area into the Land Resources Mission Area. This allows the USGS to focus on its core functions and capabilities, including classifying and examining land and associated resources/products of national interest; detecting and understanding changes in lands and associated resources/products; and delivering scientific information in forms/formats that are relevant to and capable of being used by land and natural resource planners, managers, and decision makers. Refer to the Technical Adjustments, Section B, for more details.

The USGS's 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) is a unique collaboration between all levels of government and the private sector to leverage the services and expertise of private sector mapping firms to acquire high-resolution elevation data. When federal and non-federal partners work together to map it once and use the data many times, they can achieve efficiencies and lower costs. When 3D elevation data are available to everyone, new innovations will occur in protecting infrastructure and natural resources, and improving forest resource management, public safety, agriculture, and other industries for years to come. The 3DEP's collaboration efforts, supported by geospatial liaisons from across the United States are critical for coordinating with Federal, State, local, and tribal governments and private industry users to obtain matching funds (approximately four partner dollars for each USGS dollar invested). This strategy effectively leverages Federal dollars through partnerships to support land and water stewardship, security, and enable job creation. The economic benefit of high-resolution elevation data is tremendous to our partners across all sectors. Estimates by the National Enhanced Elevation Assessment (Dewberry, 2012), indicate a fully funded 3DEP would result in an economic benefit of $690 million annually.

Similarly, the USGS's leads a unique collaboration between State Geological Surveys and universities to achieve efficiencies in producing three-dimensional geologic mapping and models that help to create private sector jobs, fuel American economic opportunities, and support a 21st-century economy based on energy, minerals, and oil and gas resource assessments. The USGS has over 20 years of successful cooperation among Federal (FEDMAP), State (STATEMAP), and university (EDMAP) partners to deliver digital geologic maps to the public. Each of these three components has a unique role per the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Act of 1992, yet all work cooperatively to select and map high- priority areas for new geologic maps. Annually, the USGS works cooperatively with approximately 45 different State Geological Surveys and 20 to 25 different universities throughout the country. State geological surveys and university participants receive funding through a competitive proposal process that requires 1:1 matching funds, ensuring the value of each proposal is weighed against its cost in Federal and State appropriated funds.

Fixed Costs

The fixed costs increase for the USGS in 2018 is $21.8 million, and includes $9.8 million to pay for

More information on the

personnel-related costs and nearly $12 million to cover increased rents costs.

Executive Summary

USGS contribution to the Department’s Working Capital Fund is located in Sundry Exhibits, Section Q. The fixed costs calculations are located in the USGS Exhibits, Section O. Cost saving projects have resulted in a smaller facilities footprint and have reduced the USGS’s rent costs; however, GSA rental rates are projected to escalate in the San Francisco Bay Area. More information on rented facilities, owned facilities and their operation and maintenance, and cost saving projects is located in Facilities, Section M.

Executive Summary

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Technical

Adjustments

And Internal Transfers

Technical Adjustments

Technical Adjustments
Technical Adjustments

The USGS has two technical adjustments in the 2018 President’s budget request:

Restructuring the Climate and Land Use Mission Area (CLU) into the Land Resources Mission Area (LRMA). The 2018 President’s budget request contains a number of internal transfers related to the CLU to LR restructure.

Renaming of the Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) to the Coastal-Marine Hazards and Resources Program (CMHRP) to convey the work of the program.

Climate and Land Use Change Mission Area/Land Resources Mission Area Budget Restructure

The 2018 President’s budget proposes to restructure the Climate and Land Use Change Mission Area. This restructure is necessary to allow us to more effectively operate under the proposed 2018 funding levels within the President’s request. The change conveys the work that the programs within Land Resources will be focusing on in 2018.

The table below provides a map of the changes from the old to the new structure and the descriptions that follow provide an overview of the proposed subactivities:

Climate and Land Use Mission Area

Land Resources Mission Area

Climate Variability Subactivity

N/A

National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center/ DOI Climate Science Centers Program Element

National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers Subactivity

Climate Research and Development Program Element

N/A (Funding transferred to Land Change Science and projects retained in the 2018 request will be funded in that subactivity)

Carbon Sequestration Program Element

N/A (Funding transferred to Land Change Science where Biologic Carbon Sequestration will be eliminated. The remaining program functions for Geologic Carbon Sequestration will be transferred to the Energy Resources Program)

Land Use Change Subactivity

N/A

Land Remote Sensing Program Element

National Land Imaging Subactivity

Land Change Science Program Element

Land Change Science Subactivity

Technical Adjustments

Land Resources (Formerly Climate and Land Use Change)

The 2018 President’s budget realigns the existing CLU mission area, focusing a narrower set of scientific activities to meet priority stakeholder needs. This recalibration of the science of these program necessitates a restructure of functions, capabilities, and activities. In CLU’s place, the Land Resources Mission Area will focus on classifying and examining land and associated resources/products of national interest; detecting and understanding changes in lands and associated resources/products; and delivering scientific information in forms/formats that are relevant to and capable of being used by land and natural resource planners, managers, and decision makers.

The following are summaries of each of the renamed/scoped programs and their relationship to one another:

The National Land Imaging Program (NLI) subactivity delivers the remote sensing observation capacity, data, and research required to understand how landscapes and associated natural resources are changing at grand scales. It collects, archives, and distributes a broad array of data from near-Earth and satellite-based remote sensing platforms. The NLIP provides long-term records of changes in landscapes, real-time change-detection capabilities, and associated interpretive tools that decision makers need for land and resource management decisions.

