You are on page 1of 8

ChuzhuoWencai.

txt
<html>

<!-- Mirrored from terebess.hu/zen/mesterek/ChuzhuoWencai.html by HTTrack


Website Copier/3.x [XR&CO'2014], Sun, 09 Jul 2017 23:24:43 GMT -->
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type"
content="text/html; charset=utf-8">
<title> Chuzhuo Wencai (1273-1352) </title>
</head>

<body bgcolor="#666666" text="#ffcc99"


link="#d9d9b8" vlink="#d9d9b8" alink="#d9d9b8">
<p align="left"><strong><font color="#ff8040" size="3" face="Verdana, Arial,
Helvetica, sans-serif">ZEN MESTEREK </font><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial,
Helvetica, sans-serif">ZEN MASTERS </font><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial,
Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
</font></strong><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><font
color="ccccff"><b><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"
size="2"><b><a href="../index-2.html" target="_parent"> Zen foldal </a><br>
</b></font><font color="#BFA493" size="2"
face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><b><a
href="https://terebess.hu/index.html" target="_top"> vissza a Terebess Online
nyitlapjra</a></b></font></b></font></font></p>
<p align="center"> <img width="400" height="418"
src="https://terebess.hu/zen/mesterek/ChuzhuoWencai.jpg"> </p>
<p align="center"><font size="5" face="MingLiU"> <font face="Verdana,
Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Chuzhuo Wencai (1273-1352)</font> </font></p>
<p align="center">&nbsp;</p>
<p align="left"> <font size="2"><strong><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif" size="5"><a name="a" id="a"></a></font><font size="2" face="Verdana,
Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><img src="https://terebess.hu/zen/angol.gif"
width="36" height="25" border="0"></font></strong></font></p>
<p><font size="3" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">
<br>
<strong>Chuzhuo Wencai (1273-1352), Patriarch of the Sixtieth
Generation</strong></font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">60th Generational
Patriarch Dhyana Master Wen Tsai of Tswun Jwo Monastery <br>
Lives of the Patriarchs <br>
Composed by the Elder Master Hsu Yun ( Xuyun, 1840-1959)<br>
Commentary by the Venerable Master Hsuan Hua ( Xuanhua,
1918-1995)<br>
, May 18, 1985 <br>
<em>Vajra Bodhi Sea (VBS): </em> A Monthly Journal of Orthodox
Buddhism, Nos. 270-271. </font></p>
<p align="left"> <font size="2"><a
href="http://www.drbachinese.org/vbs/publish/270/vbs270p013.htm"
target="_blank"><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif">http://www.drbachinese.org/vbs/publish/270/vbs270p013.htm
</font></a><font face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><br>
<a href="http://www.drbachinese.org/vbs/publish/271/vbs271p013.htm"
Pgina 1
ChuzhuoWencai.txt
target="_blank">http://www.drbachinese.org/vbs/publish/271/vbs271p013.htm
</a></font></font> </p>
<blockquote>
<p align="left"><font size="2"><strong><em><font face="Verdana, Arial,
Helvetica, sans-serif">Text: </font></em></strong><font face="Verdana, Arial,
Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong><br>
The Master was born in Ling Fen of Ping Yang, a son of the Yau family. When he
first read the Song of Enlightenment, and reached the line, &quot;This empty
body, an illusory transformation, is the Dharma-body,&quot; he was joyful
because he understood. He went to study with Hwan Ywan, presenting what he had
understood. Ywan questioned, &quot;Explain, whom does the line 'Have you not
seen...?' address?&quot; The Master replied, &quot;I personally present it to
your face, so there can be no going back and forth.&quot; Hwan Ywan said,
&quot;How can you, a fellow who has fallen into a pit, utter such words?&quot;
The Master asked, &quot;How would the Venerable Monk put it?&quot; He said,
&quot;Shut your mouth.&quot; The Master said, &quot;You have investigated and
broken through.&quot; Ywan certified him. During the year of Jya Dz in the reign
of Tai Ding in the Ywan Dynasty, he became abbot of Shau Lin. In the fifth month
of the year of Ren Chen in the Dz Jeng reign of Emperor Swun, he gave a lecture
to his disciples, and then manifested stillness. His whole body was buried to
the right of the stupa of Sywe Ting. He lived through eighty springs and
autumns. </strong></font></font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><strong><em>Commentary: </em><br>
The Master was born in Ling Fen of Ping Yang, a son of the Yau family. When he
first read the <em>Song of Enlightenment </em>, and reached the line, &quot;This
empty body, an illusory transformation, is the Dharma-body.&quot; </strong> This
Dhyana Master is the 60th Patriarch of the Tsau Dung School. His name was Dhyana
Master Wen Tsai of Tswun Jwo. He was also born in Shan Syi Province. All the
good geomancy went to Shan Syi, so as a result, Shan Syi Province produced many
