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City of Newark, New Jersey

2010-2015
HUD Consolidated Plan
& 2010-2011 Annual Action Plan

Cory A. Booker, Mayor

Department of Administration
Office of the Business Administrator

September 1, 2010 to August 31, 2015

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  1‐1 
 

 
 
Section 1: Table of Contents 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS

I. TITLE PAGE ........................................................................................................................... 1-1


A. TABLE OF CONTENTS ....................................................................................................... 1-2
II. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ....................................................................................................... 2-1
A. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 2-2
B. EVALUATION OF PAST PERFORMANCE ............................................................................... 2-2
C. SUMMARY OF 2010 HUD RESOURCES ................................................................................ 2-4
D. SUMMARY OF PRIORITY NEEDS, GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES................................. 2-5
Summary of Priority Needs and Objectives ................................................................... 2-6
Priority Consolidated Plan Activities ............................................................................... 2-7
E. GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION ............................................................................................. 2-8
F. SUMMARY OF CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PROCESS ................................................................ 2-8

III. MANAGING THE PROCESS ............................................................................................... 3-1


A. INTRODUCTION. ............................................................................................................... 3-2
B. LEAD AGENCY. ................................................................................................................. 3-2
C. INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURE. ............................................................................................. 3-2
D. COMMUNICATION PLAN AND STRATEGY. ............................................................................ 3-4
E. CONSULTATION. .............................................................................................................. 3-8
F. CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PLAN. .......................................................................................... 3-9
G. APPENDICES. ................................................................................................................. 3-11
IV. HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS ......................................................................................... 4-1
A. INTORDUCTION ................................................................................................................ 4-2
B. DEMOGRAPHIC AN DEMPLOYMENT ANALYSIS .................................................................... 4-2
C. HOUSING VALUE AND COST BURDEN ANALYSIS................................................................ 4-5
D. HOUSING SUPPLY ANALYSIS ............................................................................................. 4-7
E. PUBLIC HOUSING ........................................................................................................... 4-12
F. ASSISTED HOUSING ....................................................................................................... 4-12
G. FORECLOSURES ............................................................................................................ 4-12
H. VACANT AND ABANDNONED BUILDINGS ......................................................................... 4-14
I. SPECIAL NEEDS HOUSING.............................................................................................. 4-15
J. HOUSING DEMAND ANALYSIS ......................................................................................... 4-15

Figure 1: City of Newark Zip Codes

Table 1: City of Newark Household Trends


Table 2: Distribution of Household by Income
Table 3: Household Growth Trends by Zip Code
Table 4: Employment and Earnings by Occupant
Table 5: City of Newark Housing Characteristics
Table 6: City of Newark Housing Cost Burden by Household Type
Table 7: City of Newark Housing Cost Burden by Household Income
Table 8: Year Housing Unit Built, City of Newark
Table 9: Number of Units in Housing Structures in the City of Newark, 2009
Table 10: City of Newark Affordable Housing Inventory
Table 11: City of Newark Foreclosure Rates for February 2009 – January 2010

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  1‐2 
 

 
 
Section 1: Table of Contents 
Table 12: Special Needs Households
Table 13: Homeless Special Needs Sub-Populations
Table 14: City of Newark Residential Housing Demand in 2010
Chart 1: City of Newark Permit Trends 2008-2009
Chart 2: Newark Rental Submarket Total Inventory and Vacancy Rate
Chart 3: Newark Rental Submarket Average Asking and Effective Rents
Chart 4: City of Newark Home Sale Price Trends in 2009
Chart 5: Unsold Inventory and Months of Supply in 2009
Chart 6: Contract Sales January 2009-January 2010
Chart 7: City of Newark Foreclosures by Zip Code – Feb. 2009 – Jan. 2010
Chart 8: Distribution of Newark Foreclosures by Zip Code in January 2010
Chart 9: Newark Foreclosures and Average Sales Price
V. HOUSING AND HOMELESS NEEDS ASSESSMENT ......................................................... 5-1
A. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 5-2
Household Income and Poverty ..................................................................................... 5-2
Housing Unit Characteristics .......................................................................................... 5-3
B. HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT ......................................................................................... 5-4
All Low-Income Households with Housing Needs .......................................................... 5-5
Low-Income Renter Households with Housing Needs ................................................... 5-6
Low-Income Owner Households with Housing Needs ................................................... 5-7
Housing Affordability Mismatch ...................................................................................... 5-9
Low-Income and Racial/Ethnic Concentrations ........................................................... 5-10
Public Housing Needs .................................................................................................. 5-12
Housing and Transportation ......................................................................................... 5-14
C. HOMELESS NEEDS ASSESSMENT ................................................................................... 5-15
Definition of Homelessness .......................................................................................... 5-16
Nature and Extent opf Homelessness in Newark ......................................................... 5-17
Persons at Risk of Becoming Homeless ...................................................................... 5-18
Contributing Factors to Homelessness ........................................................................ 5-18
Homeless Facilities and Service Providers .................................................................. 5-18
D. ASSESSMENT OF NON-HOMELESS SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATIONS .................................. 5-19
Needs of Non-Homeless Subpopulations in Newark ................................................... 5-20
E. LEAD-BASED PAINT ....................................................................................................... 5-24

Table 1: Household Income


Table 2: Housing Units
Table 3: Housing Problems – City of Newark Census Place
Table 4: Low-Income Renter Households with Housing Problems
Table 5: Low-Income Owner Households with Housing Problems
Table 6: Affordability Mismatch for All Households
Table 7: Rental Affordability Gap Analysis
Table 8: Owner Affordability Gap Analysis
Table 9: NHA Family Developments
Table 10: NHA Townhouse Specific Developments
Table 11: NHA Elderly Developments
Table 12: Means of Transportation to Work by Tenure (16 yrs and over)
Table 13: (HUD Table 1A): Housing Gap Analysis Chart
Table 14: Contributing Factors of Homelessness
Table 15: (HUD Table 1B): Special Needs (Non-Homeless) Populations
Table 16: Newark Residents HIV/AIDS Cases Reported as of June 30, 2009

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  1‐3 
 
 
Section 1: Table of Contents 
Table 17: Newark Residents with a Disability by Type and Age

Chart 1: Housing Units by Size, Newark


Chart 2: Housing Stock Comparison
Chart 3: Racial/Ethnic Concentrations by Zip Code
Chart 4: Veterans by Sex and Age in Newark
Chart 5: Age of Housing Stock in Newark

Map 1: Housing and Transportation Costs, Newark


Map 2: Newark –Essex County CoC Boundary Map 2008
VI. 2010-2015 STRATEGIC PLAN ............................................................................................ 6-1
A. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 6-2
B. PRIORITY NEEDS ............................................................................................................. 6-5
Priority Housing Needs .................................................................................................. 6-5
Priority Homeless Needs ................................................................................................ 6-6
Special Needs Population Priority Needs ...................................................................... 6-7
Community Development Priority Needs ..................................................................... 6-10
Section 108 Loan Program Summary .......................................................................... 6-11
C. SPECIFIC GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES ........................................................... 6-13
Priority Consolidated Plan Activities ............................................................................. 6-15
Performance Measurement System ............................................................................. 6-15
D. CROSS CUTTING ISSUES ................................................................................................ 6-17
Lead-Based Paint Strategy .......................................................................................... 6-17
Barriers to Affordable Housing (AI Summary) .............................................................. 6-18
Antipoverty Strategy ..................................................................................................... 6-18
Monitoring .................................................................................................................... 6-19
E. APPENDICES .................................................................................................................. 6-23
Appendix A – HUD Table 1A ........................................................................................ 6-24
Appendix A – HUD Table 1B ........................................................................................ 6-25
Appendix A – HUD Table 1C ....................................................................................... 6-26
Appendix A – HUD Table 2A Part I .............................................................................. 6-27
Appendix A – HUD Table 2A Part II ............................................................................. 6-28
Appendix A – HUD Table 2A Part III ............................................................................ 6-29
Appendix A – HUD Table 2B ........................................................................................ 6-30
Appendix B – Newark 2010-2015 Strategic Framework .............................................. 6-31
Appendix C – Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing CHoice.................................. 6-32

Table 1: Proposed Activities for Funding


Table 2: HUD Outcome Statements
VII. 2010-2011 ANNUAL ACTION PLAN .................................................................................. 7-1
A. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................... 7-2
Evaluation of Past Performance ..................................................................................... 7-2
Summary of Priority Needs ............................................................................................ 7-4
Statement of Specific Annual Objectives – HUD Table 3A ............................................ 7-6
Sources of Funds ........................................................................................................... 7-7
Allocation of Funds Summary ........................................................................................ 7-8
Geographic Distribution ................................................................................................ 7-10
B. MANAGING THE PROCESS .............................................................................................. 7-10
Lead Agency ................................................................................................................ 7-10

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  1‐4 
 
 
Section 1: Table of Contents 
Institutional Structure ................................................................................................... 7-10
Summary of Citizen Participation Process ................................................................... 7-12
Monitoring .................................................................................................................... 7-12
C. HOUSING ....................................................................................................................... 7-15
HOME Specific Requirements ..................................................................................... 7-16
Needs of Public Housing .............................................................................................. 7-17
Barriers to Affordable Housing ..................................................................................... 7-18
Lead-Based Paint Strategy .......................................................................................... 7-18
D. HOMELESS .................................................................................................................... 7-19
Homeless Coordination Strategy ................................................................................. 7-19
Chronic Homeless Strategy ......................................................................................... 7-19
ESG Program ............................................................................................................... 7-20
E. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ........................................................................................... 7-20
Antipoverty Strategy ..................................................................................................... 7-21
F. NON-HOMELESS SPECIAL NEEDS ................................................................................... 7-22
HOPWA Program ......................................................................................................... 7-22
G. APPENDICES .................................................................................................................. 7-24
Appendix A – Listing of Action Plan Projects – HUD Table 3C .................................... 7-24

HUD Table 3A: Summary of Specific Annual Objectives


Table 1: Allocation of HOME Funds
Table 2: Allocation of CDBG Funds
Table 3: Allocation of ESG Funds
Table 4: Allocation of HOPWA Funds
 

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  1‐5 
 
 
Section 2: Executive Summary

TABLE OF CONTENTS
II. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .................................................................................................... 2-1
A. INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 2-2
B. EVALUATION OF PAST PERFORMANCE ............................................................................ 2-2
C. SUMMARY OF 2010 HUD RESOURCES ............................................................................. 2-4
D. SUMMARY OF PRIORITY NEEDS, GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND ACTIVITIES ............................... 2-5
Summary of Priority Needs and Objectives ................................................................. 2-6
Priority Consolidated Plan Activities ............................................................................ 2-7
E. GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION ........................................................................................... 2-8
F. SUMMARY OF CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PROCESS .............................................................. 2-8

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 2-1
Section 2: Executive Summary
A. INTRODUCTION

The City of Newark is required to prepare a five-year Consolidated Plan to receive federal
funds from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The Consolidated
Plan combines, in one report, important information about Newark demographics and economic
activity as well as detailed information on the housing and community needs of its residents.
The plan outlines the City’s goals and objectives for the ensuing five-year period and the
strategies the City will implement to achieve these goals and objectives. The plan also
incorporates comments from the public received during public hearings, stakeholders meetings,
and in writing.

For each succeeding year, the City of Newark is required to prepare an Annual Action Plan to
inform citizens and HUD of the City’s intended actions during that particular year. The Action
Plan details how the City will allocate its resources to fund projects and services consistent with
its annual goals and objectives, which are a subset of the Consolidated Plan goals and
objectives.

The Action Plan is developed in accordance with HUD guidelines and serves as the application
for the following four annual grant programs:

 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG);


 HOME Investment Partnerships (HOME);
 Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG); and
 Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA).

At the end of each program year, the City must prepare a Consolidated Annual Performance
and Evaluation Report (CAPER) to provide information to HUD and citizens about that year’s
accomplishments towards achieving the goals and objectives identified for that year. This
information allows HUD, city officials, and the public to evaluate the City’s performance and
determine whether the activities undertaken during the program year helped to achieve the
City’s goals, objectives, and strategies to address priority needs identified in the Consolidated
Plan. Overall, the CAPER reflects the City’s progress toward meeting the needs, strategies, and
objectives described and presented in the City’s 2010-2015 Consolidated Plan and the 2010-
2011 Annual Action Plan.

The Office Partnerships and Grants Management (PGM) is the lead City agency responsible for
consolidated planning and reporting on the four formula programs to HUD. PGM is directly
responsible for administration of CDBG and ESG funds. The Department of Child and Family
Well Being (CFWB) is responsible for administration of HOPWA funds. The Department of
Economic and Housing Development (EHD) is responsible for the administration of HOME
funds.

B. EVALUATION OF PAST PERFORMANCE

The City of Newark adopted its previous Consolidated Plan in 2005, at which time the following
priorities were identified:

1. Provision of Neighborhood Services;


2. Provision of Public Services Across a Continuum of Care; and
3. Provision of Economic and Housing Development Services
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 2-2
Section 2: Executive Summary

For program year 2008-2009, the City of Newark received five (5) entitlement grants from HUD
totaling $17,884,235. The City and its community partners used these funds and additional
resources to address these three priorities. The following provides a summary of the City’s
progress towards addressing these three priorities, as identified in the City’s 2008-2009
CAPER.

Provision of Neighborhood Services

During the 2008-2009 program year the City focused its neighborhood services on
demolition/clearance and code enforcement activities. The City’s demolition program focused on
damaged and abandoned housing structures in low- to moderate-income block groups that pose
an imminent risk to health and safety. During the 2008-2009 program year the City demolished
30 properties totaling 39 units. The City’s code enforcement activities worked in concert with
demolition activities to target properties to enforce local and state building codes to improve City
neighborhoods. Four non-profit organizations were also funded to conduct an array of services
to youth, seniors, and the general population of Newark’s NRSA target area. Additionally, three
CBDOs were funded to provide neighborhood services targeted in specific communities of
need. In total, over $1,509,859 in funding was disbursed during the 2008-2009 program year for
neighborhood service objectives.

Provision of Public Services across a Continuum of Care

One of Newark’s Consolidated Plan priorities was to establish a continuum of public services for
its residents. In the 2008-2009 program year, the City prioritized ten (10) key services to
address the priority needs of its residents, including: general services, workforce development,
educational services, ex-offender re-entry, emergency shelter services (ESG), surveillance and
prevention services, environmental health – including lead poisoning services, services and
housing for persons with AIDS (HOPWA), and housing counseling services. Approximately 65
percent of the funds disbursed to address this priority were from the City’s HOPWA program,
providing services to persons with AIDS. In total, eighteen (18) organizations were funded to
provide services to persons with AIDS. In total, over $4,281,957.23 in total HUD funding was
disbursed to sustain a continuum of public services for City residents.

Provision of Economic and Housing Development Services

In the 2008-2009 program year, the City used a variety of activities to address this priority,
including: acquisition, relocation, residential rehabilitation, public facility rehabilitation, new
construction, and downpayment assistance. During the program year the City disbursed
$507,775.91 to facilitate acquisition ($197,255.21) and relocation ($310,520.70) efforts targeting
six (6) project sites to support surrounding development activities. The City’s Neighborhood
Rehabilitation Program (NRP) assisted 44 units with rehabilitation activities totaling
$1,304,949.27, accounting for approximately 50 percent of the City’s efforts towards addressing
this priority. The City also provided downpayment assistance to 35 homebuyers with ADDI
funds during the 2008-2009 program year.

The City of Newark strives to achieve every goal and objective established for its programs.
Given the recent foreclosure, housing, and economic crisis it has become increasingly
challenging to achieve desired accomplishments. The City’s population encompasses a
predominantly low-income population with needs across the spectrum of community, housing,
and economic development categories. The City was hard hit by the foreclosure crisis and as a
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 2-3
Section 2: Executive Summary
result properties were abandoned and left to deteriorate. While housing and other community
development objectives are often the most publicized, providing services to homeless and
special needs populations are just as important. Given the wide-spread needs of City residents
and the physical deterioration of properties, prioritization and targeting of City programs remains
a challenge.

C. SUMMARY OF 2010 HUD RESOURCES

Sources of Funds

HUD Entitlement Funds

For program year 2010-2011, the City of Newark will receive four (4) entitlement grants from
HUD totaling $20,569,064. A brief description of the grants and the City’s allocation for the
2010-2011 program year is as follows:

 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) - $9,359,979 – The primary objective


of the CDBG program is to develop “viable urban communities, by providing decent
housing and suitable living environment and expanding economic opportunities
principally for persons of low and moderate income”. All CDBG projects and activities
must meet one of three national objectives: (1) principally benefit low- and moderate-
income persons; (2) aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or blight; or (3) meet
other urgent community needs. Each approved activity must benefit at least 51 percent
low- and moderate-income families or individuals. At least 70 percent of the City’s total
funds must be used for low- and moderate-income benefit activities.

 HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) - $4,210,862 – The purpose of the


HOME program is to undertake activities that achieve the following: (1) provide decent
affordable housing to lower income households; (2) expand the capacity of nonprofit
housing providers; (3) strengthen the ability of local governments to provide housing;
and (4) leverage private-sector participation. HOME funds can be used for homeowner
rehabilitation, homebuyer activities, rental housing, and tenant-based rental assistance
(TBRA).

 Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) - $6,620,013 – HOPWA


funding provides housing assistance and related supportive services. Grantees are
encouraged to develop community-wide strategies and form partnerships with area
nonprofit organizations. HOPWA funds may be used for a wide range of housing, social
services, program planning, and development costs. These include, but are not limited
to, the acquisition, rehabilitation, or new construction of housing units; costs for facility
operations; rental assistance; and short-term payments to prevent homelessness.
HOPWA funds also may be used for health care and mental health services, chemical
dependency treatment, nutritional services, case management, assistance with daily
living, and other supportive services.

 Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) - $378,210 – The purpose of the ESG program is to
provide funds for the rehabilitation or conversion of buildings for use as emergency
shelters for the homeless, for the payment of certain operating expenses and essential
services in connection with emergency shelters for the homeless, and for homeless
prevention activities.
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 2-4
Section 2: Executive Summary
HUD Stimulus Funds

As a result of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) and American Recovery
Reinvestment Act (ARRA) the City of Newark received direct stimulus funds in 2009 totaling
$9,250,334, as follows:

 Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP1) - $3,406,849 – The Neighborhood


Stabilization Program (NSP) was a formula grant awarded for activities eligible under
division B, title III of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-
289, NSP round 1), to address home foreclosure and abandonment and for the provision
of capacity building and support for NSP grantees. Rating factors will include grantee
capacity to execute projects, leveraging potential, and concentration of investment to
achieve neighborhood stabilization.

 Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP2) - $20,759,155 – The City of Newark in a


consortium agreement with Essex County, the City of East Orange, the City of Irvington,
the City of Montclair, the Township of Orange, Brand New Day, Don Pedro Development
Corporation, Episcopal Community Development Corporation, Housing and
Neighborhood Development Services, HOME Corp, Ironbound Community Corporation,
Make It Right Foundation, Unified Vailsburg Service Organization, and the Community
Loan Fund of New Jersey and in a for-profit partnership with Fairmount Heights
Development Corporation, Michaels Development Corporation, and RPM Development
Corporation has been awarded $20,759,155 in NSP2 funds. Approximately $11 million
of the allocation will be used for Newark area activities. Grantees must expend at least
50 percent of each grant within 2 years and 100 percent within 3 years of the grant
award.

 CDBG-R - $2,310,137 – The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Recovery


program enables local governments to undertake a wide range of activities intended to
create suitable living environments, provide decent affordable housing, and create
economic opportunities, primarily for persons of low and moderate income. The City is
using CDBG-R to perform renovations of lead free safe houses, renovations of Newark
Public Library, and provide Community Based Organizations with funding to support
employment training services.

 Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program (HPRP) – $3,533,348 – The


Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program provides financial assistance
and services to prevent individuals and families from becoming homeless and help those
who are experiencing homelessness to be quickly re-housed and stabilized. The funds
under this program are intended to target individuals and families who would be
homeless but for this assistance. The funds will provide for a variety of assistance,
including: short-term or medium-term rental assistance and housing relocation and
stabilization services, including such activities as mediation, credit counseling, security
or utility deposits, utility payments, moving cost assistance, and case management.

D. SUMMARY OF PRIORITY NEEDS, GOAL, OBJECTIVES, AND ACTIVITIES

Summary of Priority Needs and Objectives

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 2-5
Section 2: Executive Summary
This 2010-2015 Consolidated Plan outlines the current planned uses of CDBG, HOME, ESG,
and HOPWA funds for activities that are consistent with the current priority needs identified and
support identified objectives presented in this document. These activities will support three
overarching goals developed for the 2010-2015 consolidated planning period, including:

1. Jobs for residents;


2. Healthy and safe neighborhoods; and
3. Newark as a City of choice.

The priority needs below have been identified based on the assessment of housing and
homeless needs, housing market analysis, and consultation with stakeholders and partner
agencies. Below is a summary of the priority needs identified through these assessments.

Housing

 Increasing affordable rental housing opportunities for low-income households.


 Providing new affordable homeownership opportunities for low- to moderate-income
households.
 Improving conditions of existing housing.
 Increasing availability of sustainable housing options.
 Providing counseling for first-time homebuyers and current homeowners.

Homeless

 Reducing the number of individuals and families that become homeless.


 Increasing availability of permanent supportive housing options for homeless individuals
and families.
 Supporting operations of existing emergency/transitional homeless facilities.
 Providing essential services to homeless populations.

Special Needs Populations

 Increasing accessibility/availability of affordable housing specifically for persons with


HIV/AIDS.
 Providing new affordable permanent supportive housing for low- to moderate-income
veteran households.
 Increasing availability of permanent housing for special needs populations.
 Providing support services to special needs populations.

Community/Economic Development

 Increasing economic opportunities for low-income residents in Newark.


 Revitalizing and beautifying Newark businesses and storefronts.
 Providing technical assistance to small businesses.
 Establishing social venture programs.
 Providing public services.

To address the priority needs identified above, the City will focus on the following seven (7)
objectives as detailed in the Strategic Plan to work toward the three overarching goals listed
above:
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 2-6
Section 2: Executive Summary

 Objective 1: Increase economic growth and job opportunities through large scale
development projects, social ventures, and job training programs.

 Objective 2: Increase access to quality affordable housing choices.

 Objective 3: Improve the condition of existing neighborhoods through redevelopment


and rehabilitation of residential and commercial properties and public facilities.

 Objective 4: Provide funding for public services to support workforce development,


educational services, child care services, ex-offender social services, and homeowner
foreclosure prevention programs for low-income individuals and families in targeted
neighborhoods.

 Objective 5: Support homeless and at-risk special needs populations with coordinated
support services and housing assistance that focus on prevention and “housing first”
activities.

 Objective 6: Promote and fund targeted developments to help facilitate a living


downtown urban center around key development nodes.

 Objective 7: Make Newark’s Neighborhoods green.

Priority Consolidated Plan Activities

The tables below summarize the proposed eligible HUD-funded program activities the City will
fund to achieve desired objectives and to support identified strategies.

Proposed Activities for Funding


Specific Housing Activities Funding Source(s)
Rental new construction CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Acquisition and rehabilitation CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Rental acquisition CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Acquisition and rehabilitation CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Homeowner rehabilitation/maintenance CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Homebuyer acquisition CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Downpayment and/or closing cost assistance CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Lead-based paint remediation CDBG, HOME, LHRDG
Green building and energy efficiency rehabilitation CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Specific Homeless Activities Funding Source(s)
Short/long-term rental/mortgage and utility assistance HOPWA, HPRP,CDBG
Public facility renovations CDBG, ESG, HOPWA
Case management and coordination services ESG
Essential services ESG
Homeless prevention HPRP, ESG
Housing information and referral services HOPWA
Operations assistance for homeless facilities HOPWA, ESG
Specific Special Needs Subpopulation Activities Funding Source(s)
New construction of special needs housing HOME, CDBG
Acquisition and rehab for special needs housing HOME, CDBG
Downpayment assistance HOME, CDBG
Specific Community Development Activities Funding Source(s)
Property acquisition CDBG, Section 108
Demolition/Clearance CDBG
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 2-7
Section 2: Executive Summary
Site improvements CDBG, Section 108
Public facilities and improvements CDBG
Direct technical assistance to businesses CDBG
Tree planting/Urban agriculture CDBG
Acquisition of real property CDBG, Section 108
Direct financial assistance to for-profit businesses (commercial façade
CDBG
beautification)
Educational services CDBG
Childcare services CDBG
Workforce development/Employment training CDBG
Capacity building CDBG
Surveillance and Prevention CDBG
Housing/Foreclosure counseling CDBG
Senior Services CDBG
Youth Services CDBG

The City of Newark will fund a variety of activities using HUD entitlement funds throughout the
Consolidated Plan period, however not all activities identified above will be funded each year of
the five-year Consolidated Plan.

E. GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION

The City of Newark will continue to direct its resources into the areas with the highest needs.
The City will allocate HUD resources to the areas with the highest needs, including areas of
minority concentration which include the South, Central, lower North, East, and West Wards.
We believe the rational for this geographical distribution is straightforward. While these areas
have received large shares of assistance through HUD programs over the years, the resources
have never been sufficient to meet the demonstrated need. The City will also use the
opportunities and strategies identified in various redevelopment plans to coordinate allocation of
resources across targeted neighborhoods and development nodes.

F. SUMMARY OF CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PROCESS

As required by Consolidated Plan regulations, the City has implemented a Citizen Participation
Plan (CPP) to engage citizens and stakeholders in the consolidated planning process. The CPP
is discussed in detail in Section 3 of the Consolidated Plan. The CPP includes public notice,
community engagement of stakeholders, as well as technical assistance during the drafting and
finalizing of the Consolidated Plan. The City of Newark held two stakeholder focus group
sessions on April 21 and 23 of 2010, where over 40 organizations representing various
communities provided the City with feedback on key priorities and objectives. Additionally, a
public hearing was held on May 14, 2010 whereby citizens were provided an opportunity to
provide feedback on the City’s needs and priorities. Input received during the public hearing
process was incorporated into the plan regarding the priorities, strategies, allocation of
resources and target areas outlined in this Consolidated Plan.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 2-8
Section 3: Managing the Process
TABLE OF CONTENTS
III. MANAGING THE PROCESS............................................................................................. 3-1
A. INTRODUCTION.............................................................................................................. 3-2
B. LEAD AGENCY. .............................................................................................................. 3-2
C. INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURE. .......................................................................................... 3-2
D. COMMUNICATION PLAN AND STRATEGY........................................................................... 3-4
E. CONSULTATION............................................................................................................. 3-8
F. CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PLAN......................................................................................... 3-9
G. APPENDICES............................................................................................................... 3-11

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 3-1
Section 3: Managing the Process
A. INTRODUCTION

This section summarizes the process the City of Newark took in consulting with key agencies,
partners, and the public in preparing this Consolidated Plan and Action Plan submission to
HUD. The description of the management process, the citizen participation plan, institutional
structure and other HUD requirements outlined in this section fulfill or partially fulfill Sections
91.200, 91.215, 91.230 and 91.215 of the Consolidated Plan regulations.

B. LEAD AGENCY

In 2008, the Department of Administration renamed the Bureau of Research, the Office of
Partnerships and Grants Management (PGM). By establishing PGM, the Administration sought
to expand on the functions of the former Bureau of Research with the goal of ultimately
centralizing grants management city-wide. PGM is the lead City agency responsible for
consolidated planning and reporting on the four formula programs to HUD. PGM is directly
responsible for administration of CDBG and ESG funds. The Department of Child and Family
Well Being (CFWB) is responsible for administration of HOPWA funds. The Department of
Economic and Housing Development (EHD) is responsible for the administration of HOME
funds.

C. INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURE

The City of Newark cannot implement its Consolidated Plan without a strong institutional
structure and the closest possible intra- and intergovernmental cooperation. Our institutional
structure is composed of segments of the public sector – local, county and state – as many as
one-hundred nonprofit organizations, and a like number of for-profit companies, developers, and
financial corporations. Major partner organizations are specified below by name.

City Public Agencies

 Department of Administration, Office of the Business Administrator: Overall


policy-making, management and decision-making for all local community development
and planning initiatives; coordination of all HUD programs and requirements that involve
more than one City agency, including Con Plan coordination; and IDIS administration.

 Department of Administration, Office of Management and Budget: Fiscal planning


for all community development activities; and coordination of HUD programs with other
federal and state aid and City operating budget.

 Department of Administration, Office of Partnerships and Grants Management:


Lead City agency responsible for consolidated planning and reporting on the four
formula programs to HUD; and development and coordination of CDBG and ESG.

 Department of Finance: Financing of all community development activities, including


bonding programs; grant accounting; grant accounts payable; and internal auditing of
grants.

 Department of Economic and Housing Development (EHD), Office of the Director:


Planning and management of all City housing and economic development initiatives in

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 3-2
Section 3: Managing the Process
accordance with policies of the City administration; and all regulatory aspects of land
use and real property, through the Boards of Adjustment and Zoning, Central Planning,
and Rent Control.

 Department of Economic and Housing Development, Division of Housing and


Real Estate: Design, planning and implementation of all assisted housing programs,
under the supervision of the Director's Office; development of "mainstream" housing
elements of the Con Plan; and planning and implementation, under the Director's Of-
fice, of all housing and economic redevelopment activities, i.e., real property acquisition
and relocation of families and businesses, management, and disposal of City-owned
properties.

 Brick City Development Corporation: City’s primary economic development catalyst


that retains, attracts, and grows businesses; enhances small and minority business
capacity; spurs real estate development within Newark; and initiates and executes
economic development activities to produce and sustain economic growth, generate
jobs, and create wealth for the citizens of Newark.

 Department of Child and Family Well-Being: Design, planning and implementation


of all special needs housing programs, involving City and Essex County welfare
recipients, people with AIDS, the elderly, and the homeless; development of special
needs housing elements of the Con Plan; and development and coordination of Newark
and EMA HOPWA.

 Department of Neighborhood and Recreational Services, Division of Inspections


and Enforcement: Residential and commercial property code enforcement.

 Department of Neighborhood and Recreational Services, Division of Demolition


and Clearance: Emergency demolitions; and clearance of properties.

Newark Housing Authority

NHA, the City's public housing authority, is responsible for the development and operation of
more than 8,000 dwelling units for very- and extremely low-income Newark residents. NHA
works in close cooperation with the City to plan, design, develop and operate public housing.

Newark State Board of Education

The Board coordinates and cooperates with the Newark administration and NHA in the
planning, design, and development of facilities.

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)

UMDNJ coordinates and cooperates with the above and below-listed institutions in planning,
design and site identification for facilities.

County of Essex

 Department of Economic Development, Training and Employment: Operates


housing grant programs, primarily Balanced Housing and Regional Contribution Agree-
ments; PHA activities in Newark, including Section 8 vouchers; and coordinates its own
Con Plan with those of local entitlement cities.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 3-3
Section 3: Managing the Process
 Department of Health and Human Services: Coordinates and cooperates with regard
to City housing services for special needs populations.

 Essex-Newark Continuum of Care (CoC): Coordinates strategies and activities to


identify and serve homeless populations.

Nonprofit Organizations

Major organizations expected to implement rehabilitation and/or development projects meet


regularly with Department of Economic and Housing Development staff. Often, these meetings
occur through the Newark Community Development Network, an organization whose
constituents include the City’s leading CDCs.

EHD has fostered, encouraged, and established relationships with two major intermediaries in
the housing finance and development industry, the Local Initiative Support Corporation (LISC),
NeighborWorks and the Enterprise Foundation. Through these three intermediaries private
capital is channeled to support investment in affordable housing that is eligible for low income
housing tax credits and other federal and state subsidy programs. The City of Newark, together
with the above referenced intermediaries and nonprofit organizations, works with the New
Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency and the New Jersey Department of Community
Affairs to secure construction financing.

D. COMMUNICATION PLAN AND STRATEGY

The Consolidated Plan combines, in one report, important information about Newark
demographics and economic activity as well as detailed information on the housing and
community needs of its residents. The plan outlines the City’s goals and objectives for the
ensuing five-year period and the strategies the City will implement to achieve these goals and
objectives. The plan also incorporates comments from the public received during public
hearings, stakeholder meetings, and in written responses to published documents.

The City of Newark recognizes the value of citizen involvement and the wealth of information
and resources that the citizens of Newark possess. Equally important, is communication
between key City agencies, divisions, partners, non-profit partners and elected officials. It is
important to increase the City’s understanding of these stakeholder concerns, ideas and values
so that they can be used to inform the City’s decisions, strategies, goals and objectives
identified in the City’s Consolidated Plan. Working toward this effort, the City of Newark has
developed a communication strategy to outline the key messages the City wishes to deliver to
its stakeholders and the planning process by which the City will seek to engage its various
stakeholders. This document outlines the City of Newark’s communication strategy for the
ensuing five-year HUD Consolidated Plan period.

Process Overview

Much of the City’s overall success is shaped by the quality of its communication efforts.
Therefore, a proactive approach is needed to foster effective two-way communication among
stakeholders during the consolidated planning process. The following is an overview of the
City’s proposed communication process and strategy for the ensuing Consolidated Plan period:

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 3-4
Section 3: Managing the Process

STAKEHOLDERS CITY COUNCIL CITIZENS PARTNERS BUSINESSES


____________________________________________________________________________

INFORM MEMORANDUMS  PUBLIC CALENDAR OF EVENTS  MEDIA BRIEFINGS

CONSULT INTERVIEWS  SURVEYS  PUBLIC HEARINGS  RESEARCH

ASSESS REVIEW SURVEY RESULTS  MARKET ANALYSIS  NEEDS ASSESSMENTS

INCORPORATE GOALS/OBJECTIVES  FUNDING STRATEGIES  CONSOLIDATED PLAN

Key Objectives

The key objectives of the City of Newark’s communication strategy and plan are summarized
below:

1. Identify key stakeholders, outline the message to each and state how the message will
be delivered;
2. Reinforce and increase accountability through the communication process;
3. Obtain community buy-in through information sharing, consultation, and education
processes;
4. Provide citizens with complete, accurate, and timely information enabling them to make
informed judgments;
5. Strengthen direct communication between elected officials, City departments, partners,
for-profit businesses, and non-profit community;
6. Support, reinforce, and reflect the goals of the City government as established by the
City Council and the Administration, through a coordinated communication plan; and
7. Establish an inclusive process that builds teamwork and motivates stakeholders to
implement change in their communities.

Below is an overview of the various messages the City would like to communicate to each of its
stakeholders and the ways in which the message will be delivered.

Citizens

Message: The City will create an open, interactive, and inclusive communication strategy that
enhances the principle of community building, interactive government, and community
feedback.

HUD Consolidated Plan regulations require the City to develop a Citizen Participation Plan
(CPP). The purpose of the CPP is to provide citizens of the City of Newark maximum
involvement in identifying and prioritizing housing and community development needs in the City
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 3-5
Section 3: Managing the Process
and responding to how the City intends to address such needs through allocation of HUD
funding. From the onset of the first public hearing, to the distribution of a community-wide
survey and writing of the Consolidated Plan, the needs of the Newark residents must be
carefully considered and reflected during the drafting of the plan.

Method of Delivery:

Phase Method of Delivery


Public Hearing:
• Hold two public hearings during the consolidated planning process, including one
hearing prior to development of the plan.
Calendar of Events:
• Publish a detailed calendar of events on the City’s website outlining schedule of
Inform meetings, hearings, and publications.
Newspapers:
• Publish summaries of the draft Consolidated Plan in local community newspapers
Annual Performance Report.
• Prepare an annual assessment report of the City’s accomplishments for citizen
review and comment.
Community Survey:
• Distribute a mass community survey to solicit feedback from citizens on the City’s
programs, communication efforts, and overall needs of the City.
Consult
Public Comment Period:
• Administer a 30-day comment period for Citizens to comment on the City’s
strategic framework and Consolidated Plan.
Needs Assessment:
Assess • Compile survey and discussion results to establish congruent themes on the
needs of the City.
Citizen Participation Plan:
Incorporate • Incorporate survey and discussion results into improved communication
strategies.

Partner Agencies

Message: The City wants to establish a comprehensive Consolidated Plan strategy that
integrates and addresses the many interrelated housing, community development, economic,
educational, and geographic issues facing the City.

Three key HUD and other federal initiatives necessitate the need for the City to engage its
partner agencies in a comprehensive planning strategy, including: Choice Neighborhoods,
Promise Neighborhoods, and Sustainable Communities. These initiatives will provide
substantial grant opportunities, as well as require comprehensive strategies that engage partner
agencies on multiple levels.

Method of Delivery:

Phase Method of Delivery


Partner Agency Surveys:
• Survey partner agencies on critical needs facing their agencies and methods and
Inform strategies on how the City could better comprehensively work to address issues
with HUD funding.
Save the Date:

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 3-6
Section 3: Managing the Process

• Issue save the date memos to partner agencies on upcoming events or meetings
the City will hold to engage its partners.
Focus Group Sessions:
• Hold monthly focus group sessions to discuss areas of need, strategies on
comprehensive planning, and potential projects that leverage resources of partner
Consult agencies.
Partner Agency Survey:
• Distribute survey to solicit feedback from partners on the City’s programs,
communication efforts, and overall comprehensive needs of the City.
Strategic Planning Sessions:
Assess • Hold strategic planning sessions with partner agencies on goals, objectives, and
opportunities to leverage resources on potential projects and community
objectives for the ensuing Consolidated Plan period.
Focus Projects:
• Establish pipelines of potential projects that leverage resources of partner
agencies (Choice Neighborhoods, Promise Neighborhoods, etc.).
Consolidated Plan:
• Develop distinctive and outcome oriented objectives in a comprehensive
Consolidated Plan.
Choice Neighborhoods Grant Application:
Incorporate
• Leverage focus group discussions to incorporate Choice Neighborhood
requirements and objectives into a comprehensive application and overall choice
neighborhood strategy.
Promise Neighborhoods Grant Application:
• Leverage focus group discussions to incorporate Promise Neighborhood
requirements and objectives into a comprehensive application and overall promise
neighborhood strategy.

For-profit Businesses and Non-profit Community

Message: The City of Newark is modifying its application and RFP award processes that will
focus on outcome oriented objectives, reporting requirements, and performance standards.

Method of Delivery:

Phase Method of Delivery


Non-Profit Focus Group Sessions:
• Hold annual non-profit focus group sessions to engage existing, active, and new
non-profit developers and service providers.
Inform
For-Profit Developer Applications:
• Post housing development application guidelines after development of
Consolidated and Annual Action Plans and hold application workshops.
Stakeholder Focus Groups:
• Conduct stakeholder focus groups to engage the non-profit community during the
consolidated planning process and garner the needs of the City’s residents.
Consult
Survey:
• Distribute a non-profit community survey to solicit feedback from organizations on
the City’s programs, communication efforts, and overall needs.
Needs Assessment:
Assess • Compile survey and breakout session results and feedback and use to establish
congruent themes on the needs of the City.
Incorporate Strategic Framework:

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 3-7
Section 3: Managing the Process

• Develop a strategic framework for the City that incorporates feedback from non-
profit and for-profit organizations.
Project Applications:
• Structure project applications to be consistent with existing development projects
and community services provided by the non-profit and for-profit business
community.

E. CONSULTATION

Newark’s Consolidated Plan is developed through a collaborative process with NHA, CFWB, the
Essex-Newark Continuum of Care, and numerous other City departments. Citizen participation
is another important part of the Consolidated Plan including developing and amending the Plan
as well as commenting on program performance. As part of the Consolidated Planning process,
information on housing and community development needs of Newark citizens was gathered
through stakeholder focus group sessions and surveys, coordination of planning documents,
and public hearings. Upon publishing the draft Plan, Newark allowed a 30-day public comment
period during June 2010 to allow the public time to review and comment on the draft 2010-2015
Consolidated Plan and 2010 Action Plan. During this public comment period, citizens were
encouraged to provide written comments to PGM regarding the City’s draft plans.

Per Consolidated Plan requirements, the City of Newark has specifically consulted with the
following agencies:

 Lead-based Paint – Newark’s Department of Child and Family Well-Being (CFWB) is


the department charged with coordinating the City’s lead-based paint strategy. CFWB is
responsible for the mitigation and prevention of lead-based paint poisoning. As such, the
Division regularly consults with state and local health and child welfare agencies and
examines data on hazards and poisonings. The Division maintains a database with the
addresses of housing units in which children have been identified as lead poisoned.

 Essex-Newark Continuum of Care (CoC) – The City of Newark has adopted the
Essex-Newark CoC approach to addressing the needs of homeless and at-risk
populations. Newark is part of the Essex-Newark CoC and coordinates with Essex
County on strategies and activities to identify and serve homeless populations. The
Essex-Newark CoC addresses the housing and supportive service needs in each stage
of the process to help homeless persons make the transition to permanent housing and
independent living. As identified above, permanent supportive housing is a priority need
in Newark. Newark is committed to providing both housing and support services for
homeless persons in need of permanent housing and working to end incidences of
homelessness in Newark.

 Newark Housing Authority – The City of Newark held two strategic planning sessions
with NHA to discuss goals, objectives, and strategies for the ensuing Consolidated Plan
period. Consistent with this Consolidated Plan, NHA’s housing strategy involves both
physical development and rehabilitation and supportive services. Over the past three
years NHA has made significant progress in revamping its mission, goals, and objectives
and has been removed from HUD’s “troubled status” designation. NHA will be working in
close partnership with EHD on redevelopment and rehabilitation projects to increase the
availability and affordability of housing in Newark.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 3-8
Section 3: Managing the Process
 Non-profit Stakeholders – The City of Newark held two stakeholder focus group
sessions on April 21 and 23 of 2010, where over 40 organizations representing various
communities provided the City with feedback on key priorities and objectives.

F. CITIZEN PARTICIPATION PLAN

Participation

As required by Consolidated Plan regulations, the City has implemented a Citizen Participation
Plan (CPP) to engage citizens and stakeholders in the consolidated planning process. The CPP
includes public notice, community engagement of stakeholders, as well as technical assistance
during the drafting and finalizing of the Consolidated Plan. The City of Newark held two
stakeholder focus group sessions on April 21 and 23 of 2010, where over 40 organizations
representing various communities provided the City with feedback on key priorities and
objectives. Additionally, a public hearing was held on May 14, 2010 where citizens were
provided an opportunity to provide feedback. Input received during the citizen participation
process was incorporated into decision making regarding the priorities, strategies, allocation of
resources and target areas outlined in the Annual Action Plan.

Access to Information

The City provides reasonable and timely access for citizens, public agencies, and other
organizations to access information and records relating to the City’s Consolidated Plan, annual
Action Plan, performance reports, substantial amendment(s), Citizen Participation Plan, and the
City’s use of assistance under the programs covered by the plan during the preceding five
years. The City of Newark announces the availability of planning documents on its website and
specifically regarding Consolidated and Annual Action Plans, in the Star Ledger and El Coqui
newspapers. Additionally, the City makes copies of plans available for review at City Hall.

The City of Newark’s web page is http://www.ci.newark.nj.us/ for citizens interested in obtaining
more information about city services and programs or to review the plans and performance
reports.

Public Hearings and Public Comments

Consolidated Plan regulations require grantees to provide a minimum of two public hearings per
year, at a minimum of two different stages of the program year, to obtain citizen’s views and to
respond to comments and questions.

Consolidated/Annual Action Plan

A two-week public notice is given prior to publishing the draft Consolidated Plan/Annual Action
Plan. This year, notice was given on April 29th and on May 6th, advertising the public hearing
held on May 14, 2010. The City will advertise public hearings for at least two consecutive weeks
and in multiple newspapers when possible. The City’s primary newspapers for advertising public
hearings are the Star Ledger and El Coqui. The public notices will include a brief summary
explaining the content of the draft plan and announce when the plan will be available for
comment. A thirty-day public comment period will be provided to receive, review, and
incorporate comments from the public into the final Consolidated Plan/Annual Action Plan.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 3-9
Section 3: Managing the Process
Comments on Draft Plans:

The City announced the draft 2010-2015 Consolidated Plan and 2010-2011 Annual
Action Plan available for public comment on May 28, 2010. The comment period ended
on June 28, 2010. No comments were received from the public in writing by the end of
the thirty-day comment period.

Annual Performance Reports

The second public hearing will be held prior to drafting of the City’s annual performance report
(CAPER). A two-week notice will be given for the public hearing on the annual performance
report. A fifteen-day public comment period will be provided to receive, review, and incorporate
comments from the public into the final CAPER.

Substantial Amendments

Any substantial amendment to the Consolidated Plan or Annual Action plan requires a fifteen-
day public comment period. The City defines a substantial amendment to the Consolidated Plan
or Annual Action Plan as any changes in the use of CDBG funds from one eligible activity to
another. Reallocating funds amongst identified activities will not constitute a substantial
amendment.

Complaints

The public may provide comments and complaints related to any HUD program. Written public
comments and complaints can be mailed to PGM at 920 Broad Street, Room B-16, Newark,
New Jersey 07102.

Written complaints must clearly state the complainant’s name, address, and zip code. A daytime
phone number or email should also be included in the event further information or clarification is
needed. PGM will provide a timely, substantive written response to every written complaint,
within 15 days of receipt.

Technical Assistance

The City can provide technical assistance to groups, representative of the target neighborhoods,
or other low-income areas that request such assistance for the preparation of funding proposals
to the greatest extent possible. Technical assistance may consist of workshops, one on-one
assistance, or information and referral. When the City initiates a request for proposals, technical
assistance is available during the pre-application phase to ensure all organizations are aware of
the opportunities and limits of the funding source. The City’s provision of technical assistance
does not include the preparation of grant applications for individuals or organizations. The City’s
provision of technical assistance can be limited by funds and staff availability.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 3-10
Section 3: Managing the Process
G. APPENDICES

Appendix A – Public Hearing Notices

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 3-11
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis

TABLE OF CONENTS
IV. HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS....................................................................................... 4-1
A. INTORDUCTION .............................................................................................................. 4-2
B. DEMOGRAPHIC AN DEMPLOYMENT ANALYSIS .................................................................. 4-2
C. HOUSING VALUE AND COST BURDEN ANALYSIS .............................................................. 4-5
D. HOUSING SUPPLY ANALYSIS .......................................................................................... 4-7
E. PUBLIC HOUSING ........................................................................................................ 4-12
F. ASSISTED HOUSING .................................................................................................... 4-12
G. FORECLOSURES ......................................................................................................... 4-12
H. VACANT AND ABANDNONED BUILDINGS ....................................................................... 4-14
I. SPECIAL NEEDS HOUSING ........................................................................................... 4-15
J. HOUSING DEMAND ANALYSIS ....................................................................................... 4-15

Figure 1: City of Newark Zip Codes

Table 1: City of Newark Household Trends


Table 2: Distribution of Household by Income
Table 3: Household Growth Trends by Zip Code
Table 4: Employment and Earnings by Occupant
Table 5: City of Newark Housing Characteristics
Table 6: City of Newark Housing Cost Burden by Household Type
Table 7: City of Newark Housing Cost Burden by Household Income
Table 8: Year Housing Unit Built, City of Newark
Table 9: Number of Units in Housing Structures in the City of Newark, 2009
Table 10: City of Newark Affordable Housing Inventory
Table 11: City of Newark Foreclosure Rates for February 2009 – January 2010
Table 12: Special Needs Households
Table 13: Homeless Special Needs Sub-Populations
Table 14: City of Newark Residential Housing Demand in 2010
Chart 1: City of Newark Permit Trends 2008-2009
Chart 2: Newark Rental Submarket Total Inventory and Vacancy Rate
Chart 3: Newark Rental Submarket Average Asking and Effective Rents
Chart 4: City of Newark Home Sale Price Trends in 2009
Chart 5: Unsold Inventory and Months of Supply in 2009
Chart 6: Contract Sales January 2009-January 2010
Chart 7: City of Newark Foreclosures by Zip Code – Feb. 2009 – Jan. 2010
Chart 8: Distribution of Newark Foreclosures by Zip Code in January 2010
Chart 9: Newark Foreclosures and Average Sales Price

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-1
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
A. INTRODUCTION

The City of Newark has experienced little household or population growth in recent years, with
growth projected to continue at a rate of 0.3 percent annually over the next five years.
Household incomes in the City of Newark are significantly lower than those in the rest of Essex
County and the Newark Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). The median family income in the
City of Newark was $38,700 in 2008 1, compared to a median income in the Newark MSA of
$106,700 2. Despite Newark’s lower household incomes and an unemployment rate of 13
percent 3, the City has still experienced substantial housing market pressure since 2000. As
growth in housing values has outpaced income growth, a crisis of housing affordability has
become pervasive throughout the City.

B. DEMOGRAPHIC AND EMPLOYMENT ANALYSIS

The City of Newark is the largest city in the State of New Jersey, with an estimated population of
282,058 in 2009. The City encompasses nine zip codes and is located within Essex County.
Overall Newark is composed of 52 percent African American households, 15 percent
White/Non-Hispanic/Latino households, and 13 percent White Hispanic/Latino households. The
trends within each of the City’s zip codes are similar to the trends for the City as a whole, except
for zip code 07105, located in the east part of downtown along the riverfront, which has 55
percent White Non-Hispanic/Latino Households and 4 percent African American households.
The greatest concentration of Hispanic/Latino households is located in zip code 07104, with
07105 and 07107 also having Hispanic/Latino concentrations over 15 percent. The African
American population is represented in significant concentrations in all the zip codes except
07105. In zip codes 07112, 07108, and 07106, African Americans make up over 75 percent of
the households.

Figure 1. City of Newark Zip Codes

1 Source: American Community Survey, U.S. Census Bureau (median income for family of four)
2 Source: Claritas
3 Source: City of Newark Re-Examination Report, 2009

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-2
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
The City of Newark has seen average annual household growth of 0.4 percent per year and
average annual population growth of 0.3 percent per year between 2000 and 2009, a trend that
is projected to continue through 2014. The median household income within the City of Newark
has increased by $664 per year since 2009, to $33,300 in 2009. The household income in the
City is projected to increase to $36,898 in 2014 at a rate of 0.3 percent per year, which is well
below inflation. Table 1, below, demonstrates the household trends for the City of Newark.

Table 1. City of Newark Household Trends


City of Newark
2000 2009 2014
CENSUS ESTIMATE PROJECTION
Population 273,546 282,058 286,541
Average Annual Change - 946 897
Compounded Annual Growth Rate - 0.3% 0.3%
Households 91,382 94,494 96,073
Average Annual Change - 346 316
Compounded Annual Growth Rate - 0.4% 0.3%
Median Income $27,323 $33,300 $36,898
Average Annual Change - $664 $720
Compounded Annual Growth Rate - 2.2% 2.1%
Household Size 2.85 2.85 2.85
Compounded Annual Growth Rate - 0.0% 0.0%

The median family income for the City of Newark in 2008 was $38,700, reflecting only a slight
increase over the median income for all households. This presents a sharp contrast to the area
median income (AMI) of the Newark Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) of $106,700. An
analysis of the distribution of households by income, based on the median family income for the
City of Newark, reveals that a third of the City’s households earn less than 50 percent of the
AMI. Similarly, this analysis indicates that almost 70 percent of households earn less than 50
percent of the AMI for the metro region. This household distribution is shown in Table 2 below.