The Land Change Science Program (LCSP) subactivity conducts research required to understand the forces that shape landscapes and their potential uses, to distinguish between land surface change resulting from natural forces and those that are associated with land use decisions, and to provide the scientific bases for land use decisions that affect the safety of communities, economic prosperity, and natural resources of the Nation. It delivers research products, information, and computer programs that help decision makers understand, interpret, and apply the knowledge and data gained from on-the-ground and remote sensing observation systems to land use planning, natural resource management, and adaptation planning decisions.

The National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers subactivity is the organizing entity within USGS for the National Climate Adaptation Science Center (NCASC) and DOI’s regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers (CASCs). These centers deliver the on-the-ground observations and research required to understand how changes in climate, land uses, and associated changes in land cover are affecting the Nation’s natural resources and associated populations of fish and wildlife species essential to the Nation’s natural heritage. It provides information essential to the development of tools and applications that help resource managers understand which observed changes are meaningful, what the observations suggest about the condition and sustainability of natural resources, and what can be done to support conservation priorities of the Nation.

Collectively, the subactivities within the Land Resources Mission Area (LRMA) deliver ground-based data and analyses, remotely sensed data and analyses, investigative research, and tools and applications necessary for science-based decisions related to stewardship of lands, natural resources, and their uses in support of economic prosperity consistent with shared conservation ethic.

Technical Adjustments

The table shown below is a crosswalk of the old and new budget structure within CLU, using 2018 funding levels.

   

PROPOSED

Land Resources

 

Fiscal Year 2018 dollars in thousands

National Land Imaging Program

Land Change Science Program

National Climate Adaptation Science Center & Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers

 

Climate & Land Use Change

National Climate Change & Wildlife Science Centers / DOI CSCs

   

$17,435

CURRENT

Climate Research and Development

 

$10,311

 

Carbon Sequestration 1

     

Land Remote Sensing

$76,127

   
 

Land Change Science

 

$8,974

 
 

2018 Request Levels in New Structure

$76,127

$19,285

$17,435

Energy Resources

Energy Resources +$1,477
Energy Resources +$1,477

+$1,477

Energy Resources +$1,477
Energy Resources +$1,477
+$1,477
+$1,477

The 2018 President’s budget is presented in the proposed new structure. The tables below are provided for comparison purposes.

The Land Resources Mission Area chapter presents the program, the summary of proposed changes, the activity and program overview, and the performance changes in the new structure.

1 The funding in the Land Change Science Program that remains from Carbon Sequestration program will transfer (through a technical adjustment) to the Energy and Minerals Program as part of the 2018 President’s request. The Carbon Sequestration line will be $0 after the transfer and is not shown in the new structure in this exhibit.

Technical Adjustments

New Budget Activities

       

%

$000

2018

Change

Change

2016

Budget

from

from

Actual

2017

CR

Request

2017

CR

2017

CR

 

Land Resources

 

National Land Imaging Program

72,194

72,057

76,127

4,070

 

6%

Land Change Science Program

41,346

41,267

19,285

-21,982

-53%

National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers

26,435

26,385

17,435

-8,950

-34%

Total

139,975

139,709

112,847

-26,862

-19%

Former Budget Activities

       

%

$000

2018

Change

Change

2016

Budget

from

from

Actual

2017

CR

Request

2017

CR

2017

CR

 

Climate and Land Use Change

 

National Climate Change and Wildlife Science Center/DOI Climate Science Centers (CSC’s)

26,435

26,385

17,435

-8,950

-34%

Climate Research and Development

21,495

21,454

0

-21,454

-100%

Carbon Sequestration

9,359

 

9,341

0

-9,341

-100%

Land Remote Sensing

72,194

72,057

76,127

4,070

 

6%

Land Change Science

10,492

10,492

19,285

8,813

84%

Total Land Resources

139,975

139,709

112,847

-26,862

-19%

Technical Adjustments

Natural Hazards

Within the Natural Hazards Mission Areas, the USGS proposes to change the name of the Coastal and Marine Geology Program (CMGP) to the Coastal/Marine Hazards and Resources Program (CMHRP). There are no funding changes based on this name change. This change reflects the connection between the critically important hazards-related activities such as offshore earthquake and tsunami hazards as well as coastal changes hazards due to extreme storms. This also highlights the priority work conducted in the Program addressing to offshore resources, including work related to identifying the extended shelf of the United States and evaluating methane hydrates as a potential energy source.

Fiscal Year 2018 dollars in thousands

Fiscal Year 2018 dollars in thousands

Fiscal Year 2018 dollars in thousands

CURRENT

Coastal and Marine Geology Program

PROPOSED

Coastal/Marine Hazards and Resources

$35,774

Technical Adjustments

Other Internal Transfers

 

USGS Internal Transfers

 
   

2017

 
 

Subactivity

Internal Transfer

Program

FTE

Change

Changes

 

Amount

Internal Transfer: Increase

 

32,272

163

Land Change

Science

Transfer from Climate Research and Development Transfer from Carbon Sequestration Transfer from Land Use Change

21,454

119

Land Change

Science

9,341

37

Energy Program

1,477

7

Internal Transfer: Decrease Climate Research and Development Carbon Sequestration Land Change Science

 

-32,272

-163

Transfer to Land Change Transfer to Land Change

Science

-21,454

-119

Science

-9,341

-37

Transfer to Energy Program

-1,477

-7

Internal Transfer Total

 

0

0

Internal Transfer from the former Climate and Research and Development Program to Land Change Science Program ($21,454,000/119 FTE): Paleontological, biogeochemical, and geographic expertise previously funded by the Climate Research and Development Program will be utilized by the Land Change Science Program (LCSP) to conduct investigations, deliver datasets, and support the development of geospatial tools intended to support delivery of research and data required to: understand the forces that shape landscapes and their potential uses; distinguish between changes resulting from natural forces and those that are associated with land use decisions; and to provide the scientific bases for decisions related to land use decisions that affect the safety of communities, economic prosperity, and natural resources of the Nation. Examples of projects to be transferred to the LCSP include development of land use and land cover change projection tools designed to help resource managers anticipate, plan for, and adapt to changes in climate and associated resource management challenges; development of geological data sets that can be used to understand how landscapes and associated natural resources have been affected by past variations in climate, water availability, and natural disturbances over time to improve understandings of our Nation’s present vulnerabilities to similar variations and the threats they pose to economic prosperity and natural heritage; and investigations of arctic landscapes and the challenges that changes in temperatures and water availability might present for the development, use, and conservation of natural resources. Of the amounts transferred, $11.1 million and 54 FTE of Climate R&D will be proposed for termination.

