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types of discrimination prohibited by the laws enforced by EEOC.

Age
Disability
Equal Pay/Compensation
Genetic Information
Harassment
National Origin
Pregnancy
Race/Color
Religion
Retaliation
Sex
Sexual Harassment

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A collection of Philippine laws, statutes and codes


not included or cited in the main indices
of the Chan Robles Virtual Law Library.

This page features the full text of


Republic Act No. 6725
AN ACT STRENGTHENING THE PROHIBITION ON DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN WITH
RESPECT TO TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT, AMENDING FOR THE PURPOSE
ARTICLE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FIVE OF THE LABOR CODE, AS AMENDED.

REPUBLIC ACT NO. 6725

AN ACT STRENGTHENING THE PROHIBITION ON DISCRIMINATION AGAINST WOMEN WITH


RESPECT TO TERMS AND CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT, AMENDING FOR THE PURPOSE
ARTICLE ONE HUNDRED THIRTY-FIVE OF THE LABOR CODE, AS AMENDED.

Section 1. Article One hundred thirty-five of the Labor Code, as amended, is hereby further
aWork
ed to read as follows:chanroblesvirtualawlibrary

"Art. 135. Discrimination Prohibited. It shall be unlawful for any employer to discriminate
against any woman employee with respect to terms and conditions of employment solely on
account of her sex. chan robles virtual law library
"The following are acts of discrimination:chanroblesvirtualawlibrary
"(a) Payment of a lesser compensation, including wage, salary or other form of
remuneration and fringe benefits, to a female employee as against a male employee, for
work of equal value; and chan robles virtual law library
"(b) Favoring a male employee over a female employee with respect to promotion, training
opportunities, study and scholarship grants solely on account of their sexes. chan robles
virtual law library
"Criminal liability for the willful commission of any unlawful act as provided in this article or
any violation of the rules and regulations issued pursuant to Section 2 hereof shall be
penalized as provided in Articles 288 and 289 of this Code: Provided, That the institution of
any criminal action under this provision shall not bar the aggrieved employee from filing an
entirely separate and distinct action for money claims, which may include claims for
damages

How to Avoid Discrimination

Think about the jokes you want to tell carefully before you say them. Humor can lighten the
mood, but it is often taken at anothers expense. Many jokes degrade women, ethnicities
and disabled people.

Learn another language, or be open to accepting that most countries have citizens who
speak dozens, if not hundreds of languages. Promoting language education, rather than
fighting it, can decrease discrimination based on ethnicity.

Fight gender stereotypes in the home. Thinking of things as womens work or mans work
may lead to gender discrimination in the next generation. As more and more families
become dual-income households, make sure both sexes are treated as partners.

Socialize with people outside your comfort zone. Join a club, group or team where you have
contact with people of different gender, sexuality or race. People often get into routines
where they arent exposed to diversity in the community.

Be open to learning about other religions. Although you might be devout, a little research
can help you find the common ground between another faith and your own. The next time
someone makes a religious slur, talk about the commonalities, rather than the differences.

Request that clubs or groups that you join adopt a policy of equal opportunity to people of
different genders, sexualities, races and physical health. Starting a conversation about
creating an open group may avoid issues based on these topics in the future.

Avoiding Discrimination at Work

Develop a set of qualifications and prerequisites before you start hiring for a job. Judge the
candidates based on these professional parameters. If you fear a colleague is discriminating
in their choices, ask for a third party to judge the candidates without seeing their names or
faces.
Set non-negotiable equal pay for new hires (based on their degrees). This stops
discrimination regarding salary offers, and accounts for the fact that women are on average
more hesitant to negotiate their salaries.

Dont ask for additional documents related to work history just because someone appears
foreign or ethnic. Requiring a person who isnt white to give you extra immigration or
citizenship papers is discrimination, unless you ask for this paperwork as a matter of policy
for all applicants.[1]

Look around at your work force. If you exist in a diverse population, but your employees are
all from the same race, you may be inadvertently promoting hiring practices based on
discrimination.

Develop a clear harassment and discrimination policy at work. Post it in a common location
and add it to your employee handbook. Place a human resources manager in charge of
complaints.
Some smaller companies cant afford to hire human resource managers. However, someone
at the business should be a contact officer, who is responsible for handling discrimination
issues before the employee contacts a state agency or a lawyer.
Take complaints very seriously. No one should be told to "stop being so sensitive" if they are
being mistreated at the office.