Table 2. Distribution of Households by Income

30% of AMI/MFI or Above 80% of


CITY OF NEWARK INCOME DISTRIBUTION Less 30-50% of AMI/MFI 50%-80% of AMI/MFI AMI/MFI Total

Income Distribution Based on: 19,852 11,263 13,563 49,816 94,494


Median Family Income for the City of Newark of $38,700
% Income Distribution 21% 12% 14% 53% 100%

Income Distribution Based on: 45,835 18,436 15,978 14,245 94,494


AMI for the Newark MSA of $106,700
% Income Distribution 49% 20% 17% 15% 100%

Within the City of Newark, the lowest median household incomes at the zip code level are
$15,900 in zip code 07102 (Downtown Newark along the riverfront) and $19,400 in zip code
07114, indicating that those two zip codes have the highest poverty levels in the City. The
highest median incomes in Newark are $42,600 in zip code 07105 (East part of downtown
Newark along the riverfront), $38,800 in zip code 07106, and just over $35,000 in zip codes
07104 and 07112. The breakdown of households, household income, and race for each zip
code is shown in Table 3 below.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-3
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
Table 3. Household Growth Trends by Zip Code
ZIP CODE HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION BY RACE

Median % White (Non % White


City of Newark Zip Codes
Household Hispanic/ (Hispanic/ % African
Households Income Latino) Latino) American % Other

07102 4,311 $15,858 8% 8% 64% 17%


07103 10,925 $28,571 2% 5% 83% 8%
07104 17,277 $35,707 11% 31% 26% 29%
07105 16,036 $42,643 55% 16% 4% 24%
07106 11,310 $38,805 9% 3% 79% 6%
07107 12,589 $31,602 12% 16% 38% 31%
07108 8,635 $24,107 1% 3% 89% 7%
07112 9,754 $35,384 1% 1% 93% 5%
07114 3,580 $19,424 8% 12% 49% 30%

City of Newark - Total 94,417 $33,347 15% 13% 52% 18%

The average annual earnings for all employment within the City of Newark are $28,300. The
majority of employment within Newark falls into the industry categories of Service occupations
(25 percent of employment), Production, Transportation, and Material Moving (19 percent),
Office and Administrative Support (14 percent), and Construction, Extraction, Maintenance, and
Repair occupations (12 percent). The median annual incomes for each of these industry sectors
range from $22,000 to $29,000. Some of the higher paying occupations, such as Management
and Business and Financial Services, have median annual earnings of around $50,000, but they
make up only a small portion of Newark’s employment, as shown on Table 4 below.

Table 4. Employment and Earnings by Occupation


% of Total Median Annual
Total Employees
Employees Earnings
Management Occupations 5,535 5% $50,033
Business and Financial Operations Occupations 2,458 2% $51,229
Computer and Mathematical Occupations 928 1% $47,377
Architecture and Engineering Occupations 939 1% $46,085
Life, Physical, and Social Science Occupations 455 0% $28,401
Community and Social Services Occupations 2,321 2% $41,597
Legal Occupations 657 1% $29,697
Education, Training, and Library Occupations 5,629 5% $31,438
Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations 811 1% $48,252
Healthcare Practitioner and Technical Occupations: 2,765 3% $42,140
Service Occupations: 27,684 25% $22,017
Sales and Related Occupations 9,715 9% $21,691
Office and Administrative Support Occupations 15,672 14% $29,008
Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations 0 0% N/A
Construction, Extraction, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations: 13,016 12% $26,691
Production, Transportation, and Material Moving Occupations: 20,952 19% $28,661

Total 109,537 100% $28,282

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-4
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
C. HOUSING VALUE AND COST BURDEN ANALYSIS

An analysis of the trends in housing values reveals significant growth in values since 2000. That
coupled with the increasing housing market pressure further continues to constrain housing
affordability in the City of Newark. The median housing value within Newark was $132,800 in
2000 and grew to an average of $305,400 during the 3-year period between 2006 and 2008.
This growth of 130 percent in a 6-8 year period reflects the rapid housing market increase
during the boom period of the last market cycle. The 2009 estimate for housing values is
$268,900, is a 12 percent decline in value from the 2006 to 2008 average which represented the
peak of the latest housing market cycle. Despite this correction in the housing market, owner-
occupied housing continues to be affordable to only a small segment of Newark’s households.

Housing values within the Newark zip codes range from $204,800 in zip code 07103 to
$402,800 in zip code 07105. Located on the east portion of downtown along the river, zip code
07105 has the highest median household income and the highest median housing value. In this
zip code the median housing value was 9.5 times the median income in 2009, compared to an
industry standard of housing values approximately 3 times household incomes. Throughout the
rest of Newark’s zip codes, this ratio of median housing value to median household income
ranges from 6.3 to 17.0, with an average of 9.7 in 2009. These ratios were substantially lower in
2000 with an average of 4.7 for the City of Newark. The change in these ratios between 2000
and 2009 indicates that housing value has significantly outpaced income growth, increasing the
housing cost burden for households occupying for-sale units and likely contributing to, in some
neighborhoods, high foreclosure rates.

Consistent with these trends, the local housing market is made up primarily of rental housing
stock, as the majority of households are priced out of the for-sale market. In 2009, 76 percent of
households are renters and 24 percent are home-owners. The portion of renter households in
each zip code ranges within Newark’s zip codes from 66 percent in zip code 07106 to 92
percent in zip code 07102, consistently reflecting a majority of renters in the market.

Table 5. City of Newark Housing Characteristics

Median Median Housing Median % Change in


City of Newark Zip Codes Housing Value Value 2006-2008 Housing Value Value:
2000 Avg. 2009 2000 - 2009 % Renter

07102 $138,710 N/A $269,928 95% 92%


07103 $98,264 N/A $204,792 108% 77%
07104 $146,751 N/A $297,382 103% 78%
07105 $187,721 N/A $402,117 114% 74%
07106 $124,007 N/A $243,009 96% 66%
07107 $137,075 N/A $282,563 106% 76%
07108 $99,015 N/A $216,267 118% 80%
07112 $124,476 N/A $248,894 100% 71%
07114 $123,056 N/A $269,928 119% 86%

City of Newark Total $132,825 $305,400 $268,910 102% 76%

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-5
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
An analysis of 2008 Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) data confirms that
there is a persistent housing affordability problem in Newark. Table 6 lists the percentage of
households spending between 30 to 50 percent and over 50 percent of their income on housing
and breaks them out by family type and tenure. Consistently across all family types, 55 percent
of households spend more than 30 percent of their household income on housing each year,
and 31 percent of households spend more than 50 percent of their household income on
housing each year. Consistent with the housing value trends observed between 2000 and 2009,
the CHAS data reveals that owners experience a more significant cost burden, with 36 percent
of owner households spending more than 50 percent of their income on housing, compared to
26 percent of renters. Households that are headed by elderly homeowners experience the
greatest housing cost burden, particularly those households that are made up of non-related
members.

The persistence of the recent foreclosure crisis and rising housing values, coupled with high
unemployment rates and continued vulnerability within the job market makes this cost burden
particularly alarming. Based on this analysis, a significant portion of Newark’s households
represent an “at-risk” population, particularly those households currently paying over 50 percent
of their income on housing.

Table 6. City of Newark Housing Cost Burden by Household Type


% of Income Spent on Housing
Owner Household Type Less than 30% 30%-50% Greater than 50%
Total
Large family 48% 27% 25% 100%
Non-Family Household, Elderly 18% 31% 51% 100%
Non-Family Household, Not Elderly 33% 21% 46% 100%
Small Family, Elderly 46% 24% 31% 100%
Small Family, Not Elderly 51% 24% 25% 100%

% of Income Spent on Housing


Renter Household Type Less than 30% 30%-50% Greater than 50%
Total
Large family 58% 23% 19% 100%
Non-Family Household, Elderly 48% 28% 25% 100%
Non-Family Household, Not Elderly 49% 23% 28% 100%
Small Family, Elderly 46% 21% 33% 100%
Small Family, Not Elderly 52% 24% 24% 100%

Table 7 on the following page demonstrates that this cost burden is experienced primarily by
lower income households, for both renter and owner households. Not surprisingly, 97 percent of
owner households earning less than 30 percent of AMI spend more than 30 percent of their
income on housing, and 90 percent of households earning 30 to 50 percent of AMI spend more
than 30 percent of their income on housing. Each of these groups represents a significant
portion of the City of Newark’s households.Table 7. City of Newark Housing Cost Burden by
Household Income

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-6
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
% of Income Spent on Housing

OWNER Less than Greater than


30% -50%
HOUSEHOLDS 30% 50%
Total
30% AMI or less 3% 10% 87% 100%
30.1-50% AMI 10% 31% 59% 99%
50.1-80% AMI 29% 33% 38% 100%
80% AMI and Above 69% 23% 8% 100%

% of Income Spent on Housing

RENTER Less than Greater than


30% -50%
HOUSEHOLDS 30% 50%
Total
30% AMI or less 25% 19% 56% 100%
30.1-50% AMI 33% 51% 16% 100%
50.1-80% AMI 75% 24% 1% 100%
80% AMI and Above 57% 21% 22% 100%

D. HOUSING SUPPLY ANALYSIS

An analysis of permitting trends, as displayed in Chart 1, reveals little activity within the single
family housing market since mid 2008, most likely all of which are for-sale units. This reflects the
recent housing market crisis and the higher proportion of renters to owners within Newark.
Multifamily permitting activity has been sporadic, with a few spikes in permitting in early 2009.
This lack of permitting activity indicates that there will be minimal housing construction within
Newark over the next few years, except for a few small to mid-size rental communities.

Chart 1. City of Newark Permit Trends 2008-2009


90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

Single Family Units Total Multifamily

___________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-7
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
The majority of Newark’s housing units, 68 percent, were built before 1970, 19 percent were
built between 1970 and 1990, and 13 percent of housing units have been built since 2000. The
increase in new housing units built after 1999, compared to the prior ten year period, reflects the
housing market growth that has put pressure on housing affordability. Table 8, below,
summarizes the year that Newark’s residential housing units were built for the City overall and
for each zip code. Zip code 07103 experienced the most growth since 2000, with 21 percent of
housing units built in that time period. Zip codes 07102 and 07106 have had the fewest new
units built since 2000, with their housing stock more heavily weighted toward older housing
units.

Table 8. Year Housing Unit Built, City of Newark


YEAR HOUSING UNITS BUILT

City of Newark Zip Codes % Built After % Built 1990- % Built 1970- % Built 1950- % Built Before
1999 1999 1989 1969 1950

07102 6% 2% 32% 35% 24%


07103 21% 10% 19% 20% 30%
07104 14% 5% 15% 27% 39%
07105 12% 9% 12% 23% 45%
07106 8% 1% 9% 38% 44%
07107 13% 4% 12% 33% 38%
07108 11% 4% 18% 26% 41%
07112 13% 2% 8% 29% 48%
07114 14% 5% 13% 39% 29%

City of Newark Total 13% 5% 14% 29% 39%

The dominance of multi-family units in the permitting trends and in the existing housing stock is
similarly reflected in Table 9, which reveals that single family detached homes only account for
11 percent of Newark’s total housing stock.

Table 9. Number of Units in Housing Structures in the City of Newark, 2009


NUMBER OF UNITS IN STRUCTURE

City of Newark Zip Codes


1 Unit Detached 1-Unit Attached Multifamily - 2 Multifamily - 3- Multifamily - 20- Multifamily -
- Single Family - Townhome Units 19 Units 49 Units Over 50 Units

07102 3% 3% 4% 32% 10% 49%


07103 8% 14% 14% 46% 2% 15%
07104 13% 6% 16% 36% 9% 19%
07105 7% 3% 28% 58% 2% 1%
07106 21% 2% 19% 36% 2% 20%
07107 10% 6% 20% 40% 6% 16%
07108 10% 8% 12% 49% 7% 14%
07112 13% 1% 18% 42% 11% 14%

07114 7% 6% 11% 44% 8% 24%

City of Newark - Total 11% 6% 18% 43% 6% 16%


____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-8
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
As part of the housing supply analysis, an evaluation was conducted of the trends in the Newark
rental submarket. The Newark rental submarket boundaries extend beyond Essex County, but
the City of Newark drives the submarket trends as it contains most of the rental properties in the
submarket. There has been little change in the overall inventory of rental units within the
submarket between 2005 and 2009, although the vacancy rate has increased from 3.5 percent
in the first quarter of 2005 to 8 percent in the fourth quarter of 2009. While this is still within the
range of a healthy vacancy rate for a submarket, it is on the declining edge of the healthy range.
The trends in the total inventory of rental units and the submarket vacancy rate are shown
below in Chart 2.

Chart 2. Newark Rental Submarket Total Inventory and Vacancy Rate


45,000 10.0%
9.5%
9.0%
40,000 8.5%
8.0%
7.5%
35,000 7.0%
6.5%
6.0%
30,000
5.5%
5.0%
4.5%
25,000
4.0%
3.5%

20,000 3.0%
2.5%
2.0%
15,000 1.5%
1.0%
0.5%
10,000 0.0%
2005 2005 2005 2005 2006 2006 2006 2006 2007 2007 2007 2007 2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2009 2009 2009
1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q

Inventory of Units in Submarket Vacancy Rate

The average effective rental rate in Newark is $848 per month, which is affordable to a one
person household earning 55 percent of the Newark MSA’s AMI, a 2-person household earning
48 percent of the MSA AMI, or a 3-person household earning 43 percent of the MSA AMI. The
average effective rent for the Newark submarket has increased since 2005, with a slight decline
in rates in 2009. The gap between effective and asking rents has increased slightly throughout
2009, indicating that the amount of concessions being offered is increasing, which is likely due
to the increasing vacancies across the submarket.

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-9
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
Chart 3. Newark Rental Submarket Average Asking and Effective Rents
$1,000

$950

$900

$850

$800

$750

$700
2005 2005 2005 2005 2006 2006 2006 2006 2007 2007 2007 2007 2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2009 2009 2009
1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q
Asking Rents Effective Rent

Newark’s for-sale housing supply has not experienced as much permitting activity over the past
few years, but the change in housing values has had a significant impact on the local housing
market. As discussed in the analysis of housing value trends in the housing cost burden section
of this report, increases in home values between 2000 and the peak of the market from 2006 to
2008 further exacerbated the housing cost burden felt by the majority of Newark households.
Home values have declined slightly as the market has corrected, but they remain high relative to
household incomes. Chart 4 depicts the sale price trends for for-sale housing units throughout
2009 and compares the average for all of Newark’s sales with the sales of foreclosed homes.

Chart 4. City of Newark Home Sale Price Trends in 2009

In the fourth quarter of 2007, Newark’s unsold for-sale housing inventory was at a peak of
around 22 months of supply, with about 505 unsold units existing in the marketplace. Since this
peak, the inventory has declined and the market has slowly absorbed this excess of units. The
unsold inventory count was 400 in the fourth quarter of 2009, and the months of supply in the
market declined to 15. This is a positive trend, as a healthy market typically has around 12
months of supply in the pipeline.

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-10
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
Chart 5. Unsold Inventory and Months of Supply in 2009
550.0 25.0

530.0

510.0 20.0

490.0

470.0 15.0

450.0

430.0 10.0

410.0

390.0 5.0

370.0

350.0 -
4Q 2006 4Q 2007 4Q 2008 4Q 2009

Unsold Inventory Months Supply

There was an average of approximately 30 contract sales per month in the City of Newark
throughout 2009, as seen in Chart 6 below, with a slight decline towards the end of 2009 to a
total of 21 sales in the month of January 2010.

Chart 6. Contract Sales January 2009 – January 2010


60

55

50

45

40

35

30

25

20

15

10
Jan-09 Feb-09 Mar-09 Apr-09 May-09 Jun-09 Jul-09 Aug-09 Sep-09 Oct-09 Nov-09 Dec-09 Jan-10

Contract Sales Seller:Buyer Ratio

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-11
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
Despite these recent market corrections, home values remain high in relation to household
incomes in Newark, and future market correction will likely do little to narrow this gap
significantly. In conjunction with fairly stagnant income growth and persistent unemployment,
the presence of affordable housing will continue to be a key component in meeting the housing
demand for Newark’s residents.

E. PUBLIC HOUSING

Newark’s existing affordable housing is primarily rental housing stock. The affordable rental
properties include properties managed by the Newark Housing Authority and other rental
properties managed by private owners. Exhibit 28A in the appendix contains the inventory of the
Newark Housing Authority units, broken down by type of unit. Of the 6,230 public affordable
housing managed by the Newark Housing Authority, 2,585 units (or 44 percent) are oriented
towards senior renters, 3,276 are family rental units, and 369 are units redeveloped through the
Hope VI program. Due to the housing cost burden on seniors identified earlier in this report, the
presence of affordable rental housing oriented towards seniors is an important resource in
addressing the housing cost burden.

F. ASSISTED HOUSING

In addition to the affordable public rental housing discussed above, there is also a significant
presence of assisted affordable housing offered by the private and non-profit sector. Table 10,
below, summarizes the breakdown of Newark’s affordable housing into Housing Authority
properties, private affordable rental properties, and for-sale affordable units. Exhibit 28B in the
appendix contains the complete inventory of the 7,342 assisted affordable rental properties, of
which 1,178 are senior units. There are currently 41 for-sale affordable units in Newark, which
are listed in the appendix on Exhibit 29.

Table 10. City of Newark Affordable Housing Inventory


Inventory of City of Newark Affordable Housing - 2010 Total Units
Newark Housing Authority Properties 6,230
Private Affordable Rental Properties 7,342
Total Affordable Rental Units 13,572

For-Sale Affordable Units 41

G. FORECLOSURES

There was an increase in foreclosures within the City of Newark throughout the second half of
2009, with small declines in September and November of 2009 and January of 2010. Newark hit
a peak of 516 foreclosures in the month of December 2009, although the number of
foreclosures dropped in January 2010 to 319 foreclosures. The distribution of foreclosures by
zip code within Newark has remained fairly consistent throughout 2009 and into January 2010,
as demonstrated in Charts 7 and 8 on the following page.
____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-12
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
Chart 7. City of Newark Foreclosures by Zip Code – February 2009 through January 2010
550

500

450

400

350

300

250

200

150

100

50

0
Feb-09 Mar-09 Apr-09 May-09 Jun-09 Jul-09 Aug-09 Sep-09 Oct-09 Nov-09 Dec-09 Jan-10
Zip 07107 Zip 07106 Zip 07103 Zip 07104 Zip 07108 Zip 07112 Zip 07102 Zip 07114 Zip 07105

Chart 8. Distribution of Newark Foreclosures by Zip Code in January 2010


Distribution of Newark Foreclosures in January 2010

8%
3% 4% 17%

10%

17%

12%

14%
15%

Zip 07106 Zip 07107 Zip 07103 Zip 07104 Zip 07108

Zip 07112 Zip 07102 Zip 07114 Zip 07105

In January 2010, zip codes 07106 and 07107 both had the highest portion of Newark’s
foreclosures, each representing 17 percent of the City’s total foreclosures. The foreclosure rates
for these zip codes over the 12 months from February 2009 through January 2010 are 15
percent and 21 percent, respectively. As shown in Table 11, the 12-month foreclosure rate
across Newark’s zip codes range from 10 to 50 percent, with a total of 19 percent for the City as
a whole. The average foreclosure rate for the three zip codes that make up over 50 percent of
Newark’s owner-occupied housing supply (zip codes 07105, 07106, and 07104) is 17 percent.
These unhealthy foreclosure rates are indicative of the housing market crisis that created a
home value appreciation that is not matched by income growth among Newark’s households.

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-13
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
Table 11. City of Newark Foreclosure Rates for February 2009-January 2010

12-Month Total % of City's Owner-


Zip Code Foreclosure Rate Occupied Units
07105 10% 18%
07106 15% 17%
07104 17% 17%
07107 21% 13%
07112 19% 12%
07103 24% 11%
07108 32% 8%
07114 40% 2%
07102 18% 2%
City of
Newark Total 19% 100%

As foreclosures increased throughout 2009, the average sales price for for-sale homes in
Newark declined from around $300,000 to just over $200,000. While the surplus of homes on
the market had a negative impact on sales price, the observed trend of a decline in the total
inventory of unsold units indicates that the market is experiencing a correction as excess supply
decreases.

Chart 9. Newark Foreclosures and Average Sales Price


550 $350,000

500
$300,000
450

400 $250,000

350
$200,000
300

250
$150,000

200

$100,000
150

100
$50,000

50

0 $0
Feb-09 Mar-09 Apr-09 May-09 Jun-09 Jul-09 Aug-09 Sep-09 Oct-09 Nov-09 Dec-09

Newark Foreclosures Newark Average Sales Price

H. VACANT AND ABANDONED BUILDINGS

The presence of vacant and abandoned buildings can lower property values and limit
neighborhood investment. According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development and the U.S. Postal Service, 3.6 percent of Newark’s residential addresses, over

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-14
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
2,500 properties, were vacant or abandoned in the fourth quarter of 2009. Because this number
includes vacant properties, the number of abandoned buildings is only a portion of the total. In
July of 2008 Newark’s Division of Housing Code Enforcement estimated there were 300
abandoned structures, which indicates that the abandoned properties represent a minority of the
2,500 abandoned and vacant properties.

I. SPECIAL NEEDS HOUSING

In addition to cost-burdened low-income households, there are also a number of special-needs


households with unique housing needs. Table 12 summarizes the number of households,
number of persons, and number of youth living in emergency shelter, transitional housing, safe
haven housing, and living unsheltered.

Table 12. Special Needs Households


Emergency Transitional
Household Types Shelter Housing Safe Haven Unsheltered
Households w/Dependent Children
# of Households w/Dependent Children 154 145 0 25
# of Persons (Adults & Children) 426 394 0 54

Households w/out Children


# of Individuals 556 121 0 165

Youth Households
# of Households 0 0 0 0
# of Persons 0 0 0 0

Table 13, below, summarizes the homeless population in Newark by special needs sub-
category and by whether the individuals are currently sheltered or unsheltered.

Table 13. Homeless Special Needs Sub-Populations


Household Types Sheltered Unsheltered

Chronically Homeless 101 28


Severe/Persistant Mental Illness 215 44
Substance Abuse 208 39
HIV/AIDS 146 18
Domestic Violence 56 8
Veterans 32 10
Unaccompanied Youth 0 0

J. HOUSING DEMAND ANALYSIS

The following provides a detailed analysis of for-sale and for-rent housing demand in 2010 for
the City of Newark by income range (for households with incomes at or below 80 percent of
AMI) and by household size. This analysis was based on current household trends and the
distribution of households by income and household size. Table 14 on the following page
summarizes the demand by income, household size, and tenure. The demand analysis was
also based on current trends for turnover within renter and owner households. The renter and
owner demand analyses were conducted separately. The analysis indicates that annually there

___________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-15
Section 4: Housing Market Analysis
is demand for a total of 720 for-sale housing units within the City, due to owner turnover and a
small portion of renters becoming owners. However, the lack of household growth within the
City indicates that this annual turnover will result in little demand for new housing as the current
housing stock is already accommodating the majority of households in turnover. New demand
for for-sale housing units will result from the small amount of projected household growth and
from the need for replacement units as housing ages and becomes obsolete.

There is a significant mismatch between the home prices that households can afford and the
home values within the City of Newark. For example, a 2-person household earning 30 to 50
percent of AMI can afford a home valued between $86,800 and $144,700, and a 2-person
household earning 50 to 80 percent of AMI can afford a for-sale housing unit between $144,700
and $231,600. These affordable home prices are all lower than the City of Newark’s average
home price, and lower than the average for all but two zip codes (07103 and 07108).

There is demand for 3,024 rental units each year, as renter households turn over and as owners
become renters (primarily due to recent foreclosures). This demand is the total annual demand
within the City of Newark, most of which is met by the existing rental stock. This rental demand
is concentrated in households with one person and primarily for households earning less than
30 percent of AMI. The presence of 11,889 affordable rental units in the City is already meeting
some of this rental demand from very-low income households. There is also a large portion of
the rental demand coming from households with 4 or more persons, which translates to larger
rental units with 3 or more bedrooms. Similar to the for-sale demand, the demand for new rental
units will largely be driven by the replacement of obsolete rental units unless Newark’s
household growth is altered significantly from the current projections.

Table 14. City of Newark Residential Housing Demand in 2010


5 or More
1-2 Person 3-4 Person Person
Households Households Households Total

Owner Demand Potential


Households Less than 30% AMI 150 123 71 343
Households 30%-50% AMI 80 61 34 175
Households 50%-80% AMI 99 68 34 201
Total Rental Demand Potential 329 252 139 720

Renter Demand Potential


Households Less than 30% AMI 591 430 555 1,576
Households 30%-50% AMI 290 189 222 702
Households 50%-80% AMI 354 202 190 746
Total Rental Demand Potential 1,235 822 967 3,024

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 4-16
Exhibit 1

ZIP CODE MAP


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
MARCH 2010

City of Newark

Exhibit 1
64-1284.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 2

POPULATION & HOUSEHOLD GROWTH TRENDS


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2000-2014

City of Newark
2000 2009 2014
CENSUS ESTIMATE PROJECTION
Population 273,546 282,058 286,541
Average Annual Change - 946 897
Compounded Annual Growth Rate - 0.3% 0.3%
Households 91,382 94,494 96,073
Average Annual Change - 346 316
Compounded Annual Growth Rate - 0.4% 0.3%
Median Income $27,323 $33,300 $36,898
Average Annual Change - $664 $720
Compounded Annual Growth Rate - 2.2% 2.1%
Household Size 2.85 2.85 2.85
Compounded Annual Growth Rate - 0.0% 0.0%

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau; Claritas, Inc.

Exhibit 2
64-12484.02
Printed:4/19/2010
Exhibit 3

HOUSEHOLD INCOME DISTRIBUTION


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2009

1
Newark MSA City of Newark

AMI for a 4-Person Household $106,667 $38,668

Less than 30% AMI Income Range Less than $32,000 Less than $11,600

30% - 50% AMI Income Range $32,000 - $53,333 $11,600 - $19,300

50% - 80% Income Range $53,333 - $85,333 $19,300 - $30,900

Over 80% AMI Income Range Over $85,333 Over $30,900

30% of AMI/MFI or Above 80% of


CITY OF NEWARK INCOME DISTRIBUTION Less 30-50% of AMI/MFI 50%-80% of AMI/MFI AMI/MFI Total

Income Distribution Based on: 19,852 11,263 13,563 49,816 94,494


Median Family Income for the City of Newark of $38,700
% Income Distribution 21% 12% 14% 53% 100%

Income Distribution Based on: 45,835 18,436 15,978 14,245 94,494


AMI for the Newark MSA of $106,700
% Income Distribution 49% 20% 17% 15% 100%

1 Data reflects 2008 Median Family Income for the City of Newark
Source: US Department of Housing and Urban Development, Claritas

Exhibit 3
64-12484.02
Printed:4/19/2010
Exhibit 4

HOUSEHOLD TRENDS BY ZIP CODE


THE CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2009

ZIP CODE HOUSEHOLD COMPOSITION BY RACE

Median % White (Non % White


City of Newark Zip Codes
Household Hispanic/ (Hispanic/ % African % Pacific % Native
Households Income Latino) Latino) American % Asian Islander American % Other

07102 4,315 $15,858 8% 8% 64% 2% 0% 1% 17%


07103 10,934 $28,571 2% 5% 83% 1% 0% 0% 8%
07104 17,291 $35,707 11% 31% 26% 2% 0% 0% 29%
07105 16,049 $42,643 55% 16% 4% 0% 0% 0% 24%
07106 11,319 $38,805 9% 3% 79% 3% 0% 0% 6%
07107 12,599 $31,602 12% 16% 38% 2% 0% 1% 31%
07108 8,642 $24,107 1% 3% 89% 0% 0% 0% 7%
07112 9,762 $35,384 1% 1% 93% 1% 0% 0% 5%
07114 3,583 $19,424 8% 12% 49% 0% 0% 0% 30%

City of Newark - Total 94,494 $33,347 15% 13% 52% 1% 0% 0% 18%

- The neighborhoods within the City of Newark have a range of median household incomes from $15,800 to $42,600, with a the median household income for the City of Newark of $33,300.

- Overall the City of Newark is composed of 52% African American households Non-Hispanic/Latino
households, 15% White Non Hispanic/Latino households
households, and 13% White Hispanic/Latino households.
households The trends within each of the zip
codes is similar to that of the city overall, except for zip code 07105, which has 55% White Non-Hispanic/Latino households and 4% African American households.

Source: Claritas

Exhibit 4
64-12484.02
Printed:4/19/2010
Exhibit 5

MAP OF MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOMES BY ZIP CODE


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2009

$35,700

$31,600

$38,900 $28,600

$15,900
$42,600
$24,100

$35,400

$19,400

Source: Claritas

Exhibit 5
64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 6

MAP OF MEDIAN HOUSING VALUE BY ZIP CODE


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2009

$297,400

$283,600

$243,000 $204,800

$269,900
$402,100
$216,300

$248,900

$270,000

Source: Claritas

Exhibit 6
64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 7A

CONCENTRATION OF WHITE HOUSEHOLDS BY ZIP CODE


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2009

White Households % of
Zip Code Total

0%-25%

26%-50%

51%-75%

76%-100%

City of Newark Boundaries

Source: Claritas

Exhibit 7A
64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 7B

CONCENTRATION OF HISPANIC/LATINO HOUSEHOLDS BY ZIP CODE


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2009

Hispanic/Latino
Households % of Zip
Code Total

0%-25%

26%-50%

51%-75%

76%-100%

City of Newark Boundaries

Source: Claritas

Exhibit 7B
64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 7C

CONCENTRATION OF AFRICAN AMERICAN HOUSEHOLDS BY ZIP CODE


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2009

African American
Households % of Zip
Code Total

0%-25%

26%-50%

51%-75%

76%-100%

City of Newark Boundaries

Source: Claritas

Exhibit 7C
64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 7D

CONCENTRATION OF HOUSEHOLDS BY RACE


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY ZIP CODES
2009

100%

90%

80%

70%

60%

50%

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%
07102 07103 07104 07105 07106 07107 07108 07112 07114

White Hispanic/Latino AfricanAmerican Other

Source: Claritas

Exhibit 7D
64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 8

HOUSING UNIT TRENDS BY ZIP CODE


THE CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2009

YEAR HOUSING UNITS BUILT


Median Median Housing Median % Change in
City of Newark Zip Codes Housing Value Value 2006-2008 Housing Value Value: % Built After % Built 1990- % Built 1970- % Built 1950- % Built Before
2000 Avg. 2009 2000 - 2009 1999 1999 1989 1969 1950 % Renter

07102 $138,710 N/A $269,928 95% 6% 2% 32% 35% 24% 92%


07103 $98,264 N/A $204,792 108% 21% 10% 19% 20% 30% 77%
07104 $146,751 N/A $297,382 103% 14% 5% 15% 27% 39% 78%
07105 $187,721 N/A $402,117 114% 12% 9% 12% 23% 45% 74%
07106 $124,007 N/A $243,009 96% 8% 1% 9% 38% 44% 66%
07107 $137,075 N/A $282,563 106% 13% 4% 12% 33% 38% 76%
07108 $99,015 N/A $216,267 118% 11% 4% 18% 26% 41% 80%
07112 $124,476 N/A $248,894 100% 13% 2% 8% 29% 48% 71%
07114 $123,056 N/A $269,928 119% 14% 5% 13% 39% 29% 86%

City of Newark Total $132,825 $305,400 $268,910 102% 13% 5% 14% 29% 39% 76%

Source: US Census, Claritas, 2006-2008 American Community Survey

Exhibit 8
64-12484.02
Printed:4/19/2010
Exhibit 9

HOUSING UNIT TRENDS BY ZIP CODE


THE CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2009

NUMBER OF UNITS IN STRUCTURE

1 Unit 1-Unit
City of Newark Zip Codes Detached - Attached - Multifamily - 2 Multifamily - 3- Multifamily - 20- Multifamily -
Single Family Townhome Units 19 Units 49 Units Over 50 Units Total

07102 3% 3% 4% 32% 10% 49% 100%


07103 8% 14% 14% 46% 2% 15% 100%
07104 13% 6% 16% 36% 9% 19% 100%
07105 7% 3% 28% 58% 2% 1% 100%
07106 21% 2% 19% 36% 2% 20% 100%
07107 10% 6% 20% 40% 6% 16% 100%
07108 10% 8% 12% 49% 7% 14% 100%
07112 13% 1% 18% 42% 11% 14% 100%

07114 7% 6% 11% 44% 8% 24% 100%

City of Newark - Total 11% 6% 18% 43% 6% 16% 100%

Housing Unit Vacancy - City of Newark

Number of Vacant Residential Addresses 2,586


Vacant as of 4Q 2009

% Of Total Residential Addresses 3.6%


Vacant as of 4Q 2009

Average Years that Addresses are Vacant 2.23

Source: US Census, Claritas, US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)

Exhibit 9
64-12484.02
Printed:4/19/2010
Exhibit 10

HOUSING COST BURDEN BY HOUSEHOLD TYPE


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2008

% of Income Spent on Housing


Owner Household Type Less than 30% 30%-50% Greater than 50% Total
Large family 48% 27% 25% 100%
Non-Family Household, Elderly 18% 31% 51% 100%
Non-Family Household, Not Elderly 33% 21% 46% 100%
Small Family, Elderly 46% 24% 31% 100%
Small Family, Not Elderly 51% 24% 25% 100%

% of Income Spent on Housing


Renter Household Type Less than 30% 30%-50% Greater than 50% Total
Large family 58% 23% 19% 100%
Non-Family Household, Elderly 48% 28% 25% 100%
Non-Family Household, Not Elderly 49% 23% 28% 100%
Small Family, Elderly 46% 21% 33% 100%
Small Family, Not Elderly 52% 24% 24% 100%

SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development CHAS Data

Exhibit 10
64-12484.02
Printed:4/19/2010
Exhibit 11

HOUSING CHARACTERISTICS BY MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2008

% of Income Spent on Housing Household Distribution by Number of Bedrooms


% In Sub-
OWNER Greater than 0-1 Bedroom 2-Bedroom 3- or more
Less than 30% 30%-50% Standard
HOUSEHOLDS 50% Units Units Bedroom Units
Total Housing 1 Total
30% AMI or less 3% 10% 87% 100% 0.7% 16% 29% 55% 100%
30.1-50% AMI 10% 31% 59% 99% 0.0% 6% 30% 64% 100%
50.1-80% AMI 29% 33% 38% 100% 0.5% 6% 27% 67% 100%
80% AMI and Above 69% 23% 8% 100% 0.1% 4% 30% 67% 100%

% of Income Spent on Housing Household Distribution by Number of Bedrooms


% In Sub-
RENTER Greater than 0-1 Bedroom 2-Bedroom 3- or more
Less than 30% 30%-50% Standard
HOUSEHOLDS 50% Units Units Bedroom Units
Total Housing 1 Total
30% AMI or less 25% 19% 56% 100% 0.7% 46% 34% 20% 100%
30.1-50% AMI 33% 51% 16% 100% 0.6% 27% 45% 27% 100%
50.1-80% AMI 75% 24% 1% 100% 0.2% 26% 43% 31% 100%
80% AMI and Above 57% 21% 22% 100% 0.7% 19% 43% 38% 100%

1
Substandard housing indicates lack of a complete kitchen or adequate plumbing facilities
SOURCE: U.S. Census Bureau; U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development CHAS Data

Exhibit 11
64-12484.02
Printed:4/19/2010
Exhibit 12

HOUSEHOLDS BY AGE AND INCOME


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2000

Under 25 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75 and over TOTAL


Income Range # % # % # % # % # % # % # % # %
Less than $15,000 2,347 43% 5,383 29% 5,664 26% 4,102 25% 4,105 31% 4,044 43% 3,968 57% 29,613 32%
$15,000 - $24,999 970 18% 2,854 16% 3,393 16% 1,731 10% 1,758 13% 1,418 15% 1,200 17% 13,324 15%
$25,000 - $34,999 872 16% 2,820 15% 3,085 14% 1,872 11% 1,538 12% 970 10% 666 10% 11,823 13%
$35,000 - $49,999 619 11% 2,889 16% 3,392 16% 2,583 16% 1,881 14% 947 10% 400 6% 12,711 14%
$50,000 - $74,999 347 6% 2,764 15% 3,552 17% 3,098 19% 1,939 15% 962 10% 382 5% 13,044 14%
$75,000 - $99,999 224 4% 1,019 6% 1,501 7% 1,646 10% 1,041 8% 419 4% 197 3% 6,047 7%
$100,000 - $124,999 32 1% 325 2% 431 2% 807 5% 430 3% 242 3% 83 1% 2,350 3%
$125,000 - $149,999 17 0% 137 1% 228 1% 213 1% 204 2% 111 1% 58 1% 968 1%
$150,000 - $199,999 15 0% 51 0% 153 1% 246 1% 160 1% 104 1% 0 0% 729 1%
$200,000 and above 22 0% 78 0% 80 0% 202 1% 148 1% 179 2% 48 1% 757 1%

TOTAL 5,465 100% 18,320 100% 21,479 100% 16,500 100% 13,204 100% 9,396 100% 7,002 100% 91,366 100%
Percent of Total 6% 20% 24% 18% 14% 10% 8% 100%

Median Income $18,683 $28,058 $30,025 $38,153 $29,771 $19,209 $12,968

INCOME DISTRIBUTION DISTRIBUTION OF HOUSEHOLDERS BY AGE


35% 35%
32%

30% 30%
27%
25% 25% 24%
20%
20% 20% 18%
15% 14% 14%
15% 15%
10%
10% 10% 8%
7% 6%
5% 4% 5%
2%
0% 0%
Less than $15,000- $25,000- $50,000- $75,000- $100,000- $150,000 Under 25 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75 and
$15,000 $24,999 $49,999 $74,999 $99,999 $149,000 and above over
Age of Householder
Income Range

Exhibit 12
64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 13

HOUSEHOLDS BY AGE AND INCOME


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2009

Under 25 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75 and over TOTAL


Income Range # % # % # % # % # % # % # % # %
Less than $15,000 2,124 37% 4,212 24% 4,505 22% 4,144 21% 4,191 29% 3,405 34% 3,089 45% 25,670 27%
$15,000 - $24,999 861 15% 2,338 14% 2,452 12% 1,831 9% 1,932 13% 1,670 17% 1,476 22% 12,560 13%
$25,000 - $34,999 880 15% 2,048 12% 2,602 12% 1,997 10% 1,540 10% 1,013 10% 783 12% 10,863 11%
$35,000 - $49,999 845 15% 2,884 17% 3,261 16% 2,677 14% 1,948 13% 1,071 11% 558 8% 13,244 14%
$50,000 - $74,999 581 10% 2,919 17% 3,515 17% 3,593 19% 2,275 15% 1,231 12% 392 6% 14,506 15%
$75,000 - $99,999 218 4% 1,517 9% 2,324 11% 2,187 11% 1,222 8% 558 6% 215 3% 8,241 9%
$100,000 - $124,999 143 2% 725 4% 1,177 6% 1,384 7% 800 5% 374 4% 126 2% 4,729 5%
$125,000 - $149,999 32 1% 283 2% 457 2% 686 4% 325 2% 176 2% 64 1% 2,023 2%
$150,000 - $199,999 24 0% 178 1% 323 2% 437 2% 235 2% 152 2% 49 1% 1,398 1%
$200,000 and above 28 0% 114 1% 231 1% 367 2% 222 2% 248 3% 50 1% 1,260 1%

TOTAL 5,736 100% 17,218 100% 20,847 100% 19,303 100% 14,690 100% 9,898 100% 6,802 100% 94,494 100%
Percent of Total 6% 18% 22% 20% 16% 10% 7% 100%

Median Income $23,535 $35,051 $38,787 $44,923 $32,944 $23,968 $16,446

INCOME DISTRIBUTION DISTRIBUTION OF HOUSEHOLDERS BY AGE


35% 35%

30% 30%
27%
26%
25% 25%
22%
20%
20% 20% 18%
15% 16%
15% 13% 15%
10%
10% 9%
7% 10% 7%
6%
5% 5%
0%
0%
Less than $15,000- $25,000- $50,000- $75,000- $100,000-
$15,000 $24,999 $49,999 $74,999 $99,999 $149,000 Under 25 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75 and
Age of Householder over
Income Range

Exhibit 13
64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 14

HOUSEHOLDS BY AGE AND INCOME


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2014

Under 25 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75 and over TOTAL


Income Range # % # % # % # % # % # % # % # %
Less than $15,000 1,923 35% 3,691 23% 3,809 19% 3,873 19% 4,253 26% 3,536 32% 2,809 39% 23,894 25%
$15,000 - $24,999 813 15% 2,035 13% 2,046 10% 1,765 9% 1,986 12% 1,885 17% 1,635 23% 12,165 13%
$25,000 - $34,999 770 14% 1,841 12% 2,186 11% 1,742 9% 1,621 10% 1,204 11% 938 13% 10,302 11%
$35,000 - $49,999 893 16% 2,735 17% 2,922 15% 2,556 13% 2,081 13% 1,242 11% 814 11% 13,243 14%
$50,000 - $74,999 631 11% 2,798 18% 3,488 17% 3,789 19% 2,530 16% 1,337 12% 460 6% 15,033 16%
$75,000 - $99,999 247 4% 1,421 9% 2,324 12% 2,450 12% 1,477 9% 751 7% 226 3% 8,896 9%
$100,000 - $124,999 144 3% 793 5% 1,521 8% 1,656 8% 932 6% 448 4% 160 2% 5,654 6%
$125,000 - $149,999 78 1% 344 2% 767 4% 980 5% 557 3% 259 2% 76 1% 3,061 3%
$150,000 - $199,999 28 1% 185 1% 507 3% 709 4% 331 2% 197 2% 67 1% 2,024 2%
$200,000 and above 39 1% 130 1% 389 2% 559 3% 319 2% 304 3% 61 1% 1,801 2%

TOTAL 5,566 100% 15,973 100% 19,959 100% 20,079 100% 16,087 100% 11,163 100% 7,246 100% 96,073 100%
Percent of Total 6% 17% 21% 21% 17% 12% 8% 100%

Median Income $25,614 $37,246 $44,702 $50,603 $35,952 $26,047 $19,123

INCOME DISTRIBUTION DISTRIBUTION OF HOUSEHOLDERS BY AGE


35% 35%

30% 30%
25% 25%
25% 25%
21% 21%
20% 20%
16% 17% 17%
15% 13% 15%
12%
9% 9%
10% 10% 8%
6%
5% 4%
5%

0%
0%
$15,000- $25,000- $50,000- $75,000- $100,000- $150,000 and
Under 25 25-34 35-44 45-54 55-64 65-74 75 and
$24,999 $49,999 $74,999 $99,999 $149,000 above
Age of Householder over
Income Range

Exhibit 14
64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 15

TOTAL EMPLOYMENT AND EARNINGS BY OCCUPATION


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2008

% of Total Median Annual


Total Employees
Employees Earnings
Management Occupations 5,535 5% $50,033
Business and Financial Operations Occupations 2,458 2% $51,229
Computer and Mathematical Occupations 928 1% $47,377
Architecture and Engineering Occupations 939 1% $46,085
Life, Physical, and Social Science Occupations 455 0% $28,401
Community and Social Services Occupations 2,321 2% $41,597
Legal Occupations 657 1% $29,697
Education, Training, and Library Occupations 5,629 5% $31,438
Arts, Design, Entertainment, Sports, and Media Occupations 811 1% $48,252
Healthcare Practitioner and Technical Occupations: 2,765 3% $42,140
Service Occupations: 27,684 25% $22,017
Sales and Related Occupations 9,715 9% $21,691
Office and Administrative Support Occupations 15,672 14% $29,008
Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations 0 0% N/A
Construction, Extraction, Maintenance, and Repair Occupations: 13,016 12% $26,691
Production, Transportation, and Material Moving Occupations: 20,952 19% $28,661

Total 109,537 100% $28,282

Source: US Census Bureau 2008 American Community Survey

Exhibit 15
64-12484.02
Printed:4/19/2010
Exhibit 16

MONTHLY RESIDENTIAL BUILDING PERMITS


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2008-2009

90

80

70

60

50

40

30

20

10

SingleFamilyUnits TotalMultifamily

Source: New Jersey Department of Labor

Exhibit 16
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 17

AVERAGE SALES PRICE


CITY OF NEWARK ZIP CODES, NEW JERSEY
MARCH 2009 - DECEMBER 2009

$350,000

$300,000

$250,000

$200,000

$150,000

$100,000

$50,000

$0
Feb09 Mar09 Apr09 May09 Jun09 Jul09 Aug09 Sep09 Oct09 Nov09 Dec09

Zip07106 Zip07107 Zip07103 Zip07104 Zip07108 Zip07112 Zip07105 CityofNewarkAverage

Source: RealtyTrac
Exhibit 17
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 18

AVERAGE SALES PRICE AND AVERAGE FORECLOSURE SALES PRICE


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
JANUARY - DECEMBER 2009

Source: City of Trenton Assessor Data

Exhibit 18
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 19

CONTRACT SALES AND SELLER:BUYER RATIO


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
JANUARY 2009 - JANUARY 2010
60

55

50

45

40

35

30

25

20

15

10
Jan09 Feb09 Mar09 Apr09 May09 Jun09 Jul09 Aug09 Sep09 Oct09 Nov09 Dec09 Jan10

ContractSales Seller:BuyerRatio

Source: Otteau Report

Exhibit 19
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 20

UNSOLD FOR-SALE RESIDENTIAL INVENTORY AND MONTHS OF SUPPLY


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
4Q 2006 - 4Q 2009

550.0 25.0

530.0

510.0 20.0

490.0

470.0 15.0

450.0

430.0 10.0

410.0

390.0 5.0

370.0

350.0 
4Q2006 4Q2007 4Q2008 4Q2009

UnsoldInventory MonthsSupply

Source: Otteau Report

Exhibit 20
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 21

AVERAGE MONTHLY SALES AND SUPPLY:DEMAND RATIO


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
4Q 2005 - 4Q 2009
60%

70.0

50%
60.0

50.0 40%

40.0
30%

30.0

20%

20.0

10%
10.0

 0%
4Q2006 4Q2007 4Q2008 4Q2009

Average#ofSalesMonthly Supply:DemandRatio

Source: Otteau Report

Exhibit 21
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 22

RECENT FORECLOSURE TRENDS


CITY OF NEWARK ZIP CODES, NEW JERSEY
FEBRUARY 2009 - JANUARY 2010
550

500

450

400

350

300

250

200

150

100

50

0
Feb09 Mar09 Apr09 May09 Jun09 Jul09 Aug09 Sep09 Oct09 Nov09 Dec09 Jan10
Zip07107 Zip07106 Zip07103 Zip07104 Zip07108 Zip07112 Zip07102 Zip07114 Zip07105

Source: RealtyTrac

Exhibit 22
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 23

FORECLOSURES BY ZIP CODE


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
JANUARY 2010

DistributionofNewarkForeclosuresinJanuary2010

8%
3% 4% 17%

10%

17%

12%

14%
15%

Zip07106 Zip07107 Zip07103 Zip07104 Zip07108

Zip07112 Zip07102 Zip07114 Zip07105

Source: RealtyTrac

Exhibit 23
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 24

RECENT FORECLOSURE AND SALE PRICE TRENDS


CITY OF NEWARK ZIP CODES, NEW JERSEY
2009
550 $350,000

500
$300,000
450

400 $250,000

350
$200,000
300

250
$150,000

200

$100,000
$100 000
150

100
$50,000
50

0 $0
Feb09 Mar09 Apr09 May09 Jun09 Jul09 Aug09 Sep09 Oct09 Nov09 Dec09

NewarkForeclosures NewarkAverageSalesPrice

Source: RealtyTrac

Exhibit 24
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 25

FOR-RENT RESIDENTIAL SUBMARKET MAP


NEWARK AND EAST ESSEX COUNTY, NEW JERSERY
MARCH 2010

Newark Rental Submarket


Source: REIS

Exhibit 25
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 26

TOTAL INVENTORY OF UNITS AND VACANCY RATE


NEWARK/EAST ESSEX COUNTY RENTAL SUBMARKET
2005-2009

45,000 10.0%
9.5%
9.0%
40,000 8.5%
8.0%
7.5%
35,000
7.0%
6.5%
6.0%
30,000
5.5%
5.0%
4.5%
25,000
4.0%
3.5%
3.0%
20,000
2.5%
2.0%

15,000 1.5%
1.0%
0.5%
10,000 0.0%
20051Q 20052Q 20053Q 20054Q 20061Q 20062Q 20063Q 20064Q 20071Q 20072Q 20073Q 20074Q 20081Q 20082Q 20083Q 20084Q 20091Q 20092Q 20093Q 20094Q

InventoryofUnitsinSubmarket VacancyRate

Source: REIS

Exhibit 26
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 27

ASKING AND EFFECTIVE RENTS


NEWARK/EAST ESSEX COUNTY RENTAL SUBMARKET, CENTRAL NEW JERSEY
2005-2009
$1,000

$950

$900

$850

Theaverage effectiverentalrateintheNewarksubmarket in4Q2009is


$848/month,thisrateisaffordableto:
$800
 1personhouseholdearning55%ofAMIfortheMSA
 2personhouseholdearning48%ofAMIfortheMSA
 3personhouseholdearning43%ofAMIfortheMSA
 4personhouseholdearning39%ofAMIfortheMSA
$750
AccordingtotheHUDguidelinesforFairMarketRents,thesubmarket
averageeffectiverentof$848inthe4Q2009correlatestotherentfor
anefficiency/studiounit.

