Report Review of the Arts in Canberra

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Prepared by: Peter Loxton and Tim othy Loxton, Peter Loxton & Associates Pty Ltd Greenwich, Sydney. June 2010!

Contents
1. BACKGROUND ...................................................................................................5 2. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY......................................................................................6 3. CONTEXT...........................................................................................................13
3.1 Canberra: Brief History, Location and Population .................................................... 13 3.2 ACT Government - Territory and Local Responsibilities .......................................... 13

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4. CURRENT ARTS LANDSCAPE ........................................................................14
4.1 Arts Activities............................................................................................................ 14 4.2 Arts Organisations.................................................................................................... 16 4.3 Arts Facilities............................................................................................................ 17 4.4 Funding .................................................................................................................... 19

5. CONSULTATIONS SUMMARY .........................................................................20 6. ISSUES, POLICY DIRECTIONS AND DELIVERY ............................................25
6.1 Government ............................................................................................................. 25 6.1.1 Arts, Culture and Heritage – What Role for Government?................................ 25 6.1.2 Australian Government, Other Jurisdictions and Policy Alignment ................... 28 6.1.3 Chief Minister, Minister for the Arts and Heritage ............................................. 31 6.1.4 Chief Minister’s Department (CMD), Other ACT Agencies and Whole-of-Government......................................................................................... 33 6.2 ACT Government Arts Policy Review ...................................................................... 36 6.3 artsACT .................................................................................................................... 43 6.4 Major ACT Arts Bodies............................................................................................. 47 6.4.1 Cultural Council (CC) ........................................................................................ 47 6.4.2 Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC) ................................................................ 49 6.4.3 Heritage and Proposed Historic Properties Trust (HPT) .................................. 54 6.5 Arts Organisations.................................................................................................... 57

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6.6 Professional Artists .................................................................................................. 63 6.6.1 Established Artists............................................................................................. 67 6.6.2 Emerging Artists ................................................................................................ 69 6.6.3 Artists in Residence .......................................................................................... 73 6.7 Community Participation in the Arts ......................................................................... 76 6.8 Public Art ................................................................................................................. 80 6.9 Venues and Facilities .............................................................................................. 83 6.10 Cultural Facilities Planning..................................................................................... 88 6.11 Governance............................................................................................................ 91 6.12 Data and Research ................................................................................................ 94 6.13 Communication, Marketing and Promotion ............................................................ 96 6.14 Universities............................................................................................................. 98 6.14.1 Australian National University (ANU) .............................................................. 98 6.14.2 University of Canberra (UC) .......................................................................... 101 6.15 National Cultural Institutions ............................................................................... 103 6.16 Diversity .............................................................................................................. 105 6.17 Indigenous Arts .................................................................................................... 108 6.18 Accessibility.......................................................................................................... 113 6.19 Arts and Education .............................................................................................. 115 6.20 Arts, Health and Social Development .................................................................. 118 6.21 Arts Innovation and Economic Development ...................................................... 120 6.22 Arts and Environmental Sustainability.................................................................. 123 6.23 The Public ........................................................................................................... 125

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7. FUNDING .........................................................................................................127
7.1 Arts Budget Reflecting Policy Priorities.................................................................. 128 7.2 Funding Categories, Processes and Decisions ..................................................... 134 7.3 Future Funding Priorities........................................................................................ 140 7.4 Funding Sources – Partnerships, Sponsorship and Philanthropy.......................... 147

8. RECOMMENDATIONS ....................................................................................151 9. APPENDICIES .................................................................................................170
9.1 Public Submissions Summary................................................................................ 170 9.2 Public Consultations Summary .............................................................................. 175 9.3 Online Public Survey Summary ............................................................................. 181

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1. Background The Chief Minister recognised the need to review the overall operations, interactions, issues and needs of the arts in the ACT. As a result, the ACT Government issued a request for proposal and quotation for a consultancy to review the previous arts policy, consult widely, and report back to the ACT Government with feedback, analysis and recommendations on a proposed ‘way forward’. Peter Loxton and Associates were appointed as the consultants to conduct an independent review of the arts in Canberra. The review was created in part in response to the need for a new ACT Government action statement for the arts after the current statement expired at the end of 2008. This report will be used to assist the ACT Government to develop new approaches to supporting a dynamic, accessible and sustainable arts sector for the ACT community. The review was both practical and strategic in nature and included consideration of the effectiveness of public sector support for the arts in the ACT. The creation of a new arts policy and strategy has been viewed as being of great importance to keep up with changing needs and priorities in the arts sector in Canberra. In order to achieve this, the ACT Government has recognised the need to adopt best-practice arts policies based on feedback and recommendations from the ACT and other jurisdictions. Peter Loxton and Associates have worked with the ACT Chief Minister’s Department to develop the methodology for this review of the arts in Canberra. This report on the review has been built on a combination of research into the ACT arts community’s views of the effectiveness of the current policy, as well as best practice arts policy from around Australia. The review of the arts in Canberra involved a thorough consultation process which engaged key stakeholders. Peter Loxton and Associates have worked with stakeholders to understand their experiences and views about priorities, opportunities, issues, program delivery, and funding methods. Particular emphasis during the consultations was given to receiving honest, informed and quite often confidential feedback from many stakeholders with regard to areas such as strengths, opportunities and challenges in the ACT arts sector; current advisory mechanisms; key arts priorities; issues in relation to policy; strategic directions; and strengths and weaknesses of funding methods. A number of different consultation mechanisms have provided an important foundation of information for the report, including interviews, field visits, focus and discussion groups, online and hardcopy surveys, open forums and include face-to-face, phone, email, post and media. The review has included different modes and approaches to consultations to ensure the widest spread of views across the arts sector and the broader community. It is expected that the findings and recommendations from this review will be used to inform the ACT Government in an ongoing commitment to and investment in the arts in Canberra through new policies, strategies and actions to strengthen the arts.

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2. Executive Summary Background The ACT Government recognised that the arts in the ACT faced a range of challenges that needed to be addressed through a wide-ranging, practical and strategic review. The scope of the review required consideration of the effectiveness of policies, strategies and public sector support for the arts in the ACT. A major motivation for commissioning a review at this time was the need for a new ACT Government policy for the arts after the policy statement, Arts Canberra – Action Statement for the Arts, expired at the end of 2008. The creation of a new arts policy and strategy was recognised as being of great importance to identify changing needs and opportunities in the arts sector in Canberra and to guide future funding and other Government priorities. A request for proposal and quotation was issued for a consultancy to review arts policy, consult widely, and report back to the ACT Government with feedback, analysis and recommendations on proposed future policies, strategies and actions. In September 2009, the Chief Minister and Minister for the Arts and Heritage, Mr Jon Stanhope, announced the appointment of Peter Loxton and Associates Pty Ltd to undertake a detailed independent review of the arts in Canberra over approximately nine months, including the overall operations, interactions, issues and future needs of the arts in the ACT. The review involved research into best-practice arts policy from around Australia and extensive consultations with the ACT arts community, the public and other jurisdictions. Consultations included three public forums, online and hardcopy public surveys, artist and other arts workshops, face-to-face interviews and email and written submissions. These consultations provided an important foundation of information, ideas and feedback for this report. Issues and Learnings There were a number of strong impressions, most of which became evident quite early, and were reinforced over the duration of the review through consultations and inputs from hundreds of stakeholders in the ACT. What was learned from the ACT arts sector and public formed the foundations of many of the issues to be addressed through this review. These included: • • • • • • • There is a high level of interest in and passion for the arts in the ACT There is very active community involvement in the arts It is difficult to survive as a full-time professional artist in Canberra, especially as a young or emerging artist Some areas of the arts appear to be better funded than others Arts facilities and venues are in high demand and are valued The balance and blending of funding needs to change, with more for professional artists, especially emerging artists Communication and information about the arts needs attention

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There is no clear delineation between the needs of professional and community arts There is rigour in Government processes, but they are also often complex, slow, inflexible and unresponsive to the needs of the arts There should be a greater awareness and connection of the arts to education, community, social, and economic development Arts budgets and resources are too tight, and there is an urgent need for new priorities and change

Future Policy Directions The ACT Government was widely seen through the review as supportive of the arts. However, it became clear that because of significant strains on current funding, there will have to be changes to the future role of Government in relation to the arts. These changes should be consistent with new policy priorities, which should be aligned as closely as possible with principles, developments and priorities in the Australian Government and other jurisdictions. It is suggested that the Government’s future key goals for the arts should be: 1. Increasing participation in the arts 2. Attracting and developing artists and quality art These goals, combined with a range of more specific policies, should guide Government funding and resourcing priorities. It is proposed that Government funding for the arts should in future be more targeted to ensure there is real impact in priority areas, rather than trying to support all areas of the arts, which would inevitably fall short of expectations. It will be essential for transparency and effectiveness that Government ensures future funding decisions are based only on new goals and priorities. This will require some difficult decisions, including reviewing all existing funding and setting clear timeframes for new funding priorities and arrangements, as well as for new performance expectations. There will also need to be significant changes to streamline and improve Government communication and processes so that decisions guided by new policies are made and advised as promptly as possible. Summary of Key Issues, Analysis and Recommendations Government There is genuine reason for concern about the heavy and apparently growing dependence from the arts sector on ACT Government funding. The level of dependence on the ACT Government seems to be higher in the ACT than in other jurisdictions, and the level of Australian Government funding is lower. This will require strategies to maximise the focus and impact of Government funding around new, clear policy priorities and to minimise the costs of administration and duplication. There will also be a requirement for concerted action to increase the diversity of revenue sources for the arts, including through new partnerships and greater involvement of business through sponsorship, as well as by encouraging philanthropy.

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The Chief Minister and ACT Government will have an important leadership role to play in driving these changes. The most obvious role for Government is that of direct funding for the arts. However, there is also a leadership role for Government to play in developing a vision for the arts in Canberra. It should also promote the value of the arts for individuals and communities, as well as significant contributions to other areas of Government priority including education, health, social and economic development. There is also an important facilitation role for ACT Government to help the arts community to connect with different areas and levels of Government, business, the public, and with other artists and arts organisations nationally and internationally. There are excellent opportunities for the arts to create stronger relationships and partnerships with other areas of Government and business in a range of areas including tourism, events and festivals. It is reasonable for Government to expect that one aspect of its return on investment in the arts is the economic benefits that the arts deliver to the ACT economy. artsACT Management and staff at artsACT demonstrate a strong commitment to the arts and to providing professional public administration. However, this review found that there was criticism that artsACT appeared to be overly process-driven, bureaucratic and unresponsive. Staff are currently required to provide a range of services and administrative support that are no longer appropriate. With new funding and grants administration arrangements, artsACT would be able to streamline all processes. With clear Government goals and policies, artsACT would be given the opportunity to refocus its efforts on policy advice, data collection, research and communication. It should be well placed to become more proactive, better connected and informed and be the focal point for responsive, timely, informed policy advice to the Chief Minister and to agencies across Government. artsACT would also need to develop more effective, open and trusted communication with the arts sector, and to provide more active specialist leadership in the coordination and promotion of the arts, including working with Government agencies. An upgraded website would be required to enable one aspect of improved communication, engagement and feedback. artsACT should be encouraged to broaden its policy scope to build capacity, knowledge and expertise in the areas of economic development, innovation and creative industries.

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Cultural Council Currently the majority of the Cultural Council’s time is spent on funding matters. It is suggested that Cultural Council should relinquish current funding responsibilities and refocus its attention on becoming an effective, responsive policy advisory body. The Cultural Council should develop into a Ministerial Arts Advisory Council which would principally provide advice directly to the Minister for the Arts on both specific issues raised by the Minister as well as their own ideas and initiatives, based on a closer connection with the ACT arts sector. At present the Council’s funding responsibilities inhibit this connection to some extent because of concerns about probity. Cultural Facilities Corporation The Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC) demonstrates effective administration with high standards of corporate governance but its range of responsibilities is unusual and based on decisions taken at an earlier time, rather than on natural synergies. While the CFC was seen to add real value in some areas, such as the management of historic properties, in other areas it did not appear to add significant benefit when taking account of the administrative costs. It is proposed that the CFC would relinquish its responsibilities other than for historic properties. The CFC would build on its strengths and develop into a new Historic Places Trust (HPT) to take responsibility for all heritage properties and assets, as well as historic and significant places. The new HPT would take on a more focused, active and entrepreneurial role modeled on the NSW Historic Houses Trust. The Canberra Theatre Centre appears to perform well in its own right, and it is suggested that this would operate most effectively and efficiently in future as a separate, fully ACT Government owned entity operating under a Board reporting to the Chief Minister. The Canberra Museum and Gallery (CMAG) is an important facility but it seems to struggle with its identity and with attracting audiences. As soon as possible, artsACT should be responsible for significant changes to the structure and operations of CMAG. The Museum and Gallery aspects of CMAG would separate with the opportunity to have different management and partnership arrangements for each function. There would be a new Canberra Gallery in the current location of the CMAG, which would focus on the full range of ACT visual arts, including an ACT Indigenous component. There would also be innovative elements and partnerships to provide a new and interesting museum presence for Canberra. Arts Organisations Government should in future only fund organisations that can demonstrate strategies for the delivery of outcomes that support Government policy priorities of increased participation and quality art.

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There is currently an unsustainable number of Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) and a lack of clarity about what constitutes a KAO. Government should in future fund a smaller number of organisations or clusters of organisations and should also discontinue use of the term ‘Key Arts Organisations’. Collaboration and partnerships between arts organisations and art forms will need to be strongly encouraged, as this will be the future focus of all funding for arts organisations. Government’s aim would be for about eight ‘arts hubs’ to emerge based on art form and/or precinct, and these would be funded for a maximum of three years. There would also be an emphasis on identifying and supporting ‘centres of excellence’, with a focus on art forms and organisations where the ACT has competitive advantage on the national and global stage. Professional Artists Professional artists are clearly central to a healthy, dynamic arts sector and a new ACT Government arts policy must fully recognise their vital contribution. It has been observed around Australia that funding for individual artists is reducing in proportion to funding for major institutions and arts organisations, and this is certainly the case in the ACT. There is a need to focus on providing greater support for more practising professional artists, particularly young and emerging artists, as well as for new and emerging art forms. This support should include mentoring and professional development, access to appropriate arts facilities, facilitation of artist forums and increased funding. There is strong evidence to support a Government funded Artists in Residence program, which will promote quality art, education and Canberra as an arts hub. Government should also create an Emerging Artists category in the Arts Fund and ensure that grants application and commissioning processes for artists are as simple, quick and flexible as possible while properly meeting essential probity and risk management requirements. Community Participation in the Arts The ACT Government’s primary goal in support for community arts should be to increase participation in the arts, rather than to achieve artistic quality or excellence. Funding for community arts should generally be allocated at the regional level and the main focus of Government funding for community arts should be the provision of appropriate, multi-purpose, accessible facilities. Public Art The ACT Government has made a significant investment in public art in recent years. This initiative showed vision in recognising that public art could be an integral part of public spaces and has resulted in many outstanding works becoming a part of Canberra’s cultural and physical landscape. However, the initiative has also received a considerable amount of critical public comment and negative media coverage directed mainly at an apparent lack of transparency in the process of buying or commissioning the sculptures and planning for their location.

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A policy framework for public art would assist greatly in setting clear directions and processes. These policies would stem mainly from an ACT Cultural Facilities Plan that would indicate future placement of Public Art in the ACT, and the associated consultation and decision-making processes. artsACT would have a continuing policy role only, including ensuring ongoing curatorial oversight. In future, the new ACT Arts Fund Panel should make recommendations, after seeking appropriate specialist Public Art advice. Art beyond sculpture should be included as part of the scope of Public Art. Despite some criticisms, most of which can be addressed through new policies, there was overwhelming support during the review for the vision behind Public Art, and for the determination that a Public Art program should continue. These views are strongly supported by the reviewers. Facilities and Planning Facilities are a vital element of infrastructure to support the arts in the ACT. A Cultural Facilities Plan is required to create clarity and structure around planning for core cultural facilities, venues, heritage buildings, regional and multiple use facilities, future arts precincts, and any major new developments of cultural facilities for Canberra. The Plan should be developed in an open and collaborative process with input from all key stakeholders. artsACT should retain ownership and control of its non-heritage arts facilities, but responsibility for repairs and maintenance should be transferred or outsourced with a realistic budget from the small, dedicated team to external specialists in this area. Access and rental arrangements need to be reviewed to ensure clarity and consistency, reflecting Government arts goals and priorities. Communication, Marketing and Promotion There was very strong feedback that communication, marketing and promotion of the arts in the ACT are currently fractured and ineffective. A cost-effective, centralised and coordinated communication and information unit, overseen by arts organisations and artsACT, should be established outside Government for artists, arts organisations and the public. Universities The ACT Government should fully acknowledge the vital contribution of the major universities, and particularly the ANU, to the arts and the professional development of artists in the ACT. This should be seen as a basis to further develop trusted relationships, new partnerships and opportunities for closer collaboration, innovation and cost-sharing with both ANU and UC. The ACT Government provides substantial arts funding to the ANU which is one of its largest recipients of funding. There must continue to be clear and agreed performance expectations in terms of benefits to the ACT, including participation goals for community outreach programs and increased access to Llewellyn Hall.

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National Cultural Institutions The National Cultural Institutions (NCIs) play a vital role in the ACT arts environment. artsACT should facilitate establishing and developing strong bilateral and multilateral relationships and partnerships between the NCIs, ACT artists and arts organisations, and ACT Government agencies. Diversity, Indigenous Arts and Accessibility Diversity is a very important issue that needs to become a broader shared responsibility of ACT Government and all arts organisations receiving funding. A condition of future artsACT funding should be a requirement to demonstrate and report on social inclusion and diversity initiatives. The ACT Community Arts Office should be outposted to provide significant local support to community arts, with two positions allocated to Tuggeranong and two to Belconnen Arts Centres, to cover the entire ACT. Current staff should be given the opportunity to take up these new roles, which would set out to increase participation in the arts, including all diversity target groups. There should be an Indigenous specific funding category in the ACT Arts Fund. artsACT should work closely and collaboratively with Indigenous people to ensure that all decisions about an Indigenous category are informed and that implementation is successful. Capacity building initiatives, including assistance with applications and reporting are strongly encouraged. There needs to be clarification of policy on all aspects of access and accessibility. Many of these, such as parking, transport and disability access, should be included in the development of a Cultural Facilities Plan. Funding Peer assessment should be retained for significant funding decisions, as this ensures informed, independent, merit-based decision-making about funding. However, in order to streamline funding decisions, a single ACT Arts Fund Panel with a strong mix of skills should be established to operate across art forms and the arts sector, with access to specialist art form advice as required. This change would streamline decision-making processes, enabling funding announcements months earlier. This would be combined with direct decision-making for lower level, responsive decisions such as Quick Response Grants, which would be decided by artsACT.