of the &quot;dragons and elephants&quot; and &quot;Dharma generals&quot; (i.e.
outstanding individuals) in the Tsau Dung School. This Dhyana Master was born in
Ling Fen County in the Ping Yang District. His lay surname was Yau. As soon as
he was born, he liked the Buddhadharma. When he first read Great Master Yung
Jya's <em>Song of Enlightenment </em>, he got to the line, &quot;This empty
body, an illusory transformation, is the Dharma-body.&quot; This sentence is
found in the <em>Song of Enlightenment</em>. What is meant by &quot;illusory
transformation&quot;? It refers to that which is empty and false. What does
&quot;empty body&quot; mean? It doesn't mean that there's no body. Rather, it
means this body is the temporary fusion of the four elements of earth, water,
fire, and wind. Our body is formed from the combination of the earth element,
the water element, the fire element, and the wind element. When the four
elements scatter and disperse, what happens to this body? Earth returns to
earth, water returns to water, fire to fire, and wind to wind. Each returns to
its own. This proves that these are not our &quot;self.&quot; Thus, the body is
said to be empty. It's created from the combination of the four elements. This
being the case, what's so precious about the body? What's there to cherish?
What's there that you cannot renounce? What's there that you can't put down? If
you can put it down, you'll no longer be restricted by your inherited
disposition, nor covered by your material desires. So it's said, &quot;Leap out
of the three realms. No longer be within the five elements.&quot; </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">When you go
Pgina 2
ChuzhuoWencai.txt
beyond the material realm, you'll know that the Dharma-body is contained right
within the empty body. Our Dharma-body is just inside this empty body. But,
while within this empty body, you fail to recognize it, and you get attached to
this empty body. You don't understand that the Dharma-body is something we
inherently own. It is the real treasure of our self-nature. But since we don't
recognize it, the <em>Song of Enlightenment </em> tells us that our Dharma-body
is found right within this false, unreal, impermanent body made up of the four
elements. Don't search for it elsewhere. It also means, &quot;Ice is just water,
and water is just ice.&quot; Before you understand your Dharma-body, you produce
ignorant attachment, and as a result it's this empty body. If you can break
through this ignorant attachment, then it's the Dharma-body. Then you've seen
through your empty body, and there is no attachment. You will know that in
everything you did before, you were just working as a horse and an ox for it.
Your inverted false thinking drove you to act that way. You sought enjoyment for
the body; you sought comfort, happiness, and freedom for its sake as well. This
is all upside-down, looking for something to do when there's nothing to do. Our
self-nature isn't like this. You shouldn't always seek outside, looking for
external things. If you truly understood, you would know that the Dharma-body
within the self-nature is without impediments, without self, without others, and
without attachments. This kind of state surpasses the three realms and is no
longer among the five elements. This is true freedom, true level equality, and
true bliss. If you haven't reached this state, then you are still restricted.
You are still hustling around being a horse, an ox and a slave for this stinking
skinbag. When the body feels it's had enough, it will split without even saying
goodbye. It will not want you anymore. So this is pretty meaningless.
</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>He was
joyful because he understood. </strong> When he read to the line, &quot;This
empty body, an illusory transformation, is just the Dharma-body,&quot; he
understood a little, and was delighted. But he didn't know if he understood
correctly or not, so he searched for a Good Knowing One to certify him.
&quot;Please tell me, is my state correct or not?&quot; </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>He went
to study with Hwan Ywan... </strong> He visited the Venerable Hwan Ywan.
<strong>...presenting what he had understood. </strong> He described the state
and the theory which he had awakened to at the time. He gave a full account
without holding anything back, explaining his understanding of the principle.
However, probably sometimes his words failed to convey his meaning. In some
places he only mentioned one point and left out ten thousand others. Or maybe he
didn't speak very perfectly. Consequently, the Venerable Hwan Ywan didn't
believe him. Therefore he pressed him a bit, by giving him a blow on the head.
He struck him right on the crown of the head. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>Ywan
questioned</strong>, he asked him to try to explain it again.
<strong>&quot;Explain, whom does the line 'Have you not seen...?' address?&quot;