$700
2005 2005 2005 2005 2006 2006 2006 2006 2007 2007 2007 2007 2008 2008 2008 2008 2009 2009 2009 2009
1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q 1Q 2Q 3Q 4Q

AskingRents EffectiveRent

Source: REIS

Exhibit 27
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 28A

SELECT AFFORDABLE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
MARCH 2010

PROJECT NAME ADDRESS UNITS WAITING LIST % AFFORDABILITY

NEWARK HOUSING AUTHORITY PROPERTIES - FAMILY HOUSING

James Baxter Terrace 180-234 Orange Street 508 Over 24 Months 30% of AMI or Less
Total 508

Bradley Court 16-32 N. Munn Avenue 18 Over 24 Months 30% of AMI or Less
Total 18

Felix Fuld N/A 300 N/A 30% of AMI or Less


Multi-family Total 300

Hyatt Court 2 Roanoke Avenue 402 N/A 30% of AMI or Less


Multi-family Total 402

Pennington Court 214 South Street 227 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Multi-family Total 227

Redevelopment NJ2-46 N/A 96 N/A 30% of AMI or Less


Multi-family Total 96

Seth Boyden Terrace 124 Seth Boyden Terrace 503 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Multi-family Total 503

Stephen Crane Village N/A 351 N/A 30% of AMI or Less


Multi-family Total 351

Kemsco NJ2-42 93 7th Ave; 33 Triton Terrace 194 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Townhouse Total 194

La Villa Jose Rosario 111 Wright Street 94 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Townhouse Total 94

Millard E. Terrel Homes NJ2-9 35 Riverview Ct. 275 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Townhouse Total 275

Scattered Sites NJ2-39 190 Court Street 254 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Townhouse Total 254

Exhibit 28A
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 28A

SELECT AFFORDABLE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
MARCH 2010

PROJECT NAME ADDRESS UNITS WAITING LIST % AFFORDABILITY

West Side Village NJ2-35 281 16th Ave 248 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Townhouse Total 248

West Side Village 560 15th Ave 48 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Townhouse Total 48

Wynona Lipman 200 Cathedral Court 300 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Townhouse Total 300

Oak Brook Square Clinton Avenue 43 N/A 30% of AMI or Less


Townhouse Total 43

NEWARK HOUSING AUTHORITY PROPERTIES - SENIOR HOUSING

Baxter Elderly Summit St. 341 N/A 30% of AMI or Less


Senior, Multifamily Total 341

Foushee Towers Lincoln St. 252 N/A 30% of AMI or Less


Senior, Multifamily Total 252

James C. White NJ2-25 516 Bergen St. 206 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Senior, Multifamily Total 206

Kretchmer Elderly NJ2-70 100 Ludlow St. 143 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Senior, Multifamily Total 143

Otto Kretchmer Elderly NJ2-17 N/A 198 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Senior, Multifamily Total 198

Seth Boyden Elderly 27 Foster St. 360 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Seth Boyden Elderly NJ2-21E 130 Dayton St. 286 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Seth Boyden Elderly NJ2-21F 991 Frelinghuysen Ave. 200 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Seth Boyden Elderly NJ2-21F 46 Evergreen Ave. 199 N/A 30% of AMI or Less
Total 1,045

Stephen Crane Elderly 900 Franklin Ave. 375 N/A


Stephen Crane NJ2-16 60 Cedar Lane 198 N/A
Stephen Crane Elderly NJ2-22D 789, 801, 815 N. 6th St. 374 Over 24 Months 30% of AMI or Less
Total 947

HOPE VI PROPERTIES

Stella Garden Townhomes 35 Spruce St. 93 N/A


Hope VI Total 93

Exhibit 28A
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 28A

SELECT AFFORDABLE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
MARCH 2010

PROJECT NAME ADDRESS UNITS WAITING LIST % AFFORDABILITY

Charlton Gardens 151 Irvine Turner Blvd. 60 N/A


Hope VI Total 60

Cottage Place (Hill Manor) 643 Martin L King Jr. Blvd 100 N/A
Hope VI Total 100

City View Landing Apartments 147 W. Kinney St. 116 N/A


Hope VI Total 116

Total Family Housing 1 3,276


Total Senior Housing 1 2,585
Total Hope VI Units 369

Total Housing Authority Units 1 6,230

1
Excluding developments with no unit count available.
Source: Newark Housing Authority

Exhibit 28A
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 28B

SELECT AFFORDABLE FOR-RENT RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
MARCH 2010

PROJECT NAME ADDRESS ZIP CODE TOTAL UNITS TYPE LEVEL OF AFFORDABILITY
OTHER AFFORDABLE RENTAL HOUSING

Bruce Street Gardens 47-61 12th Ave. 24-58 Bruce St 07102 N/A Family N/A
CHARC 203 W. Runyon St. 07108 N/A Family N/A
Clinton Street Lofts 9-15 Clinton Street 07102 63 Family N/A
Ebon Square 753-759 Clinton Ave. 07104 N/A Family N/A
Littleton Ave. Community Vill. 352 South 6Th St., 07103 79 Family Between 101% & 120% FMR
Pilgrim Baptist Village II 446 Bergen Street 07108 151 Family Between 101% & 120% FMR
St. Clares Home Phase II 182 Roseville Ave. 07107 13 Family N/A
Telephone Heights 176 Avon Avenue 07108 N/A Family N/A
Tiffany Manor/Parkside Manor 90 Tiffany Blvd. 07108 147 Family N/A
University Court 419 Washington St. 07102 N/A Family N/A
Weequahic Park 525 Elizabeth Ave. 07108 N/A Family N/A
West Kinney Gardens (B) Springifeld / Morris Ave. 07102 36 Family N/A
West Kinney Garden (A) Boyd Street 07102 133 Family , LIHTC N/A
Carmel Towers 440 Elizabeth Ave. 07112 N/A Family , Section 8 N/A
Georgia King Village 250 Georgia King Village 07107 422 Family , Section 8 N/A
New Comm. Douglass-Harrison 51 Somerset St. 07103 135 Family , Section 8 N/A
New Community Commons 140 South Orange Ave. 07106 370 Family , Section 8 N/A
New Community Gardens 265 Morris Ave. 07106 233 Family , Section 8 N/A
New Hope 195 West Market St. 07103 N/A Family , Section 8 N/A
Norfolk Square Apartments 20 Hartford St. 07199 224 Family , Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
Pilgrim Baptist I 446 Bergen St. 07108 152 Family , Section 8 Between 101% & 120% FMR
Reservoir Site 185 14th Ave. 07103 N/A Family , Section 8 N/A
Shalom Clemente 75-95 Clinton Ave. 07114 150 Family , Section 8 N/A
St. James AME 440 Washington St. 07102 109 Family , Section 8 Between 141% & 160% FMR
Villa Victoria 133-7th Avenue 07104 193 Family , Section 8 Between 101% & 120% FMR
Willie T. Wright Plaza Apts. 135 Prince St. 07103 114 Family , Section 8 N/A
Zion Towers 515 Elizabeth Ave. 07112 N/A Family , Section 8 N/A
Newark Genesis Apartments Oriental & Mt. Pleasant Ave 51 LIHTC, Below50% AMI *15 Units Designated for HIV/AIDS
28 FLEMING AVENUE 28 FLEMING AVENUE 07105 59 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
Amity Village #1 325 - 329 Hawthorne Avenue 07103 21 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
Amity Village #2 413 So. 15th Street 07103 13 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
Amity Village #5 523 S 14th St 07103 16 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
Amity Village #6 458 So. 16th Street 07103 12 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
Amity Village #7 410,474-76, 519, 534-36, 07103 48 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
Amity Village #8 307 14th Avenue,503 South 19th Street 07103 28 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
ASPEN BELMONT B 399-400 BELMONT AVENUE 07102 35 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
ASPEN RIVERPARK APTS 17 OXFORD STREET 07105 255 Section 8 Between 101% & 120% FMR
ASPEN STRATFORD B 29 STRATFORD PL 07108 59 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
ASPEN STRATFORD C 19 STRATFORD PL 07102 54 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
BALLANTYNE HOUSE 585 Mt. Prospect Avenue 07104 58 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
BELMONT APTS A 393-395 BELMONT AVENUE 07102 200 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
BRANCH BROOK MANOR 1 BRANCH BROOK PLZ 07104 70 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
BROADWAY MANOR 766 - 780 BROADWAY 07104 85 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
CASA MIA 502 SUMMER AVE 07104 41 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
CENTER CITY HOUSING 9C 1007 BROAD ST 07102 41 Section 8 Over 160% FMR
CLINTON HILL COMMUNITY GARDENS 201 W. RUNYON STREET 07108 9 Section 8 N/A

Exhibit 28B
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 28B

SELECT AFFORDABLE FOR-RENT RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
MARCH 2010

PROJECT NAME ADDRESS ZIP CODE TOTAL UNITS TYPE LEVEL OF AFFORDABILITY
ESSEX PROPERTIES 193 -211HUNTERDON ST 07103 24 Section 8 Over 160% FMR
FOREST HILL HOUSE 505 MT. PROSPECT AVE 07104 99 Section 8 Between 101% & 120% FMR
GARDEN SPIRES 175-195 FIRST STREET 07107 350 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
GRACE WEST MANOR APTS. 301 IRVINE TURNER BLVD 07108 428 Section 8 Between 101% & 120% FMR
MOUNT CALVARY I 244 Chadwick AVE 07103 115 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
MT. CALVARY II 100 CHADWICK AVE 07103 115 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
New Community Manor 200 S. Orange Ave 07103 324 Section 8 Between 131% & 140% FMR
NEW JERSEY SCATTERED SITE - NEWARK, 88 Meade Street 07106 10 Section 8 Unknown
NEW JERSEY SCATTERED SITE PHASE II 82 CHELSEA AVENUE 07102 30 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
PROJECT LIVE II 457-63 BROADWAY 07104 8 Section 8 Between 101% & 120% FMR
PROJECT LIVE III 682 RIDGE STREET 07104 5 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
Project Live IV 305 N. 11TH ST 07107 3 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
Project Live XIII ILC 465-475 Broadway 07107 5 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
PROJECT LIVE, INC. 75 - 79 Lincoln Avenue 07104 10 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
PUEBLO CITY HOUSING 86 BRUNSWICK ST 07114 80 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
SPRUCE GARDENS (Spruce Spires) 100 SPRUCE ST 07103 112 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
ST MARY'S VILLA 425 SANFORD AVE 07106 360 Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
St Rocco's Housing 39 Ashland Avenue 07103 38 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
WESLEY TOWERS 444 MT PROSPECT AVE 07104 169 Section 8 Below 80% FMR
Ballantyne House 595 Mt. Prospect Ave 07104 169 Senior Between 101% & 120% FMR
Casa Mia 502 Summer Ave. 07104 90 Senior Between 101% & 120% FMR
Madison Turner Senior Housing 11-25 Madison Avenue 07108 75 Senior Between 80% & 100% FMR
New Community Associates 180 S. Orange Ave. 07103 225 Senior N/A
Court Towers 1 Court St. 07102 N/A Senior, Section 8 N/A
Nevada Street Apartments 2 Nevada St. 07102 306 Senior, Section 8 Between 101% & 120% FMR
NEW COMMUNITY - ROSEVILLE 1 S 8th ST 07106 99 Senior, Section 8 Between 80% & 100% FMR
New Community Douglas 15 Hill St. 07102 134 Senior, Section 8 Below 80% FMR
Lincoln Park Towers 31-33 Lincoln Park 07102 80 Senior, Section 8, LIHTC N/A

Senior Units 1,178


Non-Senior Units 6,164
Total Other Affordable Rental Units 1 7,342

1
Excludes properties where unit counts were unavailable
Source: New Jersey Housing Finance Agency, HUD

Exhibit 28B
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 29

SELECT AFFORDABLE FOR-SALE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
MARCH 2010

PROJECT NAME ADDRESS TOTAL UNITS DEVELOPER LEVEL OF AFFORDABILITY

Renaissance Housing Scattered Sites - South and Central Wards 8 Episcopal Community Development N/A
Scattered Sites - Foreclosure Rehabs 12th Street, 504 South 19th Street, 280 Johnson Ave 3 Episcopal Community Development N/A
The Cooper Building N/A 4 M&M Development Prices $53K - $112K
MLK Homes Development N/A 19 Don Pedro Development Corp. N/A
S. Ward Scattered Site 91 Lehigh 2 Episcopal Community Development N/A
S. Ward Scattered Site 26 Renner Ave. 1 Episcopal Community Development N/A
S. Ward Scattered Site 356 Peshine Ave. 2 Episcopal Community Development N/A
S. Ward Scattered Site 411 Jelliff Ave. 2 Episcopal Community Development N/A

Total For-Sale Affordable Units : 41

Source: New Jersey Housing Finance Agency, HUD

Exhibit 29
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 30

PLANNED AND PROPOSED AFFORDABLE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
MARCH 2010
TOTAL STATUS/
PROJECT NAME ADDRESS UNITS TIMING OWNER/SPONSOR
Planned and Proposed Rental Properties

Ivy Hill Senior Care facility (Bldg C Phase I and


II) Irvington Avenue 71 2010 Ivy Hill Senior Care Corp.
Richardson Lofts Green St. and Columbia St. 15 2009 NewWorks/50-60 Columbia St. Urban Renewal, LLC
Ridgewood Ave Apts 21 8/10 Project Live Inc
Roseville Commons Orange St and S. 11th St. 50 2010 RPM Development/New Comm Corp
West Ward Pilot Program Fairmount Heights Development Corp. 2010 George Group, LLC
Pacific Apts (Pennington) LIHTC Pennington and Pacific Streets 80 9/10 ETC
Lower Clinton Hill 9 Future Now CDC
Newark Genesis Apartments Oriental and Mt. Pleasant Ave. 50 Help USA, Inc
CURE 17th St Apts 418-420 S 17th St 6 Community Urban Renewal Enterprise
Integrity Women's Program Housing MLK Blvd. 8 Integrity, Inc
West End, Brookdale, Columbia - Rental 3 2010 Unified Vailsburg Service Organization
Union Chapel Estates Union Chapel Community Dev't Corp
Ivy Hill Senior Care Facility (Bldg B) Irvington Avenue 65 Ivy Hill Senior Care Corp.
Brick Towers- Montgomery St. Montgomery and MLK 80 2010 Unipen Co.
Avon/Springfield Multi-Generational Housing Avon Avenue 23 2011 Episcopal Community Development Corp.
St. Clare's Residence on Roseville Roseville Ave. 13 2009 AIDS Resource Foundation
Visions Development MLK Blvd., Chancellor Ave. 45 2011 Visions Economic Development, Inc
BAT District Lofts 368 Broad Streets 33 2010 Associates 368, LLC/ Rock Properties
Lower Broadway Stabilization Project - Rental 282 Broad St 3 2010 La Casa de Don Pedro
Macedonia Hts (Kent St) 35 Macedonia Ministries
Crest Pointe Homes - Rental 507 S. 10th St (B.307/L.10-11) 2 2010 CREST CDC
Kitty Taylor Senior Citizen Building 443-467 15th Ave 37 TBD UCC
Youthbuild Wright St Project Miller St. and Wright St. 2010 Youthbuild
344 Sanford Ave, 237 S. 8th, 149 Fabyan Pl, &
Next Generation Homeownership - Rental 92 W. Alpine St 4 2010 Community Urban Renewal Enterprise
Maybaum Ave & Silver St - Rental Maybaum Ave. 4 2009 Unified Vailsburg Service Organization
18-28 W. Kinnery Street, 15-17, 65 Lincoln
Lincoln Park LIHTC Park 70 Lincoln Park LIHTC, LLC/LPCCD
S.Ward Scattered site: 476 S.19th St 476 S. 19th Street 4 12/09 Episcopal Community Development Corp.
Baxter Park II 101 TBD NHA/TBD
Baxter Park I 240 TBD NHA/TBD
Brick Towers MLK Blvd. 200 TBD NHA/TBD
Felix Fuld 103 TBD NHA/TBD
Harmony - Special Needs Broad St. 16 TBD M and M Development
High Spruce Spruce and MLK Blvd. 111 TBD NHA/TBD
Ivy Hill Senior Project Building C (Phase I) 489, 559 Irvington Avenue 46 TBD Ivy Hill Senior Partners, LLC/VOA
Ivy Hill Senior Project Building C (Phase II) 489, 559 Irvington Avenue 25 TBD Ivy Hill Senior Partners, LLC/VOA
Milford Ave. Milford Ave. 24 TBD NHA/TBD
New Horizons ITB 86 TBD NHA/TBD
New Horizons MLK 84 TBD NHA/TBD
NJPAC Downtown TBD TBD NJPAC/Dranoff Properties
Quitman/Clinton Quitman St. and Clinton St. 150 TBD NHA/TBD
Quitman/Spruce Quitman St. and Spruce St. 12 TBD NHA/TBD
Towers at Montgomery MLK Blvd. 80 TBD NHA/TBD
West Ward Vacant/Abandoned Prop TBD
Restoration Central to S. Orange Ave., 9th St. to 10th St. TBD Fairmount Heights Dev. Corp.
129 Littleton Ave 129 Littleton Ave. 75 TBD Make It Right
Integrity Women's Prog. Housing Phase II TBD Integrity, Inc.
Meeker/Elizabeth TBD APEX
Union Chapel Villas @ West Side TBD Union Chapel Comm Venture LLC

Exhibit 30
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 30

PLANNED AND PROPOSED AFFORDABLE RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
MARCH 2010
TOTAL STATUS/
PROJECT NAME ADDRESS UNITS TIMING OWNER/SPONSOR
Planned and Proposed For-Sale Properties

YouthBuild-Corinthian Homes South Orange Ave. 10 3/10 Corinthian Housing Development


West End, Brookdale, Columbia - For-Sale 3 2010 Unified Vailsburg Service Organization
Habitat West Ward S. 12th Street 2 2010 Habitat For Humanity
Maybaum Ave & Silver St - For Sale Maybaum Ave. 4 2009 Unified Vailsburg Service Organization
344 Sanford Ave, 237 S. 8th, 149 Fabyan Pl, &
Next Generation Homeownership - For-Sale 92 W. Alpine St 7 2010 Community Urban Renewal Enterprise
Crest Pointe Homes - For-Sale 507 S. 10th St (B.307/L.10-11) 2 2010 CREST CDC
Condominiums at Harmony Square Third Ave. and Broad Street 24 M & M Development

Lower Broadway Stabilization Project - For-Sale 282 Broad St 4 2010 La Casa de Don Pedro
Habitat for Humanity 3 2010 Habitat For Humanity
UMMAT II 203-213 Littleton Ave 4 UMMAT Developers
Black Wall Street Project 9th Street 2 2009 Mid-Atlantic Investment Alliance
One Court 222 TBD NHA
385-391, 393, 399, 400, 416 Irvine Turner TBD
Belmont Apartments Blvd. 110 Veramax/RMA
Condominiums @ Harmony Square Phase II 21 TBD M&M Development
Habitat for Humanity Newark 8 TBD Habitat for Humanity
West Ward Rehab Phase III 58 TBD Fairmount Heights Dev. Corp.
Help USA, II 60 TBD Help USA
Chen/Genesis 45 TBD Genesis Developers
Springfield Ave. Seniors 50 TBD Telesis Development
Montgomery Heights II 80 TBD Penn Rose
Douglas Harrison Somerset, Irvine Turner and Spruce 100 TBD TBD

Total Planned & Proposed Rental Units 2,084


Total Planned & Proposed For-Sale Units 819

Total Planned & Proposed Units 2,903

Source: City of Newark Department of Economic & Housing Development

Exhibit 30
P# 64-12484.02
Printed: 4/19/2010
Exhibit 31

SUMMARY OF RESIDENTIAL DEMAND


CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2010
Owner Demand Potential - 2010
1-2 Person HH 3-4 Person HH 5+ Person HH Total
Households Less than 30% AMI 150 123 71 343
Households 30%-50% AMI 80 61 34 175
Households 50%-80% AMI 99 68 34 201
Total Rental Demand Potential 329 252 139 720

Renter Demand Potential - 2010


1-2 Person HH 3-4 Person HH 5+ Person HH Total
Households Less than 30% AMI 591 430 555 1,576
Households 30%-50% AMI 290 189 222 702
Households 50%-80% AMI 354 202 190 746
Total Rental Demand Potential 1,235 822 967 3,024
Exhibit 32A
DEMAND FOR RENTAL HOUSING BY INCOME RANGE
CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2010
Total Households in the City of Newark - 2009 94,494
% Renter 76%
Annual Household Growth 2009-2014 316
Total Renter Households in the City of Newark - 2010 72,056

LESS THAN 30% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME 1


Household Size 1 person 2 person 3 person 4 person 5 person 6 person 7 person 8 person
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Household Income $18,390 $21,030 $23,640 $26,280 $28,380 $30,480 $32,580 $34,680 TOTAL
(x) % HH Size Qualified 3/ 27% 0% 0% 15% 9% 4% 3% 1%
(x) % Income Qualified 3/ 30% 34% 38% 39% 42% 45% 48% 51%
2
(x) % HH Size and Income Qualified 7.9% 0.0% 0.0% 5.7% 3.7% 1.9% 1.5% 0.5%
(=)Total HH Size and Income Qualified Households 5,687 0 0 4,134 2,631 1,340 1,045 371 15,208

3
(x) % Renters In Turnover 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10%
(=) Total Potential Renter Demand Less than 30% AMI 580 0 0 422 269 137 107 38 1552

(x) % Owners Becoming Renters 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7% 7%


(=) Total Owner Becoming Renter Demand Less than 30% AMI 5 5 5 4 2 1 1 0 24

(=) Potential Demand for Rental Housing Affordable to


Households Less than 30% AMI 586 5 5 426 271 138 108 38 1,576

Affordable Rental Rates $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0


$460 $526 $591 $657 $710 $762 $815 $867

30% TO 50% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME 1


Household Size 1 person 2 person 3 person 4 person 5 person 6 person 7 person 8 person
$18,390 $21,030 $23,640 $26,280 $28,380 $30,480 $32,580 $34,680
Household Income $30,650 $35,050 $39,400 $43,800 $47,300 $50,800 $54,300 $57,800 TOTAL

(x) % HH Size Qualified 3/ 27% 0% 0% 15% 9% 4% 3% 1%


(x) % Income Qualified 3/ 15% 16% 17% 18% 19% 17% 18% 19%
2
(x) % HH Size and Income Qualified 4.0% 0.0% 0.0% 2.6% 1.7% 0.7% 0.5% 0.2%
(=)Total HH Size and Income Qualified Households 2,904 0 0 1,895 1,206 492 384 136 7,016

3
(x) % Renters In Turnover 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10%
(=) Total Potential Renter Demand 30%-50% AMI 290 0 0 189 121 49 38 14 702

(x) % Owners Becoming Renters 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5% 5%


(=) Total Owner Becoming Renter Demand 30%-50% AMI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(=) Potential Demand for Rental Housing Affordable to


Households 30%-50% AMI 290 0 0 189 121 49 38 14 702

Affordable Rental Rates $460 $526 $591 $657 $710 $762 $815 $867
$766 $876 $985 $1,095 $1,183 $1,270 $1,358 $1,445

50% TO 80% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME 1

Household Size 1 person 2 person 3 person 4 person 5 person 6 person 7 person 8 person
$30,650 $35,050 $39,400 $43,800 $47,300 $50,800 $54,300 $57,800
Household Income $49,040 $56,080 $63,040 $70,080 $75,680 $81,280 $86,880 $92,480 TOTAL
(x) % HH Size Qualified 3/ 27% 0% 0% 15% 9% 4% 3% 1%
(x) % Income Qualified 3/ 19% 15% 17% 19% 17% 15% 16% 17%
2
(x) % HH Size and Income Qualified 5.0% 0.0% 0.0% 2.8% 1.4% 0.6% 0.5% 0.2%
(=)Total HH Size and Income Qualified Households 3,586 0 0 2,045 1,039 435 339 120 7,563

3
(x) % Renters In Turnover 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10% 10%
(=) Total Potential Renter Demand 50%-80% AMI 351 0 0 200 102 43 33 12 741

(x) % Owners Becoming Renters 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3% 3%


(=) Total Owner Becoming Renter Demand 50%-80% AMI 1 1 1 1 0 0 0 0 5

(=) Potential Demand for Rental Housing Affordable to


Households 50%-80% AMI 353 1 1 201 102 43 33 12 746

Affordable Rental Rates $766 $876 $985 $1,095 $1,183 $1,270 $1,358 $1,445
$1,226 $1,402 $1,576 $1,752 $1,892 $2,032 $2,172 $2,312

SUMMARY OF DEMAND

1 person 2 person 3 person 4 person 5 person 6 person 7 person 8 person Total

Total Rental Demand Potential for Households Less than 30% AMI 586 5 5 426 271 138 108 38 1,576
Total Rental Demand Potential for Households 30%-50% AMI 290 0 0 189 121 49 38 14 702
Total Rental Demand Potential for Households 50%-80% AM 353 1 1 201 102 43 33 12 746

Total Rental Demand Potential - Up to 80% AMI 1,229 6 6 816 494 230 179 64 3,024

1
HUD 2009 Income Limits
2
Claritas 2009 data for City of Newark
3
Census 2000 PUMS data for Washington, D.C. PMSA
Exhibit 32B
DEMAND FOR FOR-SALE HOUSING BY INCOME RANGE
CITY OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY
2010

Total Households in the City of Newark - 2009 94,494


% Owner 24%
Annual Household Growth 2009-2014 316
Total Owner Households in the City of Newark - 2010 22,754

LESS THAN 30% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME 1


Household Size 1 person 2 person 3 person 4 person 5 person 6 person 7 person 8 person
$0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0
Household Income $18,390 $21,030 $23,640 $26,280 $28,380 $30,480 $32,580 $34,680 TOTAL
(x) % HH Size Qualified 3/ 27% 24% 19% 15% 9% 4% 3% 1%
(x) % Income Qualified 3/ 30% 34% 38% 39% 42% 45% 48% 51%
(x) % HH Size and Income Qualified 2 7.9% 8.0% 7.3% 5.7% 3.7% 1.9% 1.5% 0.5%
(=)Total HH Size and Income Qualified Households 1,796 1,825 1,657 1,305 831 423 330 117 8,285

(x) % Owners In Turnover 3 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4%


(=) Total Potential Owner Demand Less than 30% AMI 74 76 69 54 34 18 14 5 343

(x) % Renters Becoming Owners 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0% 0%


(=) Total Renter Becoming Owner Demand Less than 30% AMI 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

(=) Potential Demand for Owner Housing Affordable to


Households Less than 30% AMI 74 76 69 54 34 18 14 5 343

Affordable Sales Prices $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0


$75,941 $86,842 $97,620 $108,522 $117,194 $125,866 $134,537 $143,209

30% TO 50% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME 1

Household Size 1 person 2 person 3 person 4 person 5 person 6 person 7 person 8 person
$18,390 $21,030 $23,640 $26,280 $28,380 $30,480 $32,580 $34,680
Household Income $30,650 $35,050 $39,400 $43,800 $47,300 $50,800 $54,300 $57,800 TOTAL
(x) % HH Size Qualified 3/ 27% 24% 19% 15% 9% 4% 3% 1%
(x) % Income Qualified 3/ 15% 16% 17% 18% 19% 17% 18% 19%
(x) % HH Size and Income Qualified 2 4.0% 3.7% 3.3% 2.6% 1.7% 0.7% 0.5% 0.2%
(=)Total HH Size and Income Qualified Households 917 834 757 598 381 155 121 43 3,806

(x) % Owners In Turnover 3 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4%


(=) Total Potential Owner Demand 30%-50% AMI 39 35 32 25 16 7 5 2 161

(x) % Renters Becoming Owners 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2% 2%


(=) Total Renter Becoming Owner Demand 30%-50% AMI 6 0 0 4 2 1 1 0 14

(=) Potential Demand for Owner Housing Affordable to


Households 30%-50% AMI 45 35 32 29 19 8 6 2 175

Affordable Sales Prices $75,941 $86,842 $97,620 $108,522 $117,194 $125,866 $134,537 $143,209
$126,568 $144,737 $162,700 $180,870 $195,323 $209,776 $224,229 $238,682

50% TO 80% OF AREA MEDIAN INCOME 1

Household Size 1 person 2 person 3 person 4 person 5 person 6 person 7 person 8 person
$30,650 $35,050 $39,400 $43,800 $47,300 $50,800 $54,300 $57,800
Household Income $49,040 $56,080 $63,040 $70,080 $75,680 $81,280 $86,880 $92,480 TOTAL
(x) % HH Size Qualified 3/ 27% 24% 19% 15% 9% 4% 3% 1%
(x) % Income Qualified 3/ 19% 15% 17% 19% 17% 15% 16% 17%
(x) % HH Size and Income Qualified 2 5.0% 3.6% 3.3% 2.8% 1.4% 0.6% 0.5% 0.2%
(=)Total HH Size and Income Qualified Households 1,132 828 752 646 328 137 107 38 3,968

3
(x) % Owners In Turnover 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4%
(=) Total Potential Owner Demand 50%-80% AMI 49 36 33 28 14 6 5 2 172

(x) % Renters Becoming Owners 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4% 4%


(=) Total Renter Becoming Owner Demand 50%-80% AMI 14 0 0 8 4 2 1 0 30

(=) Potential Demand for Owner Housing Affordable to


Households 50%-80% AMI 63 36 33 36 18 8 6 2 201

Affordable Sales Prices $126,568 $144,737 $162,700 $180,870 $195,323 $209,776 $224,229 $238,682
$202,508 $231,580 $260,320 $289,392 $312,517 $335,642 $358,767 $381,891

SUMMARY OF DEMAND

1 person 2 person 3 person 4 person 5 person 6 person 7 person 8 person Total


Total Owner Demand Potential for Households Less than 30% AMI 74 76 69 54 34 18 14 5 343
Total Owner Demand Potential for Households 30%-50% AMI 45 35 32 29 19 8 6 2 175
Total Owner Demand Potential for Households 50%-80% AMI 63 36 33 36 18 8 6 2 201

Total Owner Demand Potential - Up to 80% AMI 182 147 133 119 71 33 26 9 720

1
HUD 2009 Income Limits
2
Claritas 2009 data for City of Newark
3
Census 2000 PUMS data for Washington, D.C. PMSA
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
V. HOUSING AND HOMELESS NEEDS ASSESSMENT ......................................................... 5-1
A. INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................ 5-2
Household Income and Poverty ..................................................................................... 5-2
Housing Unit Characteristics .......................................................................................... 5-3
B. HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT ......................................................................................... 5-4
All Low-Income Households with Housing Needs .......................................................... 5-5
Low-Income Renter Households with Housing Needs ................................................... 5-6
Low-Income Owner Households with Housing Needs ................................................... 5-7
Housing Affordability Mismatch ...................................................................................... 5-9
Low-Income and Racial/Ethnic Concentrations ........................................................... 5-10
Public Housing Needs .................................................................................................. 5-12
Housing and Transportation ......................................................................................... 5-14
C. HOMELESS NEEDS ASSESSMENT ................................................................................... 5-15
Definition of Homelessness .......................................................................................... 5-16
Nature and Extent opf Homelessness in Newark ......................................................... 5-17
Persons at Risk of Becoming Homeless ...................................................................... 5-18
Contributing Factors to Homelessness ........................................................................ 5-18
Homeless Facilities and Service Providers .................................................................. 5-18
D. ASSESSMENT OF NON-HOMELESS SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATIONS .................................. 5-19
Needs of Non-Homeless Subpopulations in Newark ................................................... 5-20
E. LEAD-BASED PAINT ....................................................................................................... 5-24

Table 1: Household Income


Table 2: Housing Units
Table 3: Housing Problems – City of Newark Census Place
Table 4: Low-Income Renter Households with Housing Problems
Table 5: Low-Income Owner Households with Housing Problems
Table 6: Affordability Mismatch for All Households
Table 7: Rental Affordability Gap Analysis
Table 8: Owner Affordability Gap Analysis
Table 9: NHA Family Developments
Table 10: NHA Townhouse Specific Developments
Table 11: NHA Elderly Developments
Table 12: Means of Transportation to Work by Tenure (16 yrs and over)
Table 13: (HUD Table 1A): Housing Gap Analysis Chart
Table 14: Contributing Factors of Homelessness
Table 15: (HUD Table 1B): Special Needs (Non-Homeless) Populations
Table 16: Newark Residents HIV/AIDS Cases Reported as of June 30, 2009
Table 17: Newark Residents with a Disability by Type and Age

Chart 1: Housing Units by Size, Newark


Chart 2: Housing Stock Comparison
Chart 3: Racial/Ethnic Concentrations by Zip Code
Chart 4: Veterans by Sex and Age in Newark
Chart 5: Age of Housing Stock in Newark

Map 1: Housing and Transportation Costs, Newark


Map 2: Newark –Essex County CoC Boundary Map 2008

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5‐1 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
A. INTRODUCTION

This section discusses the City of Newark’s housing and homeless needs, as determined
through review of various census and HUD data resources and of input from citizens, public
service agencies, and government agencies via stakeholder consultation, public meetings, and
surveys. This section addresses the requirements of section §91.205 of HUD’s Consolidated
Plan regulations.

Consolidated Plan regulations require that the assessment of the needs of the community be
based on census data or other data resources provided or approved by HUD. Given that the
most current census data is from the 2000 Census, the City attempted to use the most current
data available through other data sources including, Comprehensive Housing Affordability
Strategy (CHAS) data from 2006 through 2008 and 2008 American Community Survey (ACS)
estimates, local plans, or other studies as indicated. Therefore, the data and statistics presented
in this section may differ slightly from the data provided in the Housing Market Analysis (Section
4). The following assessment describes Newark’s estimated housing needs projected for the
five-year period from 2010-2015.

Household Income and Poverty

The income categories required by HUD for the Consolidated Plan are: extremely-low income
defined as income less than 30 percent of median family income (MFI); low-income defined as
income between 30 percent and 50 percent MFI; and moderate-income defined as income
between 50 percent and 80 percent MFI. Collectively, households in these income groups are
referred to as low-income households.

The MFI for Newark increased from $30,781 in 2000 to an estimated $38,668 in 2008, a 20
percent increase over this period. The increase in the MFI parallels the shift in the distribution of
households by income, a decrease in number of lower income households, coupled with a
proportionate increase in the number of more affluent households from 2000 to 2008. This trend
however does not reflect the current recession which might have reduced these income gains.

Table 1: Household Income


2000 2008 ACS
Census Estimate
Total 91,366 92,048
Less than $10,000 21,491 14,804
$10,000 to $14,999 8,122 7,304
$15,000 to $19,999 7,295 6,491
$20,000 to $24,999 6,029 5,599
$25,000 to $29,999 6,420 5,685
$30,000 to $34,999 5,403 5,719
$35,000 to $39,999 4,711 6,281 Poverty 
$40,000 to $44,999 4,179 3,942 Line for a 
$45,000 to $49,999 3,821 4,369 family of 
$50,000 to $59,999 5,986 6,016 three 
$60,000 to $74,999 7,058 7,481
$75,000 to $99,999 6,047 9,253
$100,000 to $124,999 2,350 4,962
$125,000 to $149,999 968 1,927
$150,000 to $199,999 729 829
$200,000 or more 757 1,386
Source: 2000 CHAS Data and 2008 ACS Source: 2009 Poverty Guidelines 

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-2 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
Based on 2008 ACS estimates the average household size for owner-occupied housing in
Newark is 3.06 and 2.64 for renter-occupied units. According to the 2009 Department of Health
and Human Services Poverty Guidelines, the poverty threshold for a family of three is $18,3101.
Approximately 28,000 households (an estimated 66,022 individuals) were earning below the
federal poverty level for a family of three in 2008, down from approximately 36,000 households
in 2000.

Housing Unit Characteristics

Newark’s housing market consists primarily of rental housing, with 76 percent of the housing
stock made up of rental housing units. The distribution of housing units has changed very little
since 2000, as seen in the table below. The decrease in renter-occupied housing units is likely
attributed to the increase in the City’s vacancy rate of rental housing since 2000, demolition of
deteriorated units, conversion, or abandonment.

Table 2: Housing Units


2000 2008
Census ACS Estimate
Total 100,141 108,423
Occupied 91,382 92,048
Vacant 8,759 16,375
Renter-Occupied 69,644 69,181
Owner-Occupied 21,738 22,867
Source: 2000 CHAS Data and 2008 ACS

The distribution of rental units by bedroom size is: two-bedroom units (35 percent of occupied
renter units), one-bedroom (26 percent), and three-bedroom (23 percent). Newark’s owner-
occupied units consist primarily of three-bedroom (40 percent) or two-bedroom (23 percent)
houses.

Chart 1: Housing Units by Size, Newark

Source: 2008 ACS

                                                            
1
 Federal Register Notice of the 2009 Poverty Guidelines, http://aspe.hhs.gov/poverty/09poverty.shtml

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-3 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
Newark’s owner-occupied housing stock is made up primarily of single detached units (33
percent) and two-unit duplexes (29 percent). The rental housing stock consists primarily of three
to four-unit complexes (28 percent) and larger fifty or more unit complexes (19 percent).

Chart 2: Housing Stock Comparison

Source: 2008 ACS

Newark’s housing stock is also one of the oldest in the region. Of the 22,867 owner occupied
units, 18,452 or 81 percent were built prior to 1980 and 12,133 or 53 percent were built prior to
1950. Of the 69,181 renter occupied units, 55,561 or 80 percent were built prior to 1980 and
25,626 or 37 percent were built prior to 1950. The median year built of owner-occupied units is
1948 and 1958 for renter-occupied units.

B. HOUSING NEEDS ASSESSMENT

The uncertainty and instability created by the recent economic and housing crisis has and will
continue to affect the economic and housing characteristics of Newark. The following provides
an estimate of the number and type of households in need of housing assistance and or
experiencing housing problems. Housing needs are broken down by various HUD-defined
income categories provided through the CHAS data special tabulations of the U.S. Census and
ACS estimates provided by HUD to support localities in preparing Consolidated Plans. To help
understand the CHAS data analysis, a definition of key terms follows:

 Elderly households are defined as one and two person units having one or more
persons at or over age 62 or who are declared to be disabled.
 Small related households vary in size from 2-4 related individuals.
 Large related households consist of 5 or more related individuals.
 “All Other” households consist of those households which do not meet the other
criteria.
 Housing is considered “affordable” if no more than 30 percent of a household’s
monthly income is needed for rent and utilities, or mortgage payments.
 When the proportion of household income needed to pay housing costs exceeds 30
percent, a household is considered “cost burdened” and is “severely cost burdened” if
the proportion of income to pay housing costs exceeds 50 percent.
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-4 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
 HUD defines “any housing problem” as being cost burdened, living in overcrowded
conditions, and/or living in units without complete kitchen and plumbing facilities.

Tables provided in the CHAS tabulations are estimates of the numbers of households and
persons that fit certain combinations of HUD-specified criteria such as housing needs by various
types of households and income ranges. 2000 Census data is primarily used to illustrate
housing needs within a particular income category. In addition, 2006-2008 CHAS data or 2008
ACS estimates were also used to illustrate growing trends of housing needs in Newark.

All Low-Income Households with Housing Needs

The table below is a special tabulation of the 2000 Census (CHAS data) and illustrates housing
problems experienced by low-income renters and owners in Newark.

Table 3: Housing Problems – Newark, NJ


Renters Owners
Household
Small Large Small Large Total
by Type, Elderly Elderly
Related Related All Total Related Related All Total Households
Income, & 1&2 1&2
2 to 4 5 or more Other Renters 2 to 4 5 or more Other Owners
Housing members members
members members members members
Problem
(A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) (G) (H) (I) (J) (K)

Household
Income 7,694 11,895 3,880 7,145 30,614 1,474 982 392 384 3,232 33,846
<=30% MFI
% with any
housing 57.1 74.6 90.2 67.2 70.5 82.0 76.1 93.9 60.9 79.1 71.3
problems
% Cost
54.8 71.0 75.0 64.9 66.0 82.0 73.6 91.3 57.3 77.7 67.1
Burden >30%
% Cost
34.1 53.6 52.1 51.6 48.1 68.8 65.6 80.4 53.4 67.4 49.9
Burden >50%
Household
Income
1,864 6,430 2,015 2,285 12,594 1,069 1,215 484 194 2,962 15,556
>30 to
<=50% MFI
% with any
housing 44.7 60.4 77.4 65.4 61.7 65.5 79.0 80.4 82.0 74.5 64.2
problems
% Cost
42.9 51.2 33.7 58.9 48.6 65.5 79.0 74.4 82.0 73.6 53.3
Burden >30%
% Cost
9.7 6.5 4.5 7.2 6.8 34.6 60.9 39.3 56.7 47.6 14.6
Burden >50%
Household
Income
1,003 5,550 1,645 2,730 10,928 793 1,823 910 425 3,951 14,879
>50 to
<=80% MFI
% with any
housing 16.7 20.5 60.2 24.4 27.1 40.7 65.2 72.0 69.4 62.3 36.5
problems
% Cost
11.8 8.4 5.5 20.3 11.2 40.2 64.1 58.8 69.4 58.7 23.8
Burden >30%
% Cost
0.8 0.2 0.0 1.1 0.4 21.4 29.3 13.2 40.0 25.2 7.0
Burden >50%
Source: 2000 CHAS (used to complete HUD Table 2A)

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-5 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
Based on this data there are a total of 64,281 low-income households (those earning less than
80 percent MFI) occupying housing in Newark. Of these households, 53 percent or 33,846
households earn less than 30 percent of MFI. 24 percent or 15,556 households earn between
30 and 50 percent of MFI, and 23 percent or 14,879 households earn between 50 and 80
percent of MFI.

Low-Income Renter Households with Housing Needs

The following table illustrates the housing needs of low-income renters based on 2000 CHAS
data provided in Table 3. There are approximately 54,136 low-income renter households
experiencing housing problems in Newark, the majority of which are earning less than 30
percent MFI. Of the 54,136 low-income renter households, 27,550 are cost burdened greater
than 30 percent and 15,625 households are cost burdened greater than 50 percent.
Table 4: Low-income Renter Households with Housing Problems
% Of Total Low-
< 30% 30 to 50 to 80% Total Low-income
Income Renter
MFI 50% MFI MFI Renter Households
Households
Total Households 30,614 12,594 10,928 54,136 100
With any housing problems 21,583 7,770 2,961 32,314 60
Cost Burdened >30% 20,205 6,121 1,224 27,550 51
Severely Cost Burdened >50% 14,725 856 44 15,625 29
Source: 2000 CHAS Data (excerpted from Table 3)

Renter households earning less than 30 percent of MFI make up the majority of renter
households that are cost-burdened. The following is a breakdown of renter households by type
that are cost burdened and with housing problems.

Cost Burdened Renters

Elderly Households:
 There are 10,561 elderly renter households, representing 19 percent of the
54,136 low-income renter households.
 7,694 elderly renter households have a household income less than 30 percent
of MFI, of which 54.8 percent are cost burdened greater than 30 percent and
34.1 percent are cost burdened greater than 50 percent.

Small Related:
 There are 23,875 small related renter households, representing 44 percent of
the 54,136 low-income renter households.
 11,895 of small related renters have a household income less than 30 percent
of MFI, of which 71 percent are cost burdened greater than 30 percent and
53.6 percent are cost burdened greater than 50 percent.

Large Related:
 There are 7,540 large related renter households, representing 14 percent of the
54,136 low-income renter households.
 3,880 of large related renters have a household income less than 30 percent of
MFI, of which 75 percent are cost burdened greater than 30 percent and 52.1
percent are cost burdened greater than 50 percent.

All Other Households:


____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-6 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
 There are 12,160 “all other” renter households, representing 22 percent of the
54,136 low-income renter households.
 7,145 of the other renter households have a household income less than 30
percent of MFI, of which 64 percent are cost burdened greater than 30 percent
and 51.6 percent are cost burdened greater than 50 percent MFI.

This suggests the need to increase availability, accessibility, and affordability of rental housing
options specifically amongst extremely low and very low-income renters, focusing on small
related, large related, and elderly households. Elderly households in particular are on fixed
incomes and require affordable housing options. Supportive services like child care,
transportation subsidies, job training and education, and other services are often needed to
supplement affordable rental housing and to alleviate additional cost burdens faced by low-
income renters.

Any Housing Problems

60 percent of low-income renter households are experiencing housing problems which is


consistent with the percentage of all low-income households, as renter households make up the
majority of the population. 90 percent of large related households earning less than 30 percent
MFI have housing problems, compared to 74.6 percent of small related (2-4 member
households) and 57.1 percent of elderly renter households. Larger households are more likely
to experience overcrowding issues as five-bedroom rental units make up only 1 percent of the
occupied housing stock. Overcrowding and substandard housing have been exacerbated by the
rising cost of energy prices, including heating and transportation costs, which strain the budgets
of low-income families. According to 2008 ACS data, of the 69,181 renter occupied units, 1,085
lack plumbing facilities and 1,086 lack complete kitchen facilities. As noted previously, 25,626 or
37 percent of the renter-occupied units were built prior to 1950. These units are often in
substandard condition requiring repairs and may need to be replenished in the near future.

Low-Income Owner Households with Housing Needs

The following table illustrates the housing needs of low-income owners based on the 2000
CHAS data provided above. Compared to the total number of low-income households, owners
only make up a small portion of the low-income households, with 10,145 households. The
majority of households in this category earn between 50 to 80 percent of MFI.
Table 5: Low-income Owner Households with Housing Problems
% Of Total Low-
< 30% 30 to 50 to Total Low-income
Income Owner
MFI 50% MFI 80% MFI Owner Households
Households
Total Households 3,232 2,962 3,951 10,145 100
With any housing problems 2,557 2,206 2,461 7,224 71
Cost Burdened >30% 2,511 2,180 2,319 7,010 69
Severely Cost Burdened >50% 2,178 1,410 996 4,584 45
Source: 2000 CHAS Data (excerpted from Table 3)

Of the 10,145 low-income owner households 7,010 are cost burdened greater than 30 percent
and 4,584 households are cost burdened greater than 50 percent. Owner households earning
less than 30 percent of MFI make up the majority of owner households that are cost-burdened.
The following is a breakdown of owner households by type that are cost burdened and with
housing problems.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-7 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
Cost Burdened Owners

Elderly Households:
 There are 3,336 elderly owner households, which represents 32 percent of the
10,145 low-income owner households.
 1,474 elderly owner households have a household income less than 30 percent
of MFI (or 45 percent of all owner households earning less than 30 percent of
MFI), of which 82 percent are cost burdened greater than 30 percent and 68.8
percent are cost burdened greater than 50 percent.

Small Related:
 There are 2,320 small related owner households, representing 23 percent of
the 10,145 low-income owner households.
 982 of small related owner households have a household income of less than
30 percent of MFI, of which 73.6 percent are cost burdened greater than 30
percent and 65.6 percent are cost burdened greater than 50 percent.
 1,823 of small related owner households have a household income between 50
and 80 percent of MFI, of which 64.1 percent are cost burdened greater than
30 percent and only 29.3 percent are cost burdened greater than 50 percent.

Large Related:
 There are 1,786 large related owner households, representing 18 percent of
the 10,145 low-income owner households.
 392 of large related owners have a household income less than 30 percent of
MFI, of which 91.3 percent are cost burdened greater than 30 percent and 80.4
percent are cost burdened greater than 50 percent.

All Other Households:


 There are 1,003 “all other” renter households, representing 10 percent of the
10,145 low-income owner households.
 194 of all other owner households have a household income between 30 and
50 percent of MFI, of which 82 percent are cost burdened greater than 30
percent and 56.7 percent are cost burdened greater than 50 percent MFI

Owner-occupied households make up the minority of households in Newark which underlines


the need to increase homeownership opportunities for Newark residents. Higher housing costs
also negatively affect low-income owners, limiting their ability to maintain their homes. This
results in a concentration of lower-income households living in older neighborhoods with high
concentrations of substandard housing and overcrowding.

Any Housing Problems

7,224 or 71 percent of owner households are experiencing housing problems, compared to 60


percent of all low-income households. The majority of these housing problems are experienced
by those earning less than 30 percent MFI. This population is often unable to afford general
maintenance repairs and upkeep of their homes, because of the proportion of their income
already being expended on housing related expenses, and therefore these units are often in
substandard condition. According to 2008 ACS data, of the 22,867 owner occupied units in
Newark, 113 lack plumbing facilities and 113 lack complete kitchen facilities. The declining real
estate market also places low-income owners at risk of foreclosure and property deterioration.
____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-8 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
As noted previously, 12,133 or 53 percent of owner-occupied units were built prior to 1950.
Emergency repairs that constitute health and safety concerns are also common amongst low-
income owners, particularly occupants of housing built prior to 1950.
Housing Affordability Mismatch
To assist in assessing the affordability gap HUD provides a special tabulation of the 2000
Census to illustrate affordability gaps of renters and owners. Table 6 illustrates the number of
units that are affordable to low-income renter and owner households within the specified MFI
ranges.

Table 6: Affordability Mismatch for All Households


Data Current as
Rental Units by # of bedrooms Owned or for sale units by # of bedrooms
of 2000
Housing Units 0-1 2 3+ Total 0-1 2 3+ Total
by Affordability (A) (B) (C) (D) (E) (F) (G) (H)
1. Rent Affordable to <=30%MFI Value Affordable to <=30% MFI
a. # occupied
10,170 6,025 4,995 21,190 N/A N/A N/A N/A
units
b. % occupants
76.2 61.2 54.8 66.9 N/A N/A N/A N/A
<=30%
c. % built before
61.8 69.0 61.2 63.7 N/A N/A N/A N/A
1970
d. % some
40.0 40.0 36.5 39.2 N/A N/A N/A N/A
problem
e. # vacant for
650 775 325 1,750 # vacant for sale N/A N/A N/A N/A
rent
2. Rent Affordable to >30% to <=50% MFI Value Affordable to <=50% MFI
a. # occupied
11,625 13,690 8,440 33,755 194 1,415 4,360 5,969
units
b. % occupants
63.1 55.5 51.0 57.0 59.3 47.0 25.1 31.4
<=50%
c. % built before
80.8 78.8 74.9 78.5 82.5 85.2 90.7 89.1
1970
d. % some
59.3 50.9 49.3 53.4 18.0 13.4 7.9 9.5
problem
e. # vacant for
895 1,505 595 2,995 # vacant for sale 15 130 130 275
rent
3. Rent Affordable to >50% to <=80% MFI Value Affordable to >50% to <=80% MFI
a. # occupied
5,385 5,155 2,310 12,850 293 1,775 4,670 6,738
units
b. % occupants
72.7 61.6 61.0 66.1 40.3 53.5 41.0 44.3
<=80%
c. % built before
78.2 75.5 69.0 75.4 70.0 82.3 83.5 82.6
1970
d. % some
62.5 53.6 53.7 57.4 15.4 12.7 4.5 7.1
problem
e. # vacant for
275 40 45 360 # vacant for sale 15 45 85 145
rent
Source: HUD 2000 State of the Cities CHAS Data Sets (SOCDS)
____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-9 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
Rental Gap Analysis

Renter households are often cost burdened due to the lack of affordable housing options. The
table below compares the supply of rental units to the number of renter households in each
income category. The gap/surplus column indentifies the gap or surplus in the market.

Table 7: Rental Affordability Gap Analysis


Households in # of Vacant for
Income Ranges Units Occupied Gap/Surplus*
Category Rent
<30% MFI 30,614 21,190 1,750 7,674
30 to 50% MFI 12,594 33,755 2,995 24,156*
50 to 80% MFI 10,928 12,850 360 2,282*
Total Gap 7,674
Total Surplus 26,438
Source: 2000 CHAS Data

Renter Mismatch Summary:

<30 percent MFI:


 The majority (10,170) of units occupied by households earning less than 30
percent of MFI consist of zero to one-bedroom units.
 Only 67 percent of the 21,190 occupied units in this income category are
actually occupied by households earning less than 30 percent of MFI.
 Based on this data there is need for an additional 7,674 rental units affordable
to households earning less than 30 percent of MFI.

30 to 50 percent MFI:
 The majority (13,690) of units occupied by households earning between 30 and
50 of MFI consists of two-bedroom units.
 Only 57 percent of the 33,755 occupied units in this income category are
actually occupied by households earning less than 50 percent of MFI.

50 to 80 percent MFI:
 The majority (5,385) of units occupied by households earning between 50 and
80 MFI consists of one-bedroom units.
 Only 66 percent of the 12,850 occupied units in this income category are
actually occupied by households earning less than 80 percent of MFI

Owner Gap Analysis

Owner households are often cost burdened due to lack of supply of affordable housing options
but also due to the costs of maintaining their properties.
Table 8: Owner Affordability Gap Analysis
Households in
Income Ranges Units Occupied # of Vacant for Sale Gap/Surplus*
Category
<30% MFI 3,232 n/a n/a n/a
30 to 50% MFI 2,962 5,969 275 3,282*
50 to 80% MFI 3,951 6,738 145 2,932*
Total Gap -
Total Surplus 6,214
Source: 2000 CHAS Data

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-10 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
The table above compares the supply of owner units to the number of owner households in
each income category. The gap/surplus column indentifies the gap or surplus in the market.

Owner Mismatch Summary:

<30 percent MFI:


 2000 CHAS data is not available to assess the needs of households in this
income category.

30 to 50 percent MFI:
 There appears to be a reasonable supply of ownership housing to meet the
need of low-income households, specifically those in this income category. The
surplus identified is likely due to lack of financial resources of renter
households in this income category to pursue homeownership or the condition
or location of the housing is not suitable.
 Data presented does not account for condition of vacant units or units
demolished or lost over the years.

50 to 80 percent MFI:
 There appears to be a reasonable supply of ownership housing to meet the
need of low-income households, specifically those in this income category. The
surplus identified is likely due to lack of financial resources of households in
this category to pursue homeownership.
 Data presented does not account for condition of vacant units or units
demolished or lost over the years.

Low Income and Racial/Ethnic Concentrations

The following chart illustrates the concentration of races by zip code. The City of Newark is
comprised of 55 percent African Americans, 15 percent White (non-Hispanic/Latino), 13 percent
White (Hispanic/Latino) and 18 percent other.

Chart 3: Racial/Ethnic Concentrations by Zip Code

100%
93%
89%
90% 83% % White (non 
79% Hispanic/Latino)
80%
70% 64%
60% % White ( Hispanic 
49% /Latino)
50%
38%
40%
26% % African American
30%
4%
20%
10% % Other
0%
07102 07103 07104 07105 07106 07107 07108 `07112 `07114

Source: 2008 ACS

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-11 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
The City of Newark is characterized by a predominantly minority, lower income population.
Within the City of Newark, the lowest median household incomes at the zip code level are
concentrated in zip codes 07102 (median household income of $15,858), 07114 (median
household income of $19,424), 07108 (median household income of $24,107), and 07103
(median household income of $28,571), indicating that these four zip codes have the highest
poverty levels in the City. Zip code 07102 is 64 percent African American. Zip code 07114 is 49
percent African American. Zip code 07108 is 80 percent African American and 07103 is 83
percent African American.