Provide yearly staff training on discrimination or harassment. Make it clear that there is a
zero tolerance policy when it comes to discrimination. Announce how complaints and
disciplinary action will be handled.
Training should include topics of gender, race, LGBTQ status, size, disability, religion, and
age.
Explain that the company does not tolerate microaggressions, such as sexist jokes, the
r-word, or derogatory racial terms.

Keep a log of all discrimination claims and how they were handled. You can protect yourself
and your employees by noting each interaction.

Take steps to ensure that your locations and policies accommodate disabled people.
Installing a ramp at a retail location, installing a sit/stand desk for an employee with a
chronic back problem, or protecting an autistic person's ability to fidget at board meetings
helps you avoid disability discrimination.[2]
Be flexible about medical needs, such as doctor visits or needing to work from home
sometimes.
Allow people with mood disorders and intellectual/developmental disabilities to act a little
unusual. This means accepting behavior that looks a little odd to non-disabled people, such
as stimming (rocking, fidgeting), nervousness, or pacing.

Word job postings carefully. Include a statement at the end that says, We are an equal
opportunity/affirmative action employer. The following are common ways that people
discriminate when they advertise jobs:
Stressing that a job is or is not for a student or a youthful, mature or retired person is
age discrimination.
Saying that a job is or is not for a woman, man, dad or stay at home mom is gender
discrimination.
Requiring that a job is only for US citizens or green card holders is discrimination based on
nationality. Anyone who is qualified to work in the country should be allowed to apply. Work
permits or visas are reviewed during the last step of the hiring process.
Stating that the person must be clean-shaven can lead to religious discrimination.
Referencing any race or ethnicity can be racial discrimination.
Writing that the person is able-bodied, able to stand or slender can be disability or
weight discrimination.[3]

In general, seek to create a respectful and accommodating workplace atmosphere. This will
help encourage employees to treat each other with dignity, and help any employees who
are being mistreated feel that they can speak up and receive support.

The term discriminate appeared in the early 17th century in the English language. It is from
the Latin discriminat- 'distinguished between', from the verb discriminare, from discrimen
'distinction', from the verb discernere.[4] Since the American Civil War the term
"discrimination" generally evolved in American English usage as an understanding of
prejudicial treatment of an individual based solely on their race, later generalized as
membership in a certain socially undesirable group or social category.[5] "Discrimination"
derives from Latin, where the verb discrimire means "to separate, to distinguish, to make a
distinction".

Definitions Edit

9 THINGS YOU CAN DO TO STOP DISCRIMINATION


January 3, 2012 / Jenn Yeagley / Articles , Changing Communities
Everyone can do something to stop discrimination. Practicing simple acts every day will
help you strengthen your skills to intervene when needed. Most people are not actively
seeking to harm others, but many people will admit, they stood by when someone else was
hurt because they didnt know what to do or say.

1. Identify what you believe. Know where your beliefs originated and why they are
important to you, your family and/or your friends.

2. Challenge yourself. Try to meet someone new. Try a different restaurant or coffee
shop. Walk down a different street. Expand your world view by expanding your world.

3. Ask questions. Promote dialogue, but dont engage in diatribes. Recognize that what
has been done before is not always what is needed now. Why is it done that way?
What is the history? Can you tell me more about that?

4. Listen. Seek to understand another perspective before judging it as wrong or strange.


Try to understand the beliefs of someone from another faith or political party. Listen to
the language used around you. Does it label or offend others?

5. Practice inclusion. Is there room for every voice at your staff meeting? Is every child
included in the party? Have you listened to a teen lately? Have you asked an elder for
their advice? Do you have a friend from another ethnicity or religion? Celebrate common
ground and differences.

6. Speak up against injustice. Injustice happens in other countries, in other states and
still in our own backyards. Whether its social, environmental, racial, legal, economic or
other forms of injustice, use your voice to name the problem and begin to create change.
7. Take action. Dont just think about equality, justice and inclusion. Take action to
make it a reality.

8. Promote change. Change your mind and see what happens. Start with yourself and
it is easier to ask others to change.

9. Be intentional. Do and say what is important to you. Choose to include others.


Make intentional choices to end discrimination every day.