</strong> In the Song of Enlightenment, there are the lines, </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>Have you
not seen <br>
People whose study has ended, who do nothing, <br>
Who abide in the Way at ease? <br>
They do not banish false thoughts, they do not seek the truth. <br>
The true nature of ignorance is the Buddha-nature; <br>
Pgina 3
ChuzhuoWencai.txt
This empty body, an illusory transformation, is the Dharma-body.
</em></font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">To whom is the
question, &quot;Have you not seen...&quot; addressed? Which person is being
asked? <strong>The Master replied, &quot;I personally present it to your face
</strong> ...Dhyana Master Wen Tsai did not pause to deliberate, for as soon as
he did so, it would be wrong. He simply sized up the immediate situation and
replied, &quot;Facing you, I personally submit what I understand.&quot;
<strong>...so there can be no going back and forth </strong>. There won't be any
wavering back and forth, or any lack of clarity. Dhyana Master Wen Tsai was
clumsily trying to defend himself. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Venerable
<strong>Hwan Ywan said, &quot;How can you, a fellow who has fallen into a pit...
</strong> Speaking in this manner, you have long ago fallen into the pit of
ignorance; you've already fallen into the trench of afflictions <strong>...utter
such words? </strong> Speak such spineless nonsense? Venerable Hwan Ywan struck
him yet another blow on the head in criticizing him this way. But Dhyana Master
Wen Tsai was still unwilling to back down. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>The
Master asked, &quot;How would the Venerable Monk put it?&quot; </strong> Dhyana
Master Wen Tsai asked the Venerable Monk, &quot;What would you say?&quot;
Although he had asked the Venerable for his opinion, in his mind, he was still
reluctant to admit defeat. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>He
said, &quot;Shut your mouth.&quot; </strong> In English, this is &quot;Close
your mouth!&quot; or &quot;Stop talking!&quot; That is to say, &quot;I'll gap up
your mouth and then see what you can say.&quot; This is just, </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>Apart from
the mark of speech, <br>
Apart from the mark of conditions of the mind, <br>
Apart from the mark of writing. </em></font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">Whatever you
could say is incorrect, so just shut your mouth, and see what you can say then.
What can you ask then? After that, &quot;you do not see or talk anymore.&quot;
That is just a reply to the line, &quot;Have you not seen...?&quot; </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>The
Master said, &quot;You have investigated and broken through.&quot; </strong>
Dhyana Master Wen Tsai said, &quot;Venerable One, your words have hit the mark.
This is just the way it is.&quot; <strong>Ywan certified him. </strong> Hearing
him speak this way, the Venerable Hwan Ywan knew that he had truly understood
the sound of the books, the flavor of the melody, and the theory of playing the
lute. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>During
the year of Jya Dz in the reign of Tai Ding in the Ywan Dynasty, he became abbot
of Shau Lin. </strong> During the Tai Ding reign in the Ywan Dynasty, he acted
as the abbot at Shau Lin Monastery. <strong>In the fifth month of the year of
Ren Chen in the Dz Jeng reign of Emperor Swun, he gave a lecture to his
disciples. </strong> He admonished his disciples, &quot;Be good, follow
instructions, and uphold the precepts. Don't get distracted, and don't put your
mind to bad use, letting the time pass by in vain.&quot; This was the lecture he
gave. He exhorted them to vigorously cultivate precepts, samadhi, and wisdom,
and to put greed, anger, and stupidity to rest <strong>...and then manifested
Pgina 4
ChuzhuoWencai.txt
stillness. His whole body was buried to the right of the stupa of Sywe Ting.
</strong> His disciples did not cremate his body, but buried it on the right
side of the pagoda of Dhyana Master Sywe Ting. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>He
lived through eighty springs and autumns. </strong> What does &quot;spring and
autumn&quot; refer to? One spring and one autumn represents one year. Winter and
summer are left out. Of the four seasons of spring, summer, autumn and winter,
we only mention spring and autumn. One &quot;spring and autumn&quot; means one
year. So he lived for eighty years. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><strong>A Verse
in Praise Says: </strong></font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>A blow on
the crown of the head; <br>
Straightaway he transcended the provisional. <br>
Wonderful function with no selfishness, <br>
He does not hang on to cares and worries. <br>
Opening the eyes of Mahesvara, <br>
Revealing the face of Natha. <br>