HUD defines a disproportionate greater need as when the percentage of persons in a category
of need who are members of a particular racial or ethnic group is at least ten percentage points
higher than the percentage of persons in the category as a whole. The above chart would
indicate that African American low-income households have a disproportionate greater need
compared to other non-African American households in Newark.

Public Housing Needs

The Newark Housing Authority (NHA) is the largest public housing authority in the State of New
Jersey, charged with administering Public Housing, Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Section 8,
and HOPE VI programs in Newark. NHA currently owns and manages 45 active properties and
approximately 8,173 affordable housing units. Of these units, 7,817 are public housing units.
NHA has also developed a Homeownership Program that includes 42 renovated townhouse
units made available to qualified public housing residents. Approximately 25 townhouse units
under the HOPE VI Ward Community Redevelopment Program are also made available for
homeownership.

While NHA expects to increase its inventory of new housing units as it builds townhouses at
various sites in the City, over one-third of its stock is older family low-rise units with undersized
rooms, poor layout, and design issues that could not be rectified by available capital
improvement funds. NHA is assessing its developments to determine if portions of its family low-
rise sites could be replaced in the near future.

The following tables break down NHA’s inventory of active public and affordable housing sites
by type of development.

Table 9: NHA Family Developments


Name 0 BR 1BR 2BR 3 BR 4BR 5BR Year Built Total
James Baxter Terrace* - 132 254 144 33 6 1940 569
Bergen Street Village - - - 36 10 4 1986 50
Joseph P. Bradley Court - 45 181 75 - - 1940 301
Felix Fuld Court* 1 65 144 82 7 1 1940 300
John W. Hyatt Court - 111 186 90 15 - 1941 402
Milliard E. Terrell Homes - 100 110 65 - - 1946 275
Pennington Court - 82 114 38 2 - 1939 236
Serenity Village - - - 72 20 8 1992 100
Seth Boyden Terrace - 156 249 110 15 - 1939 530
Stephen Crane Village - 136 147 71 - - 1940 354
Total 1 827 1,385 783 102 19 - 3,117
Source: www.newarkha.org
*Approved for demolition

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NHA has a total of ten family developments with a total of 3,117 units, the majority of which are
two-bedroom units.

Table 10: NHA Townhouse Specific Developments


Name 0 BR 1BR 2BR 3 BR 4BR 5BR Year Built Total
Bellemead - - - 67 24 5 1998 96
Betty Shabazz Village - - - 91 23 10 - 124
Bradley Court I - - 8 10 - - 1981 18
Bradley Court II - - 4 2 - - - 6
Century 21 - 20 38 38 - - 2003 96
Chadwick Avenue Village - - - - 34 - 1986 34
Claremont - 24 71 5 - - - 100
Clinton Ave Townhomes - 20 41 39 - - 2003 100
Dr. Jose Rosario Village - - - 66 23 5 1996 94
Fifteen Avenue Village - - - 70 25 5 1998 100
Janice Cromer Village, 36 - - 38 39 10 2 1987 89
Janice Cromer Village, 52 - - - 6 - - - 6
Kemsco Development - - - 135 48 11 1994 194
Mount Prospect Village/Victoria
- - - - 27 - - 27
Avenue
Oriental Village - - 72 17 4 2 1987 95
Oscar Miles Village - - 68 100 24 7 1994 199
Otto Kretchmer Homes - 27 69 41 6 - 2005 143
Riverside Villa - 40 70 68 14 6 - 198
Town Homes at North Point - 14 26 14 - - - 54
Town Homes at South Point - 4 11 19 - - - 34
Westside Village - - - 36 8 4 1986 48
Woodland Village - - - 33 9 5 1986 47
Wynona Lipman Gardens - 76 209 15 - - 2002 300
Total 0 225 725 911 279 62 - 2,202
Source: www.newarkha.org

NHA has a total of 23 townhome developments with a total of 2,202 units, the majority of which
are three-bedroom units.

Table 11: NHA Elderly Developments


Year Elderly
Name 0 BR 1BR 2BR 3 BR 4BR 5BR Total
Built Only
Baxter Terrace Elderly 96 130 24 - - - 1966 125 250
Geraldine Foushee Towers 61 143 48 - - - 1962 244 252
James C. White Manor - 156 50 - - - 1976 205 206
Otto E. Kretchmer Elderly, 21A 175 221 44 - - - 1968 159 440
Otto E. Kretchmer Elderly, 17 44 132 22 - - - 1961 98 198
Seth Boyden Elderly, 21E 73 251 36 - - - 1969 176 360
Seth Boyden Elderly, 21F 80 100 20 - - - 1969 198 200
Stephen Crane Elderly, 16 44 132 22 - - - 1962 98 198
Stephen Crane Elderly, 22C 151 194 30 - - - 1967 304 375
Stephen Crane Elderly, 22D 151 194 30 - - - 1967 303 375
Total 875 1,653 326 - - - - 1,910 2,854
Source: www.newarkha.org

NHA has a total of ten elderly developments with a total of 2,854 units, the majority of which are
one-bedroom units. NHA’s 2010 Designated Housing Plan designated 1,910 units as “elderly
only” units, which represents about 23 percent of NHA’s total portfolio.

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NHA also has a number of vacant units, including: 196 units vacant due to modernization, 659
units vacant due to approved demolition, 490 routine vacancies, and 174 units vacant for other
reasons.

As of November of 2009, NHA maintained a waiting list of 8,963 family applicants, 3,596 mixed
population applicants, 1,012 elderly designated applicants, 6,076 HCV applicants, and 13 family
applicants requesting accessible units2. Waitlist totals represent the current unmet need of
public housing in the City of Newark.

To address this need NHA has prioritized the development of over 600 units of affordable
housing over the next five years. In addition, NHA will issue 1,000 HCVs to households on its
waiting list during the summer of 2010.

Housing and Transportation

The City of Newark has one of the premier transportation networks in the nation and the best in
the region. Newark International Airport is the fastest growing such facility in the U.S., handling
over 28 million passengers annually. Port Newark is the second largest containership port in the
country. The City is the hub of seven major highways, including the Garden State Parkway and
the New Jersey Turnpike. Pennsylvania Station, situated in the central business district,
provides train and bus transportation for 70,000 commuters daily.

The table below illustrates the means of transportation to work by workers sixteen years and
over in households. According to this data, only 30 percent of Newark workers age sixteen and
over use public transportation, while most residents (49 percent) drive a personal vehicle.

Table 12: Means of Transportation to Work by Tenure (16 Years and Over)
Owners % Renters % Total %
Car, Truck, or Van – drove alone 21,200 67 30,698 42 51,898 49
Car, Truck, or Van – carpooled 2,382 7 5,473 7 7,855 7
Public Transportation (excluding taxicab) 5,741 18 26,247 36 31,988 30
Walked 1,363 4 6,646 9 8,009 8
Taxicab, Motorcycle, Bicycle, or other 1,040 3 4,120 6 5,160 5
Worked at Home 147 0 625 1 772 1
Total 31,873 100 73,809 100 105,682 100
Source: 2008 ACS

Buses play a significant role in transporting residents to jobs and subway stations in Newark.
Nearly 24,000 passengers or 74 percent of workers in Newark taking public transportation board
buses each day going to work. Additionally, of those workers taking public transportation, almost
23,000 or 71 percent earn less than the $35,000 annually.

Although all of NHA’s sites and most other affordable housing developments are strategically
situated in proximity to public transportation, the added cost of transportation increases the cost
burdens of low-income residents and makes it difficult to access employment opportunities and
supportive services. Considering housing plus transportation (H+T) costs provides a more
complete measure of affordability beyond the standard method of assessing only housing costs.

                                                            
2
Based on data presented in NHA’s 2009-2014 Five Year Plan, Attachment B. Families are allowed to apply for up
to 3 waiting lists. Therefore, waitlist totals most likely include applicants that are on multiple waitlists.
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Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
Map 1: Housing (left) and Transportation (right) Costs, Newark

 
Source: http://htaindex.cnt.org/ Less than 15%
Less than 30%
15 to 18%
30% and Greater
18 to 20%
20 to 28%
28% and Greater

While housing alone is traditionally deemed affordable when consuming no more than 30
percent of income, an affordable range for H+T is defined as the combined costs consuming no
more than 45 percent of income. According to the Housing and Transportation Affordability
Index, Newark households on average spend 17.46 percent of their income on transportation
and 30.42 percent on housing costs3. While this data does not separate low-income households
from higher-income households, it does indicate that on average, low-income households
exceed the affordable range of H+T costs.

C. HOMELESS NEEDS ASSESSMENT

The City of Newark is part of the Newark-Essex County Continuum of Care (CoC) and
coordinates with Essex County on matters relating to identifying and serving homeless
populations. In 2009, Mayor Cory A. Booker and County Executive Joseph DiVincenzo, Jr.,
each convened a Task Force to End Homelessness in their respective jurisdictions. The Essex-
Newark Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness enumerates the goals, strategies, and objectives
of the CoC in serving homeless populations for a ten year period commencing in 2010. The map
below indentifies the boundaries covered by the CoC.

                                                            
3
Percentages are based on statistics for the Newark Metropolitan Region
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Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
Map 2: Newark-Essex County CoC Boundary Map 2008

Each year, a Point-in-Time Count (PITC) is conducted to identify the number of homeless
individuals and families residing in emergency shelters or transitional housing facilities, as well
as those living unsheltered, in the Newark-Essex County CoC region. It is estimated that nearly
3,708 adults and children are homeless in Essex County, the vast majority (88 percent) of which
are staying, sheltered and unsheltered, in Newark.

Definition of Homelessness

HUD defines a homeless person as someone who resides in a place or places not meant for
human habitation. The person can also reside in an emergency shelter or a transitional housing
facility for the homeless and still be considered homeless provided the person was living on the
street just prior to receiving shelter. Persons who lack resources and support networks needed
to obtain housing are also considered to be homeless when such persons are fleeing domestic
violence, facing eviction within one week, or being discharged within a week from an institution,
such as a mental health or substance abuse treatment facility or a jail/prison.

Persons living in substandard and/or overcrowded housing or who are paying an excessive
amount for housing are not considered to be homeless. Additionally, persons that currently live
in board and care facilities, adult congregate living facilities, or similar places as well as
institutionalized persons are not considered to be homeless under the federal definition. Youth
that are wards of the State and therefore eligible for state housing assistance are not
considered homeless, although youth in foster care may receive needed supportive services
which supplements, but does not substitute for, the state’s assistance.

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Nature and Extent of Homelessness in Newark

The CoC analyzed and compared information and data from the housing inventory, PITC
survey, and Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) to establish accurate unmet
needs and ascertain the number of homeless people, from the unsheltered count and
subpopulations information, who require supportive services provided by transitional and
permanent supportive housing. On January 28, 2009 the Newark-Essex County CoC completed
its 2009 PITC that estimated the Newark-Essex County homeless count at 1,730 homeless
adults (1,071) and children (659), based on the official HUD McKinney-Vento Act definition of
homelessness.

Table 10 (HUD Table 1A) below summarizes the current inventory of homeless individuals,
families, and subpopulations and their unmet need.

Table 13 (HUD Table 1A): Housing Gap Analysis Chart


Current Inventory Under Development Unmet Need/Gap
Individuals (beds)
Emergency Shelter 1,327 -434
Transitional Housing 211 -55
Permanent Supportive Housing 244 793
Subtotal 1,782
Persons in Families with Children (beds)
Emergency Shelter 122 -44
Transitional Housing 151 -31
Permanent Supportive Housing 150 600
Subtotal 423
Total 2,205
Part 1: Homeless Population
Sheltered
Emergency Transitional
Unsheltered Total
Number of Families with Children 154 145 25 324
1. Number of Persons in Families with
426 394 54 874
Children
2. Number of Single Individuals and
556 121 165 842
Persons in Households without Children
Total Persons (lines 1 & 2) 982 515 219 1,716
Part 2: Homeless Subpopulation
a. Chronically Homeless 125 28 129
b. Seriously Mentally Ill 246
c. Chronic Substance Abuse 187
d. Veterans 47
e. Persons with HIV/AIDS 126
f. Victims of Domestic Violence 55
g. Unaccompanied Youth Not available
Source: 2009 NJ PITC Report- Essex County

As the data above indicates, there is an unmet need for approximately 793 individual beds and
600 family beds in permanent support housing facilities. The existing inventory of emergency
and transitional facilities is able to serve the existing homeless population. The majority of
homeless individuals and families reside in emergency or transitional facilities, with 219
unsheltered persons. Of the homeless surveyed in 2009, 374 or 35 percent indicated that the
length of their homelessness exceed 365 days. A total of 599 or 56 percent were male, 435 or
41 percent were female, and 7 or one percent reported to be transgender. And 296 were
children under the age of six. The 2009 count showed that the largest percentage of homeless

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persons were 30-59 years of age, which represents approximately 77 percent of the total
homeless population. Approximately 74 percent of the homeless population surveyed was
African American and 10 percent was Asian.

Chronic Homeless

A person who is "chronically homeless" is an unaccompanied homeless individual with a


disabling condition who has either been continuously homeless for a year or more OR has had
at least four (4) episodes of homelessness in the past three (3) years. In order to be considered
chronically homeless, a person must have been sleeping in a place not meant for human
habitation (e.g., living on the streets) and/or in an emergency homeless shelter. Chronically
homeless persons have priority for specific types of services and shelters and must be included
in any planned strategy for local homeless assistance. A disabling condition is defined as "a
diagnosable substance abuse disorders, serious mental illness, developmental disability, or
chronic physical illness or disability, including the co-occurrence of two or more of these
conditions." A disabling condition limits an individual's ability to work or perform one or more
activities of daily living. An episode of homelessness is a separate, distinct, and sustained stay
on the streets and/or in an emergency homeless shelter. A chronically homeless person must
be unaccompanied and disabled during each episode.

In 2009, there were 125 chronically homeless counted in the PITC, totaling 11.6 percent of the
total homeless population surveyed. This represents a decrease in chronically homeless
individuals, down from 379 in 2007 and 128 in 2008. The majority (88) of the chronically
homeless resided in emergency shelters, 33 were unsheltered and four stayed periodically in
hotels and motels. Approximately 64 percent of the chronic homeless population is African
American and 20 percent White.

Persons at Risk of Becoming Homeless

Households earning less than 30 percent of MFI and/or cost burdened more than 30 percent
represent the population most at risk of becoming homeless. As indicated above, there are an
estimated 33,846 households earning less than 30 percent of MFI, and 67 percent or 22,677 of
these households are cost burdened greater than 30 percent. As illustrated in Table 11 below,
high housing costs contributed to 18 percent of the instances of homelessness in Newark.

In addition, ex-offenders who have recently been released from a county or state correctional
facility represent a population at risk of becoming homeless. Finally, a new, growing population
of sheltered homeless in the City of Newark is runaway or abandoned youth, aged 14 to 22.
The sweeping changes in the welfare system are forcing females, especially those who are
heads of household, either to work or sink more deeply into homelessness. As a result more
youth and young adults are showing up in the transient shelters of Newark. This growing
phenomenon is necessitating an emergent shelter system that provides services specifically for
homeless adults aged 18 to 22 and younger.

Contributing Factors of Homelessness

Based on the 2009 Essex County Point in Time Count there were twelve contributing factors to
homelessness. As the table below illustrates, the highest ranking factor that respondents
indicated contributed to their homelessness was loss of job/inability to find work, representing
29 percent of the homeless population surveyed.

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Table 14: Contributing Factors of Homelessness


Factor Percent
Lost job/cannot find work 29
Eviction 27
Alcohol or drug abuse problems 25
Relationship/family breakup/death 20
Housing costs too high 18
Mental illness/emotional problems 14
Incarceration 13
Have work but wages are too low 11
Medical problems/physical or developmental disability 10
Lost job due to lack of transportation 6
Domestic violence 5
Utility costs too high 5
House condemned 3
Foreclosure 2
Loss of child support 1
Natural disaster 1
Source: 2009 NJ PITC Report: Essex County

Other top ranking factors included eviction, substance abuse issues, and relationship problems.
In total, 55 percent of respondents identified housing related problems as contributing to their
homelessness, 41 percent identified economic factors as contributing to their homelessness,
and 6 percent identified transportation issues as contributing to their homelessness. This
necessitates the need for comprehensive supportive services for our homeless, focusing first on
prevention and rapid re-housing services.

Homeless Facilities and Service Providers

The Newark Department of Child and Family Well-Being (CFWB) maintains a network of
facilities and services for the homeless and those at-risk of homelessness within the City of
Newark’s jurisdiction. At present, the inventory consists of: Four (4) transitional shelters with
approximately 191 beds/units and twelve (12) emergency shelters with approximately 566 beds.

Newark’s network of emergency shelter and transitional shelter providers and various other
nonprofit agencies, as well as City and county agencies, provides a continuum of care through
shelter, food, medical, and other supportive services. Additionally, Newark’s Municipal Welfare
Division participates in the State Temporary Rental Assistance (TRA) program helps to prevent
homelessness among welfare clients, particularly those also in need of mental health and
substance abuse services. There are a group of facilities, including private boarding homes and
hotels, with which the City contracts to provide affordable housing to homeless individuals and
families.

D. ASSESSMENT OF NON-HOMELESS SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATIONS

Due the need for supportive services, special needs populations are most likely to encounter
difficulties finding affordable housing and often need supportive services in addition to
affordable housing options. The special needs populations discussed in this section include:

 Elderly/Frail Elderly;
 Persons with HIV/AIDS;
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Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
 Persons with Disabilities;
 Veterans; and
 Ex-offenders.

The City used a variety of resources to assess the needs of special needs populations,
including secondary data and existing studies on housing and service needs of special needs
populations. The following sections summarize the estimated needs of these subpopulations.

Needs of Non-homeless Subpopulations in Newark

The following table (HUD Table 1B) summarizes the priority needs of non-homeless
subpopulations in Newark.

Table 15 (HUD Table 1B): Special Needs (Non-Homeless) Populations


Priority Need Unmet Dollars to Multi-Year Annual
Special Needs Subpopulations
Level Need* Address* Goals* Goals*
Elderly Y
Frail Elderly Y
Severe Mental Illness N
Developmentally Disabled N
Physically Disabled Y
Persons with Alcohol/Other Drug Addictions N
Persons with HIV/AIDS Y 3,337
Victims of Domestic Violence N
Veterans Y
Ex-offenders Y
Total - - - -
*denotes an optional field

The City of Newark is prioritizing the needs of the elderly, disabled, persons with HIV/AIDS,
veterans and ex-offender subpopulations for the 2010-2015 consolidated planning period. The
following sections discuss the needs of these subpopulations.

Elderly/Frail Elderly

Based on 2008 ACS data there are a total of 23,359 non-institutionalized elderly civilians
residing in Newark; they represent 9 percent of the City’s total population. As noted in the
Housing Needs Assessment section, there are approximately 13,897 low-income elderly
households, which represent approximately 22 percent of all low-income households in Newark.
Of the 23,359 non-institutionalized elderly civilians, 8,922 or 38 percent have a disability. Frail
elderly are defined for purposes of this assessment as individuals age 65 and older with a self-
care difficulty. In 2008, there were a total of 1,688 elderly persons with a self-care difficulty, who
represented 7 percent of all elderly persons in the City.

HUD’s 1999 Elderly Housing Report includes the most recent national data available on seniors
living in housing in need of repair or rehabilitation. HUD indicated that 6 percent of seniors
nationwide lived in housing that needed repair or rehabilitation4. Applying this percentage to
Newark, it is estimated that as many as 1,402 elderly residents are likely living in substandard

                                                            
4
Department of Housing and Urban Development, Housing our Elders: A report card on the housing conditions and
needs of older Americans, 1999
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housing based on 2008 ACS population estimates. Necessary ADA modifications for elderly
owners contribute to housing problems for elderly owner households as well. As noted
previously, elderly homeowners earning less than 30 percent MFI are the most affected
subpopulation of owner-occupied households.

NHA recently proposed in its 2010 Designated Housing Plan, to designate 1,910 public housing
units for elderly families only. These 1,910 units are located in eighteen (18) buildings that are
part of ten (10) NHA public housing developments. In addition, there are fourteen additional
subsidized developments for elderly persons in Newark. The total number of units available in
each development was not readily available during the development of this plan; therefore,
assumptions could not be made regarding the unmet need for this subpopulation.

Persons with HIV/AIDS

As the HUD HOPWA grantee, CFWB allocates funds and monitors HOPWA programs in the
Newark Eligible Metropolitan Statistical Area (NEMSA). NEMSA includes Essex, Morris, Union,
Sussex, and Hunterdon Counties in New Jersey and Pike County, Pennsylvania. NEMSA
provides services in the following categories: long-term rental assistance, short-term rental
assistance, housing information, and operating cost. CFWB administers the City’s HOPWA
program and funds approximately seventeen (17) non-profit agencies and units of local
government annually to enhance the quality of services provided to persons with AIDS and
establish affordable housing opportunities and services to move families towards self
sufficiency.

Housing and support services are particularly difficult for women with HIV/AIDS to obtain.
Programs that allow women to be housed with their children are important; since women make
sure that their children are secure before they take care of themselves. For those who are also
homeless, some services are impossible to obtain without a permanent address. Thus, housing
identification and rental assistance become crucial services, if only to allow them to maintain an
address and thus receive other necessary services.

The greatest gap in service provision for the HIV/AIDS homeless population is the need for
emergency and/or transitional housing. This type of housing specifically for persons with
HIV/AIDS however is limited throughout the Newark EMSA. The most affordable housing
available to persons with special needs, such as persons with HIV/AIDS is usually found within
Public Housing. However, even with a number of vacant units, there are long waiting lists and
red tape that make obtaining affordable housing extremely difficult. The following table identifies
the number of persons estimated to be living with HIV and AIDS in Newark.

Table 16: Newark Residents HIV/AIDS Cases Reported as of June 30, 2009
Diagnostic Status Males Females Total
HIV Cases 2,281 1,632 3,913
AIDS Cases 4,607 2,414 9,831
Total 8,570 5,174 13,744
Source: http://www.state.nj.us/health/aids/repa/impactcities/documents/newark.pdf

A total of 13,744 HIV/AIDS cases have been reported in Newark, including pre- and post-1990
counts. There have been a total of 7,907 deaths from these reported cases. Therefore, it is
estimated that 5,837 persons with HIV/AIDS are residing in Newark. The City’s HOPWA
program provides housing information, financial assistance and related services to
approximately 2,500 persons annually, representing about only half of the HIV/AIDS population
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in Newark. Therefore, about 3,337 persons with HIV/AIDS are not serviced by the City through
HUD funded programs.

Priority needs of this group will be addressed by informing eligible, low-income persons with
HIV/AIDS and related diseases and their families of the Newark HOPWA services provided in
the EMSA. Our communication vehicles are the HOPWA Service Providers' network; Ryan
White HIV Planning Council and its Service Providers' network; County Welfare agencies and
CEAS Committees; Homeless providers Network; and various social service, health and
substance abuse treatment centers. The major services required are long- and short-term rental
assistance, short-term mortgage and utility payments, housing information and supportive
services.

Persons with Disabilities

2008 ACS data estimates the number of disabled persons in Newark with at least one disabling
condition to be at 61,583. The table below identifies the number of persons with disabilities by
type of disability and by age.

Table 17: Newark Residents with a Disability by Type and Age


Under 5 5 to 17 18 to 34 35 to 64 65 to 74 75 years
Type of Disability years years years years years and older
Total
Male
Hearing 266 46 216 1,109 175 699 2,511
Vision 145 46 508 1,021 312 739 2,771
Cognitive - 1,793 1,042 2,552 231 493 6,111
Ambulatory - 92 587 3,482 876 1,334 6,371
Self-Care - 581 465 940 648 488 3,122
Independent Living - - 795 2,160 571 892 4,418
Subtotal 25,304
Female
Hearing 0 74 379 1,951 811 1,062 4,277
Vision 115 42 510 2,092 638 778 4,175
Cognitive - 838 689 3,042 662 1,000 6,231
Ambulatory - 0 681 5,013 1,794 2,540 10,028
Self-Care - 0 426 2,031 514 1,174 4,145
Independent Living - - 627 3,285 879 2,632 7,423
Subtotal 36,279
Total 526 3,512 6,925 28,678 8,111 13,831 61,583
Source: 2008 ACS

Persons 35 to 64 years of age encompass the largest population of persons with disabilities,
representing almost half of Newark’s disabled population. Females with ambulatory conditions
make up the largest type subgroup of disabled persons, followed by females with independent
living conditions, and males with ambulatory disabilities.

As identified in the Homeless Needs Assessment section, permanent supportive housing has
been identified as a priority need and will likely be needed for non-homeless special needs
populations. There are approximately seven subsidized developments specifically for disabled
persons. The total number of units available in each development was not readily available
during the development of this plan. Therefore, assumptions could not be made regarding the
unmet need for this subpopulation.

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Veterans

Based on 2008 ACS data, there are approximately 7,690 veterans living in Newark. The
majority of veterans are males between the ages of 35 to 54 years, and they represent 32
percent of the total veteran population. While veterans only make up three percent of Newark’s
population, veterans make up a subpopulation most in need of affordable housing and
supportive services.

Chart 4: Veterans by Sex and Age in Newark


1% 2% 1% 1% 0% Male, 18 to 34 years
12% Male, 35 to 54 years
19% Male, 55 to 64 years
Male, 65 to 74 years
Male, 75 years plus
14% 32%
Female, 18 to 34 years
18% Female, 35 to 54 years
Female, 55 to 64 years
Female, 65 to 74 years
Female, 75 years plus

Source: 2008 ACS

There are approximately 1,848 veterans with incomes below the poverty line in Newark and
2,342 with a disability. Affordable housing options for veterans will be prioritized through
homeownership and affordable rental housing options, as well as through support services.
While there are numerous subsidized housing developments in Newark, none specifically target
the needs of veterans. Providing veterans with affordable housing opportunities and services
will be a priority for the ensuing five-year period.

Ex-Offenders

The New Jersey Institute for Social Justice (NJISJ) states that of the nearly 70,000 adults and
juveniles expected to leave New Jersey correctional facilities over the next five years, it is
estimated that two-thirds of that population will be re-arrested within three years of release.
Individuals convicted of crimes in New Jersey are subject to a range of criminal and civil
sanctions, from probation and fines to incarceration and parole supervision, the inability to
access certain public benefits such as affordable housing, employment opportunities, job
training, and/or education assistance. NJISJ highlights these barriers for ex-offenders5:

 Barriers to Housing - New Jersey’s anti-discrimination law, which includes protection


against housing discrimination, does not protect against discrimination on the basis of
criminal convictions, and federal laws can limit access to public housing for those with
criminal convictions. Nationally, more than 10 percent of those coming in and out of
prisons and jail are homeless in the months before their incarceration.

                                                            
5
Legal Barriers to Prisoner Reentry in New Jersey, 2006, http://www.njisj.org/equal_justice/publications.php#4
Note: Laws identified in these briefs may change.
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-23 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
 Barriers to Employment - Individuals with criminal records face disadvantages,
particularly in an unyielding labor market. New Jersey’s law against discrimination does
not include any protections against discrimination based on arrest or conviction of a
crime. The Rehabilitated and Convicted Offenders Act (RCOA) may provide relief from
occupational licensing barriers.

 Barriers to Education - One of the primary means an individual can move forward from a
criminal conviction and improve the quality of life is through education. Public and
Private colleges have a wide discretion to admit or deny admissions based on criminal
convictions. In addition, financial aid to those with convictions has been restricted.

 Barriers to Public Benefits - Public Assistance benefits that provide cash assistance and
food stamps are critical to help individuals leaving jail and prison to obtain basic
necessities while looking for employment. Eligibility for public assistance includes job
training, child care, transportation, and certain medical assistance.

To reduce the number of repeat offenders, Newark strengthened its vocational and job training
programs and increased career development courses that not only provide ex-offenders the
ability to learn an employable skill but also to restore confidence in their futures. Newark’s One-
Stop Career Center provides employment assistance and a single point of access to services
that can help individuals successfully re-enter the workforce. NewarkWorks has successfully
developed a network of over 50 Newark companies that have signed on to hire ex-offenders
referred and placed by NewarkWorks. Continued funding of these programs to support ex-
offenders will continue to be a priority for the ensuing five-year period.

E. LEAD BASED PAINT

Lead is a highly toxic metal used for many years in products found in and around our homes.
Lead can cause a variety of health effects particularly in young children, including behavioral
problems and learning disabilities, to seizures and even death. Childhood lead poisoning is one
of the major environmental health hazards facing children today. Children are exposed to lead
poisoning through paint debris, dust, and particles released into the air that settle onto the floor
and windowsills. Lead-based paint is most prevalent in homes constructed before 1940 however
lead-based paint was not prohibited by law until January 1, 1978, thus home built prior to 1978
may also contain lead-based paint.

Chart 5: Age of Housing Stock in Newark


2% 6% Built 2005 or later
6%
Built 2000 to 2004
5%
28% Built 1990 to 1999
11% Built 1980 to 1989
Built 1970 to 1979
14%
12% Built 1960 to 1969
16% Built 1950 to 1959
Built 1940 to 1949
Built 1939 or earlier 
Source: 2008 ACS

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-24 
 
 
Section 5: Housing and Homeless Needs Assessment  
 
Based on the percentages in the chart above, there are approximately 87,611 housing units in
Newark constructed prior to 1980. Pre-1980 housing represents 81 percent of Newark’s housing
stock and pre-1939 units represent 28 percent. Given the age of the housing stock and the
overall condition of much of the housing in the City, it is reasonable to assume that a high
percentage of pre-1980 housing units contain lead-based paint that could present hazards to its
occupants, especially children. A conservative estimate is that at least 50 percent of the pre-
1980 units (approximately 43, 000 units) could contain lead based paint. National data indicates
that housing units occupied by low and very low income families tend to comprise the greatest
number of units with lead based paint hazards.

Lead-based paint remediation can be costly. Low-income households are often unable to afford
the necessary repairs to remediate their homes. The City of Newark has administered a Lead
Hazard Reduction Demonstration Grant (LHRDG) program for a number of years. CFWB’s
Division of Childhood Lead Poisoning Prevention Program has worked to abate over 725
housing units of lead-based paint hazards over the past seven years. Lead hazard programs
have repaired hundreds of homes over the years; however, the magnitude of the numbers of
potential housing units with lead hazards suggests that there is potentially thousands of housing
units containing lead-based paint that are not being addressed. The continued funding of Lead
Hazard Reduction programs will continue the City’s progress in addressing lead-based paint
hazards.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  5-25 
 
 
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
TABLE OF CONTENTS
VI. 2010-2015 STRATEGIC PLAN ......................................................................................... 6-1
A. INTRODUCTION .............................................................................................................. 6-2
B. PRIORITY NEEDS ........................................................................................................... 6-5
Priority Housing Needs................................................................................................ 6-5
Priority Homeless Needs ............................................................................................. 6-6
Special Needs Population Priority Needs .................................................................... 6-7
Community Development Priority Needs ................................................................... 6-10
Section 108 Loan Program Summary ........................................................................ 6-11
C. SPECIFIC GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES ......................................................... 6-13
Priority Consolidated Plan Activities .......................................................................... 6-15
Performance Measurement System .......................................................................... 6-15
D. CROSS CUTTING ISSUES.............................................................................................. 6-17
Lead-Based Paint Strategy........................................................................................ 6-17
Barriers to Affordable Housing (AI Summary) ............................................................ 6-18
Antipoverty Strategy .................................................................................................. 6-18
Monitoring ................................................................................................................. 6-19
E. APPENDICES ............................................................................................................... 6-23
Appendix A – HUD Table 1A ..................................................................................... 6-24
Appendix A – HUD Table 1B ..................................................................................... 6-25
Appendix A – HUD Table 1C ..................................................................................... 6-26
Appendix A – HUD Table 2A Part I............................................................................ 6-27
Appendix A – HUD Table 2A Part II........................................................................... 6-28
Appendix A – HUD Table 2A Part III.......................................................................... 6-29
Appendix A – HUD Table 2B ..................................................................................... 6-30
Appendix B – Newark 2010-2015 Strategic Framework............................................. 6-31
Appendix C – Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing CHoice ................................ 6-32

Table 1: Proposed Activities for Funding


Table 2: HUD Outcome Statements

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-1
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
A. INTRODUCTION

This section summarizes the City of Newark’s housing and community development priority
needs as well as the goals, objectives, and strategies to meet those needs for program years
2010 through 2015. This section specifically addresses the requirements of section §91.215 of
HUD’s Consolidated Plan regulations. The goals, objectives, strategies and outcomes identified
will guide the City’s planning efforts and allocation of four HUD formula grants and other funding
sources over the ensuing five-year Consolidated Plan period. The City of Newark expects to
receive, at a minimum, the following entitlement grants:

 Community Development Block Grant (CDGB);


 HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME);
 Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA);
 Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG).

The City of Newark will also leverage other non-entitlement HUD funds to meet identified needs,
including:

 Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP-1 and NSP-2);


 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG-R);
 Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program (HPRP);
 Lead Hazard Reduction Demonstration Grant (LHRDG);
 Section 108 Loan Guarantee (applying in 2010).

The City of Newark recognizes that affordable housing and community development needs of its
citizens are complex and require holistic community-wide initiatives. The City of Newark also
recognizes the need to have a long-term vision for the use and application of resources
received from HUD. This Strategic Plan seeks to link 2010 to 2015 Consolidated Plan goals,
objectives and strategies to longer-term objectives, strategies and initiatives as outlined in
Shifting Forward 2025: Newark Master Plan Re-Examination Report, the 2004 Updated Land
Use Element, Newark’s economic development strategy, germane redevelopment plans, the
Newark Housing Authority’s Five Year Plan, Newark and Essex County’s Ten Year Plan to End
Homelessness, and HUD’s Sustainable Community Initiative. The following is a summary of
these long-term planning documents and initiatives.

Shifting Forward 2025: Newark Master Plan Re-examination Report. On February 17, 2009,
Mayor Cory A. Booker, submitted Shifting Forward 2025: Newark Master Plan Re-Examination
Report, to the Central Planning Board, highlighting the future needs of Newark residents as well
as critical goals, strategies, and objectives over the next fifteen (15) years. The report was
approved by the Central Planning Board on March 9, 2009. The report identifies major
challenges and an objective based upon the critical needs of current and future residents, and
describes how a Master Plan, which governs physical development, could address those needs.
It examines the extent of change (and the need for updated policy) by looking at how the City’s
most recent comprehensive planning documents – the 1999 Newark Master Plan Re-
examination Report and the 2004 Land Use Element of the Newark Master Plan – addressed
these critical needs. Shifting Forward 2025 adopts three overarching goals, including: (1) jobs
for residents; (2) healthy and safe neighborhoods; and (3) Newark as a City of Choice.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-2
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
Land Use Plan. The Land Use Plan describes the recommended future land use of Newark in
terms of a set of twenty-one land use designations in four categories: residential, commercial,
industrial, and special purpose. There are also four special overlay districts that add an
additional set of regulations to the underlying land use designations.

Redevelopment Plans. Newark has seven (7) active redevelopment plans. This Strategic Plan
seeks to utilize the opportunities and strategies presented in each plan to address priority needs
of Newark and its residents. Below is a summary of these plans.

 Lincoln Park Redevelopment Plan – The goal of the redevelopment plan is to create a
vibrant, fully productive, mixed-use neighborhood by creating new development
opportunities for private and public-private investment. The plan will provide a range of
quality commercial and residential uses that will capitalize on the area’s strategic
location. The objectives of the redevelopment plan are to: promote living and working
arrangements suitable and affordable to practitioners of the fine arts; provide parcels of
land of sufficient size and dimension to enable an orderly arrangement of new land uses;
create land use and building requirements specific to the redevelopment areas that are
sensitive to adjoining uses; provide opportunities for local and regional cultural, retail,
commercial and civic services; provide new housing and employment opportunities;
provide infrastructure improvements including streets, curbs, sidewalks, parking, and
open space.

 Broad Street Station District Redevelopment Plan – The Broad Street Station District
Redevelopment Plan consists of a $73 million project for infrastructure improvements at
the New Jersey Transit’s historic Broad Street Station which serves; three commuter rail
lines, 12 bus routes, and a new light rail line. These improvements are intended to
expedite boarding and exiting of trains, increase the availability of information to
customers, improve pedestrian circulation in and around the station, increase the
flexibility of train operations, and make the station fully accessible to customers with
disabilities. In order to attract transit-oriented development projects, the State of New
Jersey passed the Urban Transit Hub Tax Credit and included the Broad Street Station
District within that Act. Most of the site is within a 5-10 minute walking distance of the
Newark Light Rail Line, the Newark Subway system, Rutgers University, NJIT, cultural
institutions, sports venues, and the Passaic Riverfront.

 Downtown Core Redevelopment Plan – The Newark Downtown District Core Area is
comprised of approximately 24 acres bounded by Market Street and Edison Place to the
north, Broad Street to the west, Green Street and Lafayette Street to the south, and
McCarter Highway and Mulberry Street to the east. The plan seeks to eliminate blighting
influences; coordinate the redevelopment of the land surrounding Penn Station in a
manner that is consistent with other redevelopment projects; allow for more efficient use
of land and public services; expand the City's tax base by encouraging higher density
development; provide site improvements that will beautify the area; create a well
planned development area that will provide opportunities for entertainment, recreation,
permanent employment, commercial and/or retail facilities, and housing within an area
that is currently underutilized but has the potential for sound development.

 Kent-Brenner-Springfield Redevelopment Plan – The Kent/Brenner/Springfield Study


Area comprises approximately 450 acres in both the Central and South Wards of
Newark and is bounded by Bergen Street to the East, 15th Avenue to the

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-3
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
North, Irvington to the West and Avon Avenue to the South. Encompassing most of
Newark’s “West Side” neighborhood, the Study Area is bisected by Springfield Avenue,
which connects downtown Newark to surrounding municipalities and remains one of
Essex County’s most prominent arterials. The ultimate revitalization goal is to reestablish
Springfield Avenue as a thriving mixed-use corridor surrounded by a stable residential
neighborhood. New investments in housing, business, open space, and improvements to
the physical environment are envisioned to address the concerns raised by members of
the community. This Plan also endeavors to provide affordable housing choices for
residents of all income levels within the Study Area, including low income, public
housing, workforce, and market rate housing.

 Newark Living Downtown Development Plan – The Newark redevelopment living


downtown plan was submitted to the Central Planning Board on June 3, 2008 by the
Department of Housing and Economic Development, Division of Planning and
community Development. The Central Planning Board Hearing was June 9, 2008. This
plan is intended to help stimulate investment in downtown Newark, to provide jobs,
revenue to pay for City services, and the chance to upgrade the living, working, and
playing environment in the City’s downtown area. The plan will support the
redevelopment of all Central Business District (CBD) buildings and sites, promote high
density development, mixed-use developments, and the adaptive reuse of the
downtown’s historic buildings.

 Old 3rd Ward Redevelopment Plan – The Urban Renewal plan of the Old Third Ward
Urban Renewal Area is located in the City of Newark. This project was originally dated
January 12, 1960 and since then has received 19 amendments, the most recent being
on March 28, 2008. The Old Third Ward Urban Renewal plan’s objectives essentially are
to displace buildings that are structurally substandard and eliminate overcrowding of
buildings on land, excessive dwelling unit density, and other identified hazards to the
health, safety, and general well-being of the community.

 Proposed West Market Redevelopment Plan – The Northern Fairmount Neighborhood is


in Newark’s West Ward. Most of the Northern Fairmount Neighborhood is in Fairmount,
though some of it is in Lower Roseville. West Market contains Census Tracts 7, 10, 16,
and 17. This plan deploys three strategies: West marketing, Educating, and Catalyzing.
“West marketing” is an advertising campaign that lets Newarkers know that
neighborhood is a great place to live. “Educating” seeks to help existing residents and
potential residents become homeowners by helping them make informed and
responsible decisions regarding home purchases. “Catalyzing” uses design proposals,
zoning recommendations, and investments to increase the amenities and improve the
physical environment of the neighborhood.

The Road Home – Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness (2010-2020). The Essex-Newark
Task Force to End Homelessness developed the Essex-Newark Ten Year Plan to End
Homelessness to provide a framework to transform the homeless response system from one
built on emergency and temporary housing to one of prevention and permanent housing. The
plan identifies seven (7) priorities, including (1) homelessness prevention; (2) housing; (3)
coordinated services; (4) data quality and performance management; (5) employment, training,
and education; (6) advocacy and community awareness; and (7) financing.

Newark Housing Authority Five-Year Plan. NHA’s five-year plan for 2009 through 2014 fiscal
years will enable it to serve the needs of low-income, very low-income and extremely low-
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-4
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
income families over the next five years. Specifically, NHA seeks to build, maintain, and
renovate housing communities to the highest standards. To that end, NHA plans to build or
acquire over 600 units of affordable housing in the next five years and expand affordable
housing options for families using a high quality Housing Choice Voucher program.

HUD Sustainable Communities Initiative. HUD established six principles of sustainable


communities, including: (1) provide more transportation choices; (2) promote equitable and
affordable housing; (3) enhance economic competitiveness; (4) target resources to existing
communities; (5) coordinate and leverage federal policies and investments; and (6) value
unique characteristics of communities, no matter their size. These principles have been
incorporated in consolidated planning efforts and will guide the City’s overall objectives in its use
of HUD resources.

B. PRIORITY NEEDS

This section summarizes the priority needs as determined by the housing market analysis,
housing and homeless needs assessments, stakeholder focus groups, citizen participation
process, analysis of impediments and consultation with partner agencies.

Priority Housing Needs

The housing market analysis and housing needs assessment identified the housing problems
and severity of cost-burdened low-income owners and renters in Newark. The City will address
the following priority housing needs over the 2010 to 2015 Consolidated Plan period:

 Increasing affordable rental housing opportunities for low-income households. A


comparison of the affordability mismatch gap analysis for rental housing found that there
is need for 7,674 rental units affordable to extremely low-income renters (<30 percent
MFI). Over 90 percent of large-related extremely low-income renter households in
Newark have housing problems, primarily due to overcrowding and substandard living
conditions. Adding newly constructed affordable housing and rehabilitating obsolete
rental housing will help to address this priority need.

 Providing new affordable homeownership opportunities for low- to moderate-


income households. The City of Newark comprises approximately 76 percent renter-
occupied housing. As noted in Section 4, despite the growing trend of home sales in
Newark, home values remain high in relation to household incomes. Therefore, a portion
of low-income households in Newark are capable of homeownership but lack the
financial resources to achieve homeownership. Providing downpayment and closing cost
assistance will provide low-income households new access to homeownership
opportunities.

 Improving conditions of existing housing. There are approximately 32,314 renter


households and 7,224 owner households in Newark experiencing housing problems.
Given the age of housing in Newark, many pre-1980 housing units are in need of repair
and upgrading. Improving the condition of housing in Newark, especially for extremely
low-income senior owner-occupants, would return quality affordable housing to the
market.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-5
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
 Increasing availability of sustainable housing options. Continuing to incorporate
energy efficiency and green design elements in new construction and substantial
rehabilitation projects will be a priority for the ensuing consolidated planning period.

 Providing counseling for first-time homebuyers and current homeowners.


Homeowner counseling and education assistance and foreclosure prevention outreach
and counseling will also be a priority.
HUD Table 2A in Appendix A of this section outlines the allocation of HUD resources to
priority housing needs of renters, owners, and non-homeless subpopulations, specified by
type of households and income range.

Public Housing Coordination Strategy Summary

Consistent with the Consolidated Plan, NHA’s housing strategy addresses the needs of priority
low-income households in Newark. NHA’s strategy for addressing identified needs over the next
five years involves both physical development and rehabilitation and supportive services. Over
the past three years NHA has made significant progress in revamping its mission, goals, and
objectives, and has been removed from HUD’s “troubled status” designation. NHA will be
working in close partnership with EHD on redevelopment and rehabilitation projects to increase
the availability and affordability of housing in Newark. Specifically, NHA has identified the
following priority activities over the next five years:

 Mixed Finance Modernization/Development – NHA plans to engage mixed-finance


development activities for the redevelopment of the Baxter Terrace, Felix Fuld, and New
Horizons A and B public housing sites. Baxter Terrace contains 569 units and Felix Fuld
contains 300 units. Modernizing these sites will return approximately 850 quality
affordable public housing units to the market.

 Demolition/Disposition – Demolition applications for Baxter Terrace and Felix Fuld and
five buildings at Hyatt Court have been approved. NHA also proposes to develop a
series of green spaces on the site of the former Hyatt Court buildings. The proposed
green space will include a football field, two basketball courts, a leasing office,
conference center, and laundry rooms for the residents. A disposition application for
these properties will be filed this year. A disposition application for Geraldine Foushee
Towers is pending approval. It was determined that the current modernization needs of
this property could not be addressed under the current capital grant. However, NHA
plans to use Low Income Tax Credits and Section 8 vouchers to save and maintain the
252-unit building. In addition, NHA plans to build a new 16,000 square foot family activity
center and 8,000 square foot senior activity center on the site of the former Otto
Kretchmer Homes.

 Project Based Vouchers – NHA has an active Project Based Assistance (PBA)
program. Several rounds of RFP’s have been conducted resulting in the award of
approximately 200 project based voucher commitments to several developers resulting
in approximately 600 new units being built or made available in Newark. PBA resources
will be targeted to priority needs, especially extremely low-income renters, veterans,
HIV/AIDS, ex-offenders, and other permanent supportive housing.

 Designated Housing for Elderly and Disabled Families – NHA’s 2010 Designated
Housing plan identifies 1,910 units that will be designated “elderly only” units and
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-6
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
represents approximately 24 percent of NHA’s total portfolio. This designation will help to
address the needs specific to elderly households.

 Community Service and Self-Sufficiency – NHA operates a self-sufficiency program


for both public housing and voucher participants. Some of the services provided include
a workplace literacy program, workforce learning link, personal counseling, career
counseling, educational counseling, educational seminars/workshops, referral services,
networking, job preparation assistance, financial aid application assistance, assistance
with defaulted student loan situations, credit repair assistance.

 Section 3 – The NHA board approved a Section 3 Plan to increase the opportunities of
low-income residents to obtain employment with funded contractors. The plan
establishes thresholds for professional service contracts to reserve percentages of the
contracts specifically for section 3 residents.

 Safety and Crime Prevention – NHA’s goal is to invest in innovative crime prevention
and quality of life strategies. NHA is working with local law enforcement to collect and
store data of crimes occurring on NHA sites. NHA has installed over 700 state of the art
surveillance cameras throughout its properties. In addition, NHA has established a
telephone “tip-line” encouraging anyone to report incidences of crime anonymously, as
well as quality of life issues.

NHA will continue to fully use its voucher allocation, as well as apply for additional vouchers to
support affordable housing goals of the City. NHA will continue to renovate and lease up vacant
units to increase the number of available affordable units to persons on its waiting lists. NHA is
also pursuing development and acquisition of additional affordable housing by leveraging tax
credits and other funding to address the overall shortfall of affordable housing in Newark. NHA’s
strategies are consistent with the priority needs identified in this Consolidated Plan.

Homeless Priority Needs

The homeless needs assessment identified the severity of homelessness in Newark. Consistent
with the Essex-Newark Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness, Newark’s priorities and strategies
indicate a shift in our homeless response system from one built on a foundation of emergency
and temporary housing to one build upon a foundation of prevention and permanent housing.
The City does acknowledge however that during this transition some level of emergency or
transitional housing, under the former response system and strategy, will require funding. The
City will address the following priority homeless needs over the 2010 to 2015 Consolidated Plan
period:

 Reducing the number of individuals and families that become homeless. Of the
homeless individuals surveyed 55 percent identified housing related problems as
contributing to their homelessness and 41 percent identified economic factors as
contributing to their homelessness. Providing homeless prevention services via
rental/mortgage and utility assistance to individuals and families will help to prevent
homelessness in Newark.

 Increasing availability of permanent supportive housing options for homeless


individuals and families. There is an unmet need for approximately 793 individual beds
and 600 family beds in permanent supportive housing facilities. This priority need is

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-7
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
consistent with the CoC’s objective to create 1,000 new units of permanent supportive
housing within five years and 3,000 new units of low income housing within ten years.

 Supporting operations of existing emergency/transitional homeless facilities.


There are approximately four transitional homeless shelters and twelve emergency
homeless shelters in Newark. Supporting the operations of existing emergency and
transitional homeless facilities using ESG funds, ensures a suitable living environment
for homeless individuals and families as shelters transition to the housing first model.

 Providing essential services to homeless populations. Providing homeless


individuals and families with case management and other essential supportive services
will help homeless individuals maintain a suitable living environment and become more
independent.

HUD Table 1A in Appendix A of this section illustrates the priority needs of homeless
populations.

Homeless Coordination Strategy Summary

The City of Newark has adopted the Essex-Newark CoC approach to addressing the needs of
homeless and at-risk populations. Newark is part of the Essex-Newark CoC and coordinates
with Essex County on strategies and activities to identify and serve homeless populations. The
Essex-Newark CoC addresses the housing and supportive service needs in each stage of the
process to help homeless persons make the transition to permanent housing and independent
living. As identified above, permanent supportive housing is a priority need in Newark. Newark
is committed to providing both housing and support services for homeless persons in need of
permanent housing and working to end incidences of homeless in Newark. Consistent with the
Essex-Newark Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness, Newark’s strategy adopts seven (7) key
elements:

 Homeless Prevention – aimed at reducing the number of individuals and families who
become homeless by providing rent, mortgage, and utility assistance to allow families
and individuals to stay in their homes.

 Housing – aimed at creating 1,000 new units of permanent supportive housing within
five years and 3,000 new units of low-income housing within ten years county-wide. This
signifies a shift of the homeless response system to a housing first strategy, helping
persons rapidly exit homelessness by placing them directly into permanent, low-income
housing, with wraparound services as needed. Three core strategies emerge from this
element, including:
o Housing production – new construction, rehabilitation, and leasing of units;
o Access to housing – rapid re-housing and housing first activities; and
o Interim housing – development of an interim housing model and technical
assistance to shelters transitioning to this model.

 Coordinated Services - increasing the speed, accuracy, and effectiveness of service


delivery and housing placement by streamlining entry into the system, eliminating
service barriers, and creating a web-based, real-time view of housing and services
available throughout the system.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-8
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
 Data Quality and Performance Management – continuously improving the quality and
comprehensiveness of the program and resource data in Newark and providing regular
reports to the community.

 Employment, Training, and Education – increasing employment, training, and career


opportunities for homeless and formerly homeless individuals through dedicated
partnerships with mainstream workforce agencies, educational institutions, and public
and private sector employers.

 Advocacy and Community Awareness – expanding community awareness and


support for ending homelessness through outreach, regular reporting, and ongoing
opportunities to join us in this work. We will advocate for changes to public policies that
undermine or delay efforts to end homelessness.

 Financing – securing the funding necessary to reach homeless program objectives


through increased leveraging of federal, state, and local funds; expanded philanthropic
support; and re-investment of cost-savings.

Chronic Homelessness Strategy Summary

Although the number of reported chronic homeless persons (125) represents only a fraction of
the homeless population in Newark, the City has developed a strategy to address the chronic
homeless subpopulation. This strategy includes a “housing first” and “interim housing” model to
provide housing as quickly as possible, allowing time to assess the specific needs in order to
provide the appropriate services. Approximately 51 percent of the chronic homeless persons
surveyed identified substance abuse as the contributing factor to their chronic homelessness.
The City of Newark is incorporating substance abuse programs and coordinating with service
providers to develop related case management services. Ultimately, chronic homeless persons
will need long-term supportive housing options. Newark is working to develop an adequate
supply of permanent supportive housing to meet the needs of the chronically homeless.