Internal Transfer from the former Carbon Sequestration Program to Land Change Science Program ($9,341,000/37 FTE): The USGS Carbon Sequestration Program focuses on two aspects of carbon sequestration: biologic carbon sequestration and geologic carbon sequestration. The biologic carbon sequestration project focuses on the science behind removing carbon from the atmosphere and storing it in vegetation (particularly forests and wetlands), soil and sediments, and aquatic environments. The geologic carbon sequestration project researches the effects and capacity of pumping CO 2 deep underground: Will it induce seismic activity; what are the potential benefits in terms of enhanced oil recovery; how much CO 2 can be stored underground and where is it most feasible; and will the CO 2

Technical Adjustments

storage affect drinking water? Authorized by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007 (P.L. 110-140), which calls for the USGS to develop a methodology for, and then complete a national assessment of, the geologic storage capacity for CO 2 . It also directed Interior to conduct a national assessment to quantify the amount of carbon stored in ecosystems, the capacity of ecosystems to sequester additional carbon, and the rate of greenhouse gases fluxes in and out of the ecosystems (biologic carbon sequestration). Of the amounts transferred, $7.9 million of the carbon sequestration research will be proposed for reduction.

Internal Transfer from the Land Resources Mission Area, Land Change Science Program to the Energy and Mineral Resources Mission Area, Energy Resources Program ($1,477,000/7 FTE):

Carbon Sequestration – Geologic Research and Assessments project work will continue after transfer to the Energy and Mineral Resources Mission Area. The project will work on a national assessment of the technically recoverable hydrocarbon resources resulting from CO 2 injection and storage through CO 2 - enhanced oil recovery. The goals of this work are to: (1) complete and publish an assessment methodology; (2) conduct a national assessment of recoverable oil and associated CO 2 storage that is expected in future CO 2 -enhanced oil recovery operations; and (3) publish the assessment results. In addition this funding will allow for a limited amount research on improving the geologic and technical foundation of CO 2 storage in various geologic basins.

Technical Adjustments

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USGS Science Collaboration

Science Collaboration

Science Collaboration The USGS works collaboratively with other Interior bureaus and Federal agencies to identify
Science Collaboration
The USGS works collaboratively with other
Interior bureaus and Federal agencies to identify
and address issues of importance to the Nation.
USGS researchers handle an
invasive Burmese python in the
Everglades National Park.

Introduction

Created by an Organic Act of Congress in 1879, the United States Geological Survey (USGS) has evolved over the last 138 years into a bureau with a mission to deliver integrated scientific understanding and forecasts of natural systems to improve the Nation’s economic well-being; reduce societal risks to hazards; support resilient infrastructure and natural resource security; and inform strategies for adapting to changing landscapes. The USGS provides reliable scientific information for the common good of its Federal, State, tribal, and local partners and the American people.

Scientific coordination and collaboration is central to the USGS's science mission. USGS is the sole science agency for the Department of the Interior. Thousands of Federal, State, local, and tribal governments, the private sector, and non-governmental organization partners seek out the USGS for its natural science expertise; its vast Earth and biological data holdings; and unbiased scientific analyses and publications. As a non-regulatory entity, the USGS provides objective, credible scientific research and analysis that Federal agencies and Interior bureaus with regulatory responsibilities use to make informed decisions based on sound science. The USGS contributes valuable expertise to these collaborations, filling in the knowledge gaps that the USGS is uniquely capable of addressing.

By leveraging efficiencies across various Federal, State, local, tribal, and industry sectors, the USGS provides thorough and accurate science—tailor-made to address some of America's most pressing challenges of the 21st century. The USGS enters into scientific partnerships, making the best use of limited resources to further national priorities including:

The Nation’s natural resources, including energy, minerals, and water.

Stewardship, including recreation and sporting, and tribal nations.

Science

to

protect

public

safety,

health,

and

property,

including

environmental health.

natural

hazards

and

Infrastructure, including development and construction.

Management and efficiencies.

Science Collaboration

As America seeks to solve these challenges, the USGS provides sound decision-ready science in a timely manner to inform multi-entity collaborations on issues affecting energy and mineral resource assessments, infrastructure development, public health and safety, community resilience, and sustainable economies. Examples include:

Conducting monitoring and assessments associated with natural hazards as well as assessing and researching coastal impacts and resources.

Assessing the availability and recoverability of oil, gas, and other energy resources.

Assessing the sources and life cycles of critical minerals that are increasing in importance with the emergence of new technologies.

Providing the tools for communities to plan for increased pressures on available water supplies, including drought.

Developing the basis for an improved ability to project the availability of water for future economic, energy production, and environmental uses.

Creating the foundation for addressing multiple emerging Federal, State, tribal, and local governments, and private industry requirements for infrastructure, energy, and water demands through the 3D Elevation Program (3DEP).

Building a high-quality geologic mapping framework to understand the distribution and quantity of mineral resources and inform resource management.

Providing tools for early detection and control of invasive species and wildlife disease.

Providing science to help protect the health of visitors and workers on Federal lands, and science to protect the health of Native populations and the fish and wildlife they rely on for nutrition, from environmental contaminants and pathogens.