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3. Context 3.1 Canberra: Brief History, Location and Population Canberra is a thriving modern city of 353,600 people. In 1908 the Commonwealth Parliament chose the site for the capital of Australia. In 1911, the Australian Capital Territory was established, at that time called the Federal Capital Territory. The Australian capital was given the name ‘Canberra’ by Lady Denman on 13 March 1913 and the Centenary of Canberra will be celebrated throughout 2013. 3.2 ACT Government - Territory and Local Responsibilities Until 1989 the ACT was managed by the Federal Minister for Territories, but the growth of Canberra, particularly from the 1960s, led to the Australian Government decision that the ACT should be granted self-government. In 1988, the Australian Parliament passed four Bills setting up self-government for the Australian Capital Territory. The Legislative Assembly is made up of 17 Members of the Legislative Assembly (MLAs) . The current Chief Minister of the ACT is Mr Jon Stanhope MLA. Chief Minister Stanhope is also the Minister for Territory and Municipal Services, Minister for Transport, Minister for Business and Economic Development, Minister for Land and Property Services, Minister for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Affairs and Minster for the Arts and Heritage. Administrative Arrangements established the Chief Minister’s Department, the Department of Treasury, Department of Territory and Municipal Services, Department of Justice and Community Safety, Department of Health, Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services, Department of Land and Property Services and Department of the Environment, Climate Change, Energy and Water. The ACT Government effectively has a combination of Territory, and the equivalent of local government and City Council responsibilities. As a result of also being the location of the national capital, the ACT Government has interests and involvement at national, Territory-wide and community levels.

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4. CURRENT ARTS LANDSCAPE 4.1 Arts Activities artsACT The ACT Government arts administration, artsACT, is part of Chief Minister’s Department (CMD) and currently employs 20 staff. The roles for artsACT are to: • • • • • • • • • • Develop and implement Government policies on the arts Manage and deliver the ACT Arts Fund Oversee Government investment in the ACT’s 20 Key Arts Organisations, including the Canberra Glassworks and Belconnen Arts Centre Support the Community Outreach Program, which is delivered by the Australian National University (ANU) Support the ACT Cultural Council - the ACT Government’s advisory body on the arts – and its Peer Assessment Panels and working groups Oversee the ACT Government’s arts facilities including repairs and maintenance Manage and deliver the public art program and support the Public Art Panel Advocate for the ACT arts sector through forums such as the Cultural Ministers Council and the Australia Council for the Arts Administer the Cultural Facilities Corporation Act 1997 Deliver a wide range of other arts initiatives and projects such as the Regional Arts Fund and the Artists in Schools initiative

The Arts in the ACT The arts are an integral part of life for the majority of Canberrans, with the ACT recording the highest attendance at cultural venues and events in Australia. The recently released 2005-06 Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) Survey of Attendance at Cultural Venues and Events found that Canberra is the most cultured city in the nation, with 90% of Canberra residents aged 15 years and over visiting at least one cultural venue or event. This was the highest rate of all of the States and Territories and was 5% higher than the average Australian attendance rate (85%). It should be noted that the following figures are sourced from the ABS and are aggregated across cultural activities of the ACT which include the National Cultural Institutions (NCIs) and those of the ACT Government. ACT Strengths in the Arts • ACT attendance and participation to at least one cultural venue or event in the 12 months prior to survey was above the national average • Attendance at art galleries and museums was strong and attendance at performing arts activities in the ACT was also greater than the national average • Of people aged 15 to 34 years in the ACT, 93% attended a cultural venue or event in the 12 months prior to interview • Most participants who attended cultural venues and events attended more than once in the 12 months prior to interview. Of particular note is that 81.5% of those attending art galleries attended more than once.

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• • • •

Children in the ACT had greater participation in art and craft activities than the national average Children’s attendance at cultural venues and events was higher in the ACT than nationally, with the most significant difference being attendance at museums or art galleries Indigenous participation in cultural events and attendance at Indigenous festivals/carnivals involving art, craft, music or dance events in the ACT is higher than the national average People in the ACT with a disability have lower attendance rates at most cultural venues and events than the general ACT population. However, attendance rates in the ACT were still higher than for Australia as a whole. Attendance rates for people aged 60 years and older in the ACT were higher than the national average ACT household’s spending on ‘cultural items’ is higher than the national average 10,784 people or 4.1% of all employed persons in the ACT considered their main job to be in a cultural industry occupation and a greater proportion of the ACT population works in cultural activities compared with the national average The number of volunteers involved in cultural activities is above the national average At June 2008, there were 23 museums and art galleries operating in the ACT employing 1,082 people and 869 volunteers At June 2007, there were 21 performing arts businesses in the ACT which generated $5.5 million of income Attendance at cinemas in the ACT is higher than national average

Specific Art Forms noted in the artsACT ACT Arts Fund Information Booklet 2010 (and 2011) include: • • • • • • • • • Dance Theatre Literature Music Film Visual Arts Digital Arts Multi Arts / Cross Arts New Media

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4.2 Arts Organisations There is currently ACT Government funding for the following Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) for the summary of functions outlined: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • ACT Writers Centre Inc - Programs and services for writers ArtSound FM 92.7 - Community radio broadcasting and recording facility Ausdance (ACT) Inc - Dance services and programs Belconnen Arts Centre Inc - Community arts programs Canberra Contemporary Art Space Inc - Contemporary visual art exhibitions, programs and services Canberra Glassworks Inc - Glass programs, equipment and exhibitions Canberra Potters Society - Ceramic programs, studios, equipment and gallery Canberra Symphony Orchestra Inc - Symphonic concerts and services Canberra Youth Music Inc - Youth orchestral and voice programs and concerts Canberra Youth Theatre Inc - Theatre workshops and productions with young people Craft ACT: Craft and Design Centre Inc - Contemporary craft programs, exhibitions and services Gorman House Arts Centre Inc - Manage Gorman House Art Centre, manage Ainslie Arts Centre, host of the ACT Community Arts Office Jigsaw Theatre Company Inc - Theatre for young people Megalo Access Arts Inc - Printmaking access facilities, exhibitions Music For Everyone - Music programs for all ages and abilities PhotoAccess Inc - Photographic and digital access facility, exhibitions QL2 Centre for Youth Dance Inc - Youth dance programs and productions The Stagemaster Inc - Manager of The Street Theatre programs and productions Tuggeranong Community Arts Association - Community art programs, manages Tuggeranong Arts Centre Warehouse Circus - Youth physical theatre/circus programs and productions

In addition to KAOs, the Australian National University (ANU) receives $1.4m directly through the Community Outreach Program. artsACT also provides $0.2m directly to ACT music organisations to use Llewellyn Hall.

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4.3 Arts Facilities artsACT on behalf of the ACT Government currently oversees the operations of 12 facilities which are wholly dedicated to arts activity. These facilities are supported by the ACT Government to: nurture and stimulate excellence and innovation; provide opportunities to participate in the arts; and nurture cultural development. Some of these facilities were purpose built to meet identified community and arts sector needs for arts and cultural services. Other facilities were surplus ACT Government assets made available for use by arts groups which had expressed a need for space. Some of these once-surplus-assets have been significantly refurbished for arts and cultural purposes and some are nominated or listed on the ACT Heritage Register. The 12 artsACT arts facilities are: Facility Ainslie Arts Centre Location Ainslie registered) Belconnen Arts Centre Belconnen Canberra Contemporary Art Manuka Space Canberra Glassworks, Kingston including The Chapel registered) Gorman House Arts Centre Braddon registered) Manuka Arts Centre Manuka registered) Nissen Hut Store Kambah Strahnairn Arts Centre Holt The Street Theatre City West Theatre 3 City West Tuggeranong Arts Centre Greenway Watson Arts Centre Watson Focus (heritage Music Community Visual (heritage Visual and residence (heritage Multi tenanted and multi art form (heritage Visual and Radio Theatre Storage Visual Theatre Acton Community Visual – Ceramics

artsACT currently receives base funding of $329,000 for repairs and maintenance on these arts facilities. In 2010-11, $268,000 was allocated for capital upgrades of facilities. For the past number of years, an additional $400,000 has been allocated by Treasury from a central provision. This will not be provided in 2010-11. Organisations that manage artsACT facilities operate under licence and do not pay rent. They are, however, responsible for outgoings such as utilities and security. The ACT Government, through the Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC), manages the Canberra Museum and Gallery and the Canberra Theatre Centre (The Canberra Theatre, The Playhouse and The Courtyard Studio), and historic properties (Calthorpes House, Mugga Mugga and Lanyon Homestead). The CFC rents its office space and the space for Canberra Museum and Gallery from ACT Property Group within the Department of Land and Property Services for a total of $1,532,000 per annum.

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There has been development of performing arts centres in Government schools and colleges. These centres have the potential to enhance accessibility by artists and the community to versatile and well-designed venues. Schools with these venues include: Erindale College; Lyneham High School; and Calwell High. It will be important in the future to ensure coordination across Government so there is maximum use of these facilities by artists and the community. In addition there are a number of arts organisations which rent facilities under licence from the ACT Property Group. These include:
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Canberra Spinners and Weavers, Ainslie Canberra Lapidary Club, Lyons Canberra Dance Development, Spence Folk Dance Canberra, Hackett Craft ACT, Civic ACT Community Arts Office, Civic M16 Art Space, Griffith

The Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services manages a number of community facilities which also accommodate arts organisations including:
• • • • •

The Chifley Hub (former Melrose Primary School) – Warehouse Circus Cook Hub (former Cook Primary School) Canberra Youth Ballet Canberra Quilters Phoenix Players, Free Rain Theatre Company and Supa Productions

These organisations also pay a community rent and are under licence with DHCS.

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4.4 Funding Major Elements of Funding for the Arts in the ACT
RECURRENT 2009/10 ! $’000 11,607 Chief Ministers Department - artsACT Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC) 7,435 TOTAL 19,042 2010/11 $’000 11,609 7,440 19,049

In 2009/2010 the total budget for artsACT was $11,607,000. This included $5,043,024 allocated to the ACT Arts Fund. $3,808,680 of this figure, or more than three quarters of the Arts Fund, was budgeted for KAOs.
CAPITAL 2009/10 ! $’000 1,821 Chief Ministers Department - artsACT Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC) 1,962 TOTAL 3,783 2010/11 $’000 1,525 459 1,984

ACT Arts Fund Funding and Grants Historical Total amount applied for since 1994: $119,610,079 Total amount funded since 1994: $65,089,888 Number of grants provided since 1994 (all categories): 2,576 In 2009 artsACT received 21 funding applications from Key Arts Organisations (KAOs). The amount sought through these applications was $4,003,924, and 21 applications were approved with a total of $3,757,500. There were 23 applications received and funded in the previous year. The amount approved was $3,470,500. 2010 ACT Arts Fund Based on the funding available to support the Project and Community Arts Funding categories through the 2010 ACT Arts Fund, the unmet merit (applications advised for funding that fell outside the allocated budget) was $711,000. This is in comparison to a shortfall of $529,800 in the 2009 ACT Arts Fund. The 2010 ACT Arts Fund was able to fund approximately one quarter of all applications (to the Project and Community Arts Funding categories). In previous years, the Fund has been able to support approximately one third of applications. !

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5. Consultations Summary There was a clear expectation from the outset in this review from both the ACT Government and ourselves that, especially taking account of the very broad scope of the review, there would need to be extensive consultations with stakeholders. The learnings from these consultations informed analysis and recommendations which have been included in all aspects of this report. Many of the consultations were with artists and organisations either receiving or seeking funding from the ACT Government. It was clear from the outset that it would be important to offer confidentiality about sources of information to gain confidence from those being consulted so they would be as open and honest as possible about their experiences and views. Assurances about confidentiality were often sought, and commitment was given. This has been respected and maintained in this report. There are a number of references to feedback from consultations without being specific about individuals or organisations. These references are based on extensive notes taken throughout the review and on confidential inputs received. Comments, analysis, and conclusions throughout this report are based on a combination of extensive consultations, research and professional judgement. There is no intention to provide any further specifics about sources. There were a variety of consultation mechanisms in the review process, including: facilitated three public forums at Civic, Tuggeranong and Belconnen; received and considered online and written public surveys and email inputs; facilitated workshops with established and emerging artists, major ACT arts organisations, artsACT staff, and Aboriginal artists; held face-to-face interviews with senior representatives of Key Arts Organisations, National Cultural Institutions, Universities, ACT and Australian Government, business and others; as well as receiving and considering hard copy and email submissions from a wide variety of arts stakeholders; and discussions. Consultations The following is a summary of meetings, consultations, workshops, interviews and inputs to the review: ACT Government: • • • • • Chief Minister and Senior Advisor Chief Minister’s Department (CMD), including meetings with Chief Executive and senior executives Review of the Arts in Canberra Steering Committee artsACT staff workshop, and several separate background meetings with Director, managers and various staff on historic and current funding arrangements, venue management, public art, etc Visited several ACT Government arts facilities ACT Government Departments including: Chief Minister’s Department (CMD); Department of Land and Property Services (LAPS); Department of Territory and Municipal Services (TAMS); ACT Health; Department of Education and Training (DET); Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services (DHCS); ACT Planning and Land Authority (ACTPLA). Received extensive written background material from artsACT

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Major ACT Arts Bodies: • • ACT Cultural Council (one meeting, plus facilitated one full workshop); also separate meetings with the Chair and Deputy Chair Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC) Board , (including workshop and written submission) separate meetings with the Chair and Chief Executive. Also meetings and facility/display inspections with Directors of Canberra Theatre Centre, Canberra Museum and Gallery, and meeting at Lanyon Homestead on ACT Historic Places

Key Arts Organisations (KAOs): • Individual, predominantly face-to-face meetings with managers/directors and several Chairs of all of the 22 Key Arts Organisations (KAOs). Most were met in person with some follow-up meetings with, for example, chairs who were unavailable Received written responses directly from several KAOs

Other Arts Organisations:

Met or spoke in telephone conference calls with, and received written responses directly and through artsACT from a number of ACT, national and other specific interest arts organisations receiving various forms of funding support from ACT Government and/or those interested in the arts in the ACT

Artists: • • • Facilitated Emerging Artists Workshop Facilitated Established Artists Workshop Received follow-up input from artists who attended workshops and others either unable to attend or not involved in the workshops

Indigenous:
• • •

Extended phone consultation with Indigenous arts representative Facilitated Indigenous Artists Workshop in Canberra Further input invited and received

Universities: • • ANU: Meetings with Pro Vice-Chancellor (Research and Graduate Studies); Head of ANU School of Music and Head of ANU School of Art University of Canberra: Meetings with Pro Vice-Chancellor Development; Dean Faculty of Arts and Design; and COO. Input also invited from VC ACU

Australian and other Governments: • • CEO and Executive of Australia Council for the Arts (AusCo) National Cultural Institutions (NCIs): Acting Director National Portrait Gallery; Curators of Drama and Dance at National Library of Australia; Assistant Director at the National Gallery of Australia, plus a written submission; CEO at the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies

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• •

Other State Governments: meetings with Executive Director Arts NSW and extended telephone conference calls with Directors/Executive Directors from other jurisdictions including Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania and Victoria Meeting with Secretary Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts

Public and Media: • • • • • Facilitated Public Forums at Civic, Tuggeranong and Belconnen Received written public input through online and hard copy surveys Received emails and other written input mostly directly, and also through artsACT from the public, artists and arts organisations Radio extended interviews on ABC 666 (two), 2XX and ArtSound, plus news for ABC TV and Radio, and commercial AM and FM stations Broadly monitored media coverage of the review of the arts in Canberra as well as of emerging arts issues

Business/Government/Sponsorship: • • Meetings with Chairman ActewAGL, Managing Director of ACTEW Corporation; and CEO AGL; and Director ACT Australia Business Arts Foundation (AbaF)

Expert advice: • • Several discussions were held with people with a variety of relevant knowledge and expertise Peter Watts, founding Director of NSW Historic Houses Trust. Director for 29 years, and since then, independent reviewer of Museums and Galleries NSW, and Kate Clark, Director of NSW Historic Houses Trust

Venue and Facility Visits: • • • • • • • • • Visits to all artsACT-owned arts facilities and discussions with some of the managers and artists working at these facilities Visits to several KAO facilities Visits to Tuggeranong and Belconnen Arts Centres Visits to other arts facilities supported by artsACT and ACT Government eg M16 Visits to CFC facilities Tour of the Arboretum with John Mackay, Chair of the Board of Governors Attended dance and drama performances at The Street Theatre and The Playhouse Visited NCIs including: National Portrait Gallery, National Library of Australia; National Gallery of Australia; and the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Visited Llewellyn Hall at ANU

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Letters, emails and documents: • Hundreds of letters, emails, hard and soft copy documents received throughout the review from public, artists, arts organisations and Government agencies.