Special Needs Population Priority Needs

The special needs subpopulation needs assessment identified five target subpopulations that
will be addressed over the 2010 to 2015 Consolidated Plan period, including: persons with
HIV/AIDS; persons with disabilities; veterans; and ex-offenders. The following priorities are
identified for these subpopulations:

 Increasing accessibility/availability of affordable housing specifically for persons


with HIV/AIDS. Persons with HIV/AIDS comprise one of Newark’s most vulnerable
populations. Providing access to affordable housing options for this subpopulation
reduces the risk of homelessness and provides a foundation to become self-sustaining.
The City will pursue tenant based rental assistance for leased units, short-term
mortgage/rent/utility payments to prevent homelessness, and housing information
service strategies to support persons with HIV/AIDS.

 Providing new affordable permanent supportive housing opportunities for low- to


moderate-income veteran households. While veterans only make up three percent of
Newark’s population, veterans make up a subpopulation most in need of affordable
housing and supportive services. There are approximately 1,848 veterans with incomes
below the poverty line in Newark and 2,342 total veterans with a disability. Providing
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-9
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
veterans with affordable supportive housing opportunities will be a priority for the
ensuing five-year period.

 Increasing availability of permanent housing for special needs populations. It is


important to develop permanent supportive housing for special needs populations.
Combining affordable housing options with supportive services allows special needs
populations to become more self-sustaining and prevent these at risk special needs
subpopulations from becoming homeless.

 Providing support services to special needs populations. Providing special needs


populations with essential supportive services will help them to maintain a suitable living
environment.

HUD Table 1B in Appendix A of this section outlines the allocation priorities of HUD resources
to the identified special needs subpopulations.

Community Development Priority Needs

Newark’s list of priority community development needs is extensive. Similar to most major
metropolitan cities, Newark has a number of distressed neighborhoods in need of revitalization.
Over the past several years, the City has completed a comprehensive assessment of the City’s
needs, from improved land use and zoning, developing and increasing the supply of affordable
housing, and eradicating homelessness, and has invested heavily in crime reduction, code
enforcement, and demolition activities. The recent housing crisis and subsequent recession,
necessitates the need to shift away from public service programs and focus on development
projects that produce jobs and/or create job opportunities for Newark residents. This shift, in
effect, reduces the portion of CDBG funds that will be made available for public service
programs during the 2010 to 2015 consolidated planning period. The following is a summary of
the priority community development needs for the ensuing Consolidated Plan period:

 Increasing economic opportunities for low-income residents in Newark. As


identified in Section 5, Newark’s unemployment rate is at 13 percent, well above the
national average. Of Newark’s 160,000 jobs, only 25 percent are currently held by
Newark residents 1. The primary industries employing Newark residents are production,
transportation, material moving, service, administrative, and construction. Pursuing
large-scale development projects that increase job opportunities for low-income Newark
residents and bring businesses to Newark is a priority for the 2010 to 2015 consolidated
planning period.

 Developing and rehabilitating public facilities. The City maintains over fifteen public
facilities that serve youth, seniors and other special needs populations. These facilities
are intact but are in need of repairs to best serve city residents. To ensure sufficient
space for populations served by these facilities, the City will need to add approximately
three or four new facilities over the next five years and increase green space for outdoor
activities.

 Revitalizing and beautifying Newark businesses and storefronts. Streetscape


improvements and commercial façade improvement in targeted neighborhoods and
development nodes are needed to improve the appeal of these neighborhoods to local

1
Source: Shifting Forward 2025: Newark Master Plan Re-examination Report, 2009
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-10
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
businesses and entrepreneurs. Providing direct assistance to local business to improve
façade and storefronts consistent with zoning requirements will enhance their
sustainability and their capacity to provide both needed services and economic
opportunities for Newark residents.

 Technical Assistance to small businesses. Small businesses in Newark drive the


local economy, providing job opportunities to low-income residents in particular. The City
will provide technical assistance to small-businesses operating in key target
neighborhoods and development nodes.

 Establishing social venture programs. Newark has a high number of at risk


populations, none more at risk than ex-offenders. As noted in Section 5, it is estimated
that two-thirds of ex-offenders will be re-arrested within three years of release. Economic
development and job training programs that target ex-offenders will help them to develop
employable trades and other social skills and facilitate and stabilize their re-entry into the
community.

 Public Services. Despite the shift away from public services, programs that include
educational services, childcare services, senior services, workforce development, tree
planting/urban agriculture, and homeowner counseling/foreclosure prevention will be
funded on a limited basis for the ensuing consolidated planning period.

Section 108 Loan Program Summary

The City intends to make application to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development (HUD) for the use of Section 108 Loan Guaranty Funds in an amount not to
exceed $30,000,000.00. The purpose of the Section 108 Loan Fund is to assist with economic,
housing, and community development activities throughout all five wards of the City of Newark.
This will foster job creation and the elimination of blight in these communities. Goals of the
Section 108 Loan Fund include acquiring land for redevelopment and directly assisting
businesses, nonprofits, and real estate development projects that produce a public benefit.
Individual projects are proposed to be evaluated by a loan and investment committee involving
City and community representatives and the City’s economic development catalyst, Brick City
Development Corporation (BCDC).

BCDC has an impressive record of achievement promoting small business and real estate
development in the City of Newark and would be a critical partner in the Section 108 Loan Fund
administration. Highlights of BCDC’s work on behalf of economic development efforts in the City
include: gaining approval of over $5,000,000 in financing to local small businesses, assisting
over 45 businesses with City and State regulatory processes, achieving bonding for local
contractors, and supporting local and national developers to actualize important development
projects.

Additionally, BCDC partnered with the National Development Council (NDC) to provide technical
assistance to the City and BCDC in the Section 108 Loan Fund underwriting process. NDC has
been instrumental as a nonprofit partner, assisting thousands of organizations around the
country to access capital and provide community development services in underserved areas. 2
Leveraging NDC’s experience of financing over a billion dollars for community development

2
National Development Council Website, “About NDC”
<http://nationaldevelopmentcouncil.org/index.php/site/overview/category/about_us/>
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-11
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
projects and its impressive track record in related technical assistance areas, the City of Newark
and BCDC will have a strong advisor and support mechanism from which to address questions
on the Section 108 Loan Fund administration process.

Section 108 National Objectives and Public Benefit Criteria

There are specific National Objectives, as defined by HUD, which this loan fund will address.
Title 24 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Section 570.208, defines the criteria
under which an activity may meet Section 570.200(a)(2), National Objectives. Section
570.200(a)(2) requires that all CDBG activities meet one of three national objectives. These
objectives are to: 1) benefit low and moderate income families, 2) aid in the prevention or
elimination of slums or blight, and 3) meet other urgent community development needs that
pose a serious and immediate threat to the health or welfare of the community. Each project
funded through the Section 108 Loan Fund will meet one of these National Objectives as
detailed in Section 570.208.

Section 108 loans will benefit the public directly and indirectly by allocating funds for
redevelopment projects that would not occur in their absence. Redevelopment activities such as
rehabilitation, acquisition, clearance, demolition, and removal will be permissible through the
Section 108 Loan Fund. The application of Section 108 loans covered under Section
570.703(a): “acquisition of improved or unimproved real property in fee or by long-term lease,
including acquisition for economic development purposes” will be a vital resource in the
redevelopment of Newark. The City of Newark holds a federal HUD designation as a Renewal
Community (“RC”), allowing it to access tax incentives designed to encourage business location
to the City. The Section 108 Loan Fund will be a tool to bring real estate and community
development projects to fruition in the City, building upon the federal government’s recognition
of this need through granting the City’s RC status.

Loan Activities

These projects will benefit residents of the City of Newark as they will either provide
opportunities for low and moderate-income residents to access permanent residential housing
or will permit other economic development activity to take place. Other economic development
activity must be targeted either to citizens in a geographic area where at least 51 percent of
residents are of low or moderate income or to groups of citizens residing anywhere within the
City in which at least 51 percent of beneficiaries are of low or moderate income. The last
possible usage of the loan funds is to provide jobs for individuals, of which at least 51 percent of
said jobs employ persons of low or moderate income.

As required by Title 24 of the CFR, Section 570.209, one of the underwriting objectives for the
Section 108 Loan Fund is to avoid substituting CDBG funds for non-Federal financial support.
Additionally, the creation of Newark’s Section 108 Loan Fund will create jobs for low and
moderate income persons, provide services to a low income area and/or eliminate conditions of
blight in the City. The specific hiring parameters for jobs created or retained through Section 108
funds may not exceed $50,000 per full-time permanent job created by the CDBG assistance, or
$1,000 per low- and moderate-income person aided by the creation of the activity. The goal of
using Section 108 funds to lend to businesses that invest in real estate activities is to create net
new jobs in the City of Newark, especially on behalf of individuals meeting the low to moderate
income criteria.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-12
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Section 108 loans will be used for traditional lending, in addition to short-term financing. An
example of the type of loans that the Section 108 Loan Fund may provide is short-term monies
dedicated to bridging a financial gap for economic development projects that will utilize local and
state investments in the future, but which need immediate assistance in gathering initial
financing.

Financial Guarantees, Reporting, and Usage

If the Section 108 Loan Guaranty Fund is approved, any potential borrowers will be obligated to
send quarterly reports to the City and/or BCDC detailing job creation resulting from Section 108
Loan Funds. Collateral needed to secure a loan through the Section 108 Loan Fund includes
real property assets, personal and/or corporate guarantees, and pledge of future CDBG
allocation.

HUD Table 2B in Appendix A of this section outlines the allocation of CDBG/Section 108
resources to priority non-housing needs in Newark.

C. SPECIFIC GOALS, OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGIES

Consistent with Shifting Forward 2025, this Consolidated Plan adopts three overarching goals,
including: (1) jobs for residents, (2) healthy and safe neighborhoods, and (3) Newark as a City
of Choice. Aligning planning efforts and allocation of HUD resources with these three goals will
support development of measurable short-term strategies and objectives to further the City’s
progress towards meeting its long-term goals.

The following section identifies the specific goals, objectives, and strategies the City will
implement during the 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan period to address the priority needs
identified above.

Goal 1: Jobs for Residents

The following objectives and strategies will increase the availability/accessibility and
sustainability of economic opportunities in Newark.

Objective 1: Expand economic growth and job opportunities through large scale
development projects, social ventures and job training programs.

Strategy 1.1 – Fund large scale physical development projects consistent with redevelopment
plans targeting key development nodes and neighborhoods.

Strategy 1.2 – Fund the development of mixed-use commercial and retail spaces.

Strategy 1.3 – Fund social venture programs and asset building opportunities to support life
skills training and other development services to ex-offenders and other under employed and
low-income individuals.

Strategy 1.4 – Provide technical assistance to small businesses and micro-enterprises operating
and expanding in targeted neighborhoods and development nodes in Newark.

Goal 2: Healthy and Safe Neighborhoods


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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-13
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The following objectives and strategies will increase/improve the availability/accessibility,
affordability and sustainability of housing, and provide sustainable suitable living environments
and economic opportunities in Newark.

Objective 2: Increase access to quality affordable housing choices.

Strategy 2.1 – Fund new construction of affordable rental units in targeted development nodes.

Strategy 2.2 – Fund CHDOs and other non-profit developers to develop new affordable housing
opportunities, including permanent supportive housing (see also strategy 3.1).

Strategy 2.3 – Increase homeownership opportunities through a HOME-funded Homebuyer


Program targeting households earning between 50 and 80 percent AMI, specifically returning
veterans, first-time homebuyers, public safety officers, and educators.

Strategy 2.4 – Provide funding to support homebuyer counseling services for low-income
households in targeted neighborhoods.

Objective 3: Improve conditions of existing neighborhoods through redevelopment and


rehabilitation of residential and commercial properties and public facilities

Strategy 3.1 – Fund the acquisition, rehab, and resale of abandoned/or foreclosed residential
properties, focusing on targeted neighborhoods with high rates of foreclosure.

Strategy 3.2 – Fund a CDBG homeowner rehabilitation program focusing on emergency repairs
to alleviate unsafe/unhealthy living conditions targeting extremely low-income senior
homeowners.

Strategy 3.3 – Revitalize existing and develop new public and homeless facilities serving youth,
seniors, homeless, special needs, and disabled populations.

Strategy 3.4 – Fund a commercial façade improvement program consistent with updated Master
Plan zoning requirements.

Objective 4: Provide funding for public services to support workforce development,


educational services, child care services, ex-offender social services, and homeowner
foreclosure prevention programs for low-income individuals and families in targeted
neighborhoods

Strategy 4.1 – Provide funding to support Workforce development programs.

Strategy 4.2 – Provide funding to support Educational services targeting youth and individuals.

Strategy 4.3 – Provide funding to support various capacity building activities such as: nutritional
and other health related services, senior and preschool transportation, senior daycare services,
health education, and training and recreational activities.

Strategy 4.4 – Provide funding to support Ex-offender/Re-entry services with case management,
social services, and various other life skills necessary to allow individuals being released from
incarceration to become actively involved in society as productive citizens.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-14
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
Strategy 4.5 – Provide funding to support foreclosure outreach and prevention counseling to at
risk households.

Objective 5: Support homeless and at-risk special needs populations with coordinated
support services and housing assistance, focusing on prevention and “housing first”
activities

Strategy 5.1 – Develop and/or acquire and rehab special-needs permanent supportive housing
targeting veterans, ex-offenders, persons with HIV/AIDS, and other identified priority need
subpopulations.

Strategy 5.2 – Provide housing opportunities to persons with HIV/AIDS via tenant based rental
assistance services.

Strategy 5.3 – Provide housing opportunities to persons with HIV/AIDS via short-term rent,
mortgage, and utility assistance services, targeting persons and households with short-term
financial needs.

Strategy 5.4 – Provide housing information and coordination services to persons with HIV/AIDS.

Strategy 5.5 – Provide funding for operation of transitional/short-term homeless facilities or


leased units.

Strategy 5.6 – Provide funding to support delivery of essential services for homeless individuals
and special needs populations.

Strategy 5.7 – Fund homeless prevention activities and related services to assist individuals at
risk of becoming homeless.

Goal 3: Newark as a City of Choice

The following objectives and strategies will increase/improve the availability/accessibility,


affordability, and sustainability of housing and provide sustainable suitable living environments
in Newark.

Objective 6: Promote and fund targeted developments to help facilitate a living


downtown urban center around key development nodes

Strategy 6.1 – Fund mixed-income and transit-oriented housing projects, focusing on key
downtown development nodes and corridors.

Objective 7: Green Newark’s neighborhoods

Strategy 7.1 – Incorporate green building and energy efficiency design requirements in all
affordable housing development and rehabilitation projects.

Strategy 7.2 – Provide funding for tree planting and urban agriculture services in targeted
neighborhoods.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-15
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
Priority Consolidated Plan Activities

The tables below summarizes the proposed eligible HUD-funded program activities the City will
fund to achieve desired objectives and to support identified strategies.

Table 1: Proposed Activities for Funding


Specific Housing Activities Funding Source(s)
Rental new construction CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Acquisition and rehabilitation CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Rental acquisition CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Acquisition and rehabilitation CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Homeowner rehabilitation/maintenance CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Homebuyer acquisition CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Downpayment and/or closing cost assistance CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Lead-based paint remediation CDBG, HOME, LHRDG
Green building and energy efficiency rehabilitation CDBG, HOME, Section 108
Specific Homeless Activities Funding Source(s)
Short/long-term rental/mortgage and utility assistance HOPWA, HPRP,CDBG
Public facility renovations CDBG, ESG, HOPWA
Case management and coordination services ESG
Essential services ESG
Homeless prevention HPRP, ESG
Housing information and referral services HOPWA
Operations assistance for homeless facilities HOPWA, ESG
Specific Special Needs Subpopulation Activities Funding Source(s)
New construction of special needs housing HOME, CDBG
Acquisition and rehab for special needs housing HOME, CDBG
Downpayment assistance HOME, CDBG
Specific Community Development Activities Funding Source(s)
Property acquisition CDBG, Section 108
Demolition/Clearance CDBG
Site improvements CDBG, Section 108
Public facilities rehabilitation and development CDBG
Direct technical assistance to businesses CDBG
Tree planting/Urban agriculture CDBG
Acquisition of real property CDBG, Section 108
Direct financial assistance to for-profit businesses (commercial façade
CDBG
beautification)
Educational services CDBG
Childcare services CDBG
Workforce development/Employment training CDBG
Capacity building CDBG
Surveillance and Prevention CDBG
Housing/Foreclosure counseling CDBG
Senior Services CDBG
Youth Services CDBG

The City of Newark will fund a variety of activities using HUD entitlement funds throughout the
Consolidated Plan period however not all activities identified above will be funded each year of
the five-year Consolidated Plan period.

Performance Measurement System

In 2006, HUD established a Community Planning and Development (CPD) Performance


Measurement System, designed to evaluate and aggregate performance of grantees nationally.
HUD’s performance measurement system includes three objectives and three outcomes.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-16
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
Each activity funded with HUD funds must meet at least one these objectives and outcomes.
The table below summarizes these objectives and outcomes, and when combined produce an
outcome statement.

Table 2: HUD Outcome Statements


Objectives / Outcomes Availability/Accessibility (1) Affordability (2) Sustainability (3)
Decent Housing (DH) DH-1 DH-2 DH-3
Suitable Living Environment (SL) SL-1 SL-2 SL-3
Economic Opportunity (EO) EO-1 EO-2 EO-3

HUD also identified specific accomplishment indicators against which to measure grantee
performance, including but not limited to: housing units, households, people, youth, businesses,
and facilities. The City used HUD’s performance measurement system to objectify its goals,
objectives, and strategies for the 2010 to 2015 Consolidated Plan period. Please see Appendix
B of this section for a breakdown of proposed accomplishments by strategy and program year.

D. CROSS CUTTING ISSUES

Lead-Base Paint Strategy

Newark’s Department of Child and Family Well-Being (CFWB) is the department charged with
coordinating the City’s lead-based paint strategy. The Newark Department of Child and Family
Well-Being, (CFWB) Childhood Lead Poison Prevention Program, (CLPPP) evaluates
approximately 400 Newark properties annually for the presence of lead based paint hazards.
These units will be identified from several sources, the primary source being from the New
Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, (NJDHSS) lead tracking system named
“Weligent.” This system is an interactive web-based data system that notifies the CLPPP of all
lead levels in Newark.

The City of Newark is funded to respond to all lead levels over 10ug/dl. This process alone
leads to an estimated 250-300 homes being tested as a result of lead levels 10ug/dl or above.
The second vehicle of evaluating units throughout Newark is through the CLPPP collaboration
with the local Newark Housing Authority (NHA).

Through this collaboration units are inspected by CLPPP before a child age six or younger is
permitted to move into the unit. This is the single most effective activity for preventing children’s
exposure to lead hazards by making the process automatic and thus protecting hundreds of
children annually. So far since the re-starting of this collaboration in 2008 the CLPPP has
inspected twenty-one (21) units and identified five (5) units that had a lead hazard that could
have poisoned a child. The CLPPP also inspects units on demand from concerned residents
calling in to have their homes inspected.

The CLPPP uses its HUD Funding through the Lead Hazard Reduction Demonstration Grant
(LHRDG) to remove lead hazards identified from these homes. The homes identified to have
lead hazards and qualify for the HUD funds are directed to the LHRDG grant intake process for
further inspection and processing. The hazards identified at the time of inspection are removed
and clearance will be achieved before families are permitted to move back to these units. Lead
hazards that are identified and verified as being lead hazards diagnostically are removed and
cleared by an independent lab and consultant. In Newark the reduction of lead based hazards is

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-17
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
based on the presence of hazards at the time of inspection making units’ lead–safe, but not lead
free.

The units that are remediated are a part of the CLPPP lead safe housing registry and are
offered as a referral base for families seeking lead safe housing. The activities of the CLPPP
increase the availability of lead safe housing throughout Newark and by removing lead hazards
from 725 homes over the past seven years, it has created awareness to a clear and present
danger that is located directly in homes built before 1978. The City also maintains one five-unit
and one two-family Temporary Safe House for families whose homes are being remediated.

Barriers to Affordable Housing (Analysis of Impediments Summary)

The Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice (AI) is a comprehensive review of a


jurisdiction’s laws, regulations, and administrative policies, procedures, and practices affecting
the location, availability, and accessibility of housing, as well as an assessment of conditions,
both public and private, affecting fair housing choice. Impediments to fair housing choice are
any actions, omissions, or decisions taken because of race, color, religion, sex, disability,
familial status, or national origin which restrict housing choices, or any actions, omissions, or
decisions which have the effect of restricting housing choices or the availability of housing
choices on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status, or national origin.
Policies, practices, or procedures that appear neutral on their face, but which operate to deny or
adversely affect the provision of housing to persons of a particular race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status, or national origin may constitute such impediments.

Fair housing continues to be an unachieved goal in many communities in the nation. The City of
Newark is fortunate that such practices have not been employed locally. This may be attributed
to many possible factors, including: (1) a relatively diverse population; (2) a high percentage of
minority residents; and (3) a cohesive community spirit, wherein residents exhibit a concern and
willingness to act in support of their neighbors. While local conditions are favorable with respect
to fair housing, the possibility of discrimination is present. Accordingly, the City of Newark has
developed an AI to assist in assuring the effectuation of fair housing in the City and assuring
that discriminatory housing practices do not occur in the future.

Currently, Newark’s fair housing activities consist of four key areas: education, assistance to
minority families, local compliance, and special programs. The coordination of these activities, in
a planned fashion in which results can be monitored, will enable the City to measure and report
the progress of its fair housing efforts. With the public and private sector working together,
freedom of choice in housing can continue to be a reality for all the City’s residents. The full AI
has been incorporated in this plan as Appendix C.

Antipoverty Strategy

Newark's anti-poverty strategy is to a large extent the sum total of the strategies in this five-year
Consolidated Plan. As noted in Section 5 of this plan, the average household size for owner-
occupied housing in Newark is 3.06 and 2.64 for renter-occupied units. According to the 2009
Department of Health and Human Services Poverty Guidelines, the poverty threshold for a
family of three is $18,310. Approximately 28,000 households (an estimated 66,022 individuals)
were earning below the federal poverty level for a family of three in 2008, down from
approximately 36,000 households in 2000.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-18
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
The barriers to the realization of the City’s objectives are economic, involve complex forces that
impact human development, and can only be removed by self-interested partnerships that
transcend local boundaries. Although recent data would indicate that the total number of
households living in poverty in Newark has declined, this data does not reflect the recent
economic and housing crisis that has resulted over the past three years. Newark’s 13 percent
unemployment rate is more indicative of the poverty levels experienced by some residents.

CFWB has the primary responsibility for developing and implementing anti-poverty initiatives.
Coordination is multi-level and accomplished through contractual and legally mandated
relationships with counterpart agencies at the local, county, state, and federal levels, as well as
non-profit institutions and agencies and private entities.

Newark's anti-poverty strategy is designed not only to educate to bring basic skills up to high
school and college graduate levels, but also to train people for existing jobs and anticipated jobs
through the year 2010 and beyond. In addition to job training and education, it is critical that jobs
are available to support the demand. This Consolidated Plan purposefully focuses more on
housing and economic development to maximize the number of construction jobs and workforce
training opportunities. The City plans to pursue several large scale development projects to aid
in this effort.

The Federal Section 3 program regulations require that recipients of certain HUD financial
assistance, to the greatest extent possible, provide job training, employment, and contract
opportunities for low- or very-low income residents in connection with projects and activities in
their neighborhoods. Section 3 is intended to ensure that when employment or contracting
opportunities are generated because a covered project or activity results in the employment of
additional persons or the awarding of contracts for work, preference must be given to low- and
very low-income persons or business concerns residing in the community where the project is
located.

Due to the dynamic nature of Newark's population and the difficulty in identifying and assisting
persons in poverty or at-risk of falling into poverty, the City cannot present firm, quantitative
estimates regarding the reduction of the numbers of persons and households in poverty. The
antipoverty strategy is intended to be a comprehensive strategy of housing assistance, social
services, and employment and training programs all contributing to the reduction of Newark
households in poverty.

Monitoring

Consistent with regulations of 24 CFR, the City of Newark as a grantee of HUD funds is
responsible for ensuring that CDBG, ESG, HOME, and HOPWA funds are used in accordance
with all program requirements. Additionally, the City is responsible for determining the adequacy
of performance under Subrecipient agreements and procurement contracts and for taking
appropriate action when performance is inadequate or problems arise. The City is working to
revamp its monitoring procedures to improve compliance of HUD funded programs and to
enforce performance standards of subrecpients and various partner agencies. Two Newark City
agencies monitor and oversee more-or-less all sub-recipient contracts. CFWB has internal
control procedures that require written notification to a sub-recipient that does not respond to
requests to sign a contract or, having done so, does not submit reimbursement requests on a
regular basis. Generally, written warnings are issued within sixty (60) days. The department
attempts to be flexible and responsive to extenuating circumstances, however, and does not

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-19
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
rigidly impose a schedule of sanctions. Very few public services sub-recipients are late in
submitting payment requests.

EHD’s Division of Housing Assistance, monitors and oversees all HOME and NSP activities, as
well as many sub-recipient activities, especially the renovation of public facilities that are multi-
year in nature. The Division has a written set of procedures for monitoring and approving
construction, change orders, and progress payments and close-outs.

All Departments under which a Subrecipient provides Consolidated Plan activities must:

 Execute separate written agreements with all Subrecipients that delineate all provisions
of the federal regulations for the corresponding program and stipulate conditions for
receiving funds, including performance and compliance requirements;

 Monitor Subrecipients through documentation review and routine site visits to ensure
Subrecipient activities comply with program requirements;

 Provide technical assistance to Subrecipients or take effective corrective action, as


needed, with Subrecipients that are non-compliant; and

 Complete performance evaluation and close out all projects within 90 days of activity
completion.

City departments maintain routine contact with Subrecipients and require monthly reporting on
programmatic and fiscal activities. A “Monthly Project Status Report” must be submitted by each
funded non-profit no later than the 10th day of the following month in which the activity occurs.
Each Department maintains internal control procedures that require written notification to a
Subrecipient that fails to execute a contract once it has been adopted by the Municipal Council
or which, after the contract is executed, fails to submit reimbursement requests on a regular
basis.

Programmatic Review

Department monitors perform a programmatic review of each monthly report to ensure the
Subrecipient is adhering to the Scope of Services and regulatory requirements of the grant by
determining the following:

 Is the project proceeding towards the goals listed in the scope of services?

 Is the project utilizing methods and procedures described in the contract? Has the
provision of required staffing as project in the contract budget been accomplished?

 Is the project keeping adequate records of activities for its low/moderate income
beneficiaries?

 Has the Subrecipient anticipated problems in the upcoming month that might prevent the
project from reaching its objectives or meeting its time schedule?

 Has the Subrecipient listed activities which occurred during the month that were not a
part of its planned work program?

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 Major events that took place in the past month, which affected the project.

 Interrelated activities that the project has had with other entities.

 Requests for services related project activities that were not met.

 List of current contractual obligations, including compliance and performance objectives.

 Anticipated contracts and a description of the purpose of each contract.

Fiscal Review

Pursuant to HUD uniform administrative requirements, Subrecipients are required to keep


records and submit reports and supporting documentation that identify the application of funds
for grant-supported activities. These records must contain information pertaining to obligations,
un-obligated balances, expenditures, and program income. All reimbursement requests must
represent allowable costs as itemized in OMB Circular A-122. Although sub-recipients receive
an explanation for any disallowed costs, those items are deducted from the payment requests.
Department fiscal monitors or accountants perform a review of each monthly report and all
requests for reimbursement of expenditures in accordance with the following:

 Inclusion of the Monthly Budget Status Report – an itemized line item accounting form
used as a tool to indicate the manner and pattern of expenditures that properly details a
monthly accounting of the project’s total actual CDBG expenditures, accrued expenses,
total expenses, available balances, and revisions to the original appropriations.

 Inclusion of Monthly Personnel Expenditure Reports – that includes proper source


documentation for all requested reimbursements of funds. Source documentation, may
include the following: cancelled checks, invoices marked paid, purchase orders, copies
of bid advertisements, contracts for subcontractors, order to proceed letters, payroll
journal, etc.

 Accuracy of computations and consistency with line items identified in the Subrecipient’s
approved budget.

On-Site Monitoring Visits

Departments conduct monitoring site visits of all Subrecipients, whereby a team comprised of
the programmatic and fiscal monitors physically visit the facility where the grant project or
activity occurs with the following purposes:

 To inquire into all aspects of project operations and to analyze related information for the
purpose of determining compliance with the subrecipient’s contract;

 To identify problems that might affect the fulfillment of the Subrecipient’s objectives and
document project status and progress;

 To recommend corrective actions to improve project performance or to remedy existing


problems;

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-21
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 To recommend grant revisions or amendments as necessary to assist the project in
fulfilling its objectives; and

 To provide necessary technical assistance and/or assist the staff in obtaining support to
provide the project with the opportunity to achieve its objectives.

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-22
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
E. APPENDICES

Appendix A – HUD Required Tables

Appendix B – Newark 2010-2015 Consolidated Plan Strategic Framework

Appendix C – Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-23
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
Appendix A – HUD Required Tables

HUD Table 1A
Homeless Gap Analysis and Homeless Population/Subpopulation Chart

Housing Gap Analysis Chart


Current Inventory Under Development Unmet Need/Gap
Individuals (beds)
Emergency Shelter 1,327 -434
Transitional Housing 211 -55
Permanent Supportive Housing 244 793
Subtotal 1,782
Persons in Families with Children (beds)
Emergency Shelter 122 -44
Transitional Housing 151 -31
Permanent Supportive Housing 150 600
Subtotal 423
Total 2,205
Part 1: Homeless Population
Sheltered
Emergency Transitional
Unsheltered Total
Number of Families with Children 154 145 25 324
1. Number of Persons in Families with
426 394 54 874
Children
2. Number of Single Individuals and
556 121 165 842
Persons in Households without Children
Total Persons (lines 1 & 2) 982 515 219 1,716
Part 2: Homeless Subpopulation
a. Chronically Homeless 125 28 129
b. Seriously Mentally Ill 246
c. Chronic Substance Abuse 187
d. Veterans 47
e. Persons with HIV/AIDS 126
f. Victims of Domestic Violence 55
g. Unaccompanied Youth Not available

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-24
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
HUD Table 1B
Special Needs (non-homeless) Populations

Special Needs (Non-Homeless) Populations


Priority Need Unmet Dollars to Multi-Year Annual
Special Needs Subpopulations
Level Need* Address* Goals* Goals*
Elderly Y
Frail Elderly Y
Severe Mental Illness N
Developmentally Disabled N
Physically Disabled Y
Persons with Alcohol/Other Drug Addictions N
Persons with HIV/AIDS Y 3,337
Victims of Domestic Violence N
Veterans Y
Ex-offenders Y
Total
*denotes an optional field

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-25
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
HUD Table 1C
Summary of Specific Homeless/Special Needs Objectives

Summary of Specific Homeless/Special Needs Objectives


Sources of Performance Expected Actual Outcome/
Specific Objective
Funds Measures Units Units Objective
Homeless Objectives
Permanent Supportive Housing HOME/CDBG People 500
Transitional Housing ESG People 50
Emergency Housing ESG People 50

Special Needs Objectives


Disabled CDBG People 200
Persons with/HIV AIDS HOPWA People 5,000
Elderly CDBG People 250
Veterans CDBG People 50
Ex-offenders CDBG People 100

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-26
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
HUD Table 2A – Part I
Priority Housing Needs
PRIORITY HOUSING NEEDS (households) Priority Unmet Need*
0-30% H 8,099
Small Related 31-50% H 2,379
51-80% L TBD
0-30% H 3,175
Large Related 31-50% M 965
51-80% L TBD
Renter 0-30% H 3,743
Elderly 31-50% H TBD
51-80% L TBD
0-30% H 4,801
All Other 31-50% H 1501
51-80% M 30
0-30% M 746
Small Related 31-50% H 830
51-80% H 1,778
0-30% H 368
Large Related 31-50% H 259
Owner 51-80% H 825
0-30% H 1,209
Elderly 31-50% H 685
51-80% L 778
0-30% L 204
All Other 31-50% L 159
51-80% L 280
Elderly 0-80% H
6,415
Frail Elderly 0-80% H
Non- Severe Mental Illness 0-80% H 1,452
Homeless Physical Disability 0-80% L 2,443
Special
Needs Developmental Disability 0-80% M 1,047
Alcohol/Drug Abuse 0-80% H 3,130
HIV/AIDS 0-80% H 2,052
Victims of Domestic Violence 0-80% L 1,810
Ex-offenders 0-80% H 1,500
Veterans 0-80% H 1,848
*estimate of housing needs only

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-27
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
Table 2A – Part II
Priority Housing Needs/Investment Plan Goals
5-Yr. Yr. 1 Yr. 2 Yr. 3 Yr. 4 Yr. 5
Priority Need Goal Goal Goal Goal Goal Goal
Plan/Act Plan/Act Plan/Act Plan/Act Plan/Act Plan/Act
Renters
0 - 30 of MFI 1,200 200 200 300 300 200
31 - 50% of MFI 400 50 50 100 100 100
51 - 80% of MFI 200 25 25 25 25 25
Owners
0 - 30 of MFI 150 30 30 30 30 30
31 - 50 of MFI 100 20 20 20 20 20
51 - 80% of MFI 200 40 40 40 40 40
Homeless*
Individuals 200 40 40 40 40 40
Families 100 20 20 20 20 20
Non-Homeless Special Needs
Elderly**
Frail Elderly -
Severe Mental Illness -
Physical Disability -
Developmental Disability -
Alcohol/Drug Abuse -
HIV/AIDS 1200 240 240 240 240 240
Victims of Domestic Violence -
Ex-offenders**
Veterans**
Total
Total Section 215
215 Renter 1,800
215 Owner 450
* Homeless individuals and families assisted with transitional and permanent housing
**These subpopulations are included in overall renter and owner housing investment goals

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-28
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
Table 2A – Part III
Priority Housing Activities
5-Yr. Yr. 1 Yr. 2 Yr. 3 Yr. 4 Yr. 5
Priority Need Goal Goal Goal Goal Goal Goal
Plan/Act Plan/Act Plan/Act Plan/Act Plan/Act Plan/Act
CDBG
Acquisition of existing rental units 100 20 20 20 20 20
Production of new rental units 400 80 80 80 80 80
Rehabilitation of existing rental units 100 20 20 20 20 20
Rental assistance
Acquisition of existing owner units
Production of new owner units
Rehabilitation of existing owner units 150 30 30 30 30 30
Homeownership assistance
HOME
Acquisition of existing rental units 100 20 20 20 20 20
Production of new rental units 500 100 100 100 100 100
Rehabilitation of existing rental units 100 20 20 20 20 20
Rental assistance
Acquisition of existing owner units 100 20 20 20 20 20
Production of new owner units
Rehabilitation of existing owner units
Homeownership assistance 100 20 20 20 20 20
HOPWA
Tenant-Based Rental assistance (long-term) 2300 460 460 460 460 460
Short term rent/mortgage utility payments 400 80 80 80 80 80
Facility based housing development 200 40 40 40 40 40
Facility based housing operations 200 40 40 40 40 40
Supportive services
Other

Note: Goals indentified for priority housing activities are estimates only. The City of Newark reserves the right to
revise, amend or otherwise redirect investments across these categories as necessary.

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-29
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
Table 2B
Priority Community Development Needs
Priority Need Level Unmet Dollars to 5 Yr Annual Percent
Priority Need (High, Medium, Low) Priority Address Goal Goal Goal
Need* Need* Plan/Act* Plan/Act* Completed*
Acquisition of Real Property H
Disposition L
Clearance and Demolition H
Clearance of Contaminated Sites H
Code Enforcement H
Public Facility (General)
Senior Centers H
Handicapped Centers L
Homeless Facilities H
Youth Centers H
Neighborhood Facilities H
Child Care Centers n/a
Health Facilities H
Mental Health Facilities H
Parks and/or Recreation Facilities H
Parking Facilities M
Tree Planting L
Fire Stations/Equipment M
Abused/Neglected Children Facilities H
Asbestos Removal n/a
Non-Residential Historic Preservation L
Other Public Facility Needs
Infrastructure (General) M
Water/Sewer Improvements M
Street Improvements M
Sidewalks M
Solid Waste Disposal Improvements L
Flood Drainage Improvements M
Other Infrastructure
Public Services (General) H
Senior Services H
Handicapped Services M
Legal Services n/a
Youth Services H
Child Care Services M
Transportation Services M
Substance Abuse Services ?
Employment/Training Services H
Health Services H
Lead Hazard Screening H
Crime Awareness H
Fair Housing Activities L
Tenant Landlord Counseling L
Other Services
Economic Development (General) H
C/I Land Acquisition/Disposition H
C/I Infrastructure Development H
C/I Building Acq/Const/Rehab H
Other C/I
ED Assistance to For-Profit H
ED Technical Assistance H
Micro-enterprise Assistance L
Other
*denotes an optional field

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-30
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
Appendix B – Newark 2010-2015 Consolidated Plan Strategic Framework
Overarching Funding Output/Indicator for Action Plan Year Outcome
5-Yr Strategic Plan Objectives and Strategies Category
Goal Source(s) 2010-11 2011-12 2012-13 2013-14 2014-15 Statement
Objective 1: Increase economic growth and job opportunities through large scale development projects, social venture and job training programs
Strategy 1.1 Fund large-scale physical development consistent with redevelopment plans CDBG Economic 2000
EO-1
targeting key development nodes and neighborhoods Section 108 Development (Jobs)
Strategy 1.2 Fund the development of mixed-use commercial and retail spaces CDBG Economic
Over 200,000 SF. Of Commercial Space EO-1
Section 108 Development
Jobs for Residents Strategy 1.3 Fund social venture and asset building opportunities to support life skills training
Economic 100
and other development services to ex-offenders and other under employed and CDBG EO-3
Development (Persons)
low-income individuals
Strategy 1.4 Provide Technical Assistance to small businesses and micro-enterprises
Economic 20
operating and expanding in targeted neighborhoods and development nodes in CDBG EO-3
Development (Businesses)
Newark
Objective 2: Increase access to quality affordable housing choices
Strategy 2.1 Fund new construction of affordable rental units in targeted development HOME
Affordable 400
nodes and within walking distance of public transportation CDBG DH-1
Housing (Units)
Section 108
Strategy 2.2 Fund CHDOs and other non-profit developers to develop new affordable Affordable 100
HOME DH-2
housing opportunities, including permanent supportive housing Housing (Units)
Strategy 2.3 Increase homeownership opportunities through a HOME-funded Homebuyer
Affordable 100
Program targeting households earning between 60 and 80% AMI, specifically HOME DH-2
Housing (Households)
returning veterans, first-time homebuyers, public safety officers, and educators.
Strategy 2.4 Provide funding to support homebuyer counseling services for low to moderate- 250
CDBG Public Service DH-3
income homebuyers in targeted neighborhoods (Households)
Objective 3: Improve condition of existing neighborhoods through redevelopment and rehabilitation of residential and commercial properties and public facilities
Healthy and Safe
Strategy 3.1 Fund acquisition, rehab and resale of abandoned and/or foreclosed residential Affordable 110
Neighborhoods CDBG DH-1
properties neighborhoods with high rates of foreclosure Housing (Units)
Strategy 3.2 Fund a CDBG Homeowner Rehabilitation Program focusing on emergency
CDBG Affordable 150
repairs to alleviate unsafe/healthy living conditions targeting extremely low- DH-2
Housing (units)
income senior homeowners
Strategy 3.3 Revitalize existing and develop new public, homeless facilities serving youth, CDBG Public 15-20
SL-2/3
seniors, homeless, special needs and disabled populations ESG Improvements (Facilities)
Strategy 3.4 Fund a Commercial Façade and Streetscape Improvement program consistent Economic 60
CDBG EO-3
with revised Master Plan zoning requirements Development (Businesses)
Objective 4: Provide funding for public services to support workforce development, educational services, capacity building, ex-offender social services and homeowner foreclosure counseling programs for low-income
individuals and families in targeted neighborhoods
Strategy 4.1 Provide funding to support workforce development programs CDBG
Public Service 10,000 (People) SL-1

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-31
Strategy 4.2 Provide funding to support Educational services targeting youth and individuals CDBG Public Service 10,000
SL-1
(People)
Strategy 4.3 Provide funding to support various capacity building activities such as:
nutritional and other health related services, senior and preschool CDBG Public Service 10,000
SL-1
transportation, senior daycare services, health education and training and (People)
recreational activities.
Strategy 4.4 Provide funding to support Ex-offender/Re-entry services with case
management, social services, and various other life skills necessary to allow CDBG Public Service 200
EO-2
individuals being released from incarceration to become actively involved in (People)
society as productive citizens
Strategy 4.5 Provide funding to support foreclosure outreach and prevention counseling to CDBG Public Service 200
SL-3
at risk households (households)
Objective 5: Support homeless and at-risk special needs populations with coordinated support services and housing assistance, focusing on prevention and “housing first” activities
Strategy 5.1 Develop and/or acquire and rehab special needs permanent supportive
HOME Affordable 300
housing targeting veterans, ex-offenders, persons with HIV/AIDS and other DH-1
CDBG Housing (Units)
priority need subpopulations
Strategy 5.2 Provide housing opportunities persons with HIV/AIDS via tenant based rental Affordable 2300
HOPWA DH-1
assistance services Housing (Persons)
Strategy 5.3 Provide housing opportunities to persons with HIV/AIDS via short-term rent,
HOPWA Affordable 1250
mortgage and utility assistance services targeting persons and households with DH-3
Housing (Persons)
short-term financial needs
Strategy 5.4 Provide housing information and coordination services to homeless persons 5000
HOPWA Public Service DH-1
with HIV/AIDS (Persons)
Strategy 5.5 Provide funding for operations of transitional/short-term and emergency Affordable 1000
ESG DH-2
homeless facilities or leased units Housing (Persons)
Strategy 5.6 Provide funding to support delivery of essential services for homeless 2500
ESG Public Service SL-1
individuals and special needs populations (Persons)
Strategy 5.7 Fund homeless prevention activities and related services to assist individuals at 200
ESG Public Service DH-3
risk of becoming homeless (Households)
Objective 6: Promote and fund targeted developments to help facilitate a living downtown urban center around key development nodes
Strategy 6.1 Fund mixed-income and transit-oriented housing projects, focusing on key CDBG
Affordable 200
downtown development nodes and corridors HOME DH-1
Housing (Units)
Section 108
Newark as a City of
Objective 7: Green Newark’s neighborhoods
Choice
Strategy 7.1 Incorporate green building and energy efficiency design requirements in all CDBG Affordable 400
SL-3
affordable housing development and rehabilitation projects HOME Housing (Units)
Strategy 7.2 Provide funding for tree planting and urban agriculture services in targeted CDBG Public
TBD TBD
neighborhood Section 108 Improvements

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-32
Section 6: 2010-2015 Strategic Plan
Appendix C – Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan 6-33
City of Newark
New Jersey

Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice

Date:
May 27, 2010
ANALYSIS OF IMPEDIMENTS TO FAIR HOUSING CHOICE
Table of Contents
I. INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL SUMMARY ............................................................................................... 1
A. CONDUCT OF THE ANALYSIS AND FUNDING ..................................................................................................... 1
B. METHODOLOGY ............................................................................................................................................... 1
C. CONCLUSIONS .................................................................................................................................................. 1
II. BACKGROUND DATA......................................................................................................................................... 3
A. DEMOGRAPHIC DATA....................................................................................................................................... 3
1. Community Description ................................................................................................................................... 3
2. Population ........................................................................................................................................................ 3
3. Race.................................................................................................................................................................. 6
4. Age and Gender ............................................................................................................................................. 14
B. INCOME DATA ................................................................................................................................................ 17
1. Income............................................................................................................................................................ 17
2. Poverty ........................................................................................................................................................... 23
C. EMPLOYMENT CHARACTERISTICS .................................................................................................................. 25
1. Labor Force .................................................................................................................................................... 25
2. Resident Employment by Industry and Occupation ....................................................................................... 26
3. Employment Projections ................................................................................................................................ 30
4. Housing and Employment .............................................................................................................................. 30
5. Employment Centers ...................................................................................................................................... 31
D. HOUSING PROFILE .......................................................................................................................................... 34
1. Units by Tenure and Type .............................................................................................................................. 34
2. Households ..................................................................................................................................................... 35
3. Age of Housing .............................................................................................................................................. 35
4. Condition of Units .......................................................................................................................................... 40
5. Owner Occupied Housing Value and Rental Rates ........................................................................................ 40
6. Housing Costs ................................................................................................................................................ 42
7. Incidence of Overcrowding by Tenure and Income Group ............................................................................ 46
8. Affordability of Housing for Low and Moderate Income Households .......................................................... 49
E. PERSONS WITH DISABILITIES ......................................................................................................................... 61
1. Frail Elderly ................................................................................................................................................... 61
2. Developmentally Disabled ............................................................................................................................. 61
3. Physically Disabled ........................................................................................................................................ 61
III. EVALUATION OF CURRENT FAIR HOUSING LEGAL STATUS........................................................... 62
A. FAIR HOUSING COMPLAINTS OR COMPLIANCE REVIEWS WHERE THE SECRETARY OF HUD OR THE N.J.
DIVISION ON CIVIL RIGHTS HAS ISSUED A CHARGE OF OR MADE A FINDING OF DISCRIMINATION. ........................... 62
B. EXPLANATION OF TRENDS OR PATTERNS. ....................................................................................................... 62
C. DISCUSSION OF OTHER FAIR HOUSING CONCERNS OR PROBLEMS.................................................................... 63
IV. IDENTIFICATION OF IMPEDIMENTS TO FAIR HOUSING CHOICE AND ASSESSMENT OF
CURRENT PUBLIC AND PRIVATE FAIR HOUSING PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES IN THE
JURISDICTION ........................................................................................................................................................ 64
A. PUBLIC SECTOR.............................................................................................................................................. 64
B. PRIVATE SECTOR ........................................................................................................................................... 66
C. PUBLIC AND PRIVATE SECTOR ....................................................................................................................... 67
V. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS .............................................................................................. 70
A. CONCLUSIONS ................................................................................................................................................ 70
B. RECOMMENDATIONS ...................................................................................................................................... 70
VI. SIGNATURE PAGE ........................................................................................................................................... 71
I. INTRODUCTION AND GENERAL SUMMARY

A. Conduct of the Analysis and Funding

The Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice (AI) is a comprehensive review of


a jurisdiction’s laws, regulations, and administrative policies, procedures, and practices
affecting the location, availability, and accessibility of housing, as well as an assessment
of conditions, both public and private, affecting fair housing choice.

Impediments to fair housing choice are any actions, omissions, or decisions taken
because of race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin which
restrict housing choices, or any actions, omissions, or decisions which have the effect of
restricting housing choices or the availability of housing choices on the basis of race,
color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin. Policies, practices or
procedures that appear neutral on their face, but which operate to deny or adversely affect
the provision of housing to persons of a particular race, color, religion, sex, disability,
familial status, or national origin may constitute such impediments.

The analysis was conducted by the Department of Economic and Housing Development
of the City of Newark.

B. Methodology

Census and other data was collected in order to augment the data provided by the U.S.
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Written materials on fair housing
problems and programs, regional and local demographics, transportation, and local
planning were collected and reviewed. Various federal, state and local statutes and
ordinances were consulted. This report is the product of these analyses.

C. Conclusions

Fair housing continues to be an unachieved goal in many communities in the nation. The
City of Newark is fortunate that widespread discriminatory practices in housing have not
been employed locally. This may be attributed to many possible factors, including: (1) a
relatively diverse population; (2) a high percentage of minority residents; and (3) active
public forums and widespread participation.

While local conditions are favorable with respect to fair housing, the possibility of
discrimination is present. Accordingly, the City of Newark has developed this Analysis of
Impediments to Fair Housing Choice to assist in promoting of fair housing in the City
and assuring that discriminatory housing practices do not occur in the future.

Currently, Newark’s fair housing activities consist of four key areas: education,
assistance to minority families, local compliance, and special programs. The coordination
of these activities, in a planned fashion in which results can be monitored, will enable the
City to measure and report the progress of its fair housing efforts. With the public and

1
private sector working together, freedom of choice in housing can continue to be a reality
for all the City’s residents.

2
II. BACKGROUND DATA

A. Demographic Data

1. Community Description

The City of Newark is located in southeastern Essex County, the northeastern segment of
the State of New Jersey, on the Passaic River, 10 miles west of New York City. Newark,
the nation’s third oldest city, has a land area of 23.8 square miles, the largest area of any
municipality in the County. The City is a part of the New York-New Jersey Metropolitan
Region. It is bound on the south by Elizabeth in Union County. Hillside in Union County
lies to the west as do Irvington and East Orange. Bloomfield Township is northwest of
the City. Kearny and Harrison lie to the east, across the Passaic River, as does Bayonne
which is on the eastern shore of Newark Bay.

The City is home to the 2nd busiest airport in the New York City region which is also the
10th busiest in the country for handling cargo1, the largest port on the East Coast, and one
of the most heavily traveled hubs on Amtrak’s Northeast Corridor. As an employment
center to the region, Newark is home to more jobs than any other city in New Jersey.
Seventy-six companies have located their corporate headquarters within one mile of the
intersection of Broad and Market Streets and 147,000 people commute to work in
Newark every day. Newark is one of the state’s most accessible municipalities as it is
traversed by the N.J. Turnpike (I-95), Garden State Parkway, Interstate Routes 78 and
280, U.S. Routes 1 & 9 and U.S. Route 22, and State Routes 21 and 27.

2. Population

The City of Newark has been the most populous city in New Jersey for many years, with
a peak population of 442,337 reported in the 1930 Census. Since that peak, however, the
City’s population has declined as residents migrated to suburban areas. This trend
reversed by 2008. With a total population in 2008 of 278,9802, the resident population
per square mile of Newark’s 23.8 square mile land area was approximately 11,721. Essex
County’s 2008 population stood at 772,663.

The City of Newark’s total population increased 2 percent from 273,546 in 2000 to
278,980 in 2008. The City’s total population had declined steadily since 1930, declining
by 37.8 percent from 1930 to 1990. Population increased after World War II to 438,776
in 1950, an increase of 2.1 percent. From 1950 to 2000, the City lost over 160,000
residents; the greatest rate of loss occurred between 1980 and 1990, when the City lost
about 54,000 residents, or about 16.4 percent. By 2000, the rate of population loss
drastically fell, to only .6 percent, as the 2000 population fell to 273,546 from 275,221.
By 2008, the population loss had shifted to a population growth.

1
Airports Council International. The Top 30 Airports 2008 – Cargo traffic. The ACI World Airport Traffic Report
2008.
2
U.S. Census Bureau, Population Estimation Program, 2008.

3
Table II-1 portrays the City’s population from 1930 through 2008 while the chart which
follows graphs the data for the same period.

Table II-1
City of Newark & Essex County, N.J.
Population Trends: 1930-2008

City of Newark County of Essex


Numerical Percent Numerical Percent
Year Population Change Change Population Change Change
1930 442,337 833,513
1940 429,760 -12,577 -2.8% 837,340 -3,827 -0.5%
1950 438,776 9,016 2.1% 905,949 -68,609 -8.2%
1960 405,220 -33,556 -7.6% 923,545 -17,596 -1.9%
1970 381,930 -23,290 -5.7% 932,526 -8,981 -1.0%
1980 329,248 -52,682 -13.8% 851,304 81,222 8.7%
1990 275,221 -54,027 -16.4% 778,206 73,098 8.6%
2000 273,546 -1,675 -0.6% 793,633 -15,427 -2.0%
2008 278,980 5,434 2.0% 772,663 20,970 2.6%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Estimates Program

4
City of Newark, N.J.
Population 1930-2008

500000

400000

300000

Persons

200000

100000

0
1930 1940 1950 1960 1975 1980 1990 2000 2008
Total 442337 429760 438776 405220 339568 329248 275221 273546 278980

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Population Estimates Program

5
3. Race

Reflecting a statewide trend, the City of Newark’s population became more diverse in
terms of racial/ethnic composition from 1980 to 2008. Table II-2 provides the breakdown
from the 1990 and 2000 Census, as well as the 2006-2008 American Community Survey.
Examination of the data reveals that the percentage of White (non-Hispanic) persons in
the City increased from 46,276 in 1990 to 63,856 in 2008, an increase of 38 percent. The
Black (non-Hispanic) population decreased from 155,055 persons in 1990 to 140,608
persons in 2008 and currently comprises approximately 53.6 percent of Newark’s
population. This represents a 3.3 percentage point decrease from 1990. The Asian and
Pacific-Islander (non-Hispanic) portion of the population increased from 2,808 in 1990 to
4,352 persons in 2008, currently representing 1.7 percent of the City’s population. From
1990 to 2008, this portion of the population grew 55 percent. The Native American
population increased from 480 in 1990 to 912 in 2008. The Other Race (non-Hispanic)
category grew significantly from 1990 to 2008, increasing by 162.7 percent, although
representing only 1.4 percent of Newark’s total population in 2008. The number of
Hispanics of all races increased significantly as well, from 69,204 in 1990 to 83,687 in
2008, a 20.9 percent increase. This segment of the population now represents 31.9
percent of the City’s population, the second-largest racial group in Newark.