Engaging the next generation to build a 21st century workforce.

Examples of USGS Science Coordination and Collaborations

The USGS collaborates with its partners to provide valuable science for decision making. The following section offers a snapshot of a cross-section of the USGS’s science coordination activities with other Interior bureaus, and Federal, State, tribal, and local partners.

The Nation’s Natural Resources

Critical Minerals: The USGS collaborates with a number of external organizations to leverage the expertise and contributions of partners toward the goal of a more thorough understanding of the Nation’s mineral potential, production, and consumption. The USGS has been closely involved with the development of a critical mineral early warning screening tool in collaboration with Federal agency partners (including the Department of Energy, the Department of Defense, and the Department of Commerce, among others) and industry stakeholders. This tool is essential for decision makers to understand the supply and availability of critical minerals upon which the Nation depends for products ranging from smartphones to advanced national defense systems. The United

Science Collaboration

States is 100 percent dependent upon foreign countries for its supply of 20 critical mineral commodities, and more than 50 percent dependent upon imports for an additional 30 critical minerals. Therefore, the collaboration between the USGS and its Federal and industry partners to develop the critical minerals early warning system has been important to United States’ national security and economic prosperity.

Unconventional Energy Resource Assessments: The USGS works with Federal agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy and other agencies, on a scientific research collaboration project designed to better understand our Nation’s unconventional oil and gas (UOG) resources and their impacts. Through the Federal Multiagency Collaboration on Unconventional Oil and Gas, the USGS provides research to understand the availability and recoverability of unconventional oil and gas resources across the Nation, and works with its Federal partners to leverage the scientific expertise of each agency toward the goal of a holistic understanding of UOG development so that decision makers will have thorough and accurate scientific data upon which to base their domestic energy policy decisions.

Energy Development: The USGS collaborates with the State of Wyoming, the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), the U.S. Forest Service, the Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Park Service, non-governmental organizations, industry, and communities to assess and facilitate responsible natural gas development by providing science and technical assistance to partners; and with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management on the science needed for making decisions in the outer continental shelf that balance fisheries management and energy development.

Archival Resources for Industry: The USGS's Core Research Center, located in the Denver Federal Center, houses rock cores and samples from 63,000 wells representing over 242 million linear feet of subsurface rock strata from 36 States. The USGS's geologic samples provide an invaluable archive to both the private and public sector for oil, gas, and mineral exploration; infrastructure development; and water resource management. In 2016, 57 percent of the users represented industry researchers who revisit reservoirs that were once considered tight or depleted and to reevaluate the potential for further oil and gas production with new technology, by re-analyzing the USGS's archived rock cores. Mining professionals also analyze existing, ore-rich rock cores to determine the value of pursuing extraction.

Offshore Energy: The USGS collaborates with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management on science needed for making decisions in the outer continental shelf for fisheries management and energy development; and with U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Marine Fisheries Service to assess the risk associated with alternatives for sighting offshore wind development.

Water Resources: The USGS provides science information and assessments of surface and ground water availability and quality for the Nation to Tribes, the National Park Service, U.S. the Fish and Wildlife Service, NOAA, and many other stakeholders.

Science Collaboration

Land and Water Stewardship

Water Conservation: Water is a fundamental natural resource; it circumscribes economic opportunities and is integral to the quality of our lives and the health of our environment. The USGS collaborates with States, Tribes, and local communities to address competing demands for water by helping improve conservation and increase water availability, restore watersheds, and resolve long standing water conflicts.

Sustain and Manage America's Resources for Tomorrow: The hydrologic cycle (i.e., the continuous movement of water above, on, and below the surface of the Earth) is a continuous process that often is not confined to any single political jurisdiction. Effective water stewardship and the governance of water use—and its reusability—therefore requires horizontal collaboration and cooperation across departments and sectors within a vertical hierarchy of local, State, and national interests. The USGS brings research strengths in resource assessments and surface water monitoring for America's end users – such as State, local, and tribal resource managers enabling effective water management among all sectors and stakeholders that depend on water.

The USGS's develops new water accounting tools and assesses water availability at the regional and national scales. Through the National Water Census, the USGS is integrating diverse research on water availability and use and enhancing the understanding of connection between water quality and water availability. Research is designed to build decision support capacity for water management agencies and other natural resource managers. In addition, Geographic Focus Area Studies between the USGS and the Bureau of Reclamation, provides the framework Interior needs to successfully join the related water resource programs of its bureaus and offices in pursuit of a single unifying purpose:

to secure a sustainable water future for the nation.

Coastal Erosion: The Coastal-Marine Hazards and Resources Program has worked with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE; Corps) to leverage USGS expertise about beach processes and responsibilities for forecasting beach change assisting USACE's role in coordinating beach nourishment projects. The USGS and USACE are working with the American Shore and Beach Preservation Association to discuss plans for development of a new Coastal Resiliency Network and to support collaborative research on coastal risk and vulnerability. The goal is to use the wealth of data that already exists in the Corps, the USGS, and other Federal agencies to quantify coastal resiliency and predict changes through time. Additionally, the USGS and USACE are collaborating on identifying ways to streamline and improve procedures for transforming raw lidar data into useful data products.