His investigation broke through; <br>
Snowflakes in the red-hot furnace! </em></font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>A blow on
the crown of the head. </em> He smacked him soundly on the headdealt him a
blow. <em>Straightaway he transcended the provisional </em>. He suddenly became
enlightened, surpassing all expedient dharmas, and fathoming the very bottom
source. There was no more crookedness, no more walking on unnecessary paths.
</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>Wonderful
function with no selfishness. </em> How can there be wonderful function? Simply
because there is no self. Why is there no self? Because there is wonderful
function. We cannot be selfish. If you are selfish and seek personal benefit,
you won't have wonderful function, and it won't be effective. <em>He does not
hang on to cares and worries. </em> He isn't so anxious and concerned. Why not?
Because he's not selfish and self-benefitting. So he doesn't need to worry so
much. Why do people worry so much, thinking, for example, &quot;Is this person
treating me badly?&quot; &quot;Did my words make him upset with me?&quot;
&quot;Have I insulted others?&quot; This is all worry. When you're overly
worried, you're &quot;afraid of the wolves in front, and scared of the tigers
behind.&quot; You're never at ease. But if you are not selfish, you won't have
to worry. You shouldn't have even a hair's breadth of selfishness. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>Opening the
eyes of Mahesvara. </em> He opened the eyes of Mahesvara. He stared with his
eyes opened wide. He glared angrily, with his eyebrows horizontal and eyes wide
open. Lord Mahesvara is the Lord of the Great Brahma Heaven. He has three eyes,
and is very awesome. He's always very arrogant, and feels very masterful and
contented. This Dhyana Master was also quite contented, but he wasn't arrogant.
<em>Revealing the face of Natha. </em> He had a pleasant demeanor, like that of
Natha. He also had a very fierce look. He used the two skills of subduing and
attracting to teach and transform living beings. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>His
investigation broke through. </em> He already understood, was enlightened, and
had finished everything. <em>Snowflakes in the red-hot furnace. </em> There is
no such thing as snowflakes in a red furnace. It cannot be achieved. How can
Pgina 5
ChuzhuoWencai.txt
there be snowflakes in a red-hot furnace? It's absolutely impossible. But even
though it's impossible, this time it's also possible. This is an analogy. It's
as difficult to get snowflakes in a red-hot furnace as it is to break through in
one's investigation. But now he's succeeded. That's what this line means. Don't
think that snowflakes can really exist in a red-hot furnace. It's not possible
for them to be there. When the cold reaches an extreme, it becomes warm. When
the heat reaches an extreme, it becomes cool. Snowflakes cannot exist in a
redhot furnace. The banter of the Chan School is meant to make you confused, to
make you wonder, &quot;What's going on? How is it really?&quot; It's not any way
at all. If &quot;You have not seen,&quot; that's the best! </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica,
sans-serif"><strong><em>Hsuan Hua's Verse Says: </em></strong></font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>The Song of
Enlightenment by Great Master Yung Jya <br>
Is unlike the work of Su Dung-pwo of Mount Omei. <br>
This empty body, an illusory transformation; suddenly there is awakening. <br>
Beyond expression, the Real Mark of True Suchness. <br>
Try to explain, whom does &quot;Have you not seen...&quot; address? <br>
You fall into a pit, die, and live once again. <br>
Opening Mahesvara's eyes and revealing Natha's face. <br>
Take refuge with Prajna Paramita. </em></font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>The Song of
Enlightenment by Great Master Yung Jya. </em> This song was spoken by the Great
Master Yung Jya after he certified to the way. <em>Is unlike the work of Su
Dung-pwo of Mount Omei. </em> He wasn't like Su Dung-pwo of Sz Chwyan Province,
who pretended to be an expert, to be &quot;One who has gone through&quot; How
so? He claimed to have reached a state which he had not attained. He had a state
in which he saw a little bit, but he thought it was a big deal. One day, while
meditating, he entered a shallow samadhi, and felt as if he were bowing to the
Buddha. Thereupon, he felt that his skill was really something. Being the type
of person who is meticulous in his choice of words, and wishing to show off his
literary talent, he wrote a verse. In order to let everyone know how great he
was, he composed the following poem: </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>I bow to
the god among gods; <br>
His hair-light illuminates the world. <br>
Unmoved when the Eight Winds blow, <br>