Minority population in the City increased from 228,945 in 1990 to 233,232 in 2008, an
increase of 4,287 persons.3 Minorities now comprise 88.9 percent of the City’s
population, making Newark a majority-minority city.

Table II-2 and the chart on the following page graphically portray the change in the
White and Non-White population (all races) from 1990 to 2008.

3
A minority person is as defined by the U.S. Bureau of the Census (Black, Hispanic Origin, American Indian,
Eskimo or Aleut, Asian or Pacific Islander, Other Race).

6
Table II-2
City of Newark, N.J.
Population by Race, 1980-2008

1990 2000 2008 1990-2008


Numerical
Population Number % Number % Number* % Change % Change
White (non-Hispanic) 46,276 16.8% 72,537 26.5% 63,856 24.3% 17,580 38.0%
Black (non-Hispanic) 155,055 56.3% 146,250 53.5% 140,608 53.6% -14,447 -9.3%
Hispanic (all races) 69,204 25.1% 80,622 29.5% 83,687 31.9% 14,483 20.9%
Native-American (non-Hispanic) 480 0.2% 1,005 0.4% 912 0.3% 432 90.0%
Asian & Pacific Islanders (non-
Hispanic) 2,808 1.0% 3,398 1.2% 4,352 1.7% 1,544 55.0%
Other (non-Hispanic) 1,398 0.5% 3,843 1.4% 3,673 1.4% 2,275 162.7%

Minority Population 228,945 83.2% 235,118 86.0% 233,232 88.9% 4,287 1.9%

Total Population 275,221 273,546 262,313 -12,908 -4.7%

Household Population 266,319 260,773 248,845 -17,474 -6.6%


Non-Household Population 8,902 12,773 NA

*Total population figures for 2008 are taken from the 2006-2008 American Community Survey, where race information is collected.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Summary File 1, Table P3; 1990 Summary Tape File 3, Table P012; 2006-2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates, Tables B02001.

7
City of Newark, N.J.
Population by Race 1990-2008

180,000

160,000

140,000

120,000
Persons

100,000

80,000

60,000

40,000

20,000

0
1990 2000 2008
Asian & Pacific Islanders 2,808 3,398 4,352
Black 155,055 146,250 140,608
Hispanic (all races) 69,204 80,622 83,687
Native-American 480 1,005 912
Other 1,398 3,843 3,673
White 46,276 72,537 63,856

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

8
City of Newark, N.J.
Minority Population, 1990-2008

250,000

200,000

150,000
Persons

100,000

50,000

0
1990 2000 2008
Minority 228,945 235,118 233,232
White (non-Hispanic) 46,276 72,537 63,856

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

9
For the purposes of this analysis, an Area of Racial/Ethnic Minority Concentration has been
defined as Census Tracts in which the percentage of minority population exceeds ten percent of
the minority percentage population of the city. According to the 2000 U.S. Census, minorities
comprise 86 percent of the total population of the City of Newark.4

Of the 90 Census Tracts in Newark with reported populations in 2000 there were 3 with a total
population identified as a minority race. There are 51 Census Tracts in the City with a
percentage of minorities exceeding the City of Newark’s minority percentage of 86. These
Census Tracts are generally located west of Broad Street and south of Central Avenue.

Table II-3 lists the City’s minority population by Census Tract. Map 1 – Percentage Minority
Population by Census Tract locates the City’s minority population by Census Tract.

Table II-3
City of
Newark, N.J.
Minority Population by Census Tract, 2000

Minority Total Census Tract


Census Tract population population Percentage
1 2,515 5,619 44.8%
2 1,123 2,273 49.4%
3 2,023 3,395 59.6%
4 802 2,083 38.5%
5 879 1,697 51.8%
6 2,720 4,385 62.0%
7 5,597 6,517 85.9%
8 2,947 4,410 66.8%
9 3,460 4,014 86.2%
10 3,718 4,512 82.4%
11 1,953 2,542 76.8%
13 1,440 1,473 97.8%
14 2,589 2,743 94.4%
15 1,555 1,636 95.0%
16 1,609 1,706 94.3%
17 2,043 2,135 95.7%
18 2,089 2,176 96.0%
19 2,109 2,246 93.9%
20 4,493 4,714 95.3%
21 3,344 3,504 95.4%
22.01 5,360 7,444 72.0%
22.02 2,998 3,337 89.8%
23 4,680 4,920 95.1%
24 3,854 4,004 96.3%
25 4,087 4,179 97.8%

4
According to the 2006-2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates, minorities comprise 88.9 percent of the total
population of the City of Newark. However, race information is not aggregated by census tract in the American Community
Survey. Census tract minority population figures in this report are therefore based on 2000 Census information.

10
Table II-3
City of
Newark, N.J.
Minority Population by Census Tract, 2000

Minority Total Census Tract


Census Tract population population Percentage
26 1,212 1,228 98.7%
27 810 890 91.0%
28 1,714 1,735 98.8%
29 1,351 1,450 93.2%
30 1,621 1,653 98.1%
31 787 789 99.7%
34 1,300 1,335 97.4%
35 1,715 1,747 98.2%
37 1,813 1,926 94.1%
38 2,416 2,567 94.1%
39 2,552 2,570 99.3%
40 1,030 1,055 97.6%
41 3,278 3,293 99.5%
42 3,407 3,460 98.5%
43 1,733 1,780 97.4%
44 1,904 1,904 100.0%
45 3,459 3,476 99.5%
46 3,020 3,041 99.3%
47 4,697 4,848 96.9%
48.01 2,363 2,388 99.0%
48.02 3,124 3,463 90.2%
49 4,274 4,302 99.3%
50 2,004 2,140 93.6%
51 2,401 2,409 99.7%
52 1,483 1,509 98.3%
53 2,178 2,184 99.7%
54 3,945 4,035 97.8%
57 1,624 1,872 86.8%
58 1,566 1,782 87.9%
62 2,526 2,561 98.6%
64 1,577 1,631 96.7%
66 2,303 2,303 100.0%
67 3,166 3,803 83.3%
68 2,076 3,455 60.1%
69 812 3,881 20.9%
70 723 3,553 20.3%
71 526 3,175 16.6%
72 463 3,567 13.0%
73 820 5,072 16.2%
74 530 2,475 21.4%
75.01 2,210 4,207 52.5%
75.02 1,546 3,136 49.3%
76 846 3,208 26.4%
77 453 2,543 17.8%
78 1,137 3,434 33.1%

11
Table II-3
City of
Newark, N.J.
Minority Population by Census Tract, 2000

Minority Total Census Tract


Census Tract population population Percentage
79 1,519 4,279 35.5%
80 1,334 1,767 75.5%
81 2,917 3,253 89.7%
82 2,216 2,416 91.7%
85 1,177 1,642 71.7%
86 1,204 1,328 90.7%
87 2,286 4,065 56.2%
88 1,090 1,678 65.0%
89 1,198 2,322 51.6%
90 1,685 2,142 78.7%
91 1,900 3,089 61.5%
92 3,513 5,352 65.6%
93 3,179 4,864 65.4%
94 3,624 6,085 59.6%
95 3,592 6,600 54.4%
96 2,172 3,071 70.7%
97 3,152 5,125 61.5%
98 2,742 3,338 82.1%
227 2,726 2,756 98.9%
228 1,875 1,875 100.0%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Summary File 1, Table P3

12
Map 1 – Percentage Minority Population by Census Tract

13
4. Age and Gender

With respect to the breakdown by gender, there were 131,862 men and 143,359 women
residing in Newark in 1990, with males representing 47.9 percent and females representing
52.1 percent of the City’s population. The 2008 American Community Survey reported
128,841 males or 49.1 percent of the total population, and 133,472 females or 50.9 percent of
the total population.

Table II-4 presents the 1990, 2000 and 2008 populations by age and gender for the City of
Newark. As indicated, there were significant changes in the age distributions over the almost
twenty year period due to the overall loss of population. All age groups lost population with the
exception of the 35-64 age groups and the 75 and over age group. These age groups
experienced moderate to pronounced growth, with the greatest growth occurring in the 45-54
year age group. The table and the charts that follow indicate the changing characteristics of the
age of the City’s population between 1990 and 2008.

14
Table II-4
City of Newark, N.J.
1990-2008 Population by Age & Gender

1990 2000 2008 1990-2008


% of % of % of Numerical %
Age Male Female Total Total Male Female Total Total Male Female Total Total Change Change
Under 5 11,225 10,640 21,865 8.6% 10,598 10,695 21,293 7.9% 10,851 9,837 20,688 7.8% -1,177 -5%
5 to 9 11,023 10,316 21,339 8.8% 11,502 10,741 22,243 7.8% 8,673 8,967 17,640 8.1% -3,699 -17%
10 to 14 11,210 11,076 22,286 10.3% 10,471 10,438 20,909 8.1% 10,103 9,410 19,513 7.6% -2,773 -12%
15 to 19 12,033 10,957 22,990 10.3% 10,737 10,319 21,056 8.4% 10,587 9,289 19,876 7.7% -3,114 -14%
20 to 24 12,404 12,327 24,731 8.8% 12,008 12,006 24,014 9.0% 10,940 10,571 21,511 8.8% -3,220 -13%
25 to 34 24,998 25,821 50,819 14.8% 23,324 22,820 46,144 18.5% 21,602 19,702 41,304 16.9% -9,515 -19%
35 to 44 17,443 19,589 37,032 11.4% 20,567 20,755 41,322 13.5% 20,271 19,849 40,120 15.1% 3,088 8%
45 to 54 12,399 14,953 27,352 9.5% 14,089 15,860 29,949 9.9% 15,634 17,776 33,410 10.9% 6,058 22%
55 to 59 4,762 6,130 10,892 4.6% 5,069 6,307 11,376 4.0% 5,784 6,881 12,665 4.2% 1,773 16%
60 to 64 4,794 5,634 10,428 4.1% 4,574 5,360 9,934 3.8% 4,852 5,670 10,522 3.6% 94 1%
65 to 74 6,190 9,465 15,655 5.6% 6,122 8,363 14,485 5.7% 6,145 8,775 14,920 5.3% -735 -5%
75 & over 3,381 6,451 9,832 3.2% 3,640 7,181 10,821 3.6% 3,399 6,745 10,144 4.0% 312 3%
Total 131,862 143,359 275,221 100.0% 132,701 140,845 273,546 100.0% 128,841 133,472 262,313 100.0% -12,908 -5%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1990 Summary Tape File 3, Table P118; 2000 Summary File 3, Table P8; 2006-2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates, Table B01001

15
City of Newark, N.J.
1990-2008 Change in Population by Age & Gender

2008
Under 5 to 10 to 15 to 20 to 25 to 35 to 45 to 55 to 60 to 65 to 75 &
74 over

1990
2008
1990
2008
64

1990
2008
59

1990
2008
Age Groups by Year

54

1990
2008
44

1990
2008
34

1990
2008
24

1990
2008
19

1990
2008
14

1990
2008
9

1990
2008
5

1990

0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 40,000 45,000 50,000

Female Male

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

16
B. Income Data

1. Income

Table II-5 provides 1990, 2000, and 2008 data on per capita, median family and average
household income for Newark, Essex County, and New Jersey.

The 1990 per capita income for the City was $9,424. Per capita income increased to $13,009 in
2000 and $17,364 in 2008, compared to $17,574 in 1990, $24,943 in 2000, and $31,902 in
2008 for the County. New Jersey’s per capita income was $18,714 in 1990, increasing to
$27,006 in 2000 and $34,899 in 2008. Per capita income increased by 84.3 percent in Newark
from 1990 to 2008 compared to 81.5 percent for the County and 86.5 percent for the State. Of
the 22 municipalities in the County, Newark ranked twenty-second in per capita income in
2000. Of the 21 counties in the State, Essex County ranked twelfth in per capita income in
2000.5

The U.S. Census and American Community Survey reported median family incomes in Newark
of $25,816, $30,781, and $41,625 in 1990, 2000, and 2008 respectively compared to $42,150,
$54,818, and $69,342 respectively for Essex County and $47,589, $65,370, and $84,743
respectively for New Jersey. Median family income in the City, adjusted for inflation, increased
by 61.2 percent from 1990 to 2008, while the median family income for the County and State
increased by 64.5 and 78.1 percent respectively.

Median household income in Newark in 1990 was $21,650, compared to $26,913 in 2000 and
$35,601 in 2008. For the County, the 1990 median household income was reported at $34,518,
$44,944 in 2000, and $55,407 in 2008. Median household income increased by 64.4 percent in
Newark from 1990 to 2008 compared to a 60.5 percent increase for the County and a 70.2
percent increase for the State for the same period.

Table 11-5 displays 1990 and 2000 Census information along with 2008 American Community
Survey 3-Year Estimates on per capita income, median family income, and median household
income for the City, the County, and New Jersey.

Table II-5
Newark, Essex County & New Jersey
1990-2008 Per Capita, Median Family & Median
Household Income
Per Capita Median Family Median Household
Income Income Income
City of Newark
1990 $9,424 $25,816 $21,650
2000 $13,009 $30,781 $26,913
2008 $17,364 $41,625 $35,601
Essex County
1990 $17,574 $42,150 $34,518

5
These rankings come from the New Jersey State Data Center, prepared for the New Jersey Department of Labor, August
2002, based on 2000 Census Summary File 3.

17
2000 $24,943 $54,818 $44,944
2008 $31,902 $69,342 $55,407
New Jersey
1990 $18,714 $47,589 $40,927
2000 $27,006 $65,370 $55,146
2008 $34,899 $84,743 $69,674

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1990 Summary Tape File 3, Tables P080A, P107A, P114A;
2000 Summary File 3, Tables P53, P77, P82; American Community Survey 2006-2007 3-
Year Estimates, Tables B19013, B19113, B19301

Table II-6
City of Newark
Households by Minority Status & Income Group

Percent of Very Low Other Low


Total Total Income 0- Income 51- Above
Households Households 50% MFI 80% MFI 80%
All Households 91282 49402 14879 27001
Percent 54.1% 16.3% 29.6%
White (non-Hispanic) 23700 26.0% 6325 2480 5625
Percent 26.7% 10.5% 23.7%
Black (non-Hispanic) 49039 53.7% 27710 7895 13434
Percent 56.5% 16.1% 27.4%
Hispanic (all races) 23854 26.1% 13414 3840 6600
Percent 56.2% 16.1% 27.7%
Native Amer. (non-Hispanic) 138 0.2% 79 10 49
Percent 57.2% 7.2% 35.5%
Asian and Pacific Islander (non-
Hispanic) 1017 1.1% 483 129 405
Percent 47.5% 12.7% 39.8%

Source: CHAS Data Book 2000

The CHAS Data book, published by HUD in connection with the preparation of the
Consolidated Plan, provided information on households by minority status and income group
and is shown in Table II-6 above. It is summarized as follows:

 Of the total of 91,282 households in the City, 49,402 (54.1%) were very low income,
14,879 (16.3%) were other low income, and 27,001 (29.6%) were moderate income and
above.

 Of the 23,700 white (non-Hispanic) households in the City, 6,325 (26.7%) were very
low income, 2,480 (10.5%) were other low income, and 5,625 (23.7%) were moderate
income and above.

 Of the 49,039 black (non-Hispanic) households in the City, 27,710 (56.5%) were very
low income, 7,895 (16.1%) were other low income, and 13,434 (27.4%) were moderate
income and above.

18
 Of the 23,854 Hispanic (all races) households in the City, 13,414 (56.2%) were very
low income, 3,840 (16.1%) were other low income, and 6,600 (27.7%) were moderate
income and above.

 Of the 138 Native American (non-Hispanic) households in the City, 79 (57.2%) were
very low income, 10 (7.2%) were other low income, and 49 (35.5%) were moderate
income and above.

 Of the 1,017 Asian and Pacific-Islander (non-Hispanic) households in the City, 483
(47.5%) were very low income, 129 (12.7%) were other low income, and 405 (39.8%)
were moderate income and above.

For the purposes of this analysis, an area of low income concentration has been defined as a
Census Tract that is eligible (51% L/M population) for inclusion of an area benefit Community
Development Block Grant (CDBG) program activity within its boundaries.

Under the above definition, all of the 91 Census Tracts in the City are considered to have a
concentration of low and moderate income persons. Twenty-one of Newark’s Census Tracts
have more than 80 percent of their populations in the low-mod income category. Several of
these are in the central portion of the City, including the Lincoln Park and Clinton Hill
neighborhoods.

Table II-7 shows the number and percentages of low and moderate income persons by Census
Tract in Newark based upon estimates from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
Development for Fiscal Year 2008, which are based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Map
2 – Percentage of Low/Moderate Income by Census Tract shows the geographic location of
these areas.

Table II-7
City of Newark, N.J.
Low/Mod Income Areas by Census Tract
Low/Mod Low/Mod Low/Mod
Census Tract Universe Persons Percent
1 5,619 3,298 58.7
2 2,273 1,919 84.4
3 3,387 2,562 75.6
4 2,083 1,295 62.2
5 1,693 938 55.4
6 4,257 2,701 63.4
7 6,492 4,875 75.1
8 4,344 2,955 68.0
9 4,014 3,421 85.2
10 3,513 3,056 87.0
11 1,411 731 51.8
13 1,433 1,117 77.9
14 2,726 2,179 79.9
15 1,613 1,471 91.2
16 1,684 1,274 75.7
17 2,135 1,677 78.5

19
Low/Mod Low/Mod Low/Mod
Census Tract Universe Persons Percent
18 2,176 1,689 77.6
19 2,246 1,713 76.3
20 4,697 3,356 71.4
21 3,493 1,884 53.9
22.01 7,444 5,120 68.8
22.02 3,337 1,909 57.2
23 4,917 2,681 54.5
24 4,004 2,502 62.5
25 4,179 2,705 64.7
26 1,228 960 78.2
27 890 746 83.8
28 1,735 1,387 79.9
29 1,132 904 79.9
30 1,653 1,546 93.5
31 787 590 75.0
34 1,230 982 79.8
35 1,700 1,259 74.1
37 1,902 1,284 67.5
38 2,493 1,944 78.0
39 2,570 2,361 91.9
40 1,055 938 88.9
41 3,255 2,366 72.7
42 3,447 2,402 69.7
43 1,780 1,252 70.3
44 1,904 1,335 70.1
45 3,438 2,284 66.4
46 3,041 2,162 71.1
47 4,848 3,043 62.8
48.01 2,388 1,815 76.0
48.02 3,448 2,870 83.2
49 4,302 3,137 72.9
50 2,122 1,724 81.2
51 2,409 1,523 63.2
52 1,509 887 58.8
53 2,174 1,636 75.3
54 4,017 3,084 76.8
57 1,862 1,446 77.7
58 1,748 1,458 83.4
62 2,561 2,394 93.5
64 3,559 2,724 76.5
66 2,303 2,001 86.9
67 3,301 3,005 91.0
68 3,440 2,664 77.4
69 3,881 2,632 67.8
70 3,549 2,253 63.5
71 3,175 1,924 60.6
72 3,567 2,201 61.7
73 5,040 2,748 54.5
74 2,471 1,650 66.8
75.01 4,156 3,007 72.4
75.02 3,136 2,383 76.0

20
Low/Mod Low/Mod Low/Mod
Census Tract Universe Persons Percent
76 3,208 2,137 66.6
77 2,541 1,496 58.9
78 3,434 2,148 62.6
79 4,272 2,829 66.2
80 1,402 1,139 81.2
81 3,152 2,738 86.9
82 2,146 1,684 78.5
85 653 386 59.1
86 1,328 950 71.5
87 4,007 2,974 74.2
88 1,678 1,408 83.9
89 2,322 2,033 87.6
90 2,139 1,530 71.5
91 3,067 2,309 75.3
92 2,496 2,338 93.7
93 4,827 3,823 79.2
94 6,015 3,771 62.7
95 6,445 4,036 62.6
96 3,054 2,208 72.3
97 5,124 3,892 76.0
98 79 46 58.2
227 2,683 2,314 86.2
228 1,875 1,619 86.3
Source: U.S. Dept of Housing and Urban Development based on 2000
U.S. Census data

21
Map 2 – Percentage of Low/Moderate Income by Census Tract

22
2. Poverty

The number of persons residing in the City (those for whom poverty status is determined) in
2000 living below poverty was 74,263, or 28.4 percent of those counted. In 2008, the number
of persons living below poverty was 66,022, or 26.1 percent of those counted. Of the 66,022
persons living below poverty in 2008, 55.6 percent were female. Minority (non-Hispanic)
persons represented 79.1 percent of those residents living below poverty according to the 2006-
2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates. Of the 62,068 residents living below
poverty in 2008, 21,049 (33.9%) were Hispanic. There are thirteen Census Tracts in the City
where the percentage of persons living below poverty exceeds 44 percent. Map 3 – Percentage
of Population Below Poverty Level by Census Tract shows the geographic location of these
areas.

The U.S. Census reports the number and aggregate income for households receiving public
assistance. According to the Census Bureau, “public assistance” includes any funds provided
though supplemental security income (SSI) payments by federal or state welfare agencies to
low-income persons who are aged (65 years and older), public assistance, or food stamps.
Table II-8 lists the number of households receiving SSI or public assistance. According to the
U.S. Census Bureau, 10.3 percent of households for whom poverty status was determined were
receiving SSI. In addition, 12.6 percent of households were receiving public assistance
(including food stamps). By 2008, the percentage of households receiving SSI had dropped to
8.2 percent, and the percentage receiving public assistance had jumped to 17.3 percent.

Table II-8 also describes the level of assistance being received. In 2000, the average annual
amount of SSI received per household was $6,304.26. By 2008, this figure rose to $7,067.77.
The average annual amount of public assistance received per household in 2000 was $3,140.54.
This dropped to $1,185.03 by 2008, a 62 percent drop from 2000.

Table II-8
City of Newark, N.J.
Public Assistance Recipients

2000 2008
% of % of
Number Households Number Households
Households receiving SSI 9,421 10.3% 7,390 8.2%
Households receiving Public Assistance 11,515 12.6% 15,658 17.3%
Total Number of Households for which Poverty
Status was determined 91,366 90,599

Aggregate SSI for Households $59,392,400 $52,230,800


Average Annual Amount of SSI $6,304.26 $7,067.77
Aggregate Public Assistance Income for
Households $36,163,300 $18,555,200
Average Annual Amount of Public Assistance $3,140.54 $1,185.03

Soucres: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Census, Tables P63, P64, P72, P73; 2006-2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates,
Tables B19056, B19057, B19066, B19067

23
Map 3 – Percentage of Population Below Poverty Level by Census Tract

24
C. Employment Characteristics

1. Labor Force

Table II-9 displays labor force data from the 1990, 2000, and 2008 Census which indicates that
the civilian labor force in the City decreased 2.5 percent from 123,808 in 1990 to 120,760 in
2008, a result of the overall population loss in Newark. In 1990 the Census reported that 53.4
percent of women over 16 were in the civilian labor force. This percentage increased to 57.7
percent in 2008, an increase of over 4 percentage points. The increased participation of women
in the labor force is a reflection of general economic trends.

In 1990 the Census reported that 68.1 percent of men over 16 were in the civilian labor force.
The participation rate decreased to 62.7 percent in 2008, with the total number of males in the
labor force decreasing by 3,848. The Census reported a change in the overall unemployment
rate in the City from 14.7 percent in 1990 to 11.4 percent in 2008.

Table II-9
City of Newark
Sex by Employment Status 1990-2008

Number Change % Change


1990 2000 2008 1990-2008 1990-2008
Persons Age 16 & Over
In Labor Force:
Armed Forces 314 19 165 -149 -47.5%
Civilian:
Employed 105,553 90,819 108,033 2,480 2.3%
Unemployed 18,255 17,437 12,727 -5,528 -30.3%
Not in Labor Force 81,394 97,236 78,301 -3,093 -3.8%
Unemployment Rate 14.7% 16.1% 11.4%

Males Age 16 & Over


In Labor Force:
Armed Forces 264 19 51 -213 -80.7%
Civilian:
Employed 55,636 45,848 56,061 425 0.8%
Unemployed 9,842 8,909 5,569 -4,273 -43.4%
Not in Labor Force 30,457 43,265 36,619 6,162 20.2%
Unemployment Rate 15.0% 9.1% 5.7%

Females Age 16 & Over


In Labor Force:
Armed Forces 50 0 114 64 128.0%
Civilian:
Employed 49,917 44,971 51,972 2,055 4.1%
Unemployed 8,413 8,528 7,158 -1,255 -14.9%
Not in Labor Force 50,937 53,971 41,682 -9,255 -18.2%
Unemployment Rate 14.4% 7.9% 7.0%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1990 Summary Tape File 3, Table P070; 2000 Summary File 3, Table P43; 2006-2008 American
Community Survey 3-Year Estimates, Table B23001

25
2. Resident Employment by Industry and Occupation

Newark’s total employment of residents 16 and over increased by 17,214 from 90,819 in 2000
to 108,033 in 2008. Services gained the most employees in the decade increasing by 7,888
employees, a gain of 40 percent. The construction industry grew from 6,753 in 2000 to 11,244
in 2008, a 67 percent increase. Wholesale trade employment posted a decrease, from 3,748 to
2,916, a 22 percent loss.

With respect to manufacturing, the City of Newark has suffered along with other urban centers,
counties, the state and the region. From 2000 to 2008, resident employment in the
manufacturing sector fell 15 percent, from 11,737 to 9,979. This trend continues the long-term
trend of manufacturing loss in the nation.

Table II-10 compares the 2000 and 2008 industry group employment trends of City residents.
The Chart entitled Resident Employment by Industry 2000-2008 portrays industry categories of
employed City residents as reported by the U.S. Census.

Similar to nationwide trends since the 1960s, the City’s employed residents have been shifting
from blue collar to white collar occupations. Since the 1960s these occupations have become
less prevalent. Blue collar occupations among City residents also changed during the last
decade.
Table II-10
City of Newark, N.J.
Resident Industry Groups 2000-2008
Employed Persons 16 Years and Over
2000 2008 Change in 2000-2008
Number % Number % Number %
Agriculture/Fishing/mining 107 0% 166 0% 59 55%
Construction 6,753 7% 11,244 10% 4,491 67%
Manufacturing 11,737 13% 9,979 9% -1,758 -15%
Wholesale trade 3,748 4% 2,916 3% -832 -22%
Retail trade 8,456 9% 10,486 10% 2,030 24%
Transportation, warehousing, and utilities 9,303 10% 9,910 9% 607 7%
Information 2,489 3% 2,000 2% -489 -20%
Finance/insurance/real estate 5,663 6% 6,430 6% 767 14%
Professional, scientific, and management, and administrative
and waste management services: 8,096 9% 9,946 9% 1,850 23%
Education/health/social services 18,270 20% 25,064 23% 6,794 37%
Arts/entertainment/food 6,227 7% 7,940 7% 1,713 28%
Other services, except public administration: 5,706 6% 6,507 6% 801 14%
Public administration 4,264 5% 5,109 5% 845 20%
Total 90,819 107,697 16,878

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Summary File 3, Table P49; 2006-2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates, Table B24030

Table II-11 and the Chart entitled Occupation Groups 2000-2008 portrays occupations of
employed Newark residents as reported by the U.S. Census in 2000 and 2008. The trends have
been toward significant increases in managerial and professional specialties, construction

26
occupations (as the growth in home and office construction soared throughout the decade), and
service occupations. These occupations showed increases of 31 percent, 38 percent and 40
percent, respectively.

Table II-11
City of Newark, N.J.
Resident Occupational Groups 2000-2008
Employed Persons 16 Years and Older
2000 2008 Change 2000-2008
Number % Number % Number %
Management, professional and related occupations 17,168 19% 22,498 21% 5,330 31%
Service 19,796 22% 27,684 25% 7,888 40%
Sales and office 24,985 28% 25,387 23% 402 2%
Farming, fishing and forestry 134 0% 0 0% -134 -100%
Construction, extraction and maintenance 9,455 10% 13,016 12% 3,561 38%
Production, transportation, and material moving 19,281 21% 20,952 19% 1,671 9%
Total 90,819 109,537

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Summary File 3, Table P50; 2006-2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates, Table B24010

27
CITY OF NEWARK, N.J.
Resident Employment by Industry 2000-2008

45000

40000

35000

30000

25000
Persons

20000

15000

10000

5000

0
Transportation,
Agriculture/Fishi Arts/entertainm Public
Construction Manufacturing Trade warehousing, Information FIRE Services
ng/Mining ent/food administration
and utilities
2000 107 6753 11737 12204 9303 2489 5663 32072 6227 4264
2008 166 11244 9979 13402 9910 2000 6430 41517 7940 5109

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

28
CITY OF NEWARK, N.J.
Occupational Groups 2000 - 2008

30000

25000
Employed Residents 16 & Over

20000

15000

10000

5000

0
Management, Production, Construction,
Farming, fishing and
professional and Service Sales and office transportation, and extraction and
forestry
related occupations material moving maintenance
2000 17168 19796 24985 134 19281 9455
2008 22498 27684 25387 0 20952 13016

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

29
3. Employment Projections

The economic recession has significantly shifted the workforce landscape in Newark, and
in the larger metropolitan area. According to the New Jersey Department of Labor and
Workforce Development, the fastest growing industries in Essex County are health care
and social assistance.6 According to the Industry Employment Projections, health care
and social assistance industries will grow by about 20% by 2016. The projections also
suggest that finance and insurance industries will grow by 37% by 2016, although this
projection was made in 2006 and may have significantly changed due to the economic
recession beginning in 2007. The industries experiencing the greatest decline in Essex
County include manufacturing of all types; machinery manufacturing alone is projected
to drop about 40% by 2016.7

The City’s workforce is expected to grow by 30,712 employees, according to the


projections of the Council on Affordable Housing. General employment projections are
continuing to shift, however, as the economy goes through dramatic changes in four
areas: the housing market, patterns of consumption, the global credit surge, and the
ongoing macroeconomic dominance of financial activities.8 The Northern New Jersey
area experienced some of the greatest decreases in jobs in the State. The Newark/Union
Labor Area experienced a drop in employment of 1.8% in 2008.9 With its close ties to the
finance and banking institutions of New York City, the overall North Jersey region has
significantly felt the burden of the financial, credit and housing market slumps.

However, 2009 showed some areas of improvement for the Newark/Union region, as
employment gains occurred in educational and health services, as well as leisure and
hospitality. Despite slow growth, these two sectors continue to inspire optimism for
future growth. The ongoing loss in manufacturing jobs and trade, transportation and
utilities sector jobs continues to overwhelmingly burden Newark and the surrounding
suburbs. Initiatives targeted at slowing this downward trend in these two sectors will be a
crucial element in retaining jobs and expanding residents’ access to the labor market. In
addition, a turn in the real estate market as well as infrastructure improvements in the
North Jersey region will generate new construction jobs and strengthen a sector greatly
influenced by the economic downturn.

4. Housing and Employment

A commonly recognized impediment to choice of housing is the inability to obtain


employment in proximity to affordable housing. Table II-12 portrays the number of
Newark residents working in the state, county and city. In 2000, the number of residents
living in Newark and working outside the city was 58.6 percent of all Newark’s
employed residents. The number of residents working outside the county was 31.7

6
State of New Jersey, Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Industry Employment Projections. 2006.
7
Ibid.
8
Sitar-Rutgers University. 2009: The Shape of the “New Normal”. Sitar-Rutgers Regional Report. 12:1, Feb 2009.
9
State of New Jersey. Department of Labor and Workforce Development. New Jersey Economic Indicators.
November 2009.

30
percent of Newark’s employed residents. Only 6.8 percent of Newark’s employed
residents worked outside of the state. These trends remained relatively stable, although
the proportion of Newark residents working in the City rose by about one percentage
point (from 41.4% to 42.1%).

Table II-12
City of Newark, N.J.
Workplace of Residents

2000 2008
Total: 87,720 103,478
Worked in state of residence: 81,768 93.2% 94,797 91.6%
Worked outside state of residence 5,952 6.8% 8,681 8.4%
Worked in county of residence 53,949 61.5% 62,763 60.7%
Worked outside county of
residence 27,819 31.7% 32,034 31.0%
Worked in place of residence 36,319 41.4% 43,552 42.1%
Worked outside place of
residence 51,401 58.6% 59,926 57.9%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Summary File 3, Tables P26, P27; 2006-2008 American
Community Survey 3-Year Estimates, Table B08007, B08008

5. Employment Centers
 
According to the City’s Master Plan Re-Exam of February 2009, out of the City’s
160,000 jobs, only 25% are currently held by Newarkers and 60% of Newark residents
work outside the City. Thus, a high percentage of Newarkers still commute out of the
City to work, many commuting to places that are not well served by transit from
Newark’s neighborhoods, as shown in Figure 110. This is especially true of
neighborhoods in need (high unemployment, low-income, low motor vehicle ownership).
Commuting to the suburbs often requires driving, yet 44% of households still lack access
to a car. And while the City’s transit system provides excellent connections to the
downtown, it fails to provide efficient access to growing employment opportunities at the
air and sea ports. The City’s Master Plan Re-Exam of February 2009 promotes a series of
long-range transit projects and policies that improve resident employment opportunities,
as well as community and business development (demonstrated in Figure 2).

10
The figures are taken from Newark’s Master Plan Re-Exam of February 2009.

31
Figure 1: Transit and Employment Centers

32
Figure 2: Proposed Transit Enhancements

33
D. Housing Profile

1. Units by Tenure and Type

According to 2008 U.S. Census data, the total number of housing units in the City,
including vacant, seasonal and migratory units was 108,423, with 92,048 occupied
housing units and 16,375 vacant units.

Of the vacant housing units reported in 2008, there were 6,655 units for rent and 1,525
units for sale, with a reported vacancy rate of units for rent of 9.4 percent and 4.9 percent
for units for sale.

Table II-13 indicates the changing characteristics of the City’s housing stock from 1990
to 2008.

Renter occupied housing is the most dominant housing type in the City. The 2008
American Community Survey reported that, of the 92,048 total occupied housing units in
the City, renter occupied housing comprised 69,181 units or 75 percent. Owner occupied
units were reported at 22,867 units or 25 percent in 2008.

Table II-13
City of Newark, N.J.
Housing Units by Tenure 1990-2008

1990 2000 2008


Num. Change %
Number % Number % Number % 1990-2008 Change
Total Year-
round Units 102,473 100,141 108,423 5,950 5.8%
Occupied
Housing Units 91,552 91,382 92,048 496 0.5%
Owner-
Occupied 21,115 23% 21,738 24% 22,867 25% 1,752 8.3%
Renter-
Occupied 70,437 77% 69,644 76% 69,181 75% -1,256 -1.8%

Vacant units 10,921 8,759 16,375 5,454 49.9%


For rent 6,042 55% 4,112 47% 6,655 41% 613 10.1%
Rented or sold,
not occupied 1,476 14% 440 5% 827 5% -649 -44.0%

For sale only 536 5% 451 5% 1,525 9% 989 184.5%


For seasonal,
recreational, or
occasional use 53 0% 124 1% 230 1% 177 334.0%
For migrant
workers 20 0% 4 0% 0 0% -20 -100.0%
Other vacant 2,794 26% 3,628 41% 7,138 44% 4,344 155.5%

34
Vacancy Rate
Homeowner
Vacancy Rate 2.5% 2.0% 4.9%
Rental Vacancy
Rate 7.9% 5.6% 9.4%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1990 Census, 2000 Census, 2008 American Community Survey

2. Households

As with its total population, the City’s household population experienced a decline during
the past decade. According to the U.S. Census, the City’s 1990 household population was
266,319, while its 2008 total household population was 248,845. This indicates a
decrease of 17,474 persons or 6.6 percent. In 2008 the number of households was 92,048
compared to 91,382 in 2000. The average number of persons per household was 2.74 in
2008 compared to 2.85 in 2000.

Non-household population decreased from 12,784 to 11,477, a decrease of 1,307 persons,


representing a 10 percent decrease from 2000 to 2008. In 2008 the U.S. Census reported
59,754 family households and 32,294 non-family households.

3. Age of Housing

The age of housing stock in the City is reflective of the fact that Newark was largely
settled prior to World War II and has developed slowly during the decades following the
end of the war. Of the 108,423 housing units in the City in 2008, 30,400 or 28 percent
were constructed in 1939 or earlier. The most intensive decade for housing construction
after the war was during the 1950’s when 16,591 units or 17 percent of the housing stock
was built. From 2000 to 2008, 8,736 units were added to the City’s housing stock. This
represents a boom in housing construction consistent with national trends.

Table II-14 and the chart on the following page portray the age of the City’s housing
inventory.

Table II-14
City of Newark, N.J.
Number of Housing Units by Age

2000 2008
Year Built Number % Number %
2005 or later NA 2094 2%
2000 to 2004 NA 6642 6%
1990 to 1999 7325 7% 6452 6%
1980 to 1989 6168 6% 5624 5%
1970 to 1979 9710 10% 11800 11%
1960 to 1969 15592 16% 13164 12%
1950 to 1959 16591 17% 17672 16%
1940 to 1949 16379 16% 14575 13%

35
1939 or earlier 28376 28% 30400 28%
Total 100141 108423

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Summary File 3, Table H34; 2006-2008 American
Community Survey 3-Year Estimates, Table B25034

36
City of Newark, N.J.
Occupied Units by Year Structure Built, 2008

2005 or later , 2,094, 2%


2000 to 2004 , 6,642, 6%
1990 to 1999 , 6,452, 6%
1939 or earlier , 30,400, 29%
1980 to 1989 , 5,624, 5%

1970 to 1979 , 11,800, 11%

1940 to 1949 , 14,575, 13%


1960 to 1969 , 13,164, 12%

1950 to 1959 , 17,672, 16%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

37
Table II-15 below and the chart on the following page portray the age of the City’s housing
inventory categorized by owner or rental occupied units. It is interesting to note that rental type
units have been the predominant type of residential construction in the City, particularly in the
more recent decades.

Table II-15
City of Newark, N.J.
Tenure by Year Housing Unit Constructed, 2008

Year Built Owner Percent Renter Percent


Built 2005 or later 303 1.3% 1,575 2.3%
Built 2000 to 2004 1,669 7.3% 3,496 5.1%
Built 1990 to 1999 1,882 8.2% 3,871 5.6%
Built 1980 to 1989 561 2.5% 4,678 6.8%
Built 1970 to 1979 1,142 5.0% 9,118 13.2%
Built 1960 to 1969 1,576 6.9% 9,305 13.5%
Built 1950 to 1959 3,601 15.7% 11,512 16.6%
Built 1940 to 1949 4,071 17.8% 8,558 12.4%
Built 1939 or earlier 8,062 35.3% 17,068 24.7%
Total: 22,867 69,181

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Summary File 3, Table H36; American Community
Survey 3-Year Estimates, Table B25036

38
City of Newark, N.J.
Occupied Housing Units by Year Structure Built

Renter Units (2008)


Owner Units (2008)

2005 or later, 1575, 2%


2005 or later, 303, 1% 2000 to 2004, 3496, 5%
2000 to 2004, 1669, 7%
1990 to 1999, 3871, 6%
1939 or earlier, 17068, 25%
1990 to 1999, 1882, 8%
1980 to 1989, 4678, 7%

1939 or earlier, 8062, 36% 1980 to 1989, 561, 2%

1970 to 1979, 1142, 5%

1970 to 1979, 9118, 13%

1960 to 1969, 1576, 7%

1940 to 1949, 8558, 12%

1950 to 1959, 3601, 16% 1960 to 1969, 9305, 13%

1940 to 1949, 4071, 18% 1950 to 1959, 11512, 17%

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

39
4. Condition of Units

The condition of much of the housing stock in the City is fair to good because of its age
although many units have been well maintained in several neighborhoods. Most of the housing
quality problems are scattered throughout the City, however several of the areas within the City
show housing rehabilitation needs.

Housing quality can be measured with a number of quality indicators collected by the U.S.
Census. Age, overcrowding, plumbing facilities, kitchen facilities, and heating facilities all
provide insight into the overall state of the City’s housing.

For descriptive purposes, the following indicators were collected:


- Age: Units built in 1939 or earlier are considered to be aged and more likely to need
rehabilitation.
- Overcrowding: Units containing more than 1.0 person per room are considered overcrowded.
- Plumbing facilities: Units lacking plumbing facilities are considered deficient.
- Kitchen facilities: Units lacking complete kitchen facilities (i.e. piped water, a stove and a
refrigerator) are considered deficient.
- Heating facilities: Units lacking a central source of heating are considered deficient.

As indicated above and in the chart below, over a quarter of Newark’s housing stock was built
before 1940. The percentage of aged structures has greatly declined since 1990, from 35% of
the housing stock to about 28% in 2000. In addition, the level of overcrowded units has also
greatly decreased, from 12% of the housing stock in 1990 to only 6% in 2008. Of the total
housing units, 6% lack complete kitchen facilities, 3% lack complete plumbing facilities, and
virtually none lack central heating.

Table II-16
City of Newark, N.J.
Quality Indicators
1990 2000 2008
Number % Number % Number %
Lacking complete kitchen facilities 2,413 2% 1,875 2% 5,005 5%
Lacking complete plumbing facilities 2,128 2% 1,733 2% 2,167 2%
Lacking central heating 1,596 2% 1,088 1% 405 0%
Units containing more than 1.0 persons per room (both renter
and owner occupied) 12,472 12% 11,800 12% 6,110 6%
Built before 1940 36,014 35% 28,376 28% 32,291 30%
Total housing units (including vacant and occupied) 102,473 100,141 106,898

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 1990 Summary Tape File 3, Tables H025, H030, H042, H064, H069; 2000 Summary File 3, Tables H20, H34, H40, H47,
H50; 2006-2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates Tables B25014, B25034, B25040, B25047, B25051

5. Owner Occupied Housing Value and Rental Rates

The value of single family units as reported by the Census Bureau is based upon the owner’s
estimate of current market value. The median value of owner occupied housing units in Newark
in 2000 was reported at $132,800 while the median value of such units for Essex County and
New Jersey was $188,400 and $167,900, respectively. The median value of owner occupied

40
housing units in Newark in 2008 increased to $305,400 while the median value of such units
for Essex County and New Jersey increased to $420,000 and $367,600, respectively. The
median gross rent was reported at $586 for Newark in 2000, while the median gross rent was
$675 for the County and $751 for New Jersey. The median gross rent increased to $864 for
Newark in 2008, while the median gross rent increased to $947 for the County and $1,058 for
New Jersey.

Table II-17 provides data on the value of specified housing units in the City.

Table II-17
City of Newark, N.J.
Value of All Owner Occupied Units

2000 2008
Value Number % Number %
Less than $50,000 910 4% 264 1%
$50,000 to $99,999 2,003 9% 337 1%
$100,000 to $149,999 7,277 33% 1,440 6%
$150,000 to $199,999 4,894 23% 2,339 10%
$200,000 to $249,999 1,704 8% 3,681 16%
$250,000 to $299,999 1,002 5% 3,181 14%
$300,000 to $399,999 392 2% 6,112 26%
$400,000 to $499,999 76 0% 3,614 16%
$500,000 to $749,999 61 0% 2,051 9%
$750,000 to $999,999 27 0% 60 0%
$1,000,000 or more 71 0% 65 0%
Total 21,750 23,144

Median Value 2000 2008


Newark 132,800 305,400
Essex County 188,400 420,000
New Jersey 167,900 367,600

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Summary File 3 Tables H84, H85; 2006-2008 American
Community Survey 3-Year Estimates Tables B25075, B25077

Table II-18 provides data on the Gross Rent of specified housing units in the City.

Table II-18
City of Newark, N.J.
Gross Rent of Renter Occupied Units
2000 2008
Value Number % Number %
Less than $100 2,308 3% 1,372 2%
$100 to $199 7,248 10% 3,888 6%
$200 to $299 4,088 6% 4,768 7%
$300 to $399 3,729 5% 2,127 3%
$400 to $499 7,309 11% 2,092 3%
$500 to $599 11,177 16% 2,690 4%
$600 to $699 11,797 17% 4,244 6%
$700 to $799 9,020 13% 6,606 10%

41
$800 to $899 5,550 8% 8,367 12%
$900 to $999 2,697 4% 7,353 11%
$1,000 to $1,499 3,147 5% 18,122 27%
$1,500 to $1,999 298 0% 4,346 6%
$2,000 or more 88 0% 377 1%
No cash rent 1,059 2% 1,103 2%
Total 69,515 67,455

Median Gross Rent 2000 2008


Newark 586 864
Essex County 675 947
New Jersey 751 1,058

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Summary File 3, Tables H62, H63; 2006-2008
American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates, Tables B25063, B25064

Table II-19 shows that in 2008 for owner occupied units, 15,538, or 67.1 percent, have three or
more bedrooms. However, for renter occupied units, 18,891, or 28.0 percent have three or more
bedrooms. Large family renters in the City may have a difficult time finding a suitable unit,
particularly those low- and very low-income households.

Table II-19
City of Newark, N.J.
Number of Bedrooms by Tenure

2000 2008
Owner Owner
Occupied Renter Occupied Occupied Renter Occupied
No bedroom 68 4,936 214 5,129
1 bedroom 1,615 23,292 1,085 18,797
2 bedrooms 6,958 25,385 6,307 24,638
3 bedrooms 7,740 13,168 9,202 15,872
4 bedrooms 2,514 2,029 3,073 2,208
5 or more bedrooms 2,855 822 3,263 811
Total 21,750 69,632 23,144 67,455

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2000 Summary File 3, Table H42; 2006-2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates,
Table B25042

6. Housing Costs

Two of the 2008 American Community Survey tables provided data on the housing costs as
a percentage of income broken down by age and tenure. Table II-20 provides comparative
data for Newark, Essex County and New Jersey for households whose householder is from
age 15 to 64 years and for householders age 65 years and older. Generally, households
whose monthly housing costs exceed thirty percent of income are experiencing difficulty
making ends meet.

According to the 2008 American Community Survey, a higher percentage of owner


households in the City paid more than 30 percent of monthly income on housing costs than
did Essex County and New Jersey households. Fifty-seven percent of City owner

42
households paid more than 30 percent of their income on home costs compared to 46.4
percent for Essex County and 40.7 percent for all of New Jersey. In addition, a higher
percentage of renter households in the City paid more than 30 percent of their monthly
income on housing costs than County and New Jersey households. Fifty-three percent of
City renter households paid more than 30 percent of their income on home costs compared
to 50.0 percent for Essex County and 50.4 percent for all of New Jersey.

The pie chart that follows provides a graphic portrayal of the housing costs of the
population as a percentage of income for both owner and rental households in the City of
Newark.

a. Owner Households

The 2008 American Community Survey reported a total of 16,997 sampled City owner
households whose householder was age 15 to 64 years. Of these, 4,009 (23.6 percent)
paid less than 20 percent of their monthly income on housing costs, 1,537 (9.0 percent)
of non-elderly owners paid between 20 and 24 percent of their monthly income on
housing costs, 1,842 (10.8 percent) of non-elderly owners paid between 25 and 29
percent of their monthly income for housing costs. One thousand four hundred and
thirty-eight (8.5 percent) non-elderly residents pay 30 to 34 percent of their income on
housing, and 8,171 (48.1 percent) paid 35 percent or more. These residents are
considered cost-burdened.

The 2008 American Community Survey reported a total of 5,943 sampled elderly owner
households in the City. Of these, 1,527 (25.7 percent) paid less than 20 percent of their
monthly income on housing costs, 511 (8.6 percent) paid between 20 and 24 percent of
their monthly income on housing, 487 (8.2 percent) paid between 25 and 29 percent of
their monthly income on housing costs. Two hundred and ninety-seven (5.0 percent)
elderly owners paid 30 to 34 percent, and 3,121 (52.5 percent) paid 35 percent or more
of their monthly income on housing costs. Over 55 percent of Newark’s elderly
homeowners are cost burdened or severely cost-burdened.

b. Renter Households

The 2008 American Community Survey reported a total of 55,344 non-elderly sampled
renter households in the City. Of these, 14,870 (26.9 percent) paid less than 20 percent
of their monthly income on housing costs, 5,185 (9.4 percent) paid between 20 and 24
percent of their monthly income on housing costs, and 6,315 (11.4 percent) paid
between 25 and 29 percent of their monthly income on housing costs. Five thousand
three hundred and thirty-one (9.6 percent) paid between 30 and 34 percent of their
monthly income and 23,643 (42.7 percent) paid over 35 percent of their monthly
income on housing costs.

The 2008 American Community Survey reported a total of 9,555 elderly sampled renter
households in the City. Of these, 1,429 (15.0 percent) paid less than 20 percent of their
monthly income on housing costs, 648 (6.8 percent) paid between 20 and 24 percent,
and 1,798 (18.8 percent) of elderly renters paid between 25 and 29 percent of their
monthly income on housing costs. One thousand five hundred and ninety-five (16.7
percent) paid 30 to 34 percent of their monthly income and 4,085 (42.8 percent) paid
43
over 35 percent of their monthly income on housing costs. Over 55 percent of elderly
rental households are considered cost-burdened or severely cost-burdened.

Table II-20
Newark, Essex County & New Jersey
Housing Costs as a Percentage of Income
Householders by Age & Tenure

Newark Essex County New Jersey


Homeowners Number % Number % Number %

Age 15 to 64 years:
Less than 20.0 percent 4,009 23.6% 30,839 30.9% 529,143 33.0%
20.0 to 24.9 percent 1,537 9.0% 12,497 12.5% 229,136 14.3%
25.0 to 29.9 percent 1,842 10.8% 10,656 10.7% 200,756 12.5%
30.0 to 34.9 percent 1,438 8.5% 9,340 9.3% 153,870 9.6%
35.0 percent or more 8,171 48.1% 36,567 36.6% 492,249 30.7%
Total Computed: 16,997 99,899 1,605,154

Age 65 years and over:


Less than 20.0 percent 1,527 25.7% 10,559 33.9% 187,009 37.0%
20.0 to 24.9 percent 511 8.6% 2,951 9.5% 59,394 11.8%
25.0 to 29.9 percent 487 8.2% 2,709 8.7% 46,392 9.2%
30.0 to 34.9 percent 297 5.0% 1,836 5.9% 35,313 7.0%
35.0 percent or more 3,121 52.5% 13,126 42.1% 177,141 35.1%
Total Computed: 5,943 31,181 505,249

Newark Essex County New Jersey


Renters Number % Number % Number %

Age 15 to 24 years:
Less than 20.0 percent 14,870 26.9% 32,579 27.7% 223,002 27.1%
20.0 to 24.9 percent 5,185 9.4% 14,388 12.2% 110,871 13.5%
25.0 to 29.9 percent 6,315 11.4% 14,469 12.3% 95,227 11.6%
30.0 to 34.9 percent 5,331 9.6% 10,304 8.8% 75,669 9.2%
35.0 percent or more 23,643 42.7% 45,864 39.0% 319,393 38.8%
Total computed: 55,344 117,604 824,162

Age 65 years and over:


Less than 20.0 percent 1,429 15.0% 3,241 14.5% 22,753 14.8%
20.0 to 24.9 percent 648 6.8% 1,706 7.6% 13,075 8.5%
25.0 to 29.9 percent 1,798 18.8% 3,724 16.6% 19,751 12.8%
30.0 to 34.9 percent 1,595 16.7% 3,382 15.1% 17,649 11.5%
35.0 percent or more 4,085 42.8% 10,375 46.3% 80,553 52.4%
Total computed: 9,555 22,428 153,781

Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2006-2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates, Tables B25072, B25093

44
City of Newark, N.J.
Housing Costs as Percentage of Income

Owner Households Renter Households

Less than 20 percent


Less than 20 percent 25%
28%

30 percent or more
30 percent or more
53%
50% 20 to 24 percent
9%

20 to 24 percent
10% 25 to 29 percent
13%

25 to 29 percent
12%

Source: 2006-2008 American Community Survey 3-Year Estimates

45
7. Incidence of Overcrowding by Tenure and Income Group

The CHAS Data Book provided information of the incidence of overcrowded households
by tenure and income group for various types of households in the City of Newark. An
overcrowded household is defined as one that has occupancy of more than 1.01 persons per
room.

a. Renter Households

According to the data provided, 5,045, or 7.4 percent, of all renter households
experience conditions of overcrowding. Of the households at 0-30 percent of HUD
Adjusted Median Family Income (HAMFI), 1,685 (6.3 percent) were overcrowded.
Of the households at 30.1-50 percent of HAMFI, 1,560 (10.9 percent) were
overcrowded. Of the households at 50.1-80 percent of HAMFI, 880 (6.2 percent)
were overcrowded. Of the households at 80.1-95 percent of HAMFI, 360 (8.2
percent) were overcrowded. Of the households at 95.1 percent and higher of
HAMFI, 550 (6.6 percent) were overcrowded.