Harmful Algal Blooms and Harmful Algal Toxins: The USGS currently leads a diverse range of multi-disciplinary studies to address harmful algal bloom and harmful algal toxin issues in water bodies throughout the Nation, including the following: developing field and laboratory methods to identify and quantify harmful algal blooms and associated toxins; understanding causal factors, environmental fate and transport, ecological processes, and effects of environmental exposure; and developing early warning systems for potentially harmful blooms. Study approaches use a combination of traditional methods and emerging technologies, including advanced analytical techniques, stable isotopes, molecular techniques, sensor technology, and satellite imagery. Studies

Science Collaboration

range in scale from laboratory experiments on individual water bodies, to studies that are regional or national in scope, and are completed in collaboration with local, State, Federal, tribal, non- governmental organizations, and industry partners.

non- governmental organizations, and industry partners. Figure 1: The USGS has conducted cyanobacterial harmful

Figure 1: The USGS has conducted cyanobacterial harmful algal bloom studies at thousands of sites throughout the Nation since the mid-1990s. Studies range in scope, from local to national, and have been completed in collaboration with local, State, Federal, tribal, academic, non- governmental organization, and industry partners. Source: USGS.

Recent examples of USGS harmful algal bloom/harmful algal toxin science include:

Developing a variety of approaches to quantify harmful algae and associated toxins including field protocols, field guides, taxonomy, sample preparation techniques, advanced analytical techniques, and molecular tools.

Operating a network of about 80 sensors that measure algae in near real-time in high-valued water bodies used for recreation and drinking water throughout the Nation.

Conducting National- and regional-scale assessments to show the widespread occurrence of multiple algal toxins in a diverse range of settings across the Nation.

Characterizing the environmental persistence, fate, and transport of harmful algae and associated compounds (e.g., harmful algal toxins). USGS studies have documented impacts hundreds of miles downstream from lakes reporting harmful blooms.

Performing integrated ecosystem studies that use tools such as stable isotopes, genetics, and sensors, in additional to traditional approaches, to better understand environmental drivers of harmful algal bloom formation in lakes, rivers, and estuaries throughout the Nation.

Science Collaboration

Quantifying

impacts

endangered species.

of

harmful

blooms

on

aquatic

organisms,

including

threatened

and

Collaborating with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NOAA, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to develop an early warning indicator, called the Cyanobacteria Assessment Network (CyAN), of freshwater and estuarine algal blooms using satellite information to aid expedient public health advisories.

Land Imaging: The National Land Imaging (NLI) Program advances the science and methods for collecting, analyzing, and understanding user needs in order to motivate agility in its product and service portfolio. The program collaborates with many Federal partners including Interior bureaus, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, NOAA, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), and the National Geospatial Intelligence Agency on remote sensing science. Landsat is a valuable tool for many Federal partners providing them with information that enhances their ability to meet their mission. For example, the USDA uses Landsat imagery to estimate crop production and monitor water use for agricultural production. Landsat imagery is also used to develop the USDA’s Cropland Data Layer, a crop-specific land cover classification product, and USDA’s Satellite Imagery Archive. NLI works with users to better understand their needs for land imaging observations, products, and services; through the Interior Remote Sensing Working Group and other venues, NLI works with various Interior bureaus to seek input on its new products and land imaging initiatives in order to better meet user needs. Interior bureaus use Landsat satellite data and products for work including: drought, invasive species, fire mitigation, water use and availability information, and energy and mineral development.

Geologic Mapping with States: The USGS, along with State and university partners, share the common responsibility identified in the National Geologic Mapping Act, of 1992, to collaborate and expedite the production of a geologic map database for the Nation applicable to land-use management, assessment, and utilization and conservation of natural resources, groundwater management, and public safety. Annually, the USGS works cooperatively with approximately 45 different State geological surveys and 20-25 different universities throughout the country to select and map high-priority areas for new geologic maps.

Mapping Public Lands: The Protected Areas Database of the United States (PAD-US) is the Nation's inventory of public parks (including National Parks) and other protected open space. With more than three billion acres in 150,000 locations, the spatial data within the PAD-US represents public lands managed by national, State, regional, and local governments, as well as non-profit conservation organizations. PAD-US informs critical decisions in habitat management, recreation, public health, and wildfire planning and response by groups such as the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, and National Wildfire Coordinating Group. The accuracy and accessibility of PAD-US make it one of the vital engines behind scientific analysis of issues involving land management and conservation practice for government, academic, commercial, and non-profit science.

Science Collaboration

Wildlife Management: USGS science is needed by agencies to determine appropriate harvest levels by hunters, manage disease outbreaks in both wildlife and domestic animals, ensure public safety, and manage wildlife on National Refuges, National Parks, and BLM Units.

Wildlife-Related Recreation: The unique role of the Cooperative Research Unit’s Program (CRU) is exemplified by the agency partnerships and integration of its work into management decision making. Each Unit is owned collectively by its cooperators, made up of Interior agencies, the State natural resource agency, and the university. Collaborative work conducted by the CRUs provides science support to management agencies designed to sustain the hunting, fishing, and wildlife-related recreation needs of the public that account for $144 billion dollars in expenditures and 480,000 American jobs (2017 National Recreation Economy Report, Outdoor Industry Association).

Tribal Fisheries, Water Uses, and the Environment: The USGS evaluates habitat projects designed to enhance anadromous fish populations (i.e., fish born in fresh water, spending adult life in the sea, and returning to fresh water to spawn; salmon, smelt, shad, striped bass, and sturgeon are common examples) by tribal partners, including the Nisqually Indian Tribe, Swinomish Indian Tribe, and the Yakama Nation to most effectively target limited financial resources. The USGS collaborates with work related to water availability issues on tribal lands in order to address such topics as water rights, water use, hydrologic conditions, and water-quality issues. In addition, USGS cooperative activities related to energy and water enhance local cooperative studies related to regional drought and enhance data collection related to tribal water issues. In addition, environmental factors are recognized drivers of Native health. USGS Environmental Health science, in collaboration with Federal, State, local, and tribal partners, helps inform efforts to protect the health of Native populations, and the fish and wildlife they rely on as sources of nutrition, from environmental contaminants and pathogens.