Public Consultations and Brief Summary of Online Learnings Public and community input into this review through a variety of consultation approaches was an essential component in providing awareness and analysis of ideas, concerns, opportunities, issues, options, and ultimately recommendations. The public survey asked for community responses about priorities, opportunities, issues, program delivery, and funding methods and included the following areas:
• • • • • • • •

Participation in the arts in the ACT Arts events attended and how often Most valued arts organisations Whether ACT Government spending on the arts is effectively allocated Changes to the way the arts operate and are funded Whether the ACT Government spends too much in some arts areas and not enough in others Arts venues used in the ACT and whether they could be more effectively used The importance of the arts to creative industries, tourism and the ACT economy

While a wide variety of views were expressed by the public, some consistent themes emerged. A brief summary of the online community consultation provides a snapshot of public interest in the arts in the ACT which is not inconsistent. There were more than 200 responses to the online survey from all age groups and interests in the arts. The majority participated in the arts, either directly or as audiences and all art forms were valued. Most participated in music events, visual arts, and performance, but other art forms were well represented in the survey, including textile, design and print-making, pottery, photography, film, writing and craft. A significant proportion were from Canberra’s inner north and south, but all other areas of Canberra were represented. Although young people under 20 years of age were not well represented, many parents responding to the survey provided information and priorities for their children. The survey clearly demonstrated that the arts are highly valued in Canberra, and that the public believes that Government has an important leadership role to support the arts through funding, facilities, promotion and positive partnerships. Some people felt that not enough was being spent in a number of areas of the arts. There was a wide range of very divergent views about what was most important in the arts flowing to differing views about priorities for Government arts expenditure. In recognition of the variety of demands on Government, the public felt that the ACT Government needed transparent policies and processes demonstrating that funding was allocated according to clear policy priorities, as well as sector needs and opportunities.

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The public want the arts to be accessible, and public art is appreciated. Availability of and access to appropriate venues and facilities for community and professional arts is recognised as very important. Finally, the survey showed that the majority of the public support emerging and innovative arts, professional and amateur arts, and strongly value arts events and festivals. Please find attached full summaries of public consultations as Appendices: Appendix 1: Public Submissions Summary Appendix 2: Public Consultations Summary Appendix 3: Online Public Survey Summary

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6. Issues, Policy Directions and Delivery 6.1 Government Both the Australian Government and the ACT Government have important roles in setting policy direction for the arts in the Canberra. This section covers both of these areas of Government. artsACT is the major focus of policy advice and service delivery for the arts in the ACT Government. Taking account of its importance in this review it is covered separately in section 6.3. 6.1.1 Arts, Culture and Heritage - What Role for Government? 6.1.1 Issues and Analysis 1. There has been a long history of recognition by Government of the importance of the arts in the ACT and the need for Government support. However, there have also been high profile issues, such as public art, which have proven to be politically divisive. It would be unfortunate if such issues had a negative impact on overall bipartisan recognition of the importance of ACT Government funding and other forms of support for the arts. It is important through the policy review process to have a fresh look at the role of Government. 2. While the ACT Government is widely seen as quite supportive of the arts, it became clear through the review that because of significant strains on current funding and other forms of support, there will have to be a range of changes in the future role of Government in relation to the arts sector. These changes should be consistent with new policy priorities. 3. The most obvious role for Government is that of direct funding for the arts, which is dealt with in some detail in Section 7 of this report. However, there is also a leadership role for Government to play in developing a vision, policy and strategy for the arts in Canberra. There is an important facilitation role to help the arts community to connect with different areas and levels of Government, business, the public, and with other artists and arts organisations nationally and internationally. The ACT Government also has a vital role to recognise and promote the importance of the arts and culture in education, health, social well-being, economic development and the environment. 4. In the ACT, there appears to be a higher level of expectation of, and dependence on, Government funding and resources for the arts than in other jurisdictions. This can impact, at least to some extent, on the entrepreneurial outlook of artists and arts organisations and can potentially even affect the scope of artistic vision of what might be possible to be achieved in Canberra.

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There often seems to be a sense that if Government does not provide funding then artistic activity cannot happen. This is not only the case in the professional arts, but also to some extent in community based arts activities. This may reflect in part the nature of Canberra as the National Capital, but it also reflects the perceived relative lack of funding support from other sources including sponsorship and philanthropy. There seem to be differing views about why this is the case and the potential for additional funding support from business. 5. While it is recognised that the level of funding able to be sourced from business sponsorship and philanthropy may be more limited in Canberra than for many other major Australian cities, there appears to be a real opportunity to attract more sponsorship, and possibly more from philanthropy, for the arts in Canberra. This would require a variety of changes including a change in mindset in the sector about the role of Government as virtually the sole funding source for the arts. 6. There is potential for the ACT Government to provide a leadership role to encourage business interest in sponsorship of the arts directly and through relevant business organisations including the ACT and Region Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the Canberra Business Council. There is now a parttime Australia Business Arts Foundation (AbaF) representative in the ACT who is working to raise awareness with the business community about the benefits of supporting the arts. It is important for business to see that sponsoring the arts can have marketing benefits similar to those from sponsoring sporting events and activities. 7. There also needs to be a much firmer articulation by Government of the need for Government funded arts organisations to maximise revenue through a variety of means such as ticket sales, merchandising, paid courses and the sale of artistic materials. 8. It will be important for Government to set clear priorities for funding to achieve particular policy goals and priorities. At present, funding is spread too thinly to have effective impact in key areas. It is proposed that the spread of Government funding for the arts should be reduced and more focussed in order to ensure serious impact rather than trying to support all areas of the arts which inevitably falls short of expectations. This will require some difficult decisions, including reviewing existing funding arrangements and setting clear timeframes for funding and performance. 9. One issue to be determined will be the relative priorities of support for professional artists and organisations compared to community based arts. This is not to suggest that the role of the arts in communities is less important but community arts activity should only receive Government funding support where the community is not able to fund essential activity without Government support. There should be a higher level of self-funding where community members are able to support their arts interest financially, as happens in most jurisdictions.

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10. It should also be recognised that Government plays a vital role in the planning and delivery of arts infrastructure, particularly including arts venues and facilities. The ACT Government already provides a high level of support in this area, though there is a need for more effective planning, which would ensure a more consistent approach to meeting the needs of all art forms and regions across the ACT. 11. Government has an important role in arts and culture well beyond funding provided through the ACT Arts Fund. Many agencies, including DET, DHCS and ACT Health have an important role to play in the arts including provision of funding, facilities and other forms of support. 12. There could be value in some form of audit, so there is a better understanding within Government and by the public of the diverse involvement of Government agencies in the contribution of the arts to education, social development, the economy and other areas of life in the ACT. 13. There was some concern expressed through the review that some areas of the ACT Government could appear, through their directive style, statements and expectations, to be setting out to control rather than to support the arts through funding. However, more rather than less Government policy direction would be generally welcomed by the arts sector and the public who provided feedback, to help overcome concerns about transparency around how funding decisions are determined. 14. There was criticism from the arts sector about the Government’s previous arts policy document, Arts Canberra – Action Statement for the Arts. There was a strong view from artists and arts organisations that the ACT Government’s Arts Policy should be a clear and comprehensive ‘passionate statement of intent’. 6.1.1 Recommendations 1. The ACT Government must provide clear policy direction on the arts. New goals, policies and strategic priorities need to be established, based on the extensive consultation, and wide ranging feedback, analysis and recommendations provided through this review. 2. The ACT Government needs to promote a wider recognition of the intrinsic value of the arts, as well as the importance of the arts and culture in education, health, social well-being, and as an important component of economic development. 3. Undertake an audit of all the areas across Government where the ACT Government makes a contribution to the arts through funding, resources and facilities. Pursue opportunities for better coordination, greater efficiency and more integrated planning to achieve clear policy goals and outcomes. 4. There is a high level of dependence on Government funding for the arts in the ACT. Government leadership is required to actively investigate alternate sources of funding and revenue. This should include encouraging greater business interest in sponsorship as well as philanthropy.

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6.1.2 Australian Government, Other Jurisdictions and Policy Alignment In the review of current arts policies, it will be important to have full awareness of, and as far as possible, effective alignment with Cultural Ministers Council (CMC) and Australia Council policy approaches, priorities and terminologies. There also needs to be a keen awareness of developments in other jurisdictions. 6.1.2 Issues and Analysis Australian Government 1. While it will be important to ensure policies are appropriate to meet the specific requirements of the ACT Government’s approach to the arts in Canberra, policy principles at least will need to be consistent with Australian Government policy directions. 2. All States and Territories and the Australia Council have sensibly adopted the ‘Road to Harmony’ protocols, which have been designed to improve clarity and consistency, and to reduce the duplication of information collected. ‘Harmony’ information includes a consistent approach to formats for information sought from grants applicants in relation to: Business Plans, Budget information and quantitative data. There is also an agreed Glossary of Terms. In addition, harmonisation is aimed to align timing with funding applications, including for Triennial Program Funding. It will be important to remain aware of these factors in the policy development process. 3. Irrespective of the future role of Ministerial Councils and the Council of Australian Governments (COAG), policy should be developed and reviewed taking account of developments in all jurisdictions. There should be ongoing multilateral and bilateral contact with other jurisdictions. The ACT should ensure it remains aware of new policy approaches, and practical experience about what works and what does not work, to be able to establish and retain a role as a policy leader in the arts. Several States through this review indicated a strong preparedness to cooperate. 4. It will also be important to continue to track and take account of any developments from the Australian Government’s process of developing a National Cultural Policy to ensure awareness of any national shifts in policy priorities. 5. There seemed to be a sense of mistrust and concern from several people spoken to during the course of the review about relationships with Australian Government agencies and Institutions. While some in the ACT arts sector have pursued or responded to proposals for partnerships, unfortunately this appears to be the exception rather than the rule. 6. There was a consistent view expressed by senior representatives of the Australian Government and the National Cultural Institutions, though not specifically from the Australia Council, of a keenness to work more closely and collaboratively on the arts with Canberra artists, arts organisations and the ACT Government.

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7. There is obviously a genuine concern from artists that the Australian Government and Australia Council do not seem to recognise the number and range of artists and arts organisations and the quality of art in Canberra. The percentage and level of funding that comes to the ACT from Australia Council appears to be very low. 8. There seem to be very good and positive relationships between the ACT and other jurisdictions in relation to the arts at Ministerial, Chief Minister’s Department and artsACT levels. There are also positive relationships through Cultural Ministers Council (CMC), and generally bilaterally with Australian Government agencies and other jurisdictions. 9. This review included discussions with the CEO and Executive of the Australia Council, as well as with the Executive Directors/Directors of Government Arts agencies in Queensland, New South Wales, Victoria, South Australia and Tasmania. While the ACT is smaller and different to other State jurisdictions, all have been facing similar challenges, including the need to clarify policies and strategies to guide funding priorities with budgets ranging from very tight to severely shrinking. There are significant opportunities to be more active in pursuing discussions to test the benefits of what has been found to work in other jurisdictions, which could be adopted in the ACT. Several of these ideas and initiatives have been outlined in this report. 10. Despite differences in scale, and the need to adapt strategies to the particular needs of the ACT, it is still important that policies, strategies, models, systems and definitions are generally consistent with other jurisdictions around Australia. It will be very important, particularly with the initiative to create a National Cultural Policy being undertaken by the Australian Government, to stay connected with what is happening, to pick up ideas and make sure the ACT is on a consistent track. 11. One possibility that was raised by one of the larger States was the opportunity for more sharing of production and other resources across States and Territories. An example was given of commissioning or purchasing a production to be shown in both a major capital city and in Canberra, resulting in reduced costs and extended availability of quality productions for Canberra audiences. This is likely to be more an issue for the Canberra Theatre Centre to consider, taking account of costs and benefits to Canberra. There are similar initiatives emerging in the area of festivals and events, where costs of blockbuster productions are also a major issue and interest is increasingly being tested in cooperative ventures across jurisdictions. 12. Irrespective of whether sharing decisions and costs of productions across jurisdictions is found to be beneficial, there is no doubt from this review that there are many opportunities across the board for greater sharing of ideas, initiatives and costs that should be pursued. There seems to be a consistent openness to sharing of ideas and experiences, and no doubt this happens informally to some extent on an ongoing basis. However, beyond areas like data and research, there appears a surprising lack of concerted action in relation to sharing. The ACT could lead the way in an initiative to actively pursue an agenda of areas and initiatives where cost and resource sharing could be mutually beneficial.

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It is fully acknowledged that what works in larger jurisdictions will not necessarily work without some adaptation to the arts and demographic environment in the ACT, but this should not stand in the way of active investigation of opportunities. 6.1.2 Recommendations 1. A new ACT Arts Policy should be aligned with policy principles, developments and priorities in the Australian Government and in other jurisdictions. It will be necessary to continually review policy developments and funding initiatives in other jurisdictions and to actively investigate sharing arrangements to minimise costs and increase alignment.

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6.1.3 Chief Minister, Minister for the Arts and Heritage There is clearly a strong interest in and commitment to the arts from the Chief Minister, Minister for the Arts and Heritage. However, there are appropriate concerns from the Chief Minister and the ACT Government that there are increasing demands on the Budget, including from the arts, and that there needs to be a fresh look at current and future policies and priorities for ACT Government funding, resourcing and support. 6.1.3 Issues and Analysis 1. There is recognition of the need to review the overall operations, interactions, issues and needs of the arts in the ACT. 2. There is also recognition that, while Government commitment to the arts continues to be strong, there is growing frustration from most parties that Government support is now over-stretched across all areas of the arts. 3. As a result, the Chief Minister saw a need to consult widely and to listen to views and ideas from many stakeholders associated with the arts in the ACT. There was obviously a strong and genuine interest from the Chief Minister to receive feedback, analysis and recommendations to tackle the challenges ahead. 4. Following consultations, it was necessary to reassess the most appropriate future role of Government in the arts. This included policy priorities in the context of current and likely future needs, challenges and opportunities in the arts. 5. There has been some frustration from the Chief Minister, the Cultural Council and artsACT about scope, timeliness and current mechanisms for receiving, testing, developing and providing ideas, feedback and policy advice from the arts sector to the Chief Minister. 6. Following consultations and analysis of options, it is suggested there should be four key sources of policy advice to the Chief Minister: • artsACT • A Ministerial Advisory Council • Effective research and communication by Government with artists, arts organisations and the public • Regular Annual or Biennial Artist Forums 7. There is concern from the Chief Minister about the heavy and apparently growing dependence from the arts sector on ACT Government funding. This has increased awareness of the need to maximise efficiency, minimise duplication, diversify revenue sources and to maximise funding and other support from alternative sources. There need to be new partnerships and greater involvement of business through sponsorship, as well as philanthropy. The Chief Minister and Government will have an important leadership role to play in these changes.

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8. The recognition provided by Awards and Prizes is very important in the arts, and gives the Chief Minister and ACT Government an opportunity to show leadership and to give recognition for achievement and contribution. The Ruby Awards introduced in 2006 in South Australia provide an excellent model for consideration to be adapted to the ACT. Some ACT Arts Fund decisions could be announced at the annual ACT Arts Awards, and it is suggested that the Chief Minister should play a central role in the Awards, presenting at least one major Award. It is also suggested that there should be a Chief Minister’s Award, chosen by the Chief Minister, for outstanding achievement or contribution to the arts in the ACT. 6.1.3 Recommendations 1. The Chief Minister should consider establishing annual ACT Arts Awards for all areas of the arts in Canberra. As part of these Awards, there should be a Chief Minister’s Arts Achievement Award.

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6.1.4 Chief Minister’s Department, Other Agencies and Whole-of-Government Through the process of this review it was evident that the Chief Minister’s Department (CMD) is active and generally widely respected both within ACT Government and with external stakeholders. 6.1.4. Issues and Analysis 1. It is recognised that strong leadership from respected senior management of CMD will be an important factor in adding value to the arts sector by coordinating support for arts initiatives across Government. However, there were indications that there could be some concerns if there was too much emphasis on centralisation rather than on coordination from CMD. 2. There was clear feedback from artists, arts organisations and the public about what is seen as an obvious lack of communication and coordination across ACT Government in relation to the arts. This leads to considerable frustration in the arts community, especially taking account of the relatively small size of the ACT public sector. There appears to be very little awareness of this situation within agencies. 3. There are varying levels of awareness of and interest in the arts at senior levels of ACT Government agencies. Despite considerable encouragement from the Chief Executive of CMD, only one Chief Executive, in the large and vital area of Education and Training, was able to meet with the reviewers. This is a very different situation to larger jurisdictions, where experience indicates that Directors General/Chief Executives would appreciate the importance of the arts and would wish to be directly involved. To a large extent, the level of interest in the arts in most agencies reflects the personal interests and initiative of a few individuals rather than any informed, policy-driven strategic approach. Individual enthusiasm is valuable and often the source of positive initiatives. However, in the absence of agency awareness or strategy, and apparently in a few cases in the face of apathy or opposition, agency action involving the arts is not as effective as it could be. While there is a considerable level of activity and potential in relation to the arts in most agencies, there is a notable and unfortunate lack of communication, coordination and whole-of-Government action. 4. There were differing views about whether artsACT or senior management of CMD was best positioned to take on a wider role of providing policy advice and whole-ofGovernment coordination on the arts across Government. Some concerns were expressed that artsACT have not previously appeared to demonstrate strong interest to become actively involved in wider issues, like the many roles and opportunities for the arts in areas of social and economic development. However, on balance it is suggested that artsACT, with the clear support of CMD, should become the focal point for policy, information and coordination of all issues related to the arts in ACT Government. It is also expected that artsACT would become more actively engaged with the arts sector and the community.

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This expanded role may require additional skills and knowledge, a reallocation of resources to strengthen policy capability in the arts and associated areas, and some culture shift to be more outward looking and pro-active. Action from both CMD and artsACT to raise awareness of an expanded policy and engagement role for artsACT would also be necessary. 5. As artsACT takes up its extended role, it would be highly desirable for CMD and other agencies to seek policy advice from artsACT on any issues related to the arts. 6. Further opportunities for structural change, which had also been noted during the review process, appear to have been acted upon. These involve bringing together Australian Capital Tourism with the Special Events Unit and the Centenary of Canberra section in CMD. There are important opportunities for closer connection, cooperation and coordination between each of these areas, and with arts and heritage. 7. The ACT Government plays an important role in relation to heritage. There are close connections, though also clear distinctions, between arts and heritage. It was going to be suggested that the Heritage Unit should move to Chief Minister’s Department (CMD), with separate managers for Arts and Heritage under a single Division and Senior Executive. It is pleasing to see that this initiative has already been taken. 8. Libraries also play an important community-based role in supporting and providing outlets for community art. In fact, libraries appear to be an interested, excellent, and probably under-utilised resource and meeting place for educational, social and community arts. While there are already many initiatives, the ACT Library and Information Service indicated that they are interested in developing further productive partnerships with the arts and communities. 9. Public art has become a valuable focal point for cooperative arts-related activities across several agencies. ACT Health is one agency that has demonstrated recent initiative and interest in public art and in working with other agencies. 10. Poetry in ACTION is a great example of ACT whole-of-Government cooperation based on a creative idea that began in London 25 years ago with ‘Poems on the Underground’, and has since spread to major cities around the world. It has been in operation for four years in the ACT and displays selected commissioned poems from shortlisted poets for the David Campbell Award inside 100 ACTION buses. There is quite strong interest in writing and poetry in the ACT and this project, strongly supported by the Chief Minister, aims to increase people’s exposure to poetry, as well as to provide a forum for local poets. The poems are estimated to read by about 10,000 Canberrans. It is hoped that this project continues. 11. There are many very good arts related initiatives across ACT Government. artsACT could play an important role in gathering information about these activities and encouraging appropriate cross-promotion by agencies to raise public awareness of the scope of Government arts activity.