Of a total of 2,715 large related rental households, 810 or 29.8 percent experience
conditions of overcrowding. Of the large related households at 0-30 percent of
HAMFI, 325 (68.4 percent) were overcrowded. Of the large related households at
30.1-50 percent of HAMFI, 155 (36.5 percent) were overcrowded. Of the large
related households at 50.1-80 percent of HAMFI, 265 (34.6 percent) were
overcrowded. Of the large related households at 80.1-95 percent of HAMFI, 45
(13.8 percent) were overcrowded. Of the large related households at 95.1 percent
and over of HAMFI, 55 (15.3 percent) were overcrowded.

b. Owner Households

According to the data provided, 710, or 3.1 percent, of all owner household
experience conditions of overcrowding. Of the owner households at 0-30 percent
HAMFI, 35 (1.1 percent) were overcrowded. Of the owner households at 30.1-50
percent HAMFI, 80 (2.6 percent) were overcrowded. Of the owner households at
50.1-80 percent HAMFI, 250 (4.6 percent) were overcrowded. Of the owner
households at 80.1-95 percent HAMFI, 50 (2.1 percent) were overcrowded. Of the
owner households at 95.1 percent and over HAMFI, 300 (3.2 percent) were
overcrowded.

46
Table II-21
City of Newark, N.J.
Incidence of Overcrowded Households by Tenure & Income Group

Number & Percent Incidence by Income Group

0-30% 30.1-50% 50.1-80% 80.1-95% 95.1% AMI and up


Total Number Num. Num. Num. Num. Num.
Units Overcrowded % Total % Crw. Total % Crw. Total % Crw. Total % Crw. Total % Crw.

Renters
All Renters 68,245 5045 7.4% 26,920 6.3% 1685 14,350 10.9% 1,560 14,240 6.2% 880 4405 8.2% 360 8,320 6.6% 550
Large Related 2,715 810 29.8% 475 68.4% 325 425 36.5% 155 765 34.6% 265 325 13.8% 45 360 15.3% 55

Owners
All Owners 23,245 710 3.1% 3,170 1.1% 35 3,030 2.6% 80 5,395 4.6% 250 2375 2.1% 50 9,280 3.2% 300
Large Related 1,600 105 6.6% 75 0.0% 0 215 14.0% 30 275 7.3% 20 120 0.0% 0 915 6.0% 55

Source: CHAS Data Book 2000 – Table 10

47
City of Newark, N.J.
Incidence of Overcrowded Units

All Rental Households All Owner Households

Overcrowded Overcrowded
7% 3%

Not Overcrowded
93% Not overcrowded
97%

Source: CHAS Data Tables, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development

48
8. Affordability of Housing for Low and Moderate Income Households

Table II-22 and the charts that follow provide data on the number of housing units
affordable to households with incomes of less than 30%, 50% or 80% HUD Adjusted
Median Family Income by tenure and vacancy status in the City of Newark.

a. Rental Units

Of a total of 22,165 0 to 1 bedroom renter occupied units in the City, there were
8,130 (36.7%) units affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI; 16,135
(72.8%) of the units were affordable to households at 0 to 50 percent HAMFI; and
21,890 (98.8%) were affordable to households at 0 to 80 percent HAMFI.

Of a total of 26,895 2 bedroom renter occupied units in the City, there were 5,395
(20.1%) units affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI; 16,000 (59.5%)
of the units were affordable to households at 0 to 50 percent HAMFI; and 26,215
(97.5%) were affordable to households at 0 to 80 percent HAMFI.

Of a total of 18,300 3+ bedroom renter occupied units in the City, there were 4,065
(22.2%) units affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI; 10,175 (55.6%)
of the units were affordable to households at 0 to 50 percent HAMFI; and 17,580
(96.1%) were affordable to households at 0 to 80 percent HAMFI.

Of a total of 1,645 vacant 0 to 1 bedroom rental units in the City, there were 475
(28.9%) units affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI; 1,075 (65.3%) of
the units were affordable to households at 0 to 50 percent HAMFI; and 1,645
(100%) were affordable to households at 0 to 80 percent HAMFI.

Of a total of 1,760 vacant 2 bedroom rental units in the City, there were 310
(17.6%) units affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI; 1,470 (83.5%) of
the units were affordable to households at 0 to 50 percent HAMFI; and 1,730
(98.3%) were affordable to households at 0 to 80 percent HAMFI.

Of a total of 1,720 vacant 3+ bedroom rental units in the City, there were 370
(21.5%) units affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI; 1,350 (78.5%) of
the units were affordable to households at 0 to 50 percent HAMFI; and 1,690
(98.3%) were affordable to households at 0 to 80 percent HAMFI.

b. Owner Units

Of a total of 440 owner occupied 0 to 1 bedroom units in the City, there were no
units affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI; 100 (22.7%) of the units
were affordable to households at 0 to 50 percent HAMFI; and 130 (29.5%) units
affordable to households at 0 to 80 percent HAMFI.

Of a total of 2,495 owner occupied 2 bedroom units in the City, there were no units
affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI; 365 (14.6%) of the units were
affordable to households at 0 to 50 percent HAMFI; and 685 (27.5%) units
affordable to households at 0 to 80 percent HAMFI.
49
Of a total of 3,350 owner occupied 3+ bedroom units in the City, there were no units
affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI; 625 (18.7%) of the units were
affordable to households at 0 to 50 percent HAMFI; and 1,650 (49.3%) units
affordable to households at 0 to 80 percent HAMFI.

Of a total of 45 vacant for sale 0 to 1 bedroom units in the City, there were no units
affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI, 0 to 50 percent HAMFI, and 0
to 80 percent HAMFI.

Of a total of 300 vacant for sale 2 bedroom units in the City, there were no units
affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI and 0 to 50 percent HAMFI; 30
(10.0%) units were affordable to households at 0 to 80 percent HAMFI.

Of a total of 305 vacant for sale 3+ bedroom units in the City, there were no units
affordable to households at 0 to 30 percent HAMFI; 30 (9.8%) of the units were
affordable to households at 0 to 50 percent HAMFI; and 145 (47.5%) units
affordable to households at 0 to 80 percent HAMFI.

50
Table II-22
City of Newark, N.J.
Units Affordable* by Bedroom to Households with Incomes
Less Than 30%, Less Than 50% and Less Than 80% HAMFI

0 and 1 Bedroom 2 Bedrooms 3 or more Bedrooms


TOTAL Total 0-30% 0-50% 0-80% Total 0-30% 0-50% 0-80% Total 0-30% 0-50% 0-80%
Renter Occupied
Units 67,360 22,165 8,130 16,135 21,890 26,895 5,395 16,000 26,215 18,300 4,065 10,175 17,580
% Affordable 36.7% 72.8% 98.8% 20.1% 59.5% 97.5% 22.2% 55.6% 96.1%

Vacant for Rent 6,345 1,645 475 1,075 1,645 1,760 310 1,470 1,730 1,720 370 1,350 1,690
% Affordable 28.9% 65.3% 100.0% 17.6% 83.5% 98.3% 21.5% 78.5% 98.3%

Owner Occupied
Units 6,340 440 0 100 130 2495 0 365 685 3,350 0 625 1,650
% Affordable 0.0% 22.7% 29.5% 0.0% 14.6% 27.5% 0.0% 18.7% 49.3%

Vacant for Sale 805 45 0 0 0 300 0 0 30 305 0 30 145


% Affordable 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 10.0% 0.0% 9.8% 47.5%

Source: CHAS Data Book 2000 – Tables 14A, 14B, 15A, 15B

*Affordable is defined as: Renter Affordability assumes that a 30% monthly payment standard is the threshold for affordability.
The Owner Affordability dimension requires a series of assumptions, in order to determine the relationship
between a housing unit’s value and the monthly mortgage payment required to purchase it. HUD assumed a 31%
monthly payment standard, 96.5% loan-to-value rate, a 5.5% interest rate, a 1.75% upfront insurance premium, a
.55% annual insurance premium, and 2% annual taxes and insurance. Based on these assumptions, HUD
estimated value to income ratio of 3.36 for an “affordable” home.

51
City of Newark, N.J.
Housing Units by Bedroom, Tenure and Affordability Group
Renter Occupied Units

30,000

25,000

20,000

0-30% HAMFI
15,000 0-50% HAMFI
0-80% HAMFI

10,000

5,000

0
0-1 Bedroom 2 Bedrooms 3 or more Bedrooms
0-30% HAMFI 8,130 5,395 4,065
0-50% HAMFI 16,135 16,000 10,175
0-80% HAMFI 21,890 26,215 17,580

Source: CHAS Data Tables, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development

52
City of Newark, N.J.
Housing Units by Bedroom, Tenure and Affordability Group
Vacant Rental Units

2,000

1,800

1,600

1,400

1,200
0-30% HAMFI
1,000 0-50% HAMFI
0-80% HAMFI
800

600

400

200

0
0-1 Bedroom 2 Bedrooms 3 or more Bedrooms
0-30% HAMFI 475 310 370
0-50% HAMFI 1,075 1,470 1,350
0-80% HAMFI 1,645 1,730 1,690

Source: CHAD Data Tables, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development

53
City of Newark, N.J.
Housing Units by Bedroom, Tenure and Affordability Group
Owner Occupied Units

1,800

1,600

1,400

1,200

1,000 0-30% HAMFI


0-50% HAMFI
800 0-80% HAMFI

600

400

200

0
0-1 Bedroom 2 Bedrooms 3 or more Bedrooms
0-30% HAMFI 0 0 0
0-50% HAMFI 100 365 625
0-80% HAMFI 130 685 1,650

Source: CHAS Data Tables, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development

54
City of Newark, N.J.
Housing Units by Bedroom, Tenure and Affordability Group
Vacant Units for Sale

160

140

120

100

0-30% HAMFI
80 0-50% HAMFI
0-80% HAMFI

60

40

20

0
0-1 Bedroom 2 Bedrooms 3 or more Bedrooms
0-30% HAMFI 0 0 0
0-50% HAMFI 0 0 30
0-80% HAMFI 0 30 145

Source: CHAS Data Tables, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development

55
9. Disproportionate Needs Analysis

Table II-23 provides insights on the extent that any racial or ethnic group has housing needs
that are disproportionate to the needs of that category as a whole. The information on the City
of Newark is from the CHAS data book that was provided by HUD.

a. Rental Households

Extremely Low-Income Households (0-30% HAMFI)

Of the 26,925 households in this category, 70.7 percent, or 19,025 households


reported having housing problems. Of the 24,595 minority headed households, 70.2
percent, or 17,275 households reported having housing problems. Of the 16,035
Black non-Hispanic households, 66.6 percent, or 10,680 households reported having
housing problems. Of the 8,045 Hispanic households, 77.1 percent, or 6,200
households reported having housing problems.

Very Low-Income Households (30.1-50% HAMFI)

Of the 14,355 households in this category, 72.1 percent, or 10,350 households


reported having housing problems. Of the 12,840 minority headed households, 70.7
percent, or 9,080 households reported having housing problems. Of the 7,965 Black
non-Hispanic households, 66.5 percent, or 5,295 households reported having
housing problems. Of the 4,125 Hispanic households, 76.2 percent, or 3,145
households reported having housing problems.

Other Low-Income Households (50.1-80% HAMFI)

Of the 14,240 households in this category, 31.0 percent, or 4,420 households


reported having housing problems. Of the 12,440 minority headed households, 30.0
percent, or 3,735 households reported having housing problems. Of the 6,970 Black
non-Hispanic households, 30.8 percent, or 2,150 households reported having
housing problems. Of the 4,725 Hispanic households, 28.6 percent, or 1,350
households reported having housing problems.

Moderate Income Households (80.1-95% HAMFI)

Of the 4,405 households in this category, 14.1 percent, or 620 households reported
having housing problems. Of the 3,730 minority headed households, 14.5 percent,
or 540 households reported having housing problems. Of the 2,230 Black non-
Hispanic households, 13.0 percent, or 290 households reported having housing
problems. Of the 1,085 Hispanic households, 20.7 percent, or 225 households
reported having housing problems.

Total Low-Income Renter Households

There are 59,925 low income renter households which comprise 87.8 percent of the
renter households in the city. Of these, 34,415 households or 57.4 percent, reported
housing problems. Of the 53,605 minority headed households, 57.1 percent, or
56
30,630 households reported having housing problems. Of the 33,200 Black non-
Hispanic households, 55.5 percent, or 18,415 households reported having housing
problems. Of the 17,980 Hispanic households, 60.7 percent, or 10,920 households
reported having housing problems.

b. Owner Households

Extremely Low-Income Households (0-30% HAMFI)

Of the 3,160 households in this category, 93.2 percent, or 2,945 households,


reported having housing problems. Of the 2,405 minority headed households, 90.9
percent, or 2,185 households reported having housing problems. Of the 1,455 Black
non-Hispanic households, 86.9 percent, or 1,265 households reported having
housing problems. Of the 8,045 Hispanic households, 77.1 percent, or 6,200
households reported having housing problems.

Very Low-Income Households (30.1-50% HAMFI)

Of the 3,030 households in this category, 90.4 percent, or 2,740 households,


reported having housing problems. Of the 2,230 minority headed households, 90.1
percent, or 2,010 households reported having housing problems. Of the 1,425 Black
non-Hispanic households, 88.4 percent, or 1,260 households reported having
housing problems. Of the 735 Hispanic households, 92.5 percent, or 680 households
reported having housing problems.

Other Low-Income Households (50.1-80% HAMFI)

Of the 5,390 households in this category, 71.5 percent, or 3,855 households,


reported having housing problems. Of the 4,525 minority headed households, 75.1
percent, or 3,400 households reported having housing problems. Of the 2,600 Black
non-Hispanic households, 69.8 percent, or 1,815 households reported having
housing problems. Of the 1,870 Hispanic households, 81.8 percent, or 1,530
households reported having housing problems.

Moderate Income Households (80.1-95% HAMFI)

Of the 2,375 households in this category, 60.0 percent, or 1,425 households,


reported having housing problems. Of the 2,050 minority headed households, 65.1
percent, or 1,335 households reported having housing problems. Of the 1,365 Black
non-Hispanic households, 67.8 percent, or 925 households reported having housing
problems. Of the 560 Hispanic households, 57.1 percent, or 320 households
reported having housing problems.

Total Low-Income Owner Households

There are 13,955 low-income owner households which comprise 60.0 percent of the
owner households in the city. Of these, 10,965 households, or 78.6 percent, reported
housing problems. Of the 11,210 minority headed households, 79.7 percent, or
8,930 households reported having housing problems. Of the 6,845 Black non-
57
Hispanic households, 76.9 percent, or 5,265 households reported having housing
problems. Of the 4,020 Hispanic households, 83.5 percent, or 3,355 households
reported having housing problems.

According to HUD regulations, a disproportionately greater need exists when the percentages
of a particular racial or ethnic group is at least ten percentage points higher than the percentage
in the category as a whole. With respect to renter units in the city a disproportionate need does
not exist in any category inasmuch as Black non-Hispanic low-income households report 55.5
percent with housing problems. Hispanic rental households report 60.7 percent with housing
problems compared to 57.4 percent for all renter households.

With respect to owner units in the city a disproportionate need does not exist in any category
inasmuch as 76.9 percent of Black non-Hispanic owners report having housing problems while
83.5 percent of Hispanic owners report housing problems compared to 78.6 percent of all low-
income owner households.

The chart entitled Disproportionate Needs of Low-Income Households by Tenure & Race
shows the percentage of low-income households with housing problems by total households,
minority households, Black non-Hispanic households and Hispanic households.

58
Table II-23
City of Newark, N.J.
Income Distribution by Tenure & Percent with Housing Problems by Minority Status
Disproportionate Needs Analysis
Income Group
Total Low-Income
0-30% HAMFI 30.1-50% HAMFI 50.1-80% HAMFI 80.1-95% HAMFI Households
Total
All Households Households Number % Number % Number % Number % Number %
Income Distribution of Renter Households 68,245 26,925 39.5% 14,355 21.0% 14,240 20.9% 4,405 6.5% 59,925 87.8%
% Renter Households w/ Any Housing Problems 51.4% 19,025 70.7% 10,350 72.1% 4,420 31.0% 620 14.1% 34,415 57.4%

Income Distribution of Owner Households 23,245 3,160 13.6% 3,030 13.0% 5,390 23.2% 2,375 10.2% 13,955 60.0%
% Owner Households w/ Any Housing Problems 57.3% 2,945 93.2% 2,740 90.4% 3,855 71.5% 1,425 60.0% 10,965 78.6%

All Minority Headed Households


Income Distribution of Renter Households 60,140 24,595 40.9% 12,840 21.4% 12,440 20.7% 3,730 16.0% 53,605 89.1%
% Renter Households w/ Any Housing Problems 52.1% 17,275 70.2% 9,080 70.7% 3,735 30.0% 540 14.5% 30,630 57.1%

Income Distribution of Owner Households 17,090 2,405 14.1% 2,230 13.0% 4,525 26.5% 2,050 8.8% 11,210 65.6%
% Owner Households w/ Any Housing Problems 54.7% 2,185 90.9% 2,010 90.1% 3,400 75.1% 1,335 65.1% 8,930 79.7%

Black Non-Hispanic Households


Income Distribution of Renter Households 37,325 16,035 43.0% 7,965 21.3% 6,970 18.7% 2,230 9.6% 33,200 88.9%
% Renter Households w/ Any Housing Problems 49.7% 10,680 66.6% 5,295 66.5% 2,150 30.8% 290 13.0% 18,415 55.5%

Income Distribution of Owner Households 11,610 1,455 12.5% 1,425 12.3% 2,600 22.4% 1,365 5.9% 6,845 59.0%
% Owner Households w/ Any Housing Problems 54.0% 1,265 86.9% 1,260 88.4% 1,815 69.8% 925 67.8% 5,265 76.9%

Hispanic Households
Income Distribution of Renter Households 19,665 8,045 40.9% 4,125 21.0% 4,725 24.0% 1,085 4.7% 17,980 91.4%
% Renter Households w/ Any Housing Problems 57.6% 6,200 77.1% 3,145 76.2% 1,350 28.6% 225 20.7% 10,920 60.7%

Income Distribution of Owner Households 6,125 855 14.0% 735 12.0% 1,870 30.5% 560 2.4% 4,020 65.6%
% Owner Households w/ Any Housing Problems 67.5% 825 96.5% 680 92.5% 1,530 81.8% 320 57.1% 3,355 83.5%

Source: CHAS Data Book 2000 – Table 1

59
City of Newark, N.J.
Disproportionate Needs of Low Income Households by Tenure & Race
Percent with Housing Problem

100%

83.5%
78.6% 79.7%
80% 76.9%

60.7%
60% 57.4% 57.1%
55.5%
All
All Minority
Black
Hispanic
40%

20%

0%
Owner Renter

Source: CHAS Data Tables, U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development

60
E. Persons With Disabilities

The data available to the City to report on the needs of persons with disabilities is extremely
limited. However, the City has estimated the needs to the best of its ability based on the limited
available Census data for each of the special needs subcategories as follows:

1. Frail Elderly

A frail elderly person has been defined as an elderly person who is unable to perform at
least three activities of daily living (i.e. eating, dressing, bathing, grooming and household
management activities). Census data indicates that 9,176 or 38.7 percent, of the City’s
population age 65 or older has a mobility limitation (defined as a sensory disability, a
physical disability, a mental disability or a go-outside-home disability), a self-care
limitation or both a self-care limitation and a mobility limitation. The City has determined
that this segment of the population is frail elderly.

2. Developmentally Disabled

Census data indicates that 6,611 non-elderly residents of the City’s population have a self-
care limitation or both a self-care limitation and a mobility limitation, thus meeting the
definition of developmentally disabled. This total did not include elderly residents or those
non-elderly residents counted in section 3 below with mobility limitations so as to avoid
double counting.

3. Physically Disabled

Census data indicates that 4,246 non-elderly residents of the City’s population have a
mobility limitation, thus meeting the definition of physically disabled.

61
III. EVALUATION OF CURRENT FAIR HOUSING LEGAL STATUS

A. Fair housing complaints or compliance reviews where the Secretary of HUD or the N.J.
Division on Civil Rights has issued a charge of or made a finding of discrimination.

The City’s Department of Housing and Economic Development received the following
information from the Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Division of the HUD’s Newark Area
Office. Table III-1 lists the fair housing complaints filed from January 1, 2004, to February 28,
2010, as well as the categories of the complaints received.

Table III-1
City of Newark, N.J.
Fair Housing Complaints by Category: Cases filed 2004 – February 201011

Category Cases filed Disposition


Disability 30 44.8%
Race/Color 16 23.9%
National Origin 12 17.9%
Familial Status 4 6.0%
Sex 3 4.5%
Religion 1 1.5%
Sexual Harassment 1 1.5%
Retaliation 0 0%
Total 67 100%
     
Source: U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development

B. Explanation of trends or patterns.

From 2004 to February 2010, 67 Fair Housing complaints were filed with HUD. Of these, the
majority of complaints (44.8 percent) were based on disabilities, followed by race/color (23.9
percent) and national origin (17.9 percent).

The number of complaints does not necessarily represent an accurate reflection of the
magnitude of a discrimination problem. Many victims of discrimination may not be aware of
their Fair Housing rights or may feel uncomfortable going to a government office because of
their legal status or language and cultural barriers.

It should also be noted that the filing of a complaint does not necessarily mean that housing
discrimination occurred. Any person who believes their rights have been violated may file a
complaint with HUD. HUD will investigate the complaint and try to reach a conciliation
agreement between the parties involved. If, after investigating the complaint, HUD finds
reasonable cause to believe that discrimination occurred, the case may be heard in either an
administrative hearing or in federal district court.

11
Equal Opportunity Division of HUD’s Newark Area Office.

62
The City has not received notice of any compliance reviews where a charge of or a finding of
discrimination has been made by the Secretary of HUD. All complaints listed above were either
resolved, withdrawn, no cause determined, or reconciled. The City has received 67 notices of
fair housing complaints or compliance reviews in over 6 years. There appear to be no trends or
patterns requiring further investigation.

The high percentage of complaints relating to disabilities may be interpreted as a sign that
special attention should be placed on education targeted to housing opportunities ad rights,
particularly as they relate to accessibility of public facilities, for this population. The City willl
work with HUD to seek additional insight into the nature of these complaints and to assess
whether public action is required.

C. Discussion of other fair housing concerns or problems.

Other fair housing concerns and problems are discussed in detail in the following section
“Identification of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice.”

63
IV. IDENTIFICATION OF IMPEDIMENTS TO FAIR HOUSING CHOICE AND ASSESSMENT
OF CURRENT PUBLIC AND PRIVATE FAIR HOUSING PROGRAMS AND ACTIVITIES IN
THE JURISDICTION

The Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice is a review of impediments to fair housing
choice in the public and private sector. Impediments to fair housing choice are any actions, omissions,
or decisions taken because of race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status or national origin
which restrict housing choices or any actions, omissions or decisions which have the effect of
restricting housing choices or the availability of housing choices on the basis of race, color, religion,
sex, disability, familial status or national origin.

The background data suggests that no disproportionate need exists for renters or homeowners. In
addition, no findings of discrimination were identified by the Newark Area Office of HUD.

Impediments to fair housing choice include actions or omissions in a jurisdiction’s public or private
housing sector that:
 Constitute violations or potential violations of the Fair Housing Act;
 Are counter-productive to fair housing choice such as:
o NIMBYism
o Resistance when minorities and/or low-income persons first move into white and/or
moderate to high income areas, or
o Community resistance to the siting of group homes for the disabled in residential
neighborhoods based on their disabilities; and
 Have the effect of restricting housing opportunities on the basis of race, color, religion, sex,
disability, familial status or national origin.

A. Public Sector

1. Potential Impediment – Local building, occupancy, health and safety codes that may
affect the availability of housing for minorities, families with children and persons
with disabilities.

Assessment – Building, occupancy, health and safety codes as administered by the


City are mandated by state statute, and are based on nationally recognized standards
and code sources. Other than affordability, such codes have not been found to
adversely impact the availability of housing for minorities, families with children, and
persons with disabilities.

2. Potential Impediment – Public policies and actions affecting the approval of sites and
other building requirements used in the approval process for the construction of public
(assisted) and private housing such as: (1) Requirements for the provision of essential
municipal services; (2) Real estate property tax assessments; (3) Building codes; (4)
Accessibility standards that do not meet the requirements of the Fair Housing Act; (5)
Equalization of municipal services; (6) Local zoning laws and policies; and (7)
Demolition and displacement decisions pertaining to assisted housing and the removal
of slums and blight.

64
Assessment – The City’s policies and actions affecting the approval of sites and other
building requirements used in the approval process for assisted and private housing do
not place special restrictions on housing being developed as affordable and/or
inclusionary housing.

3. Potential Impediment – The administrative policies concerning community


development and housing activities such as: (1) Multi-family rehabilitation; (2) The
application of site and neighborhood standards for new construction activities; (3)
Activities causing displacement which affect opportunities of minority households to
select housing inside or outside areas of minority concentration or individuals with
disabilities to select housing that is accessible and is in accessible locations.

Assessment – The jurisdiction’s policies concerning community development and


housing activities have not been identified as impediments to fair housing. The only
neighborhood and site standards applied to community development assistance are
those mandated by federal regulations. Activities causing displacement are
implemented in accordance with statutory and regulatory controls.

4. Potential Impediment – Public policies that restrict the provision of housing and
community development resources to areas of minority concentration, or policies that
inhibit the employment of minority persons and individuals with disabilities.

Assessment – The municipality does not have policies restricting the provision of
housing and community development resources to areas of minority concentration.
The City of Newark is an equal opportunity employer and, as such, does not have
policies that inhibit the employment of minority persons and individuals with
disabilities.

5. Potential Impediment – Public policies that restrict the inter-departmental


coordination between other local agencies in providing housing and community
development resources to areas of minority concentration or to individuals with
disabilities.

Assessment – The City does not have a policy of restricting the inter-departmental
coordination between other local agencies in providing housing and community
development resources to areas of minority occupation or to individuals with
disabilities.

6. Potential Impediment – Planning, financing and administrative actions related to the


provision and siting of public transportation and supportive social services that may
inhibit or concentrate affordable housing opportunities for persons with disabilities.

Assessment – The City does not have planning, financing or administrative control
over the provision and siting of public transportation which falls under the purview of
the N.J. Department of Transportation. Supportive social services are primarily under
the province of the County and as such are subject to financing, administration, siting
and control by the County. Local public assistance is provided in accordance with
state statutory requirements and is administered by the municipality and county

65
welfare agencies. These resources and services neither inhibit nor concentrate
affordable housing opportunities with persons with disabilities.

7. Potential Impediment – Policies and practices affecting the representation of all racial,
ethnic, religious and disabled segments of the community on planning and zoning
boards.

Assessment – The selection of representatives on the planning and zoning boards is


made in conformity with municipal codes and state statutes. The representation on
these boards provides for full participation of all racial, ethnic, religious and disabled
segments of the community.

B. Private Sector

1. Potential Impediment – The sale or rental of housing and real estate practices such as:
(1) Steering or blockbusting; (2) Deed restrictions; (3) Trust or lease provisions; (4)
Conversion of apartments to all-adult; (5) Inaccessible design; or (6) Property
management firm’s “occupancy quotas.”

Assessment – The above real estate practices are illegal in the state of New Jersey.
HUD’s Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Division indicated the number and types
of complaints that have been filed alleging housing discrimination, including
complaints in which the Secretary of HUD issued a charge of discrimination or where
a suit has been filed by the U.S. Department of Justice, the N.J. Division on Civil
Rights, or private plaintiffs. They identified 67 complaints from 2004 to February
2010, as described in Section III, indicating such practices have not been identified
throughout the City.

2. Potential Impediment – Banking and insurance policies and practices pertaining to the
financing, sale, purchase, rehabilitation, and rental of housing that may affect the
achievement of fair housing choice within the jurisdiction.

Assessment – Throughout the first part of this decade, subprime lenders targeted the
City of Newark and similar cities across the country. The City’s neighborhoods were
targeted with aggressive marketing and often unscrupulous and predatory lending
practices. These practices imposed what in many cases was an untenable additional
burden on an already cost-burdened residential population. In 2006, the peak of
subprime lending, 54% of all new loans in Newark were subprime, versus 26% in
New Jersey. Approximately 27% of the loans originated on homes in Newark in 2006
are currently in foreclosure. In Newark, foreclosure filings grew from 866 in 2004 to
2,080 in 2007, and to 2,701 in 2008. Approximately 2,500 loans are currently in the
foreclosure process in Newark and an additional 813 homes are currently bank-owned
REO’s. According to a survey conducted by Rutgers University Bloustein School
graduate students, in the spring of 2008 approximately 70% of the 96 properties in
Clinton Hill with foreclosure filings were vacant upon inspection. In Lower
Broadway, 41% of the 52 foreclosed properties were already empty. A more recent
Bloustein study in Clinton Hill indicated that 46% of properties in the survey area had
a foreclosure filed against it at some point between 2004 and 2009.

66
In response to this crisis, the City of Newark’s Housing and Real Estate Division and
the Essex County Housing and Community Development Division co-convened a
taskforce in November 2007 to address the impact of mortgage foreclosure on
residents and neighborhoods in Newark and adjacent municipalities. The
Newark/Essex Foreclosure Taskforce currently has over 35 organizational members
including government, community groups, research and advocacy organizations, state
and local regulators and community development lenders. The Taskforce seeks to
create a coordinated, strategic local response to the negative impact of mortgage
foreclosures on residents and neighborhoods in Newark, Irvington, East Orange,
Orange, Montclair and the surrounding area by:
 Creating a forum for sharing ideas and information and coordinating action
among the various entities working in Essex County on foreclosure prevention
and neighborhood stabilization
 Supporting programs and activities that help Essex residents affected by
foreclosure as either owners or renters to preserve their homes and
neighborhoods
 Advocating for the needs of low- and moderate-income residents and their
communities as programs and policies take shape to respond to the current
mortgage crisis.

Accomplishments over the last two years include:


 1,010 individuals attended the two Hope Now mortgage workout fair events
held in Newark
 Approximately 4,500 households were contacted through outreach efforts such
as flyer handouts, mailings and door-to-door outreach

3. Potential Impediment – The discriminatory provision of housing brokerage services.

Assessment – The above practices are illegal in the state of New Jersey. HUD’s Fair
Housing and Equal Opportunity Division indicated the number and types of
complaints that have been filed alleging housing discrimination, including complaints
in which the Secretary of HUD issued a charge of discrimination or where a suit has
been filed by the U.S. Department of Justice, the N.J. Division on Civil Rights, or
private plaintiffs. They identified 67 complaints from 2004 to February 2010, as
described in Section III, indicating such practices have not been identified throughout
the City.

4. Potential Impediment – Availability of, and dissemination of, information on the


availability of programs that may be used to provide financial assistance for
modifications to privately owned housing to make such housing accessible to persons
with disabilities and their families.

Assessment – Funding for modifications to privately owned housing to accommodate


persons with disabilities and their families is available to low-income households
through the City’s housing rehabilitation programs. The availability of these programs
is regularly advertised.

C. Public and Private Sector

67
1. Potential Impediment – The nature, extent, and disposition of housing discrimination
complaints, violations, or suits against private housing providers within the
jurisdiction; other evidence of private housing discrimination occurring within the
jurisdiction; information on any contract conditions related to fair housing
considerations placed by HUD on the jurisdiction; or information on any failure by
the jurisdiction in complying with its Affirmatively Further Fair Housing certification.

Assessment - HUD’s Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Division indicated the
number and types of complaints that have been filed alleging housing discrimination,
including complaints in which the Secretary of HUD issued a charge of discrimination
or where a suit has been filed by the U.S. Department of Justice, the N.J. Division on
Civil Rights, or private plaintiffs. They identified 67 complaints from 2004 to
February 2010, as described in Section III, indicating such practices have not been
identified throughout the City.

2. Potential Impediment – Evidence of segregated housing conditions, and the housing


desegregation plans or efforts of HUD or other Federal agencies.

Assessment – HUD’s Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity Division indicated the
number and types of complaints that have been filed alleging housing discrimination,
including complaints in which the Secretary of HUD issued a charge of discrimination
or where a suit has been filed by the U.S. Department of Justice, the N.J. Division on
Civil Rights, or private plaintiffs. They identified 67 complaints from 2004 to
February 2010, as described in Section III, indicating such practices have not been
identified throughout the City.

3. Potential Impediment – The delivery system for programs providing supportive services
to families with children and persons with disabilities.

Assessment – The delivery system for programs providing supportive services to


families with children and persons with disabilities includes a wide range of service
providers. These service providers are not for profit organizations and Essex County.
The City is supportive of these service providers and maintain an ongoing liaison and
dialog with these providers.

4. Potential Impediment – Provision of financial assistance for dwellings, such as: (1)
Discriminatory lending patterns, practices and disclosures; (2) Discriminatory
appraisal and insurance underwriting practices; (3) Disinvestment and insurance
redlining practices.

Assessment – The above practices are illegal in the state of New Jersey. HUD’s Fair
Housing and Equal Opportunity Division indicated the number and types of
complaints that have been filed alleging housing discrimination, including complaints
in which the Secretary of HUD issued a charge of discrimination or where a suit has
been filed by the U.S. Department of Justice, the N.J. Division on Civil Rights, or
private plaintiffs. They identified 67 complaints from 2004 to February 2010, as
described in Section III, indicating such practices have not been identified throughout
the City.
68
5. Potential Impediment – Other laws, policies and practices affecting the location, cost
and availability of housing.

Assessment – The City has not identified other laws, policies, and practices affecting
the location, cost and availability of housing.

6. Potential Impediment – Where is a determination of unlawful segregation or other


housing discrimination by a court or a HUD Administrative Law Judge, or a finding of
noncompliance with Title VI or the Fair Housing Act by HUD regarding assisted
housing within a jurisdiction, an analysis of the actions which could be taken by the
jurisdiction to help remedy the discriminatory condition.

Assessment – There has been no determination of unlawful segregation or other housing


discrimination by a court or a HUD Administrative Law Judge, or a finding of
noncompliance with Title VI or the Fair Housing Act by HUD regarding assisted
housing within the City. As such, an analysis of the actions which could be taken by the
jurisdiction to help remedy the discriminatory condition is unnecessary.

69
V. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

A. Conclusions

The City of Newark is complying with its certification to the U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development that it affirmatively further fair housing opportunities as follows:

1. The community profile and housing analysis did not identify conditions which would
indicate a pattern of housing development or occupancy indicating a lack of fair housing
opportunities in the City.

2. The analysis of impediments did not identify conditions or actions adversely impacting fair
housing opportunities.

B. Recommendations

1. Continue to closely monitor available statistical data as a means of early identification of


any trends indicating that fair housing opportunities are being restricted and if such
restrictions are identified, take appropriate affirmative remedial action.

2. Monitor the achievements in the provision of affordable housing opportunities in the


municipality as proposed in the City’s housing element and consolidated plans. In the event
substantive lack of performance is determined, appropriate plan revisions should be
initiated.

3. Regularly contact federal and state enforcement agencies to determine if fair housing
complaints related to the City of Newark have been filed and the status of any such
complaints.

4. Annually review this Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing Choice and its contents to
determine any necessary and appropriate changes and/or revisions necessary to maintain its
accuracy and ensure the City’s continued compliance with both the letter and spirit of
statutes and regulations related to the City’s obligation to affirmatively further fair housing
opportunities.

5. The City, perhaps with Essex County as well as public and private entities, should consider
initiating adequate outreach programs and information to educate individuals and housing
providers in fair housing rights and responsibilities.

70
VI. SIGNATURE PAGE

__________________________________ _______________
Title Date

71
City of Newark, New Jersey
2010-2011
Annual Action Plan

Cory A. Booker, Mayor

Department of Administration
Office of Business Administrator

September 1, 2010 to August 31, 2011

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐1 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
TABLE OF CONTENTS
VII. 2010-2011 ANNUAL ACTION PLAN .................................................................................. 7-1
A. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................... 7-2
Evaluation of Past Performance ..................................................................................... 7-2
Summary of Priority Needs ............................................................................................ 7-4
Statement of Specific Annual Objectives – HUD Table 3A ............................................ 7-6
Sources of Funds ........................................................................................................... 7-7
Allocation of Funds Summary ........................................................................................ 7-8
Geographic Distribution ................................................................................................ 7-10
B. MANAGING THE PROCESS .............................................................................................. 7-10
Lead Agency ................................................................................................................ 7-10
Institutional Structure ................................................................................................... 7-10
Summary of Citizen Participation Process ................................................................... 7-12
Monitoring .................................................................................................................... 7-12
C. HOUSING ....................................................................................................................... 7-15
HOME Specific Requirements ..................................................................................... 7-16
Needs of Public Housing .............................................................................................. 7-17
Barriers to Affordable Housing ..................................................................................... 7-18
Lead-Based Paint Strategy .......................................................................................... 7-18
D. HOMELESS .................................................................................................................... 7-19
Homeless Coordination Strategy ................................................................................. 7-19
Chronic Homeless Strategy ......................................................................................... 7-19
ESG Program ............................................................................................................... 7-20
E. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ........................................................................................... 7-20
Antipoverty Strategy ..................................................................................................... 7-21
F. NON-HOMELESS SPECIAL NEEDS ................................................................................... 7-22
HOPWA Program ......................................................................................................... 7-22
G. APPENDICES .................................................................................................................. 7-24
Appendix A – Listing of Action Plan Projects – HUD Table 3C .................................... 7-24

HUD Table 3A: Summary of Specific Annual Objectives


Table 1: Allocation of HOME Funds
Table 2: Allocation of CDBG Funds
Table 3: Allocation of ESG Funds
Table 4: Allocation of HOPWA Funds

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐2 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
A. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The City of Newark is submitting this 2010-2011 Action Plan as the first annual action plan of
the 2010-2015 Consolidated Plan period in accordance with Consolidated Plan regulations
found at §92.220. An annual Action Plan is required by the U.S. Department of Housing and
Urban Development (HUD) from all jurisdictions receiving annual entitlements of formula grants.
This section discusses the general goals and objectives during 2010-2011 Action Plan year,
including available and potential resources, funding priorities and projects, and various HUD-
funded program information. Newark expects to receive the following entitlement grants during
the 2010-2011 program year:

 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG);


 HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME);
 Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA); and
 Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG).

This Annual Action Plan outlines the activities that will be undertaken during the program year
beginning September 1, 2010 and ending August 31, 2011. All activities mentioned in this
Action Plan are based on current priorities and quantified by level of need. By addressing these
priorities, the City hopes to meet local objectives identified in the 2010-2015 Consolidated Plan.
All proposed activities and projects are intended to principally benefit citizens of Newark who
have extremely low-, low-, and moderate-incomes and populations that have special needs,
such as homeless, elderly, disabled persons, persons with HIV/AIDS, and other special needs
populations.

Evaluation of Past Performance

The City of Newark adopted its previous Consolidated Plan in 2005, at which time the following
priorities were identified:

1. Provision of Neighborhood Services;


2. Provision of Public Services Across a Continuum of Care; and
3. Provision of Economic and Housing Development Services.

For program year 2008-2009, the City of Newark received five (5) entitlement grants from HUD
totaling $17,884,235. The City and its community partners used these funds and additional
resources to address these three priorities. The following provides a summary of the City’s
progress towards addressing these three priorities, as identified in the City’s 2008-2009
CAPER.

Provision of Neighborhood Services

During the 2008-2009 program year the City focused its neighborhood services on
demolition/clearance and code enforcement activities. The City’s demolition program focused on
damaged and abandoned housing structures in low- to moderate-income block groups that pose
an imminent risk to health and safety. During the 2008-2009 program year the City demolished
30 properties totaling 39 units. The City’s code enforcement activities worked in concert with
demolition activities to target properties to enforce local and state building codes to improve City
neighborhoods. Four non-profit organizations were also funded to conduct an array of services
to youth, seniors, and the general population of Newark’s NRSA target area. Additionally, three
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐3 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
CBDOs were funded to provide neighborhood services targeted in specific communities of
need. In total, over $1,509,859 in funding was disbursed during the 2008-2009 program year for
neighborhood service objectives.

Provision of Public Services across a Continuum of Care

One of Newark’s Consolidated Plan priorities was to establish a continuum of public services for
its residents. In the 2008-2009 program year, the City prioritized ten (10) key services to
address the priority needs of its residents, including: general services, workforce development,
educational services, ex-offender re-entry, emergency shelter services (ESG), surveillance and
prevention services, environmental health – including lead poisoning services, services and
housing for persons with AIDS (HOPWA), and housing counseling services. Approximately 65
percent of the funds disbursed to address this priority were from the City’s HOPWA program,
which provides services to persons with AIDS. In total, eighteen (18) organizations were funded
to provide services to persons with AIDS. In total, over $4,281,957.23 in HUD funding was
disbursed to sustain a continuum of public services for City residents.

Provision of Economic and Housing Development Services

In the 2008-2009 program year, the City used a variety of activities to address this priority,
including: acquisition, relocation, residential rehabilitation, public facility rehabilitation, new
construction, and downpayment assistance. During the program year the City disbursed
$507,775.91 to facilitate acquisition ($197,255.21) and relocation ($310,520.70) efforts targeting
six (6) project sites to support surrounding development activities. The City’s Neighborhood
Rehabilitation Program (NRP) assisted 44 units with rehabilitation activities totaling
$1,304,949.27, accounting for approximately 50 percent of the City’s efforts towards addressing
this priority. The City also provided downpayment assistance to 35 homebuyers with ADDI
funds during the 2008-2009 program year.

The City of Newark strives to achieve every goal and objective established for its programs.
Given the recent foreclosure, housing, and economic crisis it has become increasingly
challenging to achieve desired accomplishments. The City’s population encompasses a
predominantly low-income population with needs across the spectrum of community, housing,
and economic development categories. The City was hard hit by the foreclosure crisis and as a
result properties were abandoned and left to deteriorate. While housing and other community
development objectives are often the most publicized, providing services to homeless and
special needs populations are just as important. Given the wide-spread needs of City residents
and the physical deterioration of properties, prioritization and targeting of City programs remains
a challenge.

Summary of Priority Needs

This 2010-2011 Annual Action Plan outlines the current planned uses of CDBG, HOME, ESG,
and HOPWA funds for activities that are consistent with the current priority needs identified in
the City of Newark’s strategic plan and support identified objectives. These activities will support
three new overarching goals, including:

1. Jobs for residents;


2. Healthy and safe neighborhoods; and
3. Newark as a City of choice.
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐4 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
The priorities below have been identified for the 2010-2011 Action Plan year based on the
housing and homeless needs assessments, housing market analysis and consultation with
stakeholders and partner agencies. Below is a summary of the priority needs identified through
these assessments.

Housing
 Increasing affordable rental housing opportunities for low-income households.
 Providing new affordable homeownership opportunities for low- to moderate-income
households.
 Improving conditions of existing housing.
 Increasing availability of sustainable housing options.
 Providing counseling for first-time homebuyers and current homeowners.
Homeless
 Reducing the number of individuals and families that become homeless.
 Increasing availability of permanent supportive housing options for homeless individuals
and families.
 Supporting operations of existing emergency/transitional homeless facilities.
 Providing essential services to homeless populations.
Special Needs Populations
 Increasing accessibility/availability of affordable housing specifically for persons with
HIV/AIDS.
 Providing new affordable permanent supportive housing for low- to moderate-income
veteran households.
 Increasing availability of permanent housing for special needs populations.
 Providing support services to special needs populations.
Community/Economic Development
 Increasing economic opportunities for low-income residents in Newark.
 Revitalizing and beautifying Newark businesses and storefronts.
 Providing technical assistance to small businesses.
 Establishing social venture programs.
 Providing public services.

During the 2010-2011 Action Plan year, the City will focus on the following objectives and
strategies identified in the Strategic Plan to working toward the three goals above:

 Objective 1: Increase economic growth and job opportunities through large scale
development projects, social ventures, and job training programs. [Strategies 1.1-1.3]
 Objective 2: Increase access to quality affordable housing choices. [Strategies 2.1-2.4]
 Objective 3: Improve the condition of existing neighborhoods through redevelopment
and rehabilitation of residential and commercial properties and public facilities.
[Strategies 3.1-3.5]
 Objective 4: Provide funding for public services to support workforce development,
educational services, child care services, ex-offender social services, and homeowner
foreclosure prevention programs for low-income individuals and families in targeted
neighborhoods. [Strategies 4.1-4.5]
 Objective 5: Support homeless and at-risk special needs populations with coordinated
support services and housing assistance that focus on prevention and “housing first”
activities. [Strategies 5.1-5.7]

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐5 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
 Objective 6: Promote and fund targeted developments to help facilitate a living
downtown urban center around key development nodes. [Strategy 6.1]
 Objective 7: Make Newark’s neighborhoods green. [Strategy 7.1]

Statement of Specific Annual Objectives – HUD Table 3A

The following table (HUD Table 3A) summarizes the City’s 2010-2011 annual goals and funded
activities using HUD resources.
HUD Table 3A: Summary of Specific Annual Objectives
Obj. Source 2010-11 2010-11 Objective/
Specific Objectives Indicator
# of Funds Projected Actual Outcome
Rental Housing Objectives
003 Affordable Rental Housing New Constr. HOME Units 80 DH-1
0024 Rental Housing Development/Rehab CDBG Units 25 DH-2
004 CHDO Rental Housing Development HOME Units 20 DH-1
Owner Housing Objectives
005 Neighborhood Rehabilitation Program HOME Units 5 DH-3
007 Senior Emergency Repair Program HOME Units 40 DH-3
002 Downpayment Assistance HOME Households 20 DH-2
Economic Development Objectives
008 Commercial/Industrial Development CDBG Jobs 125 EO-1
Commercial Façade/Streetscape
0010 CDBG Businesses 12 EO-3
Improvements
Public Facilities Objectives
Public Facility Development and
0011 CDBG Facilities 3 SL-2/3
Rehabilitation
0023 Homeless Facility Renovations ESG Facilities 4 SL-3
Public Services Objectives
009 CDBG Public Services (Various) CDBG People 30,000 SL-1
0025 Urban Agriculture/Tree Planting CDBG People 5,000 EO-1
Special Needs and Homeless Objectives
0014 Long-term Tenant Rental Assistance HOPWA People 460 DH-1
0016 HIV/AIDS Facility Operations HOPWA People 1,000 DH-2
Short-term Rent, Mortgage and Utility
0017 HOPWA People 250 DH-3
Assistance
0018 Housing Information Services HOPWA People 1,400 DH-1
0020 Essential Services ESG People 60 DH-1
0021 Homeless Prevention Services ESG People 50 DH-3
0022 Facility Operational Assistance ESG People 100 DH-1
Administration/Planning/Project Delivery
001 General HOME Administration HOME - - N/A
006 CDBG Administration CDBG - - N/A
0012 CDBG Project Delivery CDBG - - N/A
0013 HOPWA Administration (City) HOPWA - - N/A
0015 HOPWA Administration (Subrecipient) HOPWA - - N/A
0019 ESG Administration ESG - - N/A

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐6 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
Sources of Funds

HUD Entitlement Funds

For program year 2010-2011, the City of Newark will receive four (4) entitlement grants from
HUD totaling $20,569,064. The City will allocate these resources to the areas with the highest
needs, including areas of minority concentration which include the South, Central, lower North,
East, and West Wards. A brief description of the grants and the City’s allocation for the 2010-
2011 program year is as follows:

 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) - $9,359,979 – The primary objective


of the CDBG program is to develop “viable urban communities, by providing decent
housing and suitable living environment and expanding economic opportunities
principally for persons of low and moderate income”. All CDBG projects and activities
must meet one of three national objectives: (1) principally benefit low- and moderate-
income persons, (2) aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or blight, or (3) meet
other urgent community needs. Each approved activity must benefit at least 51 percent
low- and moderate-income families or individuals. At least 70 percent of the City’s total
funds must be used for low- and moderate-income benefit activities.

 HOME Investment Partnerships Program (HOME) - $4,210,862 – The purpose of the


HOME program is to undertake activities that achieve the following: (1) provide decent
affordable housing to lower income households, (2) expand the capacity of nonprofit
housing providers, (3) strengthen the ability of local governments to provide housing,
and (4) leverage private-sector participation. HOME funds can be used for homeowner
rehabilitation, homebuyer activities, rental housing, and tenant-based rental assistance
(TBRA).

 Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS (HOPWA) - $6,620,013 – HOPWA


funding provides housing assistance and related supportive services. Grantees are
encouraged to develop community-wide strategies and form partnerships with area
nonprofit organizations. HOPWA funds may be used for a wide range of housing, social
services, program planning, and development costs. These include, but are not limited
to, the acquisition, rehabilitation, or new construction of housing units; costs for facility
operations; rental assistance; and short-term payments to prevent homelessness.
HOPWA funds may also be used for health care and mental health services, chemical
dependency treatment, nutritional services, case management, assistance with daily
living, and other supportive services.

 Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) - $378,210 – The purpose of the ESG program is to
provide funds for the rehabilitation or conversion of buildings for use as emergency
shelters for the homeless, for the payment of certain operating expenses and essential
services in connection with emergency shelters for the homeless, and for homeless
prevention activities.

HUD Stimulus Funds

As a result of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act (HERA) and American Recovery
Reinvestment Act (ARRA) the City of Newark received direct stimulus funds in 2009 totaling
$9,250,334, as follows:
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐7 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
 Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP1) - $3,406,849 – The Neighborhood
Stabilization Program (NSP) was a formula grant awarded for activities eligible under
division B, title III of the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 (Public Law 110-
289, NSP round 1), to address home foreclosure and abandonment and for the provision
of capacity building and support for NSP grantees. Rating factors will include grantee
capacity to execute projects, leveraging potential, and concentration of investment to
achieve neighborhood stabilization.

 Neighborhood Stabilization Program (NSP2) - $20,759,155 – The City of Newark in a


consortium agreement with Essex County, the City of East Orange, the City of Irvington,
the City of Montclair, the Township of Orange, Brand New Day, Don Pedro Development
Corporation, Episcopal Community Development Corporation, Housing and
Neighborhood Development Services, HOME Corp, Ironbound Community Corporation,
Make It Right Foundation, Unified Vailsburg Service Organization, and The Community
Loan Fund of New Jersey and in a for-profit partnership with Fairmount Heights
Development Corporation, Michaels Development Corporation, and RPM Development
Corporation has been awarded $20,759,155 in NSP2 funds. Approximately $11 million
of the allocation will be used for Newark area activities. Grantees must expend at least
50 percent of each grant within 2 years and 100 percent within 3 years of the grant
award.