Public Safety and Security

Earthquake Hazards: Through National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program, (NEHRP), the USGS partners with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the National Science Foundation, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to reduce earthquake losses in the United States. For example, the USGS partners with FEMA and NIST in the development and updating of building codes, based on USGS earthquake hazard science. The USGS ShakeMap product, which provides rapid situational awareness of earthquake ground motions, is sent directly to numerous businesses, utilities, lifeline operators, response officials, and State and local government agencies, and is imported directly into FEMA’s HAZUS software for detailed estimation of earthquake impacts.

Mapping for Disaster Response: The USGS offers world-class science capabilities to support the Department of Defense (DOD). Since 2003, the USGS has partnered with the U.S. Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) to facilitate science support in the event of a major natural disaster. One key product that now supports USNORTHCOM and other DOD partners during a natural disaster is the USGS topographic map or US Topo, which the USGS provides to DOD through a partnership with the Defense Logistics Agency. This new capability enables immediate requests and delivery of this USGS resource to the impacted area.

Science Collaboration

Providing Critical Information during Flooding: Through the Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program, the USGS operates more than 8,200 streamgages that provides data for flood forecasting, flood-control operations, and disaster mitigation and recovery. The river stage and streamflow discharge data that the USGS collects and disseminates are crucial to the reliability of National Weather Service (NWS) river and flood forecasts by enabling the adjustment and validation of flood models. USGS data also support the operation of water control structures by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) and numerous other water managers by providing real-time validation of water releases. USGS personnel routinely perform maintenance of streamgage equipment and make manual measurements of streamflow discharge during flooding events. These activities are even more critical during times of flood, especially when flows are above the peak flow of record. The USGS provided this critical data recently during the significant flooding that occurred from Arkansas to Indiana beginning in April-May 2017.

from Arkansas to Indiana beginning in April-May 2017. Figure 2 --USGS streamgages reporting flow above NWS

Figure 2 --USGS streamgages reporting flow above NWS minor, moderate, and major flood stage from April 27 to May 2, 2017.

Infrastructure

Invasive Species Impacts to the Built Environment: USGS scientists partner with Interior and other Federal, State, tribal, territorial agencies, non-governmental entities, and private industry to help solve problems posed by invasive species. Invasive species cause broad-scale negative ecological, agricultural, cultural, human health and quality of life impacts. Similarly, damaging impacts of invasive species on the Nation’s economy, infrastructure, energy, water resources, and military readiness are significant. Every year, invasive species cost the United States billions of dollars in economic losses and other damages. The USGS joins the above-mentioned entities to combat invasive species from a Federal perspective by investigating (1) new and emerging priorities of national concern; (2) early detection and rapid response; (3) innovative control technologies; and (4) cost-effective techniques for prevention, eradication, control and restoration. The USGS’s invasive

Science Collaboration

species efforts provide resource managers within, and outside, Interior tools and guidance to control invasive species negatively impacting the Nation’s trust resources.

Science for Safe Drinking Water and other Public Health Infrastructure on Public Lands: The USGS's Environmental Health science helps inform upgrades to wastewater and drinking water treatment infrastructure, road building, and other facilities improvements on public lands. The USGS Environmental Health Mission Area works with Federal partners such as the National Park Service, as well as State and local agencies to provide critical science on issues related to infrastructure and health on public lands.

Management and Efficiencies

USGS Environmental Health science ultimately helps enhance efficiency and management of Department of Interior activities, by informing decision making, reducing costs, and balancing regulatory burdens with opportunities to protect healthincluding protecting the health of Interior workers on Federal lands. Examples include helping understand occurrences, origins, and health implications of contaminants (such as harmful algal toxins, metals, and other compounds) and pathogens in waters, rocks, soils, and dusts on public lands. The USGS Environmental Health Mission Area works with the Department of the Interior – Office of Occupational Safety and Health, the National Park Service – Office of Public Health, the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among others, on these activities.

The USGS, via the 3DEP Executive Forum, facilitates executive dialog and collaboration on strategies to implement and sustain 3DEP for the benefit of its Federal stakeholders and the broader community. The Forum is comprised of representatives from 14 Federal agencies that support 3DEP goals for nationwide data coverage.

The USGS-led Alaska Mapping Executive Committee meets regularly to coordinate on critical Alaska topographic mapping activities. Executives from 15 Federal agencies and the State of Alaska are combining efforts to acquire new digital elevation, hydrography, transportation, shoreline and geopositional data for Alaska, and create a new digital topographic map series for the State.

The USGS and the U.S. Forest Service share data for mapping purposes to create more consistent and current products. This collaboration reduces costs for map production and results in more consistent products.

Science Collaboration

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Budget at a Glance

Budget at a Glance

Budget at a Glance (Dollars in Thousands)

 
   

2017

     

2018

2016

Actual

CR

Annualized

Fixed

Costs

Internal

Transfer

Program

Changes

Budget

Request

Surveys, Investigations, and Research

Ecosystems

Status and Trends Program Eliminate Curation of Smithsonian Museum Collections Reduce Species-Specific Wildlife Research Reduce Status and Trends Program Operations Fisheries Program Eliminate Unconventional Oil and Gas Research Reduce Contaminants Research Reduce Species-Specific Fisheries Research Reduce Wildlife Program Operations Wildlife Program Eliminate Whooping Crane Propagation Program Reduce Contaminants Research Reduce Changing Arctic Ecosystems Research and Monitoring Reduce Species-Specific Wildlife Research Wildlife Operations Environments Program Reduce Ecosystem Services Tool Development and Case Studies Reduce Greater Everglades Research and Monitoring Reduce Chesapeake Bay Research and Monitoring Reduce Environments Program Operations Invasive Species Program Reduce Invasive Species Program Operations Cooperative Research Units Program Reduce Cooperative Research Units Program Operations