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6.1.4 Recommendations 1. Having taken positive initiatives on structural change by bringing Australian Capital Tourism, Special Events and the Centenary of Canberra together with the ACT Heritage Unit and artsACT in CMD, opportunities should now be actively pursued for closer connection, cooperation and coordination between each of these areas. 2. CMD should drive and support improved communication and better coordinated whole-of-Government responses to the arts to be led by artsACT. This needs to ensure improved, more responsive service delivery, greater efficiency and performance measurement against Government arts priorities. 3. There should be strong encouragement from CMD for agencies to work together, with the support of artsACT, on developing and promoting arts initiatives such as Poetry in ACTION, which is excellent, and should continue to receive support. CMD and other agencies should seek policy and strategic advice from artsACT on any arts or cultural issues or proposals relating to their agencies.

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6.2 ACT Government Arts Policy Overview The ACT Government’s arts policy document: Arts Canberra – Action Statement for the Arts 2006 – 2008 expired two years ago. The major reasons for this review were to provide a current strategic and practical analysis of the arts in the ACT and to review this earlier policy to enable the development of a new Arts Policy. The comments in this section of the report should be read taking account of Arts Canberra. There have been some recent policy initiatives since Arts Canberra. These included the Theatre in the ACT Strategic Directions Statement 2010-13, Developing Arts Audiences in the ACT Strategic Directions Statement 2008-10 and Dance in the ACT Strategic Directions Statement 2008-10. The purpose of the Theatre Statement for instance was to provide a framework for ACT Government investment in, and Government and sector support for, the ACT theatre sector, and to support key objectives to strengthen and grow the ACT theatre sector and support high-quality theatre. Key themes included: clustering, connecting, critical debate and visibility. The first two of these themes at least, are strong recurring themes in this report. Different approaches were applied in undertaking this valuable policy work. It is understood that in at least some cases, the processes involved required considerable time to complete. It is hoped that responses to this much larger review should be completed with appropriate consultation in the shortest possible time, so there is a demonstrated genuine commitment to change. 6.2 Issues and Analysis 1. As has been recognised by the Chief Minister, Chief Minister’s Department (CMD) and artsACT, there was considerable feedback throughout the review that the previous policy is now dated and a new policy is necessary. 2. Comments in this section will refer to some extent to the previous policy but this is not to suggest that a new policy should be an edited version of the 2006-2008 document. It is widely felt that a quite fresh approach should be taken when writing and structuring a new arts policy. Artists and arts organisations in particular called for a lively, inspirational and accessible policy. This view is endorsed. 3. The arts are very highly valued in the ACT and there is a greater level of involvement in the arts than in other States and Territories. The recently released 2005-06 Australian Bureau of Statistics Survey of Attendance at Cultural Venues and Events found that the ACT had a 90% attendance rate, which was 5% higher than the Australian average. However, there is a widespread recognition of the need for change in the way ACT Government provides support to the arts. 4. Having a contemporary and comprehensive policy for the arts is seen as a vitally important early step to set direction and guide action, including the ACT Government’s funding and resourcing of the arts.

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5. In developing a new arts policy, there is no suggestion of any move away from acknowledging the central importance of the arts and their intrinsic value. However, it is suggested that the arts should not be viewed in isolation from other areas of Government policy priorities and other areas of society. There are strong and clear intersections between the arts and areas including education, social development, economic development and the environment. While care needs to be taken to not lose focus in developing arts policy, it is equally undesirable to ignore the fact that the arts are intimately connected with, and enrich, a wide variety of areas of life. Governments need to recognise and support the full scope of the importance of the arts. Sport would appear to have been more effective than the arts in conveying the message that the full range of sports, from community to elite sports, reach into and contribute positively to most areas of Australian life. As a result sport has reaped the benefits of wide public recognition, government funding, sponsorship and other financial support, despite the fact that the diverse value of, and public passion and support for the arts, would seem to be at least as great. Recent evidence of the effectiveness of the sporting sector in putting its case to Government was the Australian Government’s recent announcement of its new vision for Australian sport: ‘The Pathway to Success’. It aims to increase the numbers of Australians participating in sport and strengthen sporting pathways to link grassroots and high performance sport. This is backed by $195 million in extra funding, which is the largest-ever injection into Australian sport. Also, ACT consultations several times pointed to the relative success of sport over the arts in the ACT, with sport being seen to attract significantly more media attention and sponsorship funding. 6. There were varying views during the process of the review about whether the focus of this policy review should include ‘culture’. Extensive consideration of the debate about the differences and similarities between ‘arts’ and ‘culture’ is unlikely to be fruitful. Interpretations of ‘culture’ can be so varied as to be unhelpful, but in the context of the term ‘arts and culture’, there is widespread understanding of something extending beyond arts into the cultural life of a place like Canberra. While the reviewers were asked to review the arts and arts policy, the issue of the need for a broader cultural policy for the ACT Government must not be overlooked in the process of creating a new policy in this area. 7. The scope and future direction of arts and cultural policy have recently been raised by the Australian Government. Considering the importance of policy alignment, these developments and some key comments should be noted in this report and considered carefully in reviewing arts (and cultural) policy in the ACT. In his speech about a new National Cultural Policy to 2020, Minister Garrett said: “The Government agreed to consider further the need for a broader policy framework, growing out all of the arts, to embrace and include culture… while the arts are a core component of culture, culture is more than just the arts…So we begin with an essential principle, namely, affirming the right that all Australians, whatever their background, have to the benefits of cultural activity.”

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He identified three themes for a new National Cultural Policy framework: keeping culture strong, engaging the community, and empowering the young. ‘Keeping culture strong’ included maintaining and developing key institutions such as galleries, museums, libraries and major performing arts companies, as well as recognising the foundation position Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander history and expression occupies in Australia’s cultural life. ‘Engaging the community’ involves producing work which is not only relevant but also attracts new audiences. The theme of ‘powering the young’ was seen to demand attention, given the immense reservoir of creative vitality and enthusiasm that resides in young people. In order to unleash and promote this creativity for wider consumption there was a need to examine new opportunities for experimentation and exhibition. Minister Garrett recognised that “a key role for government is to ensure public funding is linked to specific public priorities.” This was seen by the Minister to include exploring direct funding for individuals whose creative activity pushes the boundaries to new knowledge and ways of doing things, like public funding for scientific research. He wanted to build stronger connections between individual artists and the well-supported, large arts organisations to increase opportunities for artists, especially including new work from emerging artists. These issues, and the new National Cultural Policy were often referred to, and widely recognised through review consultations, as fundamentally important for the ACT. 8. Strong views were expressed that a new ACT arts policy needs to be based on strong and clear vision and purpose and should not aim to please everyone. It should aim to reflect public and Government priorities and to transparently guide decisions about Government funding and support. 9. Response to Arts Canberra Action Statement for the Arts 2006-2008 As noted earlier, it is not proposed to provide detailed analysis of the previous policy. Rather the aim is to provide guidance here and through the whole report for the development of a new policy. Comments and thoughts in this part of the report will follow key Headings, beginning with statements in Arts Canberra and suggestions of possible alternatives: 9.1 Previous Vision The ACT is rich in arts activities and experiences that creatively engage, challenge and inspire our community A possible new Vision: The highest level of interest, engagement and participation in the arts is valued and nurtured. The arts and culture have intrinsic value, are a central and sustainable part of life in the ACT, and contribute actively to our identity, creativity, community, education, social and economic development.

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9.2 Previous Principles • Arts and cultural activities are at the heart of our community’s identity, dynamism and strength. • Excellence, sustainability and professionalism are central to the development of the arts. • Practising artists and arts organisations make a vital contribution to our community. • All people have accessible opportunities to participate in arts and cultural activities. • Innovation, risk-taking and artistic freedom are respected. • Government, business and community investment in the arts generates significant social, cultural and economic benefits. • High quality arts facilities and resources are essential to a sound public infrastructure. • The arts have a central place in education. • Art in public places engages and inspires our community and enhances our physical environment. Principles Analysis: The list of principles is quite long and comprehensive – perhaps too long. The main comments here, if a section titled ‘principles’ is retained, are: to ensure each item on the list is genuinely a guiding ‘principle’, rather than ‘vision’ of a ‘goal’; consider a shorter list of principles – ideally about 5; while this is not ‘vision’ use language that is clear and inspirational. If a list of ‘principles’ is retained, two examples of principles that should be highlighted and included are “accessibility” and “diversity” which are dealt with in this report. To follow these examples, without a genuine commitment to these principles, any goal relating to participation would be very difficult to achieve. 9.3 Previous Goals 1. Excellence is Encouraged Foster artists’ professional and creative development. Support excellence, innovation and challenge in artistic practice. 2. Engagement and Participation is Maximised Assist diverse, high quality artistic activity to achieve a high visibility. Improve access for all people, including young people, to a diversity of arts activities as audience members and active participants. 3. Sustainability is Strengthened Foster the further development of existing strengths in the arts. Develop capacity and resilience in individuals, organisations and structures. Support the development of new ideas, practices, outcomes and initiatives. ! !

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Thoughts on Goals: It is suggested that ‘Goals’ are particularly important in a policy statement. Two short, sharp goals should declare why the ACT Government funds and supports the arts. The Goals should also suggest what Government expects in return from this investment. Government funding should be directed towards achieving these goals, which will be supported by more specific arts policies. Applications for funding and acquittals would need to demonstrate real, preferably measurable, benefits. Possible New Goals: 1. Increasing participation in the arts 2. Attracting and developing artists and quality art Strengthening sustainability would clearly continue to be important, but is seen as inherent in the two goals suggested above, and more of an issue of ‘how to’ rather than ‘what to’. There are a number of proposals elsewhere in this report dealing with strategies to improve efficiency and sustainability, and importantly to ensure that funding is focused more sharply on achieving the two goals suggested above. In relation to the first suggested goal, ‘participation’ is seen to be a broader term incorporating ‘engagement’. According to the Oxford dictionary, both terms involve ‘taking part’, and ‘participation’ includes ‘sharing in’. ‘Engagement’ can also mean to ‘hold fast a person’s attention’ or imply a level of intensity of participation. So in the context of simplifying a goal statement, only the word ‘participation’ is suggested. Participation includes people not only taking part directly in the arts and experiencing creative expression, but also audiences for and consumers of the arts. In the second suggested goal, the focus is on quality, which incorporates excellence in artists and the arts. The terms ‘quality’ and ‘excellence’ were found to be problematic through many consultations. While the importance of ‘quality’ was widely recognised, its interpretation and application outside a clear policy context, across community and professional arts, and across cultures, was seen to undermine its true meaning and significance. Some arts activities and even organisations that had apparently been funded on the basis of ‘quality’ were seen to be somewhat dull and lacking in quality, which raised the question of ‘quality according to whom?’ The question was also asked as to how the same terms ‘quality’ and ‘excellence’ could be the basis of assessing both experienced professional artists and participants in community arts, many of whom would not claim to be producing ‘quality’ work, but rather enjoying participation for personal satisfaction.

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It is suggested that ‘quality’ must be retained as an important goal and measure, but it needs to be more consistently meaningful and mainly applied to the professional arts. Participation, and the associated values of social inclusion, satisfaction, pleasure and fun should mostly be applied to community arts. 9.4 Previous Priority Areas 1. public art 2. community arts 3. arts facilities and cultural institutions 4. key arts organisations 5. arts funding 6. special programs and initiatives Possible New Priority Areas: 1. Professional Artists – Established and Emerging 2. Community Arts 3. Arts Organisations 4. Arts Facilities, Precincts and Planning 5. Arts in Education, Social and Economic Development 6. Public Art 7. Arts Funding 8. Special Initiatives 9.5 Other elements that should be considered for inclusion in some way in a new policy document on the arts and culture are included in the headings in this section of the report. These could serve as at least a checklist of policy issues or future directions. 10. The arts and culture can and do deliver major benefits that are vitally important to communities and governments. These benefits can sometimes go unnoticed or unrecognised. Many could be of wider interest to governments if the current and potential value of the contribution of the arts to a variety of policy priority areas was more widely appreciated. A brief summary of benefits for consideration as a further check list in developing a new, more broad-ranging policy could include the contributions of the arts to individuals, as well as to society and the economy:

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Individuals: Experiencing creativity; life long learning; finding meaning and purpose at all ages; identification and expression of personal and cultural identity; building self-confidence; connecting and engaging with others; pleasure and fun; physical health and emotional well-being. Society and Economy: Developing and applying creativity and inspiration; generating ideas; finding new forms of expression; extending the value of education, knowledge and experience; contributing to leadership in innovation; building economies by creating ‘smart’ new products, services and industries; strengthening networks and communities by building awareness and understanding across cultures, ages and genders by bringing diverse people together around a love of art and culture. 6.2 Recommendations 1. A new ACT Arts Policy should set clear goals and priorities to transparently guide ACT Government decisions about all areas of future funding and support. New ACT Government Goals for the Arts should be: Increasing participation in the arts; and attracting and developing artists and quality art. 2. In writing a new ACT Arts Policy, there are several ideas and proposals in this section of the report including comments on vision, principles and priority areas, which should be given careful consideration for inclusion.

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6.3 artsACT Management and staff at artsACT demonstrate a strong commitment to the arts and to providing professional public administration. There is quite a heavy workload and staff have been doing their best to meet management and Government requirements and expectations. There is now a need for change which is generally recognised both within artsACT and beyond. 6.3 Issues and Analysis 1. artsACT does a range of work which, as in many areas of the public sector, is the result of a combination of history, culture and responding to current requirements of Government. Any critical comments based on extensive consultations should not be seen as being directed at any individuals in artsACT. In fact there is a good deal of readiness among all the staff for a new focus of direction. This analysis is aimed at achieving positive change to enable strong and effective support to Government and the arts in the ACT. 2. The strongest areas of current effort and emphasis appear to be on providing administrative support in a range of areas including: the ACT Arts Fund; the operations of the ACT Cultural Council; public art, and arts facilities asset management. There is an apparent imbalance of focus on processes and a variety of services that do not necessarily relate to what is generally felt to be artsACT’s core role. 3. There are perhaps three key factors affecting the way in which artsACT operates. These are: Direction - Government arts policy; Function - responsibilities and structure; and Delivery - how it operates and its culture. The first two are largely beyond the control of artsACT and require action by Government and senior management to drive change, but the third point heavily includes the responsibility of artsACT management and staff. The review has indicated the need for clarification and some change in all three areas. 4. artsACT’s functions and systems are regarded, both internally and externally, to lack a clear framing vision to enable effective policy advice, decision-making and action. This may contribute in part at least to external perceptions that decisions and responses can sometimes appear to lack a proper evidence base, planning or transparency. There is a feeling that artsACT are primarily reactive rather than proactive. Another contributing factor to this perception could be the lack of relevant data and research to inform decisions. 5. artsACT should be the ACT Government’s focal point for policy advice, but due to its funding and service-focused responsibilities, artsACT does not have adequate numbers of staff with the necessary skills and experience to provide the desired quantity, quality and responsiveness of policy advice. 6. It is important for policy advice from artsACT to be both proactive, taking account of established Government policy directions, and quickly reactive to emerging circumstances and challenges. In this way, artsACT needs to always be prepared to both offer, and respond to requests for, informed advice to the Arts Minister.

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7. In addition it is essential that artsACT is aware of, and effectively connected to, arts policy issues across Government, so they are in a position to offer background and specialist advice to agencies as well as to their Minister. 8. Policy advice should be evidence-based, as well as taking account of policy directions in other jurisdictions. The real need for data and research is another area requiring attention in artsACT. At least a basic level of skilled staffing resource will be important to generate and gather essential information that is needed to provide informed, responsive, timely and relevant advice. 9. Effective communication with artists, arts organisations and public is a vital tool in developing informed policy and in giving the ACT arts community ‘a voice’. This is not to suggest a direct advocacy role, but a real awareness of issues, concerns and opportunities. Building trust is also essential to knowing what is happening. A genuine commitment by Government to arts sector and community consultation is clearly important not only for artsACT to be kept informed, but it is also important for other Government agencies, to ensure ongoing knowledge of arts-related issues, concerns and opportunities. 10. The review found that there was quite extensive criticism that artsACT appeared to be overly process-driven, bureaucratic and unresponsive. This could be understandable in any situation where funding decisions are made in a context of tight Government funding, and it is also understood by the reviewers that delays can happen with any Government approval processes, including in busy Ministers’ Offices. Delays and unfavourable outcomes of decisions can, sometimes quite unfairly, be directed to artsACT. However, negative perceptions were sufficiently widespread and strong to indicate the need for at least some change in culture, operations, responsiveness and particularly communication with stakeholders. 11. There was a widespread view from Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) that, while recognising the need for probity, requirements last year in relation to governance and reporting, especially for community-based organisations, were too stringent, especially taking account of the limited numbers of art form specialists and support resources. There has very recently been a response from artsACT and the Cultural Council to address these concerns. Changes are included in the 2011 Arts Fund Information Booklet, which would have been widely welcomed, but may have left residual concerns about how decisions such as this were made. 12. There is a broad range of experience in terms of each KAO’s views on and relationships with artsACT. Many feel they have a great relationship, while others feel that engagement is limited and that they get very little from artsACT other than funding. There is a clear consciousness in many comments from KAOs and artists of the influential role that artsACT has in its recommendations about funding. From many comments from all parties, there does not seem to be enough open, effective communication between artists and arts organisations with the ACT Government. In fact there appeared to be serious gaps in communication at all levels; with a disconnect between artists, arts organisations, the bureaucracy and politicians.