 CDBG-R - $2,310,137 – The Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Recovery


program enables local governments to undertake a wide range of activities intended to
create suitable living environments, provide decent affordable housing, and create
economic opportunities, primarily for persons of low and moderate income. The City is
using CDBG-R to perform renovations of lead free safe houses, renovations of Newark
Public Library, and provide Community Based Organizations with funding to support
employment training services.

 Homeless Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program (HPRP) – $3,533,348 – The


Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing Program provides financial assistance
and services to prevent individuals and families from becoming homeless and help those
who are experiencing homelessness to be quickly re-housed and stabilized. The funds
under this program are intended to target individuals and families who would be
homeless but for this assistance. The funds will provide for a variety of assistance,
including: short-term or medium-term rental assistance and housing relocation and
stabilization services, including such activities as mediation, credit counseling, security
or utility deposits, utility payments, moving cost assistance, and case management.

The activities and priorities of 2009 stimulus funding and projected accomplishments and
expenditures are identified under separate specific action plans or substantial amendments. To
review these documents please refer to the City’s website for additional information. They can
be found on the website at http://www.ci.newark.nj.us/government/City_departments/.

Allocation of Funds Summary

The funding of activities to achieve desired accomplishments and goals outlined in this
document are based on 2010 federal funding allocations as follows:

HOME Funds
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐8 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
Table 1: Allocation of HOME Funds
Program/Activity % Total Funds Allocated
Administration 10% $421,086
Homebuyer Assistance 5.2% $220,000
Homeowner Rehabilitation (NRP) 3.6% $150,000
Rental Housing Development/Rehabilitation 66.2% $2,788,146
CHDO Housing Development (Set-aside) 15% $631,630
Total 100% $4,210,862

CDBG Funds

Table 2: Allocation of CDBG Funds


Program/Activity % Total Funds Allocated
Administration 20% $1,871,996
Homeowner Emergency Rehabilitation 10% $935,998
Commercial/Industrial Development 10.68% $1,000,000
Public Services (various) 10.73% $1,003,997
Urban Agriculture/Tree Planting 4.27% $400,000
Commercial Façade Improvement Program 2.5% $234,000
Public Facility Development/Rehabilitation 10.81% $1,044,894
Rental Housing Development/Rehabilitation 18.31% $1,713,895
Project Delivery 12.34% $1,155,199
Total 100% $9,359,979
Anticipated Program Income* $100,000
*program income will be used to fund one of the eligible CDBG activities identified above.

ESG Funds

Table 3: Allocation of ESG Funds


Program/Activity % Total Funds Allocated
Administration 5% $18,910.50
Essential Services 30% $113,463
Homeless Prevention 30% $113,463
ESG Facility Operational Assistance (Staff) 10% $37,821
ESG Facility Operational Assistance (no cap) 24% $90,000
Homeless Facility Renovations/Rehabilitation (no cap) 1% $4,552.50
Total 100% $378,210

HOPWA Funds

Table 4: Allocation of HOPWA Funds


Program/Activity % Total Funds Allocated
Administration (City) 3% $198,600
Administration (Subrecipients) 6% $397,201
Long-term Tenant Based Rental Assistance 76% $4,965,010
HIV/AIDS Facility Operational Assistance 8% $529,601
Short-term Rent, Mortgage and Utility Assistance 6% $397,201
Housing Information Services 2% $132,400
Total 100% $6,620,013

The above activities are funded specifically to implement the strategies and address priorities
identified in the five-year strategic plan.
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐9 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
Geographic Distribution

The City of Newark will continue to direct its resources into the areas with the highest needs.
The City will allocate HUD resources to the areas with the highest needs, including areas of
minority concentration which include the South, Central, lower North, East, and West Wards.
We believe the rational for this geographical distribution is straightforward. While these areas
have received large shares of assistance through HUD programs over the years, the resources
have never been sufficient to meet the demonstrated need. The City will also use the
opportunities and strategies identified in various redevelopment plans to coordinate allocation of
resources across targeted neighborhoods and development nodes.

B. MANAGING THE PROCESS

Lead Agency

In 2008, the Department of Administration renamed the Bureau of Research, the Office of
Partnerships and Grants Management (PGM). By establishing PGM, the Administration sought
to expand on the functions of the former Bureau of Research with the goal of ultimately
centralizing grants management City-wide. PGM is the lead City agency responsible for
consolidated planning and reporting on the four formula programs to HUD. PGM is directly
responsible for administration of CDBG and ESG funds. The Department of Child and Family
Well Being (CFWB) is responsible for administration of HOPWA funds. The Department of
Economic and Housing Development (EHD) is responsible for the administration of HOME
funds.

Institutional Structure

The City of Newark cannot implement its Consolidated Plan without a strong institutional
structure and the closest possible intra- and intergovernmental cooperation. Our institutional
structure is composed of segments of the public sector – local, county and state – as many as
one-hundred nonprofit organizations, and a like number of for-profit companies, developers, and
financial corporations. Major partner organizations are specified below by name.

City Public Agencies

 Department of Administration, Office of the Business Administrator: Overall


policy-making, management and decision-making for all local community development
and planning initiatives; coordination of all HUD programs and requirements that involve
more than one City agency, including Con Plan coordination; and IDIS administration.

 Department of Administration, Office of Management and Budget: Fiscal planning


for all community development activities; and coordination of HUD programs with other
federal and state aid and City operating budget.

 Department of Administration, Office of Partnerships and Grants Management:


Lead City agency responsible for consolidated planning and reporting on the four
formula programs to HUD; and development and coordination of CDBG and ESG.

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Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
 Department of Finance: Financing of all community development activities, including
bonding programs; grant accounting, grant accounts payable; and internal auditing of
grants.

 Department of Economic and Housing Development (EHD), Office of the Director:


Planning and management of all City housing and economic development initiatives in
accordance with policies of the City administration; and all regulatory aspects of land
use and real property, through the Boards of Adjustment and Zoning, Central Planning,
and Rent Control.

 Department of Economic and Housing Development, Division of Housing and


Real Estate: Design, planning and implementation of all assisted housing programs,
under the supervision of the Director's Office; development of "mainstream" housing
elements of the Con Plan; and planning and implementation, under the Director's Of-
fice, of all housing and economic redevelopment activities, i.e., real property acquisition
and relocation of families and businesses, management and disposal of City-owned
properties.

 Brick City Development Corporation: City’s primary economic development catalyst


that retains, attracts, and grows businesses; enhances small and minority business
capacity; spurs real estate development within Newark; and initiates and executes
economic development activities to produce and sustain economic growth, generate
jobs, and create wealth for the citizens of Newark.

 Department of Child and Family Well-Being: Design, planning and implementation


of all special needs housing programs, involving City and Essex County welfare
recipients, people with AIDS, the elderly, and the homeless; development of special
needs housing elements of the Con Plan; and development and coordination of Newark
and EMA HOPWA.

 Department of Neighborhood and Recreational Services, Division of Inspections


and Enforcement: Residential and commercial property code enforcement.

 Department of Neighborhood and Recreational Services, Division of Demolition


and Clearance: Emergency demolitions; and clearance of properties.

Newark Housing Authority

NHA, the City's public housing authority, is responsible for the development and operations of
more than 8,000 dwelling units for very- and extremely low-income Newark residents. NHA
works in close cooperation with the City to plan, design, develop and operate public housing.

Newark State Board of Education

The Board coordinates and cooperates with the Newark administration and NHA in the
planning, design and development of facilities.

University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (UMDNJ)

UMDNJ coordinates and cooperates with the above and below-listed institutions in planning,
design and site identification for facilities.

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Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
County of Essex

 Department of Economic Development, Training and Employment: Operates


housing grant programs, primarily Balanced Housing and Regional Contribution Agree-
ments; PHA activities in Newark, including Section 8 vouchers; and coordinates its own
Con Plan with those of local entitlement cities.

 Department of Health and Human Services: Coordinates and cooperates with regard
to City housing services for special needs populations.

 Essex-Newark Continuum of Care (CoC): Coordinates strategies and activities to


identify and serve homeless populations.

Nonprofit Organizations

Major organizations expected to implement rehabilitation and/or development projects meet


regularly with Department of Economic and Housing Development staff. Often, these meetings
occur through the Newark Community Development Network, an organization whose
constituents include the City’s leading CDCs.

EHD has fostered, encouraged and established relationships with two major intermediaries in
the housing finance and development industry, the Local Initiative Support Corporation (LISC),
NeighborWorks and the Enterprise Foundation. Through these three intermediaries private
capital is channeled to support investment in affordable housing that is eligible for low income
housing tax credits and other federal and state subsidy programs. The City of Newark, together
with the above referenced intermediaries and nonprofit organizations, works with the New
Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency and the New Jersey Department of Community
Affairs to secure construction financing.

Summary of Citizen Participation Process

As required by Consolidated Plan regulations, the City has implemented a Citizen Participation
Plan (CPP) to engage citizens and stakeholders in the consolidated planning process. The CPP
is discussed in detail in Section 3 of the Consolidated Plan. The CPP includes public notice,
community engagement of stakeholders, as well as technical assistance during the drafting and
finalizing of the Consolidated Plan. The City of Newark held two stakeholder focus group
sessions on April 21 and 23 of 2010, where over 40 organizations representing various
communities provided the City with feedback on key priorities and objectives. Additionally, a
public hearing was held on May 14, 2010 where citizens were provided an opportunity to
provide feedback. Input received during the public hearing process was incorporated into
decision making regarding the priorities, strategies, allocation of resources and target areas
outlined in this draft Annual Action Plan.

Monitoring

Consistent with regulations of 24 CFR, the City of Newark as a grantee of HUD funds is
responsible for ensuring that CDBG, ESG, HOME, and HOPWA funds are used in accordance
with all program requirements, Additionally, the City is responsible for determining the adequacy
of performance under Subrecipient agreements and procurement contracts and for taking
appropriate action when performance is inadequate or problems arise. The City is working to
revamp its monitoring procedures to improve compliance of HUD funded programs, and to
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Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
enforce performance standards of subrecpients and various partner agencies. Two Newark City
agencies monitor and oversee more-or-less all sub-recipient contracts. CFWB has internal
control procedures that require written notification to a sub-recipient that does not respond to
requests to sign a contract or, having done so, does not submit reimbursement requests on a
regular basis. Generally, written warnings are issued within sixty (60) days. The department
attempts to be flexible and responsive to extenuating circumstances, however, and does not
rigidly impose a schedule of sanctions. Very few public services sub-recipients are late in
submitting payment requests.

EHD’s Division of Housing Assistance, monitors and oversees all HOME and NSP activities, as
well as many sub-recipient activities, especially the renovation of public facilities that are multi-
year in nature. The Division has a written set of procedures for monitoring and approving
construction, change orders, and progress payments and close-outs.

All Departments under which a Subrecipient provides Consolidated Plan activities must:

 Execute separate written agreements with all Subrecipients that delineate all provisions
of the federal regulations for the corresponding program and stipulate conditions for
receiving funds, including performance and compliance requirements;

 Monitor Subrecipients through documentation review and routine site visits to ensure
Subrecipient activities comply with program requirements;

 Provide technical assistance to Subrecipients or take effective corrective action, as


needed, with Subrecipients that are non-compliant; and

 Complete performance evaluation and close out all projects within 90 days of activity
completion.

City departments maintain routine contact with Subrecipients and require monthly reporting on
programmatic and fiscal activities. A “Monthly Project Status Report” must be submitted by each
funded non-profit no later than the 10th day of the following month in which the activity occurs.
Each Department maintains internal control procedures that require written notification to a
Subrecipient that fails to execute a contract once it has been adopted by the Municipal Council
or which, after the contract is executed, fails to submit reimbursement requests on a regular
basis.

Programmatic Review

Department monitors perform a programmatic review of each monthly report to ensure the
Subrecipient is adhering to the Scope of Services and regulatory requirements of the grant by
determining the following:
 Is the project proceeding towards the goals listed in the scope of services?

 Is the project utilizing methods and procedures described in the contract? Has the
provision of required staffing as project in the contract budget been accomplished?

 Is the project keeping adequate records of activities for its low/moderate income
beneficiaries?

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Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
 Has the Subrecipient anticipated problems in the upcoming month that might prevent the
project from reaching its objectives or meeting its time schedule?

 Has the Subrecipient listed activities which occurred during the month that were not a
part of its planned work program?

 Major events that took place in the past month, which affected the project.

 Interrelated activities that the project has had with other entities

 Requests for services related project activities that were not met

 List of current contractual obligations, including compliance and performance objectives

 Anticipated contracts and a description of the purpose of each contract

Fiscal Review

Pursuant to HUD uniform administrative requirements, Subrecipients are required to keep


records and submit reports and supporting documentation that identify the application of funds
for grant-supported activities. These records must contain information pertaining to obligations,
un-obligated balances, expenditures, and program income. All reimbursement requests must
represent allowable costs as itemized in OMB Circular A-122. Although sub-recipients receive
an explanation for any disallowed costs, those items are deducted from the payment requests.
Department fiscal monitors or accountants perform a review of each monthly report and all
requests for reimbursement of expenditures in accordance with the following:

 Inclusion of the Monthly Budget Status Report – an itemized line item accounting form
used as a tool to indicate the manner and pattern of expenditures, that properly details a
monthly accounting of the project’s total actual CDBG expenditures, accrued expenses,
total expenses, available balances, and revisions to the original appropriations.

 Inclusion of Monthly Personnel Expenditure Reports – that includes proper source


documentation for all requested reimbursements of funds. Source documentation, may
include the following: cancelled checks, invoices marked paid, purchase orders, copies
of bid advertisements, contracts for subcontractors, order to proceed letters, payroll
journal, etc.

 Accuracy of computations and consistency with line items identified in the Subrecipient’s
approved budget.

On-Site Monitoring Visits

Departments conduct monitoring site visits of all Subrecipients, whereby a team comprised of
the programmatic and fiscal monitors physically visit the facility where the grant project or
activity occurs with the following purposes:

 To inquire into all aspects of project operations and to analyze related information for the
purpose of determining compliance with the subrecipient’s contract;

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Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
 To identify problems that might affect the fulfillment of the Subrecipient;s objectives and
document project status and progress;

 To recommend corrective actions to improve project performance or to remedy existing


problems;

 To recommend grant revisions or amendments as necessary to assist the project in


fulfilling its objectives; and

 To provide necessary technical assistance and/or assist the staff in obtaining support to
provide the project with the opportunity to achieve its objectives.

C. HOUSING

Based on a census data, there are 64,281 low-income households occupying housing in
Newark. Of these households, 53 percent or 33,846 households earn less than 30 percent of
MFI. Another 24 percent or 15,556 households earn between 30 and 50 percent of MFI and 23
percent or 14,879 households earn between 50 and 80 percent of MFI.

Adding newly constructed affordable housing and rehabilitating obsolete rental housing will help
to address this priority need. The City of Newark comprises approximately 76 percent renter-
occupied housing. As noted in Section 4, home values remain high in relation to household
incomes. Therefore, many low-income households in Newark are capable of homeownership
but lack the financial resources to achieve homeownership. Providing downpayment and closing
cost assistance will provide low-income households new access to homeownership
opportunities.

There are approximately 32,314 renter households and 7,224 owner households in Newark
experiencing housing problems. Given the age of housing in Newark, many housing units are in
need of repair and upgrading. Improving the condition of housing in Newark, especially for
extremely low-income senior owner-occupants, would return quality affordable housing to the
market. Continuing to incorporate energy efficiency and green design elements in new
construction and substantial rehabilitation projects will be a priority for the ensuing consolidated
planning period. Homeowner counseling and education assistance, and foreclosure prevention
outreach and counseling will also be a priority.

HOME Funds

For the 2010-2011 Action Plan year, the City has allocated HOME resources to support the
following activities. For a detailed description of these activities, refer to Appendix A.

Table 1: Allocation of HOME Funds


Program/Activity % Total Funds Allocated
Administration 10% $421,086
Homebuyer Assistance 5.2% $220,000
Homeowner Rehabilitation (NRP) 3.6% $150,000
Rental Housing Development/Rehabilitation 66.2% $2,788,146
CHDO Housing Development (Set-aside) 15% $631,630
Total 100% $4,210,862

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐15 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
HOME Program Specific Requirements

Resale/Recapture Policies

The City may use either the Resale or Recapture provisions to ensure compliance with HOME
regulations, depending on the particular program or neighborhood goal that the City has
identified. As described in more detail below, the City will allow low-income homebuyers that
have used HOME assistance for downpayment or closing costs to utilize the recapture
provisions, while homebuyers that benefit from a large amount of HOME subsidy for the
construction or rehabilitation of a HOME-assisted unit, will be required to adhere to the resale
provisions in the HUD regulations.

 HOME Resale Provisions – When the City uses HOME funds to assist the cost of
construction or rehabilitation of housing to be sold to a low-income household, and
when the total of HOME assistance exceeds $100,000 for the unit to be purchased,
the City will use Resale restrictions to ensure that HOME funds are used to preserve
affordability of the HOME-assisted unit. The affordability period will be based on the
total amount of HOME funds used to assist the property and the buyer. The
homebuyer must sell to another Low-Income homebuyer (as defined by HUD), with the
new home being affordable to the new buyer. The new homebuyer may not pay more
than 38 percent of gross income for Principal, Interest, Taxes and Insurance (PITI). In
certain circumstances, the City may permit the new homebuyer to assume the City
loan and affordability restrictions, i.e., the City will not require the full repayment of the
initial HOME subsidy. The HOME subsidy would be transferred to the new buyer in the
form of a deferred repayment downpayment assistance loan.

As required under the HUD regulations, the homebuyer for whom a resale restriction is
enforced will be allowed a fair return when selling to another income eligible buyer.
The seller (i.e., the original buyer) will be allowed the lesser of a 4 percent annual
appreciation on the original purchase price or the original purchase price of the home
as adjusted by the accumulated percentage of change in the COAH Regional resale
increase during the period of ownership as per N.J.A.C. 5:94- 7.2(b)2.

During the period of affordability, the last recorded purchase price will generally be the
minimum restricted price at the time of resale. Neither the minimum nor the maximum
restricted resale price is guaranteed to the owner. If the restricted price exceeds the
actual market value, the owner may have to accept the lower price. HOME-assisted
units must be maintained in good condition in order to receive the maximum restricted
price.

 HOME Recapture Provisions – For homebuyers that are provided HOME funds for
downpayment and closing cost assistance, as well as those that benefit from
construction or rehabilitation assistance to HOME-assisted units of less than $100,000,
the City will exercises the recapture option as outlined and in accordance with CFR
Section 92.254(5)(ii)(A). The City will recapture the entire amount of the HOME
investment from the borrower provided there are net proceeds sufficient to repay the
City loan. Under the recapture provisions, HOME affordability restrictions will be
removed from the property and the property may be sold without sales restrictions (i.e.
at market rate and/or to a non-low-income purchaser). Net proceeds are equal to the
sales price, minus non-HOME loan repayments, and closing costs. Net proceeds may
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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐16 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
deduct the value of approved capital improvements made to the property during the
period of ownership. If net proceeds are insufficient to pay off the City’s principal and
any interest that may have accrued, the balance of unpaid principal and interest shall
be forgiven. All HOME repayments from homebuyers will be used for HOME-eligible
purposes.

The City loan will also become immediately due and payable if the property ceases to
be used by the borrower as their primary residence, in accordance with 24 CFR
Section 92.254.

Affordability Period Policy

All HOME-assisted projects must remain affordable to and occupied by low-income households.
The table below provides the minimum period of affordability over which HOME-assisted units
must remain affordability.

HOME Investment per Unit Minimum Affordability Period


Under $15,000 5 years
$15,000 - $40,000 10 Years
Over $40,000 15 Years
New Construction
20 Years
Acquisition of Newly Constructed Rental Housing

Minority/Women’s Business Outreach

All housing development projects funded with City HOME funds are bid in compliance with
HOME program regulations and are monitored for compliance by the City’s Office of Affirmative
Action to assure compliance with the City’s MBE and WBE initiatives.

Affirmative Marketing

It is standard operating procedure that City of Newark project owners are required to take
substantial steps to carry out affirmative marketing. The City’s EHD department mandates that
property owners selected for participation in the HOME program comply with affirmative
marketing requirements by means of an agreement, which is applicable for a period established
by the department. Failure to abide by the agreement could result in the City accelerating the
property owner’s loan.

Needs of Public Housing

The Newark Housing Authority (NHA) is the largest public housing authority in the State of New
Jersey, charged with administering Public Housing, Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) Section 8
and HOPE VI programs in Newark. NHA currently owns and manages 45 active properties and
approximately 8,173 affordable housing units. Of these units, 7,817 are public housing units.
NHA has also developed a Homeownership Program that includes 42 renovated townhouse
units made available to qualified public housing residents. Approximately 25 townhouse units
under the HOPE VI Ward Community Redevelopment Program are also made available for
homeownership.

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Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
While NHA expects to increase its inventory of new housing units as it builds townhouses at
various sites in the City, over one-third of its stock is older family low-rise units with undersized
rooms, poor layout, and design issues that could not be rectified by available capital
improvement funds. NHA is assessing its developments to determine if portions of its family low-
rise sites could be replaced in the near future

As of November of 2009, NHA maintained a waiting list of 8,963 family applicants, 3,596 mixed
population applicants, 1,012 elderly designated applicants, 6,076 HCV applicants, and 13 family
applicants requesting accessible units1. Waitlist totals represent the current unmet need of
public housing in the City of Newark. To address this need NHA has prioritized the development
of over 600 units of affordable housing over the next five years. In addition, NHA will issue 1,000
HCVs to households on its waiting list during the summer of 2010.

Barriers to Affordable Housing

Despite new challenges associated with local and state economic conditions, the major
obstacles to comprehensively meeting the needs of what remains a primarily low-income
population are continuing underinvestment, lack of high paying jobs, and low skills jobs which
perpetuate poverty concentration in certain Wards of the City. While the City government is
limited in its capacity to address these problems on its own, the current Administration has
worked systematically and remains committed to maximizing the impact of public sector
resources to address these barriers. The City of Newark will continue its plans to expand and
leverage available resources through public-private partnerships with government, for-profit, and
non-profit entities. Under EHD, the City has made impressive progress and has planned an
ambitious program to continue working toward meeting the housing needs of City residents.

Lead-Based Paint Strategy

The Newark Department of Child and Family Well-Being, (CFWB) Childhood Lead Poison
Prevention Program, (CLPPP) evaluates properties for the presence of lead based paint
hazards. Units are identified from several sources, the primary source being from the New
Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, (NJDHSS) lead tracking system named
“Weligent.” This system is an interactive web-based data system that notifies the CLPPP of all
lead levels in Newark.

The City of Newark is funded to respond to all lead levels over 10ug/dl. This system alone
allows for estimated 250-300 children’s homes to be tested as a result of lead levels 10ug/dl or
above. The second vehicle of evaluating units throughout Newark is through the CLPPP
collaboration with the local Newark Housing Authority (NHA).

Through this collaboration units are inspected by CLPPP before a child age six or younger is
permitted to move into the unit. This is the single most effective activity for preventing children’s
exposure to lead hazards by making the process automatic, and thus protecting hundreds of
children annually. The CLPPP also inspects units on demand when concerned residents call in
to have their homes inspected.

                                                            
1
Based on data presented in NHA’s 2009-2014 Five Year Plan, Attachment B. Families are allowed to apply for up
to 3 waiting lists. Therefore, waitlist totals most likely include applicants that are on multiple waitlists.
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Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
The CLPPP uses its HUD Funding through the Lead Hazard Reduction Demonstration Grant
(LHRDG), to remove lead hazards identified from these homes. The homes identified to have
lead hazards and qualify for the HUD funds are directed to the grant’s intake process to have for
further inspection and processing. The hazards identified at the time of inspection are removed
and clearance is achieved before families are permitted to move back into these units. Lead
hazards that are identified and verified as being lead hazards diagnostically are removed and
cleared by an independent lab and consultant. In Newark the reductions of lead-based hazards
is based on the presence of hazards at the time of inspection, and making units’ lead–safe, but
not lead free.

The units that are remediated are a part of the CLPPP lead safe housing registry and are
offered as a referral base for families seeking lead safe housing. The activities of the CLPPP
increase the availability of lead safe housing throughout Newark, and by removing lead hazards
from 725 homes over the past seven years, it has created awareness to a clear and present
danger that is located directly in homes built before 1978.

D. HOMELESS

The homeless needs assessment identified the severity of homelessness in Newark. Consistent
with the Essex-Newark Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness, Newark’s priorities and strategies
indicate a shift in our homeless response system from one built on a foundation of emergency
and temporary housing to one build upon a foundation of prevention and permanent housing.
The City does acknowledge however that during this transition some level of emergency or
transitional housing, under the former response system and strategy, will require funding.

Homeless Coordination Strategy Summary

The City of Newark has adopted the Essex-Newark CoC approach to addressing the needs of
homeless and at-risk populations. Newark is part of the Essex-Newark CoC and coordinates
with Essex County on strategies and activities to identify and serve homeless populations. The
Essex-Newark CoC addresses the housing and supportive service needs in each stage of the
process to help homeless persons make the transition to permanent housing and independent
living. As identified above, permanent supportive housing is a priority need in Newark. Newark
is committed to providing both housing and support services for homeless persons in need of
permanent housing and working to end incidences of homeless in Newark.

Chronic Homelessness Strategy Summary

Although the number of reported chronic homeless persons (125) represents only a fraction of
the homeless population in Newark, the City has developed a strategy to address the chronic
homeless subpopulation. This strategy includes a “housing first” and “interim housing” model to
provide housing as quickly as possible, allowing time to assess the specific needs in order to
provide the appropriate services. Approximately 51 percent of the chronic homeless persons
surveyed identified substance abuse as the contributing factor to their chronic homelessness.
The City of Newark is incorporating substance abuse programs and coordinating with service
providers to develop related case management services. Ultimately, chronic homeless persons
will need long-term supportive housing options. Newark is working to develop an adequate
supply of permanent supportive housing to meet the needs of the chronically homeless.

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Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
ESG

Through the use of ESG funds the City has made progress in addressing homeless and
homeless prevention needs, goals, and specific objectives by providing emergency transitional
housing services to the residents of Newark. The transitional and emergency shelters provide
intensive case management services to approximately six hundred (600) individuals who would
otherwise have been homeless. ESG funds are also used to supplement payroll costs
associated with the delivery of case management services which put homeless clients in direct
contact with appropriate community, faith, and governmentally based agencies. The critical
services provided at the transitional and emergency housing empowers the victims and
encourages self-sufficiency.

ESG-funded agencies offer various services such as: education, entitlement, and employment
referrals; advocacy; assistance in money management and life skills development; nutritional
service; clothing; access to medical and mental health; substance abuse treatment; onsite
Parents Anonymous meetings; and assistance obtaining permanent housing. Due to the array
of services provided at the shelters, and since these services are essential to the individuals
and families, the average length of stay at these facilities has increased from the standard 30
days to approximately 60 to 120 days. Collectively, over the past five years the shelters
provided housing to well over 2,000 women and their families. While providing housing
assistance, various levels of case management and mental health services were also provided
to the residents.

ESG Funds

For the 2010-2011 Action Plan year, the City has allocated ESG resources to support the
following activities. For a detailed description of these activities, refer to Appendix A.

Table 3: Allocation of ESG Funds


Program/Activity % Total Funds Allocated
Administration 5% $18,910.50
Essential Services 30% $113,463
Homeless Prevention 30% $113,463
ESG Facility Operational Assistance (Staff) 10% $37,821
ESG Facility Operational Assistance (no cap) 24% $90,000
Homeless Facility Renovations/Rehabilitation (no cap) 1% $4,552.50
Total 100% $378,210

E. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

Newark’s list of priority community development needs is extensive. Similar to most major
metropolitan cities, Newark has a number of distressed neighborhoods in need of revitalization.
Over the past several years, the City has completed a comprehensive assessment of the City’s
needs, from improved land use and zoning, developing and increasing the supply of affordable
housing, to eradicating homelessness, and has invested heavily in crime reduction, code
enforcement, and demolition activities. The recent housing crisis and subsequent recession,
necessitates the need to shift away from public service programs and focus on development
projects that produce jobs and/or create job opportunities for Newark residents. This shift, in

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City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐20 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
effect, reduces the portion of CDBG funds that will be made available for public service
programs during the 2010 to 2015 consolidated planning period.
CDBG Funds

For the 2010-2011 Action Plan year, the City has allocated CDBG resources to support the
following activities. For a detailed description of these activities, refer to Appendix A.

Table 2: Allocation of CDBG Funds


Program/Activity % Total Funds Allocated
Administration 20% $1,871,996
Homeowner Emergency Rehabilitation 10% $935,998
Commercial/Industrial Development 10.68% $1,000,000
Public Services (various) 10.73% $1,003,997
Urban Agriculture/Tree Planting 4.27% $400,000
Commercial Façade Improvement Program 2.5% $234,000
Public Facility Development/Rehabilitation 10.81% $1,044,894
Rental Housing Development/Rehabilitation 18.31% $1,713,895
Project Delivery 12.34% $1,155,199
Total 100% $9,359,979
Anticipated Program Income* $100,000
*program income will be used to fund one of the eligible CDBG activities identified above.

Antipoverty Strategy

Newark's anti-poverty strategy is to a large extent the sum total of the strategies in this five-year
Consolidated Plan. As noted in Section 5 of this plan, the average household size for owner-
occupied housing in Newark is 3.06 and 2.64 for renter-occupied units. According to the 2009
Department of Health and Human Services Poverty Guidelines, the poverty threshold for a
family of three is $18,310. Approximately 28,000 households (an estimated 66,022 individuals)
were earning below the federal poverty level for a family of three in 2008, down from
approximately 36,000 households in 2000.

The barriers to the realization of the City’s objectives are economic, involve complex forces that
impact human development, and can only be removed by self-interested partnerships that
transcend local boundaries. Although recent data would indicate that the total number of
households living in poverty in Newark has declined, this data does not reflect the recent
economic and housing crisis that has resulted over the past three years. Newark’s 13 percent
unemployment rate is more indicative of the poverty levels experienced by some residents.

CFWB has the primary responsibility for developing and implementing anti-poverty initiatives.
Coordination is multi-level and accomplished through contractual and legally mandated
relationships with counterpart agencies at the local, county, state, and federal levels, as well as
non-profit institutions and agencies and private entities.

Newark's anti-poverty strategy is designed not only to educate and bring basic skills up to high
school and college graduate levels, but also to train people for existing and anticipated jobs
through the year 2010 and beyond. In addition to job training and education, it is critical that jobs
are available to support the demand. This Consolidated Plan purposefully focuses more on
housing and economic development to maximize the number of construction jobs and workforce
training opportunities. The City plans to pursue several large scale development projects to aid
in this effort.
____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐21 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 

The Federal Section 3 program regulations require that recipients of certain HUD financial
assistance, to the greatest extent possible, provide job training, employment, and contract
opportunities for low- or very-low income residents in connection with projects and activities in
their neighborhoods. Section 3 is intended to ensure that when employment or contracting
opportunities are generated because a covered project or activity results in the employment of
additional persons or the awarding of contracts for work, preference must be given to low- and
very low-income persons residing in or businesses located in the community where the project
is located.

Due to the dynamic nature of Newark's population and the difficulty in identifying and assisting
persons in poverty or at-risk of falling into poverty, the City cannot present firm, quantitative
estimates regarding the reduction of the numbers of persons and households in poverty. The
antipoverty strategy is intended to be a comprehensive strategy of housing assistance, social
services, and employment and training programs all contributing to the reduction of Newark
households in poverty.

F. NON-HOMELESS SPECIAL NEEDS

Due to the need for supportive services, special needs populations are most likely to encounter
difficulties finding affordable housing and often need supportive services in addition to
affordable housing options. The special needs populations discussed in this section include:

 Elderly/Frail Elderly;
 Persons with HIV/AIDS;
 Persons with Disabilities;
 Veterans; and
 Ex-offenders.

The City used a variety of resources to assess the needs of special needs populations,
including secondary data and existing studies on housing and service needs of special needs
populations.

HOPWA Program

The HOPWA program’s mission is to provide localities with resources and incentives to
establish long-term, comprehensive strategies for meeting the housing needs of persons with
AIDS or related diseases, in an effort to prevent homelessness within this special needs
population. The City of Newark funded seventeen (17) non-profit agencies and units of local
government within the City and the non-Newark metro area to provide services to persons with
AIDS and their families. During the 2008-2009 program year the City expended $2,780,337.56
in HOPWA funds.

As the HUD grantee, CFWB allocates funds and monitors HOPWA programs through local
government and non-profit agencies that act as sub-grantees located in the Newark Eligible
Metropolitan Statistical Area (NEMSA). NEMSA includes Essex, Morris, Union, Sussex, and
Hunterdon Counties in New Jersey and Pike County, Pennsylvania. NEMSA provides services
in the following categories: long-term rental assistance, short-term rental assistance, housing
information, and operating cost. Administrative costs to conduct and monitor the HOPWA
____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐22 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
program are also drawn from annual HUD grant awards. CFWB, in conjunction with non-profit,
local, and county government agencies have used HOPWA funds to enhance the quality of
services provided to persons with AIDS and establish affordable housing opportunities and
services to move families towards self sufficiency.

The CFWB HOPWA program provides HOPWA services to a large and diverse geographical
area that includes five counties in New Jersey and one county in Pennsylvania. In an effort to
provide continued support and technical assistance to City funded agencies, service providers
from all localities meet once a month for a mandatory roundtable meeting. During these
sessions the following is reviewed: HOPWA policies and procedures, reporting and fiscal
requirements, workshops on cultural competency, guidelines on file maintanance, HIV/AIDS,
care and treatment adherence, and other related topics.

For the 2010-2011 Action Plan year, the City has allocated its HOPWA resources to support the
following activities. For a detailed description of these activities, refer to Appendix A.

HOPWA Funds

Table 4: Allocation of HOPWA Funds


Program/Activity % Total Funds Allocated
Administration (City) 3% $198,600
Administration (Subrecipients) 6% $397,201
Long-term Tenant Based Rental Assistance 76% $4,965,010
HIV/AIDS Facility Operational Assistance 8% $529,601
Short-term Rent, Mortgage and Utility Assistance 6% $397,201
Housing Information Services 1% $66,200
Total 100% $6,220,013

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐23 
 
 
 
 
Section 7: 2010‐2011 Annual Action Plan 
 
G. APPENDICES

Appendix A – Listing of Action Plan Projects – HUD Table 3C

____________________________________________________________________________
City of Newark, New Jersey 2010-2015 HUD Consolidated Plan  7‐24 
 
 
 
 
CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: General HOME Administration
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
For the provision of providing salaries, wages and other expenses for the Department of Economic and Housing
Development, Division of Housing Assistance to implement the HOME program including management and oversight of
CHDOs.

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Planning/Administration
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date:


(mm/dd/yyyy)
Objective Category
Decent Housing
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

19A HOME Admin/Planning Costs of PJ (not part of 5% Ad Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

HOME Proposed Amt. $421,086 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (1) 1 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (1) 2 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: Homebuyer Downpayment Assistance Program
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Increase homeownership opportunities through a HOME-funded Homebuyer Program targeting households earning
between 60 and 80% AMI, specifically returning veterans, first-time homebuyers, public safety officers, and educators.

Location: Priority Need Category


Targeted neighborhoods and
development nodes. Owner Occupied Housing
Select one:

Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: Despite the growing trend of home sales in Newark, home values remain high in
relation to household incomes. Therefore, many low-income households in Newark
(mm/dd/yyyy)
are capable of homeownership but lack the financial resources to achieve
Objective Category
homeownership. Providing downpayment and closing cost assistance will provide low-
Decent Housing
income households new access to homeownership opportunities.
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Improve access to affordable owner housing
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
04 Households Proposed 20 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome
Create homeownership for low- Number of households assisted
income households

13 Direct Homeownership Assistance 570.201(n) Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

HOME Proposed Amt. $220,000 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (2) 3 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (2) 4 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: Affodable Rental Housing Development (New Construction - Non CHDO)
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Fund new construction of affordable rental units in targeted development nodes and within walking distance of public
transportation. Developers will be both for-profit and non-profit.

Location: Priority Need Category


Targeted neighborhoods and
development nodes. Rental Housing
Select one:

Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: There is need for 7,674 rental units affordable to extremely low-income renters
(<30% MFI). Over 90 percent of large-related extremely low-income renter
(mm/dd/yyyy)
households in Newark have housing problems, primarily due to overcrowding and
Objective Category
substandard living conditions. Adding newly constructed affordable rental housing
Decent Housing
will help to address this priority need.
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase the supply of affordable rental housing
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
10 Housing Units Proposed 80 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome
Develop new affordable Number of units developed or
rental housing units underway

12 Construction of Housing 570.201(m) Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

HOME Proposed Amt. $2,788,146 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (3) 5 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (3) 6 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: CHDO Affodable Housing Development
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Fund CHDOs (15% Set aside) to develop new affordable housing opportunities, including rental and permanent
supportive housing

Location: Priority Need Category


Targeted neighborhoods and
development nodes. Rental Housing
Select one:

Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: There is need for 7,674 rental units affordable to extremely low-income renters
(<30% MFI). Over 90 percent of large-related extremely low-income renter
(mm/dd/yyyy)
households in Newark have housing problems, primarily due to overcrowding and
Objective Category
substandard living conditions. Adding newly constructed affordable rental housing
Decent Housing
and permanent supportive housing will help to address this priority need.
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase the supply of affordable rental housing
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
10 Housing Units Proposed 20 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome
Development of new Number of units developed or
affordable rental housing underway

12 Construction of Housing 570.201(m) Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

HOME Proposed Amt. $631,630 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (4) 7 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (4) 8 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: Neighborhood Rehabilitation Program (Homeowner Rehab)
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Rehabilitation of housing occupied by low-income households to bring properties up to code. DHA's Neighborhood
Rehabilitation Program (NRP) will provide a deferred loan or grant to eligible low-income homeowners to remediate their
homes. Any residential owner occupied structure consisting of one to four units dwelling units and is located in targeted
neighborhoods. Mixed-use or non-residential buildings are not eligible for treatment in this program. The amount of
financial assistance will be determined based on need.
Location: Priority Need Category
Targeted neighborhoods and
development nodes. Owner Occupied Housing
Select one:

Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: There are approximately 32,314 renter households and 7,224 owner households in
Newark experiencing housing problems. Given the age of housing in Newark, many
(mm/dd/yyyy)
housing units are in need of repair and upgrading. Improving the condition of
Objective Category
housing in Newark, especially for extremely low-income senior owner-occupants,
Decent Housing
would return quality affordable housing to the market.
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Improve the quality of owner housing
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
10 Housing Units Proposed 5 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome
rehabilitate exisiting owner number of units rehabilitated
housing

14A Rehab; Single-Unit Residential 570.202 Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

HOME Proposed Amt. $150,000 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (5) 9 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (5) 10 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: CDBG Administration
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
To plan and administer all aspects of the CDBG program, including legal, fiscal, personnel; coordination with related
projects and oversight of subrecipients. Salaries, wages and other expenses for the Department of Administration, Office
of Management and BUdget, Department of Finance, Grants Accounting, Department of Economic and Housing
Development, Director's office to plan activities.

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Planning/Administration
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date:


(mm/dd/yyyy)
Objective Category
Decent Housing
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

21A General Program Administration 570.206 Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

CDBG Proposed Amt. $1,871,996 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (6) 11 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (6) 12 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: CDBG-Homeowner Emergency Rehab
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Fund a CDBG Homeowner Rehabilitation Program focusing on emergency repairs to alleviate unsafe/healthy living
conditions targeting extremely low-income senior homeowners.

Location: Priority Need Category


Targeted neighborhoods and
development nodes. Owner Occupied Housing
Select one:

Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: There are approximately 32,314 renter households and 7,224 owner households in
Newark experiencing housing problems. Given the age of housing in Newark, many
(mm/dd/yyyy)
housing units are in need of repair and upgrading. Improving the condition of
Objective Category
housing in Newark, especially for extremely low-income senior owner-occupants,
Decent Housing
would return quality affordable housing to the market.
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Improve the quality of owner housing
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
10 Housing Units Proposed 40 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome
rehabilitate exisiting owner number of units rehabilitated
housing

14A Rehab; Single-Unit Residential 570.202 Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

CDBG Proposed Amt. $935,998 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (7) 13 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (7) 14 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: CDBG - Commercial/Industrial Development
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Fund large-scale physical development consistent with redevelopment plans targeting key development nodes and
neighborhoods

Location: Priority Need Category


Targeted neighborhoods and
development nodes. Economic Development
Select one:

Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: Of Newark’s 160,000 jobs, only 25 percent are currently held by Newark residents .
The primary industries employing Newark residents are production, transportation,
(mm/dd/yyyy)
material moving, service, administrative, and construction. Pursuing large-scale
Objective Category
development projects that increase job opportunities for low-income Newark
Decent Housing
residents and bring businesses to Newark is a priority for the 2010 to 2015
Suitable Living Environment consolidated planning period.
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Improve economic opportunities for low-income persons
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
13 Jobs Proposed 125 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome
Increase economic number of jobs created
opportunities

14E Rehab; Publicly or Privately-Owned Commercial/Indu 570.202 Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

CDBG Proposed Amt. $1,000,000 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (8) 15 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (8) 16 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: CDBG Public Services
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Provide funding for public services to support workforce development, educational services, capacity building, ex-
offender social services and homeowner foreclosure counseling programs for low-income individuals and families in
targeted neighborhoods

Location: Priority Need Category


Targeted neighborhoods and
development nodes in key low- Public Services
Select one:
mod census tracts.

Explanation:

Expected Completion Date:


(mm/dd/yyyy)
Objective Category
Decent Housing
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Improve the services for low/mod income persons
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
01 People Proposed 30,000 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome
Increase the availability of Number of persons provided
services in the community services

05H Employment Training 570.201(e) 05M Health Services 570.201(e)

05A Senior Services 570.201(e) 05D Youth Services 570.201(e)

05L Child Care Services 570.201(e) 05 Public Services (General) 570.201(e)

CDBG Proposed Amt. $1,003,997 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (9) 17 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (9) 18 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: Commercial Façade and Streetscape Improvement Program
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Fund a Commercial Façade and Streetscape Improvement program consistent with revised Master Plan zoning
requirements

Location: Priority Need Category


Dowtown key development nodes
Economic Development
Select one:

Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: Streetscape improvements and commercial façade improvement in targeted
neighborhoods and development nodes are needed to improve the appeal of these
(mm/dd/yyyy)
neighborhoods to local businesses and entrepreneurs. Providing direct assistance to
Objective Category
local business to improve façade and storefronts consistent with zoning requirements
Decent Housing
will enhance their sustainability and their capacity to provide both needed services
Suitable Living Environment and economic opportunities.
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Improve economic opportunities for low-income persons
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
08 Businesses Proposed 12 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome
Direct assistance to Number of businesses assisted
businesses

18A ED Direct Financial Assistance to For-Profits 570.203(b) Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

CDBG Proposed Amt. $234,000 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (10) 19 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (10) 20 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: Public Facility Development/Rehabilitation
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Revitalize existing or develop new public and homeless facilities serving youth, seniors, homeless, special needs and
disabled populations.

Location: Priority Need Category


Targeted neighborhoods and
development nodes. Public Facilities
Select one:

Explanation:

Expected Completion Date:


(mm/dd/yyyy)
Objective Category
Decent Housing
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Improve quality / increase quantity of neighborhood facilities for low-income persons
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
11 Public Facilities Proposed 3 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome
Rehabilitation/development Number of facilities
of public facilities rehabilitated/developed

03A Senior Centers 570.201(c) 03D Youth Centers 570.201(c)

03E Neighborhood Facilities 570.201(c) 03M Child Care Centers 570.201(c)

03C Homeless Facilities (not operating costs) 570.201(c) 03P Health Facilities 570.201(c)

CDBG Proposed Amt. $1,044,894 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (11) 21 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (11) 22 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: CDBG Project Delivery (staff salaries)
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Fund eligible staff salaries and benefits expenses directly related to the delivery and carrying out of CDBG funded
development and rehabilitation projects

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Rental Housing
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date:


(mm/dd/yyyy)
Objective Category
Decent Housing
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase the supply of affordable rental housing
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
Other Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

21B Indirect Costs 570.206 Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

CDBG Proposed Amt. $1,155,199 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (12) 23 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (12) 24 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: HOPWA Administration and Planning (City)
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
For the provision of providing salaries, wages and other expenses for the Department of Child and Family Well-Being to
implement the HOPWA Program.

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Planning/Administration
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date:


(mm/dd/yyyy)
Objective Category
Decent Housing
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

31B Administration - grantee Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

HOPWA Proposed Amt. $198,600 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (13) 25 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (13) 26 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: Long-term Tenant Based Rental Assistance Administration
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
For the provision of Long-term Rental Assistance to persons with HIV/AIDS and their families.

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Homeless/HIV/AIDS
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: Persons with HIV/AIDS comprise one of Newark’s most vulnerable populations.
Providing access to affordable housing options for this subpopulation reduces the risk
(mm/dd/yyyy)
of homelessness and provides a foundation to become self-sustaining. The city will
Objective Category
pursue tenant based rental assistance to provide housing opportunities to support
Decent Housing
persons with HIV/AIDS.
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase the number of homeless persons moving into permanent housing
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
01 People Proposed 460 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

31F Tenant based rental assistance Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

HOPWA Proposed Amt. $4,965,010 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (14) 27 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (14) 28 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: HOPWA Subrecipient Administration
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
To support Subrecipients administering HOPWA programs.

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Planning/Administration
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: Persons with HIV/AIDS comprise one of Newark’s most vulnerable populations.
Providing access to affordable housing options for this subpopulation reduces the risk
(mm/dd/yyyy)
of homelessness and provides a foundation to become self-sustaining. The city will
Objective Category
work with various subrecipients in the Newark EMSA to provide housing
Decent Housing
opportunities,services and information to support persons with HIV/AIDS.
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase the number of homeless persons moving into permanent housing
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

31D Administration - project sponsor Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

HOPWA Proposed Amt. $397,201 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (15) 29 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (15) 30 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: HIV/AIDS Facility Operations Assistance
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
For the provision of facility operations costs of HOPWA facilities in the community.

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Homeless/HIV/AIDS
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: Persons with HIV/AIDS comprise one of Newark’s most vulnerable populations.
Providing access to affordable housing options for this subpopulation reduces the risk
(mm/dd/yyyy)
of homelessness and provides a foundation to become self-sustaining. The city will
Objective Category
work with various facilities in the Newark EMSA to provide facility operational costs
Decent Housing
to support persons with HIV/AIDS.
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase range of housing options & related services for persons w/ special needs
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
01 People Proposed 1000 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

31K Facility based housing - operations Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

HOPWA Proposed Amt. $529,601 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (16) 31 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (16) 32 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: Short-term Rent, Mortgage and Utility Assistance Services
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Provide housing opportunities to persons with HIV/AIDS via short-term rent, mortgage and utility assistance services
targeting HIV/AIDS persons and families with short-term financial needs

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Homeless/HIV/AIDS
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: Persons with HIV/AIDS comprise one of Newark’s most vulnerable populations.
Providing access to affordable housing options for this subpopulation reduces the risk
(mm/dd/yyyy)
of homelessness and provides a foundation to become self-sustaining. The city will
Objective Category
pursue short-term rent, mortgage and utility assistance to provide sustainable
Decent Housing
housing options to support persons with HIV/AIDS.
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase range of housing options & related services for persons w/ special needs
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
01 People Proposed 250 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

31G Short term rent mortgage utility payments Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

HOPWA Proposed Amt. $397,201 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (17) 33 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (17) 34 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: Housing Information Services for Persons with HIV/AIDS
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Provide housing information and coordination services to homeless persons with HIV/AIDS

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Homeless/HIV/AIDS
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date: Persons with HIV/AIDS comprise one of Newark’s most vulnerable populations.
Providing access to affordable housing options for this subpopulation reduces the risk
(mm/dd/yyyy)
of homelessness and provides a foundation to become self-sustaining. The city will
Objective Category
work with various subrecipients in the Newark EMSA to provide housing information
Decent Housing
services to support persons with HIV/AIDS.
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase range of housing options & related services for persons w/ special needs
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
01 People Proposed 1400 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

31I Housing information services Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

HOPWA Proposed Amt. $132,400 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (18) 35 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (18) 36 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: ESG Administration
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
For the provision of providing salaries, wages and other expenses for the Department of Child and Family Well-Being to
implement the ESG Program.

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Planning/Administration
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date:


(mm/dd/yyyy)
Objective Category
Decent Housing
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase range of housing options & related services for persons w/ special needs
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

21A General Program Administration 570.206 Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

ESG Proposed Amt. $18,911 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (19) 37 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (19) 38 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: City of Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: ESG Essential Services
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: 342190
Provision of essential services to support emergency homeless facilities and service providers.

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Homeless/HIV/AIDS
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date:


(mm/dd/yyyy)
Objective Category
Decent Housing
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase range of housing options & related services for persons w/ special needs
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
01 People Proposed 60 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

03C Homeless Facilities (not operating costs) 570.201(c) Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

ESG Proposed Amt. $79,424 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (20) 39 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (20) 40 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: Newark, New Jersey
Project Name: Homeless Prevention Services
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: UOG Code
Provision of homeless prevention services for at-risk households and special needs populations.

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Homeless/HIV/AIDS
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date:


(mm/dd/yyyy)
Objective Category
Decent Housing
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase the number of homeless persons moving into permanent housing
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
01 People Proposed 50 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

31E Supportive service Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

ESG Proposed Amt. $64,296 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (21) 41 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (21) 42 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: Jurisdiction
Project Name: ESG Facility Operations Assistance
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: UOG Code
Provision of operations costs to support emergency homeless facilities.

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Homeless/HIV/AIDS
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date:


(mm/dd/yyyy)
Objective Category
Decent Housing
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Increase range of housing options & related services for persons w/ special needs
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
01 People Proposed 100 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

31K Facility based housing - operations Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

ESG Proposed Amt. $64,296 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (22) 43 CPMP


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Year 2
Actual Amount Actual Amount
Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 3

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 4

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Year 5

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Program Y

Actual Amount Actual Amount

Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units


Actual Units Actual Units
Accompl. Type: Proposed Units Accompl. Type: Proposed Units
Actual Units Actual Units

Project (22) 44 CPMP


CPMP Version 2.0
Grantee Name: Jurisdiction
Project Name: Homeless Facility Renovations/Rehabilitation
Description: IDIS Project #: UOG Code: UOG Code
Revitalize/renovate existing homeless facilities serving homeless populations.

Location: Priority Need Category


Enter location, address, zip codes,
census tracks, or other elements Homeless/HIV/AIDS
Select one:
that will help to identify the
location of the project.
Explanation:

Expected Completion Date:


(mm/dd/yyyy)
Objective Category
Decent Housing
Suitable Living Environment
Economic Opportunity
Specific Objectives
Outcome Categories Improve quality / increase quantity of neighborhood facilities for low-income persons
1
Availability/Accessibility
Affordability 2
Sustainability 3
11 Public Facilities Proposed 4 Accompl. Type: Proposed
Accompliishments

Underway Underway
Projectt-level

Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete

Accompl. Type: Proposed Accompl. Type: Proposed


Underway Underway
Complete Complete
Proposed Outcome Performance Measure Actual Outcome

03 Public Facilities and Improvements (General) 570.201(c) Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

Matrix Codes Matrix Codes

ESG Proposed Amt. $151,284 Fund Source: Proposed Amt.


Program Year 1

Actual Amount Actual Amount


Fund Source: Proposed Amt. Fund Source: Proposed Amt.
Actual Amount Actual Amount</