20,473

20,434

206

0

-3,806

16,834

-1,600

-2,000

-206

20,886

20,846

253

0

-5,253

15,846

-1,000

-500

-3,500

-253

45,757

45,670

508

0

-10,707

35,471

-1,500

-500

-1,600

-6,599

-508

38,415

38,342

392

0

-9,392

29,342

-1,000

-5,000

-3,000

-392

17,330

17,297

127

0

-127

17,297

-127

17,371

17,338

262

0

-262

17,338

-262

Total, Ecosystems

160,232

159,927

1,748

0

-29,547

132,128

Land Resources

National Land Imaging Program Landsat 9 Ground System Development Eliminate Support for National Civil Applications Center Reduce Satellite Operations Eliminate AmericaView State Grant Programs Reduce Science Research and Investigations Reduce National Land Imaging Operations Land Change Science Program Transfer from Climate Research and Development Transfer from Carbon Sequestration Eliminate Biologic Carbon Sequestration Transfer to Energy Reduce Geologic Carbon Sequestration Eliminate Landscape Science Projects Eliminate Climate Research and Development Activities Reduce Land Change Science Operations National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers Eliminate Support for National Phenology Network Eliminate Support for GeoData Portal at Office of Water Infrastructure Realign the National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers Reduce National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers Operations

72,194

72,057

340

0

3,730

76,127

22,400

-4,847

-8,996

-1,215

-3,272

-340

41,346

41,267

122

-1,477

-20,627

19,285

21,454

9,341

-5,237

-1,477

-2,627

-1,498

-11,143

-122

26,435

26,385

140

0

-9,090

17,435

-250

-200

-8,500

-140

Total, Land Resources

139,975

139,709

602

-1,477

-25,987

112,847

Budget at a Glance

 

Budget at a Glance (Dollars in Thousands)

 
   

2017

     

2018

2016

Actual

CR

Annualized

Fixed

Costs

Internal

Transfer

Program

Changes

Budget

Request

Surveys, Investigations, and Research

Energy and Mineral Resources, and Environmental Health

 

Energy and Mineral Resources

73,066

72,927

934

1,477

-934

74,404

Mineral Resources Program

48,371

48,279

644

0

-644

48,279

Reduce Mineral Resources Program Operations

       

-644

 

Energy Resources Program

24,695

24,648

290

1,477

-290

26,125

Reduce Energy Resources Program Operations

       

-290

 

Subtotal: Mineral and Energy Resources

73,066

72,927

934

1,477

-934

74,404

Environmental Health

21,445

21,404

287

0

-4,585

17,106

Contaminant Biology Program

10,197

10,178

139

0

-2,087

8,230

Reduce Contaminant Research

       

-1,948

[1,042]

Reduce Contaminant Biology Program Operations

-139

0

Toxic Substances Hydrology Program

11,248

11,226

148

0

-2,498

8,876

Eliminate Radioactive Waste Disposal Science in Support of Energy and Land and Water Stewardship Eliminate Municipal Wastewater Science to Support Land and Water Stewardship and Infrastructure

       

-700

 

-100

Eliminate Contaminant Science in Support of Water and Land Stewardship, Energy, and Wastewater and Drinking Water Infrastructure

-1,550

Reduce Toxic Substances Hydrology Program Operations

-148

-

 

Subtotal: Environmental Health

21,445

21,404

287

0

-4,585

17,106

Total, Energy and Mineral Resources, and Environmental Health

94,511

94,331

1,221

1,477

-5,519

91,510

Natural Hazards

           

Earthquake Hazards Program Eliminate implementation of Earthquake Early Warning System for the West Coast Reduce Support for Regional Earthquake Monitoring, Assessments and Research Reduce Earthquake Hazards Operations Volcano Hazards Program Suspend Implementation of NVEWS Reduce Volcano Hazard Assessments Suspend Maintenance of Monitoring Networks and Data Analysis at Yellowstone and Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Reduce Volcano Hazards Operations Landslide Hazards Program Reduce Landslide Hazards Operations Global Seismographic Network Suspend implementation of GSN seismic station upgrades Reduce Global Seismographic Network Operations Geomagnetism Program Eliminate the Geomagetism Program Coastal/Marine Hazards and Resources Program Eliminate Marine Habitat/Resource Mapping and Ocean and Glacier Studies to Inform Resource Management Eliminate Elevation Model Development and Regional Coastal Resource Assessments

60,503

60,388

561

0

-9,561

51,388

-8,200

-800

-561

26,121

26,071

343

0

-3,982

22,432

-1,500

-1,639

-500

-343

3,538

3,531

53

0

-53

3,531

-53

6,453

6,441

29

0

-1,484

4,986

-1,455

-29

1,888

1,884

-1,884

0

-1,884

40,510

40,433

493

0

-5,152

35,774

-1,600

-2,500

Reduce Support for Regional Coastal Management, Restoration, and Risk Reduction

-559

Reduce Coastal-Marine Hazards and Resources Program Operations

-493

0

 

Total, Natural Hazards

139,013

138,748

1,479

0

-22,116

118,111

Budget at a Glance

Budget at a Glance (Dollars in Thousands)

 
   

2017

     

2018

2016

Actual

CR

Annualized

Fixed

Costs

Internal

Transfer

Program

Changes

Budget

Request

Surveys, Investigations, and Research

Water Resources

Water Availability and Use Science Program Reduce National Research Program Eliminate Water Use Data and Research Eliminate Mississippi Alluvial Plan Aquifer Assessment Project Eliminate U.S.-Mexico Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Project Eliminate Water-Use Unconventional Oil and Gas Eliminate Focus Area Studies Eliminate two Regional Groundwater Evaluations Eliminate Groundwater Model Development, Maintenance and Sustainability Reduce Water Availability and Use Science Program Operations Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program Reduce National Research Program Reduce National Groundwater Monitoring Network Reduce Support to Groundwater and Streamflow Information Operations National Water Quality Program Reduce National Research Program Eliminate National Park Service Cooperative Water Partnership Eliminate National Atmospheric Deposition Program Reduce National Water-Quality Assessment Project Lower Mississippi Stream Quality Assessment Reduce National Water-Quality Assessment Project Trends Assessments Reduce National Water Quality Program Operations Water Resources Research Act Program Eliminate Water Resources Research Act Program