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13. There were many comments from organisations and artists, that with artsACT seen to be focusing so strongly on process issues such as funding applications, allocations and acquittals and on governance and rules, there is insufficient concentration on assisting them with issues where they really need Government help. This included facilitating connecting with other areas of Government, and working proactively and collaboratively with them to develop new partnerships including with business, National Cultural Institutions, training institutions, potential employers, national art form bodies and other art forms. 14. Another key area of expectation from stakeholders was for artsACT to be more actively engaged with the arts and to initiate and support actions to bring the arts together in face-to-face forums for organisations and artists. There were also seen to be opportunities to facilitate the provision of more information and online engagement. There is a pressing need to support the establishment of a communication hub to cover what is happening in the arts for all those involved in the arts. It is suggested that this would involve providing an upgraded website for artsACT, to improve engagement and feedback, though the main arts hub should operate outside Government. 15. There is also need to work with artists, arts organisations and media to create a new focal point for more coordinated, efficient and professional marketing and promotion of the arts to the public. A related aspect where artsACT could play a role is to work with organisations in tackling the difficult issue of ticketing to generate efficiencies and better information on attendance at arts activities and events. 6.3 Recommendations 1. The new ACT Arts Policy should guide artsACT’s future roles, functions, structures, systems, priorities for decisions and actions, and enable them to provide effective policy advice and leadership in the arts. 2. There needs to be a significant shift in focus for artsACT, particularly including much stronger capability in policy, data collection and communication. This will require some changes to functions and culture, and a review of current skill sets and structures to deliver on new Government priorities. 3. artsACT should be the ACT Government’s focal point for policy. Its advice must be both proactive and quickly reactive to emerging circumstances and challenges. artsACT must demonstrate leadership, communicate and consult widely with the arts sector, have access to research, and be aware of arts issues so they are able to offer informed, evidence based advice to other agencies as well as to the Chief Minister.

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4. The artsACT website should be upgraded to improve the flow of information to and engagement with, artists, arts organisations and the public. Improvements should include: streamlining funding and other processes; providing quick and relatively inexpensive survey information and feedback; improving communication, engagement and interaction with the entire arts sector and the public in the ACT; and to provide essential information in a highly accessible way to all stakeholders, including business and other potential arts sponsors and other Government agencies. 5. Streamline all processes and minimise administration, while retaining appropriate management of risk. This should include the areas of funding and grants allocation.

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6.4 Major ACT Arts Bodies ACT Cultural Council and Cultural Facilities Corporation 6.4.1 ACT Cultural Council Since the formation of the Cultural Council it has played a valuable role as a focal point for ACT Government to be able to seek advice on both policy and funding decisions. There have been many members of the Council throughout its history who have been widely recognised and respected as leaders in the arts in the ACT. It would appear that the influence and impact of the Cultural Council has varied quite significantly at different times with both Government and the arts sector. 6.4.1 Issues and Analysis 1. The Cultural Council was intended to be an important focus of external policy advice to Government, but for a range of reasons this has not been an effective arrangement. It would appear that there is at least some frustration from the Council, the Chief Minister and artsACT about the outcomes of current processes. Also, currently the majority of the Cultural Council’s time is spent on determining and advising on funding matters. It is suggested that there is a need for the Government to arrange for the Cultural Council to refocus its attention on becoming an effective policy advisory body. 2. The Cultural Council does not meet regularly with the Chief Minister, nor does it provide regular advice on specific or current arts issues in the ACT. However, it has been very pleasing to note that since this review began, and questions about role and focus have been raised, there have been at least two meetings between the Chief Minister and the Cultural Council. 3. Concerns were expressed by a variety of arts stakeholders that the Cultural Council does not appear to represent the arts, and in recent years, has been somewhat “invisible” and disconnected from the ACT arts community. 4. Members of Cultural Council were obviously committed to providing a valued contribution, but seemed to be unclear about their role and priorities in relation to providing policy and funding advice, as well as about their relationship with the Chief Minister, with artsACT and with the arts community. 5. Cultural Council meets monthly, with the exception of December and January, and spends most of its time considering funding applications. It does not appear to have spent a great deal of time in recent years considering policy issues or developments, though it could quite easily be in a position to provide useful advice to the Chief Minister with a clear role and agenda. 6. It was suggested that, while the Cultural Council continues to have a major role in funding, it is difficult for its members to be closely connected to the arts community because of potential perceptions of conflict of interest. This was seen as a problem because a key role of an effective Cultural Council should be to understand and represent the issues of artists and the arts community.

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7. Because the Cultural Council did not seem to have a high profile, to represent the arts community, or to be influential in advising the Chief Minister on arts issues or the development of arts policy, a number artists and arts organisations had come to the conclusion that the Council had little purpose beyond funding, and hence should be abolished. It was proposed that forums around art forms, arts issues and to represent all artists could be more effective in providing advice and feedback to the Chief Minister. 8. There is mutual respect but some level of unproductive tension between the Cultural Council and artsACT, principally because of a lack of clarity for both organisations about roles, responsibilities, priorities and operational protocols within meetings and in providing advice to the Chief Minister. 9. Cultural Council members generally support the need for greater clarity of their role and for at least some level of change. 6.4.1 Recommendations 1. The Cultural Council should have its role refocused to become a Ministerial Arts Advisory Council which would become the principle source of advice from the arts sector reporting directly to the Chief Minister. The new Council would generally meet quarterly to respond to specific issues raised by the Minister as well as providing its own ideas and initiatives. 2. The new Ministerial Arts Advisory Council would not have a role in assessing funding as this could limit the members’ ability to remain closely connected to the arts community without any perceived probity issues. Funding would become the responsibility of a new advisory body.

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6.4.2 Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC) The Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC) was established as a separate statutory body by an Act of Parliament in 1997 with a range of specific roles and responsibilities in relation to the arts and heritage in the ACT. These have changed since its creation and its current functions appear to be somewhat inconsistent with what the legislation originally envisaged, especially in regard to broader cultural policies and activities in the ACT. 6.4.2 Issues and Analysis The CFC has an unusual range of responsibilities that are not necessarily complementary and that reflect historical circumstances rather than natural synergies, precinct specific requirements or current priorities. 1. The CFC has had effective administration with high standards of corporate governance, and some areas of its responsibility have performed well. However, many questions were raised through the review about whether the current structure and scope of the CFC continues to be appropriate and necessary and whether it adds significant value to each component of its responsibilities, taking account of the costs of administration. While the CFC performs well in many areas, it was quite widely considered to be overly bureaucratic and process-driven. 2. Despite the name “Corporation”, and the functioning of the Board, the CFC effectively operates as an agency of Government employing public servants. These are not ideal organisational structures or employment arrangements for the arts and differ from the private sector and Key Arts Organisations (KAOs). 3. There appears to be a variation of performance and value added by the CFC between different business units within the CFC. Also, some areas of responsibility seem to need and benefit more from management by the CFC than others, which appear to operate quite effectively independently. 4. The Board and management see the need for development of the Civic precinct and for major new arts facilities. They indicated being open to the possibility of administering additional arts or heritage bodies. 5. The costs of the CFC for the additional value it delivers across its portfolio of responsibilities requires consideration. 6. While the CFC has generally been seen to have managed its responsibilities appropriately, there are inherent structural issues which add to administrative cost and require attention. There was a wide-spread and persuasive view that at least some element of change was necessary. 7. The CFC appears to add most value in relation to historic properties. There is an opportunity for an initiative to build on that proven area of capability and performance to provide significant value to the ACT in the management of historic and heritage properties and assets.

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8. It is proposed that in the future a reconstituted CFC should become the single focus of management for all ACT heritage properties and assets, as well as for some historic properties. Section 6.4.3 deals further with heritage and with this issue of a new Historic Properties Trust (HPT). The CFC would be relieved of other areas of its current responsibilities, and these would in future be managed under different arrangements. 9. The Canberra Theatre Centre appears to perform well in its own right, and it is suggested that it would operate most effectively and efficiently in future as a separate, fully ACT Government owned entity operating under a Board reporting to the Chief Minister. The selection of Board members would be important. It would be expected that it would include one or two representatives of ACT Government, including the Director of artsACT, and may benefit from the specialist experience and perspectives of interstate members. 10. The Canberra Museum and Gallery (CMAG) is an important facility, with some very good arts and cultural resources, but it seems to struggle with its identity, role, marketing and with attracting audiences. Though its purpose is very different, and its focus is the ACT, it has a major challenge to compete for audience interest with the NCIs. It is unclear what is the main cause of ‘the problem’. It may be competition, identity and structure, marketing, location, its management, or some combination of these and other issues. Change is certainly necessary, and the key questions relate to the extent and nature of change. 11. It will be proposed that the CMAG would become the responsibility of the Chief Minister as Minister for the Arts and Heritage through artsACT. 12. As soon as possible, artsACT should oversee significant changes to the structure and operations of CMAG. The Museum and Gallery aspects of CMAG would separate, with the opportunity to have different management and partnership arrangements for each function. 13. There are interesting and quite exciting possibilities and opportunities for the future Canberra Museum aspect, and it is proposed that there could be two aspects to its future, neither of which would be dependent on the ‘bricks and mortar’ of the current CMAG building, which would be dedicated to the Canberra Gallery. 14. The first aspect of a future museum role could involve a negotiated partnership with one or more National Cultural Institutions with strong, specialist museum curatorial expertise and established audience interest to include a focus on the history and culture of Canberra. This would involve similar arrangements to the existing ACT partnership with the ANU, and it would be proposed that the two organisations to work with would be the National Museum of Australia (NMA) and the Museum of Australian Democracy. This would of course require consultation and negotiation to ensure that Museum resources and the history of the ACT continue to be appropriately represented.

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15. In addition, the HPT would be expected to have an active, contemporary and dynamic future Canberra Museum role, featuring a focus on the interesting people, places and social history of Canberra, including through some of HPT’s properties and places. A new Canberra Museum would need to be professionally curated but would not be a collecting institution or limited to being contained within one building, or around static displays, but would be a diverse, living experience involving people and places across the ACT. It would be likely to include: independent walking and driving tours to interesting and historic places; aspects of local Indigenous and multi-cultural history and current activity; changing programs and features with varying elements of focus in different places around the ACT built around people’s lives, interests and cultural experiences rather than only around objects; as well as publications and an active, engaging website. This form of living Museum has been successful in other places and would be expected to be a good fit with an entrepreneurial, new HPT, and it would complement what is offered by the National Institutions. Success would require vision and energy but this would appear to be a genuine niche in the ACT with the potential to build strong interest for both participation and visitation from Canberrans, as well as for visitors to Canberra. 16. The new Canberra Gallery would be the ACT Government’s visual arts gallery. It would be expected to focus on all aspects of visual arts in the ACT. This would include traditional and contemporary visual arts with a particular focus on high quality work from ACT visual artists. It would be expected to include paintings, sculpture, ceramics, wood, glass, film, photography and digital arts. It could also include a space for local Indigenous art, some of which would be available for sale. 17. The new Canberra Gallery would aim to have an energy and purpose that attracted substantial audiences. It would be expected that consideration would be given to the placement and nature of the entry and of a café which would link to the Gallery’s purpose and audience. The performing arts would also be active in the space and the precinct. 18. It is proposed that local Indigenous artists should have an important place in the Gallery. It is very good to see that the ACT Government supports the recently opened Burrunju Aboriginal Art Gallery, which is aimed to provide local Indigenous artists with an opportunity to show and actively promote their culture and heritage through art. However, the Indigenous artist workshop strongly pressed the need, which is acknowledged, for access to an accessible, central location, and it is believed that a new Canberra Gallery and local Indigenous artists would both benefit from their inclusion. 19. An innovative option for the future of the Canberra Gallery could be to consider relocating it to Kingston as part of a new visual arts precinct. This could be considered as part of the recently announced Kingston Arts Precinct Strategy deliberations, probably as a longer-term option. Such a consideration should not inhibit purposeful action to ensure that a new Canberra Gallery in Civic receives full and focused support. If this initiative is as successful as expected, and taking account of the accessibility of Civic, it may not be desirable to move.

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20. Civic Square is an important central location for Canberra. In moving responsibility from the CFC it is important to consider that it needs focused, strategic attention, collaborative planning, and probably some funding to achieve its potential. It is suggested that the Square would become the policy and strategic responsibility of CMD, with TAMS having day-to-day management responsibility. It will be essential for CMD to work with all key stakeholders in the precinct and the city to enliven the Square and the area and to make it an attractive place for all Canberrans. 21. If accepted, these actions would be expected to require legislative change at an appropriate time. It would also be suggested that the existing very capable CFC Board and senior management would continue to operate for some time to ensure a smooth transition to the new arrangements. 6.4.2 Recommendations 1. The CFC has provided effective administration and has added particular value in relation to historic properties. In future the CFC would be relieved of other areas of its current responsibilities. 2. A reconstituted CFC would in future be called the Historic Places Trust (HPT) and would become the single focus of management for all ACT heritage properties and assets, as well as for appropriate properties and places. 3. The Canberra Theatre Centre should operate in future as a separate, fully ACT Government owned entity, directed by a Board and reporting to the Chief Minister, with a clear statement of purpose and performance expectations. 4. There would be significant changes, to be overseen by artsACT, to the structure and operations of CMAG. The Museum and Gallery aspects of CMAG would separate, with each function having different management and partnership arrangements. On behalf of the Chief Minister, artsACT would continue to oversee the operations of a new Canberra Gallery, and those museum arrangements that would in future be managed by other Institutions. The HPT would take over responsibility for an exciting and unusual new Canberra Museum. 5. The Museum aspect of CMAG would in future have two components of operation. The first component would involve a negotiated partnership, similar to that with the ANU, preferably with two National Institutions with strong museum curatorial expertise to feature objects and documents reflecting Canberra’s history. The second component would be a dynamic, non-collecting, curated, living, non-static Canberra Museum which would not be located in any one place and would reflect the social history, people and culture of Canberra. The new Canberra Museum would be the responsibility of the HPT and would make use of its properties, places and assets. 6. The new Canberra Gallery would be the ACT Government’s visual arts gallery, would be located in the current CMAG building, and would focus on all aspects of visual arts in the ACT including an Indigenous component.

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7. Civic Square would become the policy and strategic responsibility of CMD, with TAMS having day-to-day management responsibility. It will be essential for CMD to work with all key stakeholders in the precinct and the city to enliven the Square and the area and to make it an attractive place for all Canberrans. 8. Any savings resulting from reduced administration costs associated with the reduced scope of responsibilities for the CFC should be directed to the ACT Arts Fund to fund new arts priorities, such as emerging and Indigenous artists and additional quick response grants.

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6.4.3 Heritage and Proposed Historic Places Trust (HPT) 1. The ACT Government plays an important role in relation to heritage. As in the case of the Arts, it was to be suggested that the Heritage Unit should move to Chief Minister’s Department (CMD). It is pleasing to see that this has recently been decided and implemented. If decisions have not yet been made, it is suggested that arts and heritage should have separate managers in CMD under a single Division and Senior Executive. 2. All heritage places, as well as appropriate heritage assets, historic properties and other places in the ACT should come together to be managed by a single organisation emerging out of the Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC). It is proposed that in the future these functions should become the single responsibility of a refocused CFC. It would be the goal of a new ACT Historic Places Trust (HPT), which would replace the CFC, to ensure protection of historic places, as well as being entrepreneurial to maximise public access, information and tourism potential and to allow heritage and historic properties and places to come alive in a similar way to the NSW Historic Houses Trust (HHT). The NSW HHT is proposed as a model for an ACT Historic Places Trust (HPT). 3. The following description of the NSW HHT reflects closely the proposed vision for an ACT HPT. The NSW HHT is a statutory authority with of a Board of nine Trustees, at least one of whom has knowledge or experience in history, and at least one in architecture. The HHT is entrusted with the care of key historic buildings and sites. It was established in 1980 by Premier Wran to run Vaucluse House and Elizabeth Bay House and has grown to manage 14 diverse sites and properties including houses, public buildings, a farm, gardens, parklands, a beach and urban spaces. The HHT holds extensive collections in each of its properties and conducts a dynamic range of programs and activities attracting over two million visitors to its houses and museums each year. It produces exhibitions, events, publications and education programs, manages an extensive collection, library, resource centre, shops and cafes, and has an active Foundation, as well as Members and Volunteers Programs. The NSW HHT’s mission is to inspire appreciation of Australia's diverse histories and cultural heritage for present and future generations by conserving, interpreting and managing, with integrity, places of cultural significance, in the care of the HHT. It is a leader in the conservation and management of historic places in Australia and has won many awards. It is guided by the desire to be part of current community debates and open to new ideas as much as to be the repositories of important collections and the community memories.

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4. Some of the features of a new HPT would be likely to include the need for strong specialist skills, capability and judgement, combined with curatorial knowledge, care and attention to all HPT places and assets. There would need to be clear policies and criteria to ensure focus is maintained and to guide the HPT’s decisions about what it accepts, owns or manages, and it would have no heritage or other role beyond those responsibilities. This would be combined with a genuine commitment to sharing access to historic places and experiences with the ACT and Australian public. 5. The establishment of a new Historic Places Trust would be an historic, exciting and vitally important development for the ACT. Leadership at Trustee and management levels of such an exciting initiative would demand a shared, clear vision and a range of demonstrated skills and experience including being responsible, entrepreneurial, connected to community and collaborative, combined with having absolute enthusiasm and commitment, to ensure success. 6. A Trust is suggested as the appropriate nature of a statutory authority for these responsibilities, but this may require further consideration by the ACT Government. There also be consideration of what is an appropriate size of a Board of Trustees, but inclusion of historical and architectural capability, including the Chair of the Heritage Council to ensure appropriate connection, coordination and availability of expertise, is seen as very important. 7. There are a number of areas of a relatively small ACT Government with aspects of responsibility for heritage properties. This appears to create some confusion and to hinder a clear strategic focus. While there will be circumstances where it would not be sensible to disturb agency arrangements that work well, most of these responsibilities could all come together under the HPT. It is suggested that heritage properties, including artsACT properties, would become the direct responsibility of the HPT other than by exception, in which case the HPT would still have overview of how the properties are managed. 8. The same would apply with heritage assets, which are the responsibility of different agencies, some of which lack heritage knowledge. Examples include the carousel or merry-go-round designed and constructed in 1914 by Herbert Thomson, and the 1911 Gebruder Bruder organ from the Black Forest in Germany. These and other appropriate assets could become the responsibility of the HPT. 9. It would be proposed that there may need to be an audit of heritage assets and of historic properties and places to assist in determining which should become the responsibility of the HPT. It is certainly not proposed that heritage assets would need to be disconnected from appropriate and historic locations. In the case of historic properties, it is suggested that those nominated for heritage status, as well as those properties and places of strong local interest or significance, would come under the overview or direct responsibility of the HPT. 10. With the recent move of the Heritage Unit to CMD, there are no suggested changes to the role or functions of the Heritage Unit.

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6.4.3 Recommendations 1. A new ACT Historic Places Trust (HPT) would take responsibility for, and bring together, all ACT Government heritage assets and buildings (other than by exception) as well as appropriate historic and significant properties and places. There would be clear policies and protocols to guide priorities and acquisitions. The HPT would ensure protection of all assets, manage the new Canberra Museum, be entrepreneurial to maximise public access and tourism potential, and provide information and interaction through publications and a website. The NSW Historic Houses Trust (HHT) would be the model. 2. The HPT would have a Board of Trustees including: the Chair of the ACT Heritage Council to ensure effective linkages, at least one person with knowledge of history, and at least one with experience in architecture. It would be expected that some current members of the CFC Board may be offered trusteeships on the HPT, and there would be at least some level of senior management continuity. While there would be significant changes to administer requiring genuine commitment, these arrangements would provide useful continuity. 3. An early audit of ACT heritage properties and assets and of historic and significant properties and places is likely to be required to assist in determining which should become the responsibility of the HPT. Policies and protocols would need to be developed as soon as possible to guide the HPT in making decisions about what should be included in either their direct or overview responsibility.

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6.5 Arts Organisations 6.5 Issues and Analysis 1. The vital contribution that arts organisations make to a healthy and active arts environment should be clearly acknowledged. The vast majority of people working in these organisations do so because of a deep commitment to the arts, and most receive either very modest payment or work as volunteers. 2. Considerable professional capability has been developed and recognised in a number of art forms in the ACT. While all art forms should receive some form of support, it is suggested that the ACT Government should have a focus on supporting art forms and organisations where the ACT has a demonstrated competitive advantage on the national and global stage. The support for glass artists through the Canberra Glassworks is an example of an excellent initiative that is already developing an international reputation for excellence. 3. As well as supporting established art forms, it is important to identify and support emerging art forms as well as emerging artists. It is good to see support for digital arts and new media as well as for initiatives across art forms. However, it will be important that this recognition is supported by funding action, and is done with real engagement and awareness of new ideas and of what is happening in these areas. 4. Canberra has great potential for cross art form collaboration, partly because of the size of the city and because many artists know each other’s work. This needs to be fostered though better communication, funding and other Government support arrangements. 5. There could be more a focussed strategy to support professionalism in the performing arts. For example, there is wide-spread admiration for the current Director of the Street Theatre and recognition that the organisation is very effectively developing professional theatre practice. It was suggested that encouraging strong partnerships between Canberra Youth Theatre, Jigsaw and The Street Theatre, combined with more investment in their collective practice would help to solve a lot of the challenges confronting the performing arts. Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) 6. While the ACT Government does not own or control the 20 Key Arts Organisations (KAOs), it does provide the main source of funding for most of these organisations. 7. There appear to be too many ‘Key’ Arts Organisations, and there is pressure from other organisations, which appear to be very similar to current KAOs, for them to also be included. This would lead to an expanded number, as not many seem to have lost KAO status in previous years. It is suggested that Government should aim to move away from the term ‘Key Arts Organisations’ and to significantly reduce funding for duplication and administration.

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8. Funding for KAOs accounts for a major proportion of the ACT Government Arts Fund and KAOs generally receive both multi-year funding and funding increases. Despite this, the majority of all KAOs felt that the current level of funding was inadequate to meet their needs and that funding arrangements were constraining and unresponsive. There is also a sense that the main relationship with artsACT is heavily focused on funding. It is desirable to broaden the relationship so it is less adversarial with improved communication and cooperation. 9. While KAOs generally appreciate longer-term funding for three to five years, which provides greater funding certainty, there is a great deal of concern that after funding is allocated they are ‘locked in’, because they are not able to apply for any extra funding for new initiatives. They suggest this affects their ability to be responsive to changing circumstances and opportunities and tends to discourage innovation and development. 10. Funding for five years is either highly unusual or unique across other jurisdictions and the Australia Council. It is proposed that the maximum term for funding of organisations should be three years. Otherwise there can be too much inflexibility, taking account of the need for Government to ensure responsiveness to emerging arts needs and ongoing performance. Also, it should be possible in clearly defined circumstances for organisations to apply for project funding which enables innovation and ongoing artistic development. 11. The financial requirements to meet salary and operational costs continue to rise and the KAOs continue to struggle to make ends meet. This constrains time, creativity and innovative arts activity and is one of the key issues at the centre of the funding gridlock for the arts in the ACT. 12. Many KAOs struggle to attract and retain suitably qualified staff in both artistic and administrative roles and salaries tend to be quite low. There is duplication of administration across KAOs. It is proposed that a form of non-Government shared corporate service system should be established to maximise the focus of funding on achieving arts outcomes. Government would then only provide funding for administration to this shared service entity which would need to be responsive to the needs of both arts organisations and Government. This would require proper financial and business analysis to determine the most efficient model. It would then require time and detailed discussion for effective implementation. 13. It appears that current Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) tend to be somewhat insular. Many recognised that in the future there will need to be a stronger, creative, art form with administrative links. While KAOs could take initiative themselves, there is a lack of policy or leadership from Government to encourage better partnerships. The current partnerships which do exist are largely a result of historic and individual relationships rather than a strategic culture which recognises synergies and are entrepreneurial in seeking out mutually beneficial arrangements. 14. It is proposed that there should be strong encouragement from Government, supported by funding arrangements, for organisations to consolidate or cluster into a smaller number of ‘arts hubs’, mostly around art forms, but also around precincts. These arrangements would need to involve a clear policy direction

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followed by extensive discussions with arts organisations and artists on what would be most practical and work best in implementation. It would require some time for organisations to adjust and would be likely to involve a staged process of implementation. 15. There could be five art form based ‘arts hubs’ as a focus for future funding. These would be likely to include visual arts, performing arts, music, literature, and screen and digital media. There could also be an additional two or three arts precinct hubs totaling around seven or eight hubs. In future some art form hubs could amalgamate with precinct hubs, such as for instance visual arts at Kingston. The new ‘arts hubs’ could take the form of new bodies in their own right with their own boards. Alternatively, they could be an association that would be the focal point for cooperative arrangements between existing organisations that may at this time want to continue to operate separately, but come together to apply for, receive and distribute Government funding. Consideration of connection of art form hubs to locations or precincts would inform, and be informed by, the development of a Cultural Facilities Plan. 16. Communication across the KAOs does not currently appear to be very effective and many recognise that they would all benefit from a more cooperative approach to communications, promotion and marketing. 17. Arts organisations not only have opportunities to partner with other organisations in the ACT but nationally and internationally as well. Some already do this, such as the ACT Writers’ Centre, but there could be more integration. 18. There has been strong resistance from KAOs to recent governance requirements, which are seen to be too restrictive and inflexible for circumstances in the ACT. KAOs also seem to struggle both financially and in capacity with application and reporting expectations. It is hoped that many of these challenges would be addressed by proposed new strategies aimed at greater consolidation. 19. There was considerable discussion about the need for different performance measures for professional and community based arts. They also have different education, training and infrastructure needs. 20. It will be important through these initiatives to not lose sight of higher level Government priorities including greater participation and the production of quality art, as well as having all the arts come together in a vibrant Canberra arts scene. Care will be needed to avoid ‘building walls’ around art forms and precincts. There should be a focus on bringing artists and art forms together with the public. Funded Arts Organisations 21. A number of arts organisations apply for and receive Program Funding from the ACT Arts Fund. The aim of Program Funding, which is provided for one or two years across all art forms, is to provide program activity that enables access to the arts. It is available to proven, established organisations and can be used to fund

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staffing and administration, as long as there is an emphasis on outreach to the community. 22. Program Funding is a vital area of funding that is highly valued by arts organisations. However, while some staff funding is obviously necessary, it is of some concern to the reviewers that such important funding for arts activity and engagement is used to provide administration. It would be desirable to cluster these needs so that the maximum amount can be directed towards arts activity. Also, there would need to be awareness of the risk that the requirement for established organisations with demonstrated achievement does not lock out new ideas and art forms, innovation and young people. 23. Project Funding is very highly regarded and sought after. These applications are currently assessed by a number of peer panels with specific art form interest, knowledge and experience. There is no question about the integrity and commitment of panels, and the reasonableness of their decisions. However, there are questions about whether this is the best and most efficient system of peer assessment for a smaller jurisdiction like the ACT, where the number of specialist artists applying for and determining funding is quite small. Delays, administrative costs and potential conflicts of interest could be reduced by consolidating into a single peer panel with expertise across art forms. This panel could call on art form specialists for advice if required. It will be important to ensure that assessment capability continues to keep pace with changing trends and new art forms generated by young and emerging artists. 24. From considerable feedback from across the arts sector and from within artsACT, Project Funding is an area of the current ACT Arts Fund that should receive priority for any additional funds that might become available. Non-Funded Arts Organisations 25. Canberrans have an active interest in the arts, and a great deal of arts activity happens through arts organisations and individual activities without any involvement of Government. 26. The full extent of arts activity in the ACT is not known. To some extent this is the result of a lack of valuable data and research, which would assist in raising awareness by Government of the importance of creativity, the arts and culture in people’s lives. However, it is also the result of a lot of arts activities, groups and organisations operating happily and successfully in the community ‘under the radar’ of Government scrutiny or awareness. In a similar way to sport, all of this arts activity contributes significantly to quality of life in the ACT.

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27. In considering what is the appropriate role for ACT Government in relation to the arts in the ACT, it should be recognised that input from Government is not always either necessary or desirable in the achievement of positive arts outcomes. There was some feedback, from community arts in particular, that, with the best of intensions, because arts activities are happening, there must be a role for Government. One step in breaking the cycle of what appears to be an overdependence on Government funding and resourcing of the arts is for Government to be less inclined to be involved ‘because it is there’, which can lead to a sense of unwanted Government intrusion into personal and community independent arts activity. A clear policy framework should be helpful in this regard. 28. Also, where there may be an appropriate role for Government, it should be recognised the role of Government should not be limited to funding and resourcing of the arts. This relates to both professional and community-based arts. 29. The landscape of the arts in the ACT, including the role of the Australian Government and National Cultural Institutions (NCIs), needs to be fully acknowledged in deciding the most appropriate role and priorities for the ACT Government. 30. Similarly, the national capital is extremely fortunate to have the active involvement of the Embassies in arts activities and the overall richness of the arts in Canberra. 31. It could be of interest and significant value to build awareness and more readily acknowledge that there is a great deal of arts activity in the ACT that is not funded by the ACT, or in many cases, by any government. It is important to recognise there are real opportunities for more active and regular communication, and in some cases partnerships, with others in the national capital to benefit local artists and arts organisations. 32. As in most locations, there is active involvement of volunteers in many areas of life in Canberra, including the arts. Without the passion, commitment and hard work of volunteers, many areas of the arts, including those funded and not funded by ACT Government, would either not operate effectively, or would not exist. Volunteers should not only be recognised because of their current contributions, but also, if new and younger volunteers don’t see the value of becoming involved in the arts and other areas as volunteers, there could be a serious impact on the effective operation of the arts in future. 33. While it would appear that few arts organisations in Canberra have obtained private sponsorship, some have been able to prove that a tenacious attitude towards attracting sponsorship can be rewarding. Whatever the source of funding, there was feedback from the ACT and other jurisdictions that organisations that were independent of government enjoyed their independence and often flourished. 34. Commercial galleries are a very important component of the ACT arts environment. Clearly they have strong interests in the arts and ACT artists. The review showed that sometimes this is at the expense of commercial interests.

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6.5 Recommendations 1. Government should support all art forms including emerging art forms such as new media and digital arts. However, it should also identify art forms, organisations, facilities and activities that demonstrate clear potential as a national or international area of excellence, such as the Canberra Glassworks, and provide additional support. 2. All funded arts organisations should be encouraged to develop strong partnerships. Cross art form collaboration is also important in any jurisdiction but is particularly important in a smaller arts environment such as the ACT. Collaboration and partnerships between arts organisations and art forms need to be encouraged through communication and funding support for creative joint ventures. 3. There are currently too many Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) and a lack of clarity about what constitutes a KAO. Government should significantly reduce funding for duplication and administration by funding a smaller number of clusters of organisations. The aim would be for seven or eight ‘arts hubs’ to emerge based on art form and/or precinct. Government should also discontinue use of the term ‘Key Arts Organisations’. 4. A non-Government, shared corporate services system should be established to minimise duplication of administration, and maximise the focus of funding on achieving priority Government arts goals and outcomes. Government would then only provide funding for administration to this shared services entity which would need to be responsive to the needs of both arts organisations and Government. 5. Government needs to require all funded arts organisations to maximise sources of revenue through a variety of means such as ticket sales, merchandising, paid courses and the sale of artistic materials. 6. Government should only fund organisations that can demonstrate strategies for the delivery of outcomes that support Government policy priorities of increased participation and quality art.

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6.6 Professional Artists ‘Professional artists’ is another area where a lack of data and research in the ACT presents real obstacles to analysis. As a result, there was strong reliance on a combination of research, very extensive consultations and professional judgement. There were productive separate workshops with established artists and emerging artists. The reviewers also heard from several artists when speaking with, and receiving input from, arts organisations and the public. Comments on artists include a combination of their impressions and ideas, as well as our analysis. 6.6 Issues and Analysis 1. It is not the intent of this report to become ‘stuck’ in definitions, but clarity is important when using terms that provide foundations of Government policy on the arts. A number of people seem to refer to themselves as ‘professional artists’, and expect some level of Government support on that basis. It is important for Government to have appropriate tests for these contentions before allocating sometimes significant funding and resources. This is particularly the case as it is suggested that increased support for professional artists and the production of quality art should be a major future priority for the ACT Government. 2. The Australian Taxation Office draws a distinction between ‘professional artists’ and ‘hobbyists’, which is included in Taxation Ruling TR 2005/1. While this is not seen as binding in this review, it is not unimportant, and should be noted. “What distinguishes a professional from an enthusiastic amateur is the intention of the professional to carry on as a business that which others frequently pursue merely as a hobby or by way of a pastime….What distinguishes the professional from the hobbyist is an intention (objectively determined), to carry on as a business that which others undertake merely for personal enjoyment, coupled with activities which implement the taxpayer's intention to carry on a business.” 3. In this report, the meaning of term ‘professional artist’ usually refers to a ‘practising professional artist’ or ‘full-time professional artist’. This is based on the Australia Council’s interpretations. There were estimates in 2003 that there were 40,000 to 50,000 practising professional artists in Australia, with the largest group (more than 25%) being musicians and the smallest group (less than 3%) being dancers. 4. Consistent with the Australia Council’s interpretations, the term ‘professional’ indicates a degree of training, experience or talent, so the professional artist’s work can be judged against the highest professional standards of quality for the relevant art form. These ‘practising professionals’ are artists who seriously judge themselves to be committed to artistic work as a major aspect of their working life, and are currently working or seeking to work in their chosen artistic occupation. 5. It may be useful to broadly dimension this issue. A calculation based on the current population of the ACT, compared to the national population, and using the higher figure noted in point 3 above of 50,000 ‘practising professional artists’, the total number working in the ACT would have been likely to be just under 800.

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However, taking account of the stronger interest in the arts in Canberra than many other places, and the likelihood that there has been real growth of the arts in recent years, it could be estimated that there are now an additional 25% of practising professionals compared to 2003. This would indicate a current number of up to 1,000 practising professional artists in the ACT. 6. Even based on these reasonably generous estimates, and taking account of the fact that at least a quarter are likely to be musicians, the numbers for some art forms are likely to be reasonably small. Not surprisingly, numbers in each art form appear to be influenced by the availability of professional organisations, suitable venues and professional work opportunities in Canberra. It would be very helpful in future for artsACT to undertake, or initiate and participate as a partner in, research to provide accurate information on this important subject. 7. There has been advice that there are professional artists in some art forms, such as writing, painting and glass, who can make a reasonable living as professional artists in the ACT. However, many artists and arts organisations told the reviewers that there is less opportunity to be a professional artist in some art forms, and that, generally speaking, it is challenging to be a full-time professional artist in the ACT. There was advice that several people regarded as full-time professional artists spend at least a part of their time, if not full-time, working as teachers or tutors in the arts. 8. Canberra has a strong amateur scene and some have apparently moved into and out of professional arts. Also, we were advised that once artists get to a certain level of professionalism they often tend to move away to further their careers. 9. The differing needs of professional artists compared to those in the community or amateur scene relate firstly to the fact that professional artists seek to make a living from the arts. In most cases, it was clear that it is a significant challenge and struggle in most art forms to make a living as a full-time artist in Canberra without some secondary role such as tutoring. 10. It is widely recognised that many, especially younger professional and emerging artists, leave the ACT to pursue their art. Only very few people questioned if this was really the case, and if there was really a challenge in the ACT to retain artists or to attract them back. Again there is a lack of data, but this conclusion is based on overwhelming feedback from artists and organisations through consultations. Artists leaving Canberra is not necessarily a problem per se, as many creative, especially younger Australians, are mobile nationally and globally, seeking new places and experiences to develop their ideas, experiences and their art. This has long been the case for artists throughout the world. 11. What would be of concern to the future of the arts in the ACT is if professional artists do not find that it is possible to make a living from their work, or do not find the ACT sufficiently responsive to their art or the city creatively stimulating, so that they feel forced to leave or feel unable to return after living elsewhere. A number of artists also pointed out the need for other essential support and infrastructure.

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12. Aspects of support and infrastructure mentioned included a strong sense, supported by practical experience, that: Government recognised the particular needs of professional artists in different art forms; there was a stimulating artistic environment including a vibrant, active, talented arts community with mentoring, residencies, workshops and other professional communication and support; appropriate venues and facilities for creativity, rehearsal, studio work, performance, showing and selling their work. 13. Quite a strong view emerged in this review, particularly from professional artists in the ACT, that it is important to differentiate between professional and community art, and even amateur art. These areas are seen to have different functions and different needs, including for Government financial support and the nature of facilities and venues for both rehearsal and performance in the performing arts, and their equivalents in other art forms. This view is supported. 14. The reviewers were advised that, while ACT Government support for amateur theatre is appropriate, more support would be appreciated in developing professional theatre practice. The development of the Theatre in the ACT Strategic Directions Statement with artsACT had been positive and appreciated. 15. Professional artists stressed that, while connections are important between different areas of the arts in the ACT, there are by no means always benefits from attempting to ‘bundle’ the needs of all people involved in the arts. Professional artists mostly require specialist, purpose-built venues and facilities. Some professional artists said that they sometimes find it necessary to use multi-purpose facilities, which can impact on their artistic development and the quality of their art. 16. Professional artists should clearly be a vital focal point for the ACT Government’s policy on the arts. It is therefore strange that in the previous arts policy, while artists were mentioned under ‘Goals’ in the context of encouraging excellence, they are not mentioned specifically in the priority areas. 17. There needs to be a shift in policy to put more focus on professional artists and encouraging the production of quality art at the centre of Government funding and support priorities. There also needs to be a stronger recognition of the importance of younger artists and emerging artists for the long-term health of the ACT arts sector. Many people suggested that there was a need to support mentoring programs for Canberra artists. This should include attracting professional artists from interstate and overseas through artist residencies that include mentoring and specifically for mentoring. Short-term mentoring residencies may be one way to achieve this, and local established artists should not be overlooked. In some cases informal mentoring already takes place and this should be recognised and encouraged. However, it was also suggested, that while mentoring is valuable, artists need to take responsibility for their own professional development.

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6.6 Recommendations 1. As part of establishing a clear arts policy focus to frame Government funding and other support for the arts, there must be a consistent understanding of key terms, including alignment as far as possible with other jurisdictions. This should include definitions of both emerging and established professional artists, amateur artists, people participating in community arts and hobbyists. These terms are currently confused by governments, arts organisations, the media, arts audiences, the public and many in the arts sector. 2. There needs to be a shift in ACT Government arts policy priorities to give greater focus to practising professional artists, including both established and emerging professionals, as well as encouraging the production of quality art. In future this should be at the centre of Government funding and support priorities. 3. In focusing greater support on professional artists, there should be stronger recognition of the importance of identifying the needs of, and giving additional support to, emerging artists and younger artists to ensure the long-term strength of the ACT arts sector. Associated with this, is the need to identify and support new and emerging art forms, as well as being aware of potential future arts audiences who may want to access, engage with, and participate in the creation of the arts through a range of technologies and media. 4. There is a need to generate and support mentoring programs for Canberra artists, especially emerging artists. This would include initially identifying interested, suitably qualified, established ACT artists, and also attracting professional artists of all ages and from many art forms from interstate and overseas. 5. The issue of affordable accommodation for artists in the ACT needs to be investigated. This should include the impact of public housing requirements, and the relationship and potential connections between accommodation and working spaces for artists.

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6.6.1 Established Artists The Canada Council for the Arts has clear, useful definitions for ‘emerging’ and ‘established’ artists. It defines an ‘established artist’ as an artist who is at a mature stage in his or her career and who has created an extensive body of independent work. An established artist has reached an advanced level of achievement by sustaining a nationally or internationally recognised contribution to the discipline. 6.6.1 Issues and Analysis, including the views of established artists Generally speaking the comments below are the views of established artists: 1. Most established artists who were consulted believed that Canberra can be a good place to be an artist and it is important for Canberra to be recognised nationally and even internationally as a great centre for the arts. 2. Canberra is believed by established artists to be generally well served by many arts organisations but there are inefficiencies through duplication of effort. 3. The Arts Canberra Strategy - Action Statement for the Arts 2006-2008 is seen by artists to be inadequate, as it gives no inspiration. A future Strategy should be clear, comprehensive, motivating and engaging. 4. Several artists believed that the way funding and support is delivered in the ACT indicates that there is not a valuing of continuity. They say that you have to become “sustainable” by a certain time. This expectation is usually unreasonable and unattainable, and can leave artists stranded. They did, however, recognise that new and emerging artists also needed access to arts facilities like studios. 5. There was a strong view expressed that there need to be easier, more flexible application processes for artists. “We are not bureaucrats.” Application processes can be particularly difficult for work with other Government departments, taking up to five months to have a grant application processed. You sometimes need to have your artistic idea in May for June the following year. Many ACT Government grant opportunities are seen as very directive and do not allow for creativity. 6. There is not seen to be a critical mass of artists in some art forms in Canberra. There is great potential to make connections between artists and across cities. It was strongly felt that at one point in the year all the creative people in the ACT should come together in an Artists Forum. If artists are ever invited by Government to give their opinions, there usually aren’t many involved. This would be a good way of hearing what a larger group of artists have to say. 7. It was acknowledged that the ACT Government has “helped slow the bleeding of artists away from Canberra” to an extent with a variety of support. Organisations like Australian National Capital Artists (ANCA) and Megalo were seen to play a role. ACT Government support has been widely appreciated and established artists said they would love to see more arts facilities being planned in conjunction with planning for Canberra’s growth.

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8. Artists said there should be a way of reaching-out to welcome outstanding new and returning artists to Canberra. They also supported Artist in Residence programs in various places, including being highly visible to the public producing art in shop-fronts. There should be “Canberra living artists”, similar to Newcastle. 9. The issue of the difficulty for artists finding affordable accommodation was raised. Artists said that it would be great to have studio spaces where artists are allowed to live. This would save on rent, and would enable more artists to be full time professional artists. 10. It was suggested that “everything seems to drop away” after the emerging artist level. It was felt by some that there could be quite a lot of support at the beginning of an artist’s career but nothing much after to develop and hold professional artists. Artists said that many top artists were going to Sydney, Melbourne and elsewhere. This may have been only a perception, but it was a strong perception from ACT artists about other artists. They indicated that providing places to attract artists to stay and work in Canberra was a major reason why Strathnairn started, and with its low-cost studios, it has flourished. 11. Artists said that ACT Procurement Solutions’ processes are cumbersome and they are difficult for artists to deal with. There seems to be “a one size fits all approach” that does not work well for commissioning art. The reviewers were advised that this may have improved recently. 12. Established artists highlighted the similarities between arts and sport, and said that there are lessons that can be learned from the way sporting bodies are able to promote themselves as making a vital contribution to community, education, economy, health and personal development. The arts should be more active in promoting the great value they contribute. This could also help with future Government funding. 6.6.1 Recommendations 1. Future Government grants application and commissioning processes for artists need to be as simple, quick and flexible as possible while properly meeting essential probity and risk management requirements. Artists see current processes as inflexible, difficult to deal with, and not well geared to art and artists, and therefore artists should be consulted in developing these processes in future. 2. Identify, welcome and provide any necessary connections or support to new and returning professional artists to the ACT so that Canberra’s commitment to professional artists and quality art is clearly demonstrated. Work with professional artists to promote the extensive value of the arts to the ACT.

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6.6.2 Emerging Artists The Canada Council for the Arts again has what seems to be a sensible and reasonable definition. It defines an ‘emerging artist’ is an artist who has specialised training in his or her field (not necessarily gained in an academic institution), who is at an early stage in his or her career, and who has created a modest independent body of work. 6.6.2 Issues and Analysis A number of the comments below are the views of established artists: 1. Not all emerging artists are young people, but in the reviewers’ experience, most are. Also, not all young professional artists are ‘emerging’, as several achieve a level of success at an early age and become young ‘established’ artists, but again, most young professionals are emerging artists. 2. Quite often in this report ‘young’ and ‘emerging’ professional artists are linked. This is not to suggest that they are one and the same, though they usually are, and in any case, they generally face many of the same challenges in a range of areas including: getting started and established; having their art or art form seen as legitimate or quality; surviving as artists including selling new work and applying for grants; and being recognised and understood by Government bureaucrats in various agencies, and those people deciding funding support. 3. Emerging artists said that they saw the need for an agreed definition of what an emerging artist is and that this should be consistent with the definitions in other jurisdictions. Lack of clarity can lead to a lack of awareness and understanding. 4. Finding and retaining accommodation, including public housing in the ACT, was reported by a number of artists as a particular challenge for professional artists, and particularly younger artists. Public housing in the ACT has rules which seem to be particularly ‘unfriendly’ to professional artists. This may be quite unintended, but requires further investigation by artsACT and DHCS. 5. There are differing views from emerging artists about the level of artistic and cultural isolation in Canberra. On the positive side, there is a lot of mobility of audiences from Canberra to Sydney in particular, and also from around Australia to Canberra, as demonstrated recently in the NGA’s Masterpieces exhibition. However, there are concerns from professional artists, especially in art forms such as dance and drama, that specialist creative connections, mentoring and stimulation are very limited. Younger artists, however, are more technology aware and are comfortable using technology to try to stay connected with what is happening elsewhere in the arts and in their art form.

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6. In the view of emerging artists, in Canberra there are “rungs missing in an artist’s career ladder”. The visual arts was given as an example. An artist can have a community show but there is nothing between that and commercial galleries, the NGA, and other larger galleries and institutions. They believed there was an abundance of spaces for people who practice art as a hobby, and then there are spaces for the established artist, but there is very little in between. 7. There was a strong view from emerging artists that it is very difficult to make a living in the ACT as a full-time emerging artist. They said that in areas like dance, you have to leave. 8. A recurring theme from emerging artists and arts organisations that work with them was that finding and being able to afford places to be able to work for reasonably extended periods is a big challenge. They said that access to unused spaces in Civic or elsewhere, even for short-terms, would be great for emerging artists. Many artists and arts organisations gave the example of the innovative Renew Newcastle initiative. However, there are particular circumstances and availability of low-cost shop fronts in Newcastle that may not apply in Canberra, however, this should still be investigated. 9. Concerns were expressed that general priorities, support and funding arrangements through artsACT do not seem to show an understanding of the real experiences and needs of young and emerging artists. 10. It was pointed out firmly that while there is no specific funding category for emerging artists in the ACT Arts Fund, the Australia Council does have a specific category, and the Australian Government seems to be more aware of the need to support young and emerging artists who are seen as the future of the arts. 11. The comment was made about ACT Arts Fund categories and grant applications: “How does this support the emerging artist?” Application processes are seen to be complex and time consuming: “We are not professional grant writers.” They suggested that perhaps another way to recognise and support emerging artists is through greater recognition of innovation. 12. Emerging artists said that smaller amounts of money, in the range of $2,000 to $4,000 available more quickly, with less process, and through the year when the money, is needed could make a huge difference to the work and lives of emerging artists. 13. There were comments about the need for encouragement at the community level for young and aspiring artists, as this is often where professional artists start their careers. They said that new artists can get lost in the community space if there are not pathways and some support to make the transition into the professional arts. 14. It was seen that in some art forms insurance can be a big expense and hence a real financial problem for emerging artists.

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15. We were told by a number of people that in recent years it has been difficult to make a living as a professional dancer in the ACT. This provides real challenges for talented, enthusiastic young dancers who are interested in pursuing professional careers, and often seems to mean that they need to leave the ACT to pursue their professional interest. Emerging artists noted that there are no career options for professional dancers or choreographers in the ACT. There is no tertiary level training and many dancers feel the ACT does not care about dance, particularly contemporary dance, which is regarded as a peripheral art form. 16. A further factor seen to be influencing whether professional artists in different art forms stay or leave the ACT is the varying availability of dynamic, professional, art form leaders, teachers and mentors. Again dance is a clear example of this. 17. Emerging artists drew attention to the fact that there are not any, what they called “top rungs” of the ladder, available in music, dance and theatre in the ACT. While the Canberra Symphony Orchestra (CSO) is very able, it is not a professional orchestra employing full-time musicians. It was noted that there are a number of long-term, older incumbent players, which makes it difficult for younger players to win a place. It was felt that the ACT public would support a professional orchestra, but this is not possible without significant additional Australian Government funding. Also, while there is some excellent theatre in Canberra, the fact that there are no professional theatre or dance companies is seen to have a big effect on employment opportunities for artists, and particularly emerging artists. 18. Mentoring should be valued as an educational and developmental tool. There is a perception that there has not been enough focus on mentoring, that there are now very few active mentors for emerging artists, and no system to encourage and arrange mentoring. The concept of residencies for eminent artists who can be utilised as mentors, especially for emerging artists is strongly supported. 19. The perceptions of young and emerging artists and of professional artists generally may not be fully accurate in reflecting the true situation in the ACT. However, these perceptions are very real, come from passionate ACT emerging and professional artists and organisations that work with them. Their perceptions and genuine concerns require serious consideration and response. Once again a lack of effective communication within the arts sector, and between artists, organisations, community and Government is a challenge that must be met with leadership from Government and commitment from all.

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6.6.2 Recommendations 1. Emerging artists are particularly important to the future of the arts in the ACT. A specific funding category for ‘Emerging Artists’ should be included in the ACT Arts Fund. This should be promoted widely along with information about new, simplified application processes. 2. ACT Government support for emerging professional artists should extend beyond funding to include proactive engagement, assistance and advice in areas such as: availability of arts facilities, arts organisations and connecting with other artists, administrative and financial planning, preparing business cases, applying for grants, marketing and promotion, and professional skills development including mentoring and training. Ensure that a new artsACT website has separate information geared to the needs of professional artists, with specific information for emerging artists, and perhaps an ‘artist’s hotline’.

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6.6.3 Artists in Residence There are different aspects to Artist in Residence programs, including the provision of accommodation and studios, predominantly for visiting artists. 6.6.3 Issues and Analysis 1. The ACT offers relatively informal Artist in Residence programs, provided by both ACT Government-funded arts organisations and the National Cultural Institutions (NCIs). ACT Government-funded arts organisations that offer Artist in Residence opportunities include Craft ACT (partnering with the Namadgi National Park for the use of the Gudgenby Ready-Cut Cottage), Megalo Print Studio, and Strathnairn Arts Centre. The Canberra Glassworks is developing an Artist in Residence program, which will bring national and international glass artists to create glass art in Canberra and engage with local glass artists. Examples of National Cultural Institutions that offer opportunities for artists to be inspired by collections include the National Film and Sound Archive and the Museum of Australian Democracy at Old Parliament House. 2. The major benefit to the Arts in the ACT of Artist in Residence programs is the opportunity for artists, arts organisations and the whole community to be exposed to new ideas, perspectives and artistic approaches from respected and experienced Australian and overseas artists. Visiting artists bring new approaches, fresh thinking and an opportunity to share skills. Appropriately qualified artists may also elect to engage with the broader community, for example through workshops. 3. Residency programs provide opportunities for an artist to work on a specific project or projects, often inspired by the place and culture in which they are temporarily living. There are a variety of potential initiatives where Artists In Residence programs can be beneficial by attracting a range of artists from other locations to come to the ACT to enrich and energise the local arts community. These initiatives would all involve bringing artists from around Australia or from overseas to stay in the ACT for different periods of time with varying roles and expectations, and to be provided with free or very low cost accommodation with access to appropriate studio or other facilities. Examples could include: 3.1 Making a major contribution to artists and community by working intensively over a longer period: This option involves attracting artists to come to Canberra to do artistic work and create a body of work; meet, work alongside, and effectively mentor local artists; and preferably also conduct workshops and exhibit and discuss their work. 3.2 Artist Sabbatical visits over a period of one or two months with less active art creation and engagement: This option would involve inviting respected artists who are ready for a sabbatical coming to the ACT to inspire artists and be inspired by the total environment. 3.3 Shorter term teaching and training assignments: This involves bringing, usually Australian artists, with demonstrated communication, teaching and training ability to the ACT to run a series of training sessions or workshops.

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4. The ACT is ideally placed to offer excellent Artist in Residence programs. Canberra is a designed national capital city in a beautiful, natural, accessible location. Canberra was recently rated in the Mercer Worldwide Quality of Living Survey as one of the world's most livable cities, being ranked 26th globally and fourth in Australia, which puts it ahead of many great cities such as New York, London, Singapore and Tokyo. Canberra has a unique mix of National Cultural Institutions, well-respected tertiary creative arts courses provided by the Australian National University and the University of Canberra, a variety of local arts organisations and activities ranging across all art forms, as well as strong public interest and engagement in the arts. There is also the opportunity for artists to live and work in either urban or nearby rural settings. 5. The promotion of residencies would not only be good for the arts, but would also contribute to the development of an internationally recognised brand for Canberra as an attractive, very livable, multi-dimensional national capital that values arts, culture and the exchange of ideas. 6. A further major advantage of programs includes attracting professional artists to come to and/or stay in Canberra. With the size of population and location of the ACT there are some perceptions from artists of an element of artistic isolation, which would be actively addressed by a high-profile program with a central aim of artistic engagement. Canberra could increasingly be recognised as a lively, interesting, connected and artistically deep and diverse place to live as an artist. 7. As noted earlier, there have been previous successful initiatives with Artists in Residence programs in various locations, working with different art forms in the ACT. All feedback through the review about these arrangements has been very positive. Artists, arts organisations and artsACT are all enthusiastic about expanding this initiative. 8. The ACT has a clear and current opportunity to develop a special identity and reputation as a national and international leader in artist residency programs. The ACT could build on its strengths in this area and attract federal arts funding, particularly through the Australia Council for the Arts, to build a significant suite of Artist in Residence programs. 9. Most programs to date have been quite informal, which could lead to misinterpretations and difficulties if this program was to develop. There do not currently appear to be clear protocols, strategies or expectations in relation to either essential facilities or agreements with artists. There are also local artists accessing studios and other facilities under a variety of arrangements. These related issues would need to be addressed comprehensively in the development of an expanded suite of Artists in Residence programs.

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10. The 2010-11 ACT Budget provided capital works funding for five new studios for the Canberra Potters Society at Watson. The Potters Society is developing a residency program, ready for when the construction is complete. This kind of commitment should be a requirement with any future Government investment in these kinds of facilities. 11. Chief Minister and Minister for Education and Training partnered with the Australia Council for the Arts to deliver an Artist in Residence Initiative in ACT schools. The Creative Education Partnership: Artist in Residence Initiative aims to give artists an opportunity to broaden their experiences and share their skills, while providing students with greater exposure to the benefits of creative practice. The program also creates opportunities for artists and teachers to work together to develop the best arts teaching methods. This is an excellent Artist in Residence initiative with clear benefits for artists, children, teachers, the arts and education. It is hoped this will continue to receive support from both Governments. 6.6.3 Recommendations 1. There should be a significant suite of ongoing ACT Government funded Artists in Residence programs in the ACT. This would provide major benefits to professional artists, the arts community, education and the public. Canberra is ideally placed to promote these programs as part of the national capital’s commitment to the arts and should seek funding support from the Australia Council. 2. A comprehensive strategy and action plan will be essential if a major commitment to Artist in Residence programs is to be fully successful. This would include: priority artist and art form needs; interested partners in arts organisations, National Cultural Institutions, schools, training institutions, universities and other agencies; planning for suitable artist studios or other facilities; accommodation; opportunities for innovation; marketing and promotion; standard agreements so that all resources and costs are known, and the expectations (such as mentoring, workshops, art exhibitions, etc) and entitlements of artists are clearly spelt out. 3. A commitment to direct participation in residency and mentoring programs should be a requirement of any future ACT Government investment in arts facilities such as the new studios for the Canberra Potters Society.

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6.7 Community Participation in the Arts The range of people interested and involved in community arts is very broad and there is a thriving community arts scene in Canberra. Government support, particularly in the form of facilities and funding of Key Arts Organisations working in the community arts area, is highly valued. It is widely recognised that participation in community arts activities delivers important social outcomes and contributes positively to the culture and quality of life of the ACT. A clear policy framework needs to inform Government’s support for community participation in the arts and to add clarity to the connections and distinctions between community and professional arts in the ACT. 6.7 Issues and Analysis 1. The ACT Government has a dual role of Territory and local Government. It therefore has a responsibility to provide appropriate support to for both community participation in the arts and for professional arts. 2. Government has an important leadership role beyond funding and resourcing, to promote the extensive benefits to individual and social well-being of community arts and to aim to increase participation in community arts. 3. Community arts, like professional arts, are important in their own right, and many people, including volunteers, should receive recognition for their vital contributions. A proposal in this report for awards for the arts should include full recognition of people who make outstanding contributions to community arts. 4. Community arts can and do make a valuable contribution to improved health, social and even economic outcomes for all Canberrans who participate. 5. Community arts facilities and activities should be accessible to all, enabling the participation of all individuals and community groups in arts and cultural activity to contribute to social inclusion and harmony. It is important for Government to ensure access to community arts for all population groups, including youth, aged, Indigenous, multi-cultural and people with disabilities. Indigenous people are involved in both community and professional arts. 6. It is proposed that the major funding focus for Government for community arts should be the provision of appropriate, accessible facilities. The priorities of access to and participation in community arts can be extended through the greater use of lower-cost multi-purpose spaces. Libraries and school facilities also play an important locally-based role in supporting and providing accessible outlets and facilities for community arts activities. 7. In most cases, community arts recipients of Government funding or support, should be expected to generate revenue from a variety of sources including membership fees and the sale of art, with the aim of becoming as self-sufficient and independent as possible. Many community-based artists and arts groups appear to already be highly active and effective in achieving this.

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8. While community arts should be valued principally for their contribution to individual creative satisfaction and social cohesion, they are also important in enabling the transition of younger people from being community or amateur artists to being professional artists. There need to be mechanisms to identify and support young community artists who want to take steps to become professional artists. Conversely, effective support for professional arts can also stimulate community arts activity. 9. It is proposed in this report that a major future goal for the ACT Government from funding, leadership and promotion should be to increase participation in the arts. This would be important to be recognised in agencies beyond artsACT, as increased participation in the arts would in turn contribute to a healthier, happier, safer and more satisfied community. 10. ‘Quality’ appears to be a dominant criterion in deciding whether ACT Government provides funding support for the arts. While ‘quality’ and ‘excellence’ are certainly not unimportant, they can mean very different things to different people, depending on perspectives including: level of artistic skill in specific art forms, age, gender, cultural background and even the motivation of the artist. It is suggested that for community arts, the primary aim should be ‘participation’ and perhaps ‘genuine creative satisfaction’, rather than the production of ‘quality’ art. This also implies the need for different performance expectations and measures for communitybased arts. 11. It was suggested that there is often misunderstanding from within Government about what is wanted and needed in community arts. Community consultation should be encouraged and communication mechanisms need to be established between Government and community organisations, as well as decentralising support and outreach arrangements as far as possible. 12. Business sometimes can be overlooked when considering possible sources of support for community arts. The reviewers were advised that Canberra is no different to the rest of Australia in that, with energy and commitment from community arts groups, local businesses in particular have been prepared to provide some funding and value-in-kind support to arts as well as to sport to demonstrate their interest and commitment in their local community. These initiatives should be encouraged with community organisations and businesses. 13. Before becoming directly involved in community arts activities, festivals or events, the ACT Government should test community views to ensure that their involvement would be necessary, helpful and welcomed. The public rather than Government should be the proprietors of community arts and Government’s role should be supportive of and secondary to community wishes. Generally speaking, Government funding for community arts should be quite limited as in most locations around Australia and focused primarily on the provision of facilities. 14. In deciding future community arts funding priorities for both facilities and activities, Government should give priority to dynamic community organisations and groups that are open, connected and welcoming to their communities and share the Government’s commitment to increasing public participation in the arts. There should also be consideration of new distribution mechanisms to reduce the cost of grants allocation administration.

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Amateur Artists 15. Amateur is a problematic term that people and governments often prefer to avoid because of possible misunderstandings about meaning. It has been decided to include mention of amateur artists, as they are an important component of arts activity with particular requirements. The reviewer’s definition is the usual, simple, technical one that an amateur artist does not expect to receive payment for their services, though in some cases they may be given a share of profits. So, in formal terms of compensation, are non-professional. It certainly does not mean that they are inept or unskilled, and the artistic endeavour is often professional in its intent. 16. In most cases amateur artists have a very strong interest in and passion for their art, and in many cases they have similar requirements for facilities and venues to professional artists. The area where amateur artists are most clearly identified in the ACT is with amateur theatre, which enjoys high levels of participation and also attracts strong audiences. In many ways this reflects the high levels of participation in the arts in the ACT and a healthy theatre culture. 17. However, there was a message from ACT professional theatre practitioners that the amateur scene can mould audience expectations in relation to quality, ticket prices and theatre experience, which can make it difficult for professional theatre to differentiate their offerings to the public. artsACT is generally appreciated for its strong support for amateur theatre, particularly through the provision of quality purpose-built facilities at ‘peppercorn’ rents. 18. In some cases, especially younger people, will make the transition from being amateur artists to being professional artists. Also, a number of former professional artists, or artists who are unable for some reason to pursue a professional career become actively involved with amateur artists who have serious purpose but do not set out to receive payment. In summary, as amateur artists are distinct from professional artists who seek to earn a living from their art, they are generally included in this report as part of the large number of keen and committed people who participate in community arts. General 19. The reviewers were told that there is a complicating factor in deciding funding priorities, in that professional art in Canberra can often begin through participation in community or amateur arts activity. However, it was suggested that effective support for professional arts can actually stimulate the community arts scene. A clear policy focus needs to frame Government support for the arts to add clarity to the distinction between community, amateur and professional arts, which is currently confused by Government, artists and audiences. Apparently the Canberra media can also be idiosyncratic, reflecting the interests, tastes and judgements of individual journalists, reviewers and editors. Through the media’s own form of ‘bundling’ of arts coverage in articles, items or reviews there can be a lack of clarity about whether the subject performances or exhibitions are professional, amateur or community. This can in turn impact on public impressions about the range, quality and value of the arts in the ACT.

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6.7 Recommendations 1. The ACT Government’s primary goal in support for community arts should be to increase participation in the arts, rather than to achieve artistic quality or excellence. 2. The main focus of funding for community arts should be the provision of appropriate, accessible facilities. 3. In most cases, community arts recipients of Government funding or support, should be expected to generate revenue from a variety of sources including membership fees, workshops, the sale of art, and support from local businesses, with the aim of becoming as self-sufficient and independent as possible. 4. Community artists who have outstanding talent and interests in becoming professional artists should be identified and supported. Effective consultation and communication mechanisms need to be established with community arts organisations. 5. The ACT Government should test community opinion before becoming directly involved in community arts activities, festivals or events, to ensure that Government involvement would be needed, beneficial and welcomed. 6. Government should give funding priority to dynamic organisations and groups that are open, connected and welcoming to their communities and share the Government’s commitment to increasing public participation in the arts. 7. Funding for community arts should, as far as possible, be allocated at the regional level through Tuggeranong and Belconnen Arts Centres, with oversight from artsACT. In this way, decisions about community arts priorities would be decentralised and administrative costs minimised.

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6.8 Public Art There has been a major Public Art initiative in the ACT in recent years which has been overwhelmingly driven by the commitment of the Chief Minister. The ACT now has about 200 public artworks, including some outstanding works by renowned Australian artists. 6.8 Issues and Analysis 1. The ACT Government showed vision in recognising that public art could be an integral part of public spaces and play a part in defining Canberra’s identity as a community by building on Griffin’s legacy. Public art can contribute to connecting residents and visitors to the landscape and to public places. 2. A more focused and strategic approach has been taken to public art in recent years, including the formation of an ACT Public Art Panel in 2006 to advise Government on new artworks and on managing existing public art, and the release in 2007 of an Action Statement for Public Art. While there has not been a publicly released plan for the future placement of public art, there was a stated determination to commission and buy public art to be placed at key locations and gateways in the ACT. 3. Obviously public art has become quite a significant public issue, which has generated a level of public concern and criticism. However, aside from a few specific pieces and issues, there has been a widespread response through the review that Chief Minister’s initiative to support public art is widely appreciated. The vast majority in all public consultations and arts sector workshops and meetings wanted the public art program to continue with some changes in process. 4. The major criticisms through the review have been about process rather than the initiative. The focus of criticism was an apparent lack of planning, consultation and transparency. There were suggestions that there does not appear to be a clear plan of where public art will be placed, what should be bought and what should be commissioned, and how these decisions are made. 5. A clearer policy framework around Public Art would assist greatly in setting direction and addressing some negative perceptions. These policies would begin with the component of a Cultural Facilities Plan that would indicate future placement of Public Art around the ACT and the associated consultation and decision-making processes. The Public Art policy would also outline how decisions to procure will be made, including: who recommends and decides, what is sought, timing, as well as where and from whom it may be purchased, commissioned or received as a gift. Public Art policy should also include a future policy focused role for artsACT with another organisation handling installation; how ongoing curatorial oversight will be managed to ensure the assets are properly maintained; and possibly future funding arrangements for Public Art.

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6. Through consultations, there seemed to be little awareness of the Public Art Panel and questions were asked about its members’ qualifications in public art and how decisions are made. While the Public Art Panel obviously includes distinguished artists, and there is no criticism of its recommendations, there does not appear to be particular specialist knowledge of public art. 7. Also, the Public Art Panel’s role and level of involvement in the procurement process appeared to be quite inconsistent. Perhaps in future, after the current Panel’s term expires, procurement recommendations could be made by the new Arts Fund Panel, drawing if necessary on public art specialists. There is also a real need to clarify the Panel’s role, including the circumstances in which the Panel’s advice would be sought and the status of its recommendations. It is expected that the Minister for the Arts and Heritage would approve at least all major purchases and commissions. 8. There were some suggestions that more works should be commissioned from local artists. However, many argued that it was totally appropriate for the ACT Government to buy and commission work locally, nationally and internationally. 9. Some artists argued that commissioned art works better when it is installed because of awareness of art for the location. There were criticisms of the procurement process, which was not seen as sufficiently flexible to recognise particular issues related to the commissioning of art. However, advice was received that actions have been taken recently to address these concerns by improving the Government’s commissioning process for Public Art. 10. Many people from the public and the arts sector strongly pressed for the need to retain Public Art and to extend the initiative beyond sculpture. Public art could incorporate other visual arts, creative landscape, music and even soundscapes. 11. There has obviously been strong and genuine public concern about aspects of Public Art, including the selection and placement of some of the works. These concerns appear to have been encouraged to some extent rather than reflected by some media coverage. Several people through the consultations said that they regretted that they had not been more vocal in support for the overall thrust of benefits from the Public Art initiative. There was a growing impression from public forums and other feedback that many from the public and the media who had been relatively neutral or even critics were becoming more aware of the overall benefits, and have started to ‘own’ and value their city’s Public Art. 12. The vast majority suggested that some version of the percent for art scheme should be retained to continue to be able to provide Public Art to the ACT. However, some would like to see funding from percent for art directed to a wider range of arts in the ACT. Most providing input to the review seemed to feel that, while policy and process should be clarified, the Public Art program had been overwhelmingly positive for Canberra, and whatever the funding source in the future, Canberrans did not want to see Public Art discontinued.

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6.8 Recommendations 1. There have been real public concerns about some aspects of Public Art, but the initiative has had significant, widely recognised benefits for the ACT. Concerns about the need for a clearer policy on selection and placement should be addressed, but the vast majority of people through this review strongly pressed to retain Public Art, preferably with the percent for art scheme, and to extend the initiative beyond sculpture to incorporate other arts. This view is supported and recommended because Public Art has generally been an excellent initiative with major current and future benefits to the arts and particularly to the image and amenity of ACT. 2. Public Art needs a clear policy framework to set direction and address concerns. A future Cultural Facilities Plan should indicate future placement of Public Art, as well as associated consultation and decision-making processes. The Public Art policy would include funding arrangements, who recommends and decides what is bought, commissioned or received as a gift, when, where and from whom. artsACT would have a policy role including ensuring ongoing curatorial oversight, with another appropriate organisation handling installation. After the Public Art Panel’s term expires, the Arts Fund Panel should make recommendations, with any appropriate specialist Public Art advice.

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6.9 Venues and Facilities There is a wide variety and range of quality of arts facilities for all art forms in Canberra. 6.9 Issues and Analysis 1. The strong interest in the arts in Canberra is reflected by a strong demand for venues and facilities. There was considerable discussion and passion about priorities, ranging from a new lyric theatre, to a professional dance space, to greater use of empty school buildings, to shop fronts for young and emerging artists, to more places for artists in residence. 2. Venues and facilities in the ACT are currently managed in an ad-hoc manner by a variety of Government agencies which has led to inconsistencies, duplication and inefficiencies. A clear Cultural Facilities Plan is required. 3. A lack of accurate data about arts facilities and venues makes it very difficult to create informed policy. It is understood that some recent action has been taken by artsACT. A full audit of arts and cultural facilities in the ACT is needed across all agencies to develop a consolidated list of community, amateur and professional venues and facilities including the number, location, nature, repairs and maintenance issues, ownership and rental arrangements. 4. Ownership of a number of arts facilities and responsibility for repairs and maintenance currently rests with artsACT. A small, dedicated team works long hours and does a very good job, which is widely appreciated by the KAOs. There are also clear advantages of ownership of arts facilities resting with an organisation that understands the arts. However, this arrangement initially seemed to be inefficient as it is an area of expertise outside artsACT’s core capabilities. Therefore, transferring ownership of venues and facilities from artsACT to the ACT Property Group and giving artsACT a Custodian type role was strongly considered in this review. However, after discussions with artsACT, Heritage, and Property Group, it became clear that there could be problems for artsACT to have effective policy input on arts facilities issues and requirements with the ACT Property Group owning the buildings. 5. There is already recognition that for specialist buildings such as schools and hospitals, ownership remains with the agencies because it appears that the ACT Property Group is currently more focussed on and experienced with standard office buildings than with specialist buildings. As a result, there could be serious risk to arts and heritage buildings if they were handed over to the ACT Property Group without some change in the way that specialist facilities are protected and maintained. Therefore, at this stage artsACT should retain ownership so that they are able to maintain effective policy control, but should outsource building maintenance, either to the ACT Property Group or some external organisation.

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Effective specialist facilities management is an issue that the ACT Government may want to consider more broadly as a whole of Government property reform. Ownership of all heritage buildings is a separate matter dealt with elsewhere in this report. 6. A key concern about venues and facilities is the considerable variation of rents paid for Government owned buildings. This is an historic problem that a number of agencies are currently grappling with. In general, Key Arts Organisations pay no rent for the buildings they occupy and other arts organisations range from paying no rent, to different levels of community rent, to commercial rent. Currently a considerable proportion of the arts fund is directed to building and rental costs so the rationalisation of rental arrangements must be a high priority for Government. This process needs to be undertaken carefully and thoughtfully because changing rental arrangements can have big affects on both Government budgets and the budgets of arts organisations. 7. In reviewing rental arrangements, the issue of access by artists to facilities such as studios also requires attention, in relation to both rental rates and duration of access. As with arts organisations, there are not surprisingly a wide range of different circumstances and arrangements that have developed over time. The issue of inconsistent historical arrangements is usually one for ‘the too hard basket’ because of potential disruption. Great sensitivity and full consultation would be necessary, but these issues cannot be overlooked in light of the important connection between facilities and policy, and the fact that a number of young and emerging artists raised their need for access to low-cost facilities such as studios. It is not suggested that Government should take full, or even major responsibility to fund facilities for artists, but there must be seen to be consistent, fair and equitable arrangements for all. It is expected that Government would usually not fund ongoing low cost facilities for artists, especially if they are not full-time professionals, and when this ‘blocks’ access for emerging artists who really need support while they attempt to become established. A standard ACT Government rental agreement, perhaps with escalating rents after an initial term, and maximum durations of availability could reflect this intention. 8. The repairs and maintenance budget for arts facilities is unrealistically low. The cost and complexity of maintaining arts facilities