Upright I sit in a purple-gold lotus. </em></font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">After writing
this verse, he felt he should go somewhere to advertise it. He thought,
&quot;Dhyana Master Fwo Yin is a notable in the Chan School. If he were to
certify me, I would be recognized as enlightened, and many people would admire
me. Then I would certainly attain great fame and benefit.&quot; So he sent his
attendant to deliver his verse to Dhyana Master Fwo Yin, who was the abbot of
Jyang Tyan Monastery on Gold Mountain. Su Dung-pwo lived on the opposite shore
of the river. He sent his verse over for the Dhyana Master to appraise. Dhyana
Master Fwo Yin took one look, wrote four characters on it, resealed the letter,
and told the attendant to take it back, saying, &quot;Show it to the scholar.
You'll know what I've written when you get back.&quot; </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif">The attendant
took it back and handed it to Su Dung-pwo. He took one look, and exploded in
outrage, exclaiming, &quot;You baldheaded monk! How can you scold me? I wrote
Pgina 6
ChuzhuoWencai.txt
such a fine poem, but you not only failed to admire it, you even dare to scold
me!&quot; Just exactly what four characters did Fwo Yin write? He had scrawled
&quot;Fart! Fart!&quot; at the end of the poem. When Su Dung-pwo saw this, he
was unable to hold his &quot;gas&quot; temper, and had to let it out. In a great
fury, he rushed across the river to straighten the account with Dhyana Master
Fwo Yin, to get revenge by plucking a few hairs from his bald head. Huffing and
puffing in rage, he exclaimed, &quot;You monk, how can you scold me?&quot;
Dhyana Master Fwo Yin smiled and asked, &quot;If the eight winds can't move you,
how come you've been blown clear across the river by a couple of farts?&quot; Su
Dong Pwo's temper vanished in a second, and he had no more farts to let out. He
went back very calmly. He had been blown over by just one wind, not to speak of
all eight winds. So that's how the two lines <em>&quot;The Song of Enlightenment
by Great Master Yung Jya; Is unlike the work of Su Dung-pwo of Mount Omei&quot;
</em> came about. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>This empty
body, an illusory transformation; suddenly there is awakening. </em> When he
read to the line, &quot;This empty body, an illusory transformation, is just the
Dharma body,&quot; he had some understanding, delved in a bit deeper, and had an
awakening. <em>Beyond expression, the Real Mark of True Suchness. </em> There's
nothing to be said about the essence of the Real Mark of True Suchness.
</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>The mouth
wants to speak, but words are lost. <br>
The mind wants to manipulate conditions, but thoughts are gone.
</em></font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>The mouth
wants to speak: </em> The mouth wants to talk, but there's nothing to say. Words
are lost: All language and literature are lost. <em>The mind wants to manipulate
conditions: </em> The mind wants to think, but it cannot produce any thoughts.
<em>Thoughts are gone: </em> There isn't anything to think about. The Real Mark
of True Suchness is just this way. </font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>Try to
explain, whom does &quot;Have you not seen...&quot; address? </em> Dhyana Master
Hwan Ywan said to him, &quot;Try to tell me whom is the question, 'Have you not
seen...?' addressing? Whom does it refer to?&quot; <em>You fall into a pit, die,
and live once again. </em> You've already fallen into a pit, and are such a dull
idiot. It's really meaningless. You ought to die and come back to life again.
What's the point of dragging this corpse around, showing it off everywhere?
</font></p>
<p><font size="2" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif"><em>Opening
Mahesvara's eyes and revealing Natha's face. </em> You've opened the eyes of
Lord' Mahesvara, the Lord of the Great Brahma Heaven, and you bear the demeanor
of Natha. Natha is said to have three faces. Actually, he has more than three
faces. He displays an awesome appearance in order to subdue the heavenly demons
and externalists. His weird, never-seen-before appearance includes three heads,
six arms, seven hands and eight feet. <em>Take refuge with Prajna Paramita.
</em> One should take refuge with wisdom. All people should study wisdom. If one
truly has wisdom, one can arrive at the other shore. Paramita means
&quot;reaching the other shore.&quot; Prajna Paramita is &quot;wisdom which
reaches the other shore.&quot; If you have wisdom, you can reach the other
shore. If you don't have wisdom, you're stuck on this shore, and can't cross the
river. </font></p>
Pgina 7
ChuzhuoWencai.txt
</blockquote>
<p>&nbsp;</p>
<p>&nbsp;</p>

<!-- Mirrored from terebess.hu/zen/mesterek/ChuzhuoWencai.html by HTTrack


Website Copier/3.x [XR&CO'2014], Sun, 09 Jul 2017 23:24:43 GMT -->
</html>

Pgina 8