42,052

41,972

642

0

-12,201

30,413

-4,325

-1,500

-1,000

-1,000

-250

-1,600

-789

-1,095

-642

71,535

71,399

742

0

-3,982

68,159

-1,540

-1,700

-742

90,600

90,428

1,277

0

-17,235

74,470

-6,011

-1,743

-1,576

-4,000

-2,628

-1,277

6,500

6,488

0

0

-6,488

0

-6,488

Total, Water Resources

210,687

210,287

2,661

0

-39,906

173,042

Core Science Systems

National Geospatial Program Reduce Federal Geographic Data Committee Functions Eliminate Geospatial Research and Reduce 3DEP Technical Support Reduce 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) Functions Reduce National Geospatial Program Operations National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program Reduce National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program Functions Reduce National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program Operations Science Synthesis, Analysis and Research Program Reduce USGS Library Functions Reduce Biogeographic Science Functions Reduce Science Synthesis, Analysis and Research Program Operations

62,854

62,735

575

0

-11,375

51,935

-2,700

-5,100

-3,000

-575

24,397

24,351

244

0

-2,314

22,281

-2,070

-244

24,299

24,253

202

0

-5,702

18,753

-3,000

-2,500

-202

Total, Core Science Systems

111,550

111,339

1,021

0

-19,391

92,969

Science Support

Administration and Management Reduce Administration and Management Services Reduce Administration and Management Operations Information Services Reduce Information Services Program Reduce Information Services Operations

81,981

81,825

944

0

-13,390

69,379

-12,446

-944

23,630

23,585

138

0

-3,734

19,989

-3,596

-138

Total, Science Support

105,611

105,410

1,082

0

-17,124

89,368

Facilities

Rental Payments and Operations & Maintenance Deferred Maintenance and Capital Improvement

93,141

92,964

11,963

0

0

104,927

7,280

7,266

0

0

0

7,266

Total, Facilities

100,421

100,230

11,963

0

0

112,193

Total, SIR 1,062,000

1,059,981

21,777

0

-159,590

922,168

Budget at a Glance

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Program Changes

Program Changes

Program Changes
Program Changes
     

2018

   

2016

Program

Fixed

2018

Dollars in Thousands

Enacted

2017 CR

Changes

Costs

Request

Ecosystems

$160,232

$159,927

-$29,547

$1,748

$132,128

Status and Trends Program

$20,473

$20,434

-$3,806

$206

$16,834

Fisheries Program

$20,886

$20,846

-$5,253

$253

$15,846

Wildlife Program

$45,757

$45,670

-$10,707

$508

$35,471

Environments Program

$38,415

$38,342

-$9,392

$392

$29,342

Invasive Species Program

$17,330

$17,297

-$127

$127

$17,297

Cooperative Research Units Program

$17,371

$17,338

-$262

$262

$17,338

Land Resources

$139,975

$139,709

-$25,987

$602

$112,847

National Land Imaging Program

$72,194

$72,057

$3,730

$340

$76,127

Land Change Science Program

$10,492

$10,472

-$20,627

$122

$19,285

National and Regional Climate Adaptation Science Centers

$26,435

$26,385

-$9,090

$140

$17,435

Climate Research and Development Program

$21,495

$21,454

$0

$0

$0

Carbon Sequestration Program

$9,359

$9,341

$0

$0

$0

Energy and Mineral Resources, and Environmental Health

$94,511

$94,331

-$5,519

$1,221

$91,510

Energy and Mineral Resources

$73,066

$72,927

-$934

$934

$74,404

Mineral Resources Program

$48,371

$48,279

-$644

$644

$48,279

Energy Resources Program

$24,695

$24,648

-$290

$290

$26,125

Environmental Health

$21,445

$21,404

-$4,585

$287

$17,106

Contaminant Biology Program

$10,197

$10,178

-$2,087

$139

$8,230

Toxic Substances Hydrology Program

$11,248

$11,226

-$2,498

$148

$8,876

Natural Hazards

$139,013

$138,748

-$22,116

$1,479

$118,111

Earthquake Hazards Program

$60,503

$60,388

-$9,561

$561

$51,388

Volcano Hazards Program

$26,121

$26,071

-$3,982

$343

$22,432

Landslide Hazards Program

$3,538

$3,531

-$53

$53

$3,531

Global Seismographic Network

$6,453

$6,441

-$1,484

$29

$4,986

Geomagnetism Program

$1,888

$1,884

-$1,884

$0

$0

Coastal/Marine Hazards and Resources Program

$40,510

$40,433

-$5,152

$493

$35,774

Program Changes

     

2018

   

2016

Program

Fixed

2018

Dollars in Thousands

Enacted

2017 CR

Changes

Costs

Request

Water Resources

$210,687

$210,287

-$39,906

$2,661

$173,042

Water Availability and Use Science Program

$42,052

$41,972

-$12,201

$642

$30,413

Groundwater and Streamflow Information Program

$71,535

$71,399

-$3,982

$742

$68,159

National Water Quality Program

$90,600

$90,428

-$17,235

$1,277

$74,470

Water Resources Research Act Program

$6,500

$6,488

-$6,488

$0

$0

Core Science Systems

$111,550

$111,339

-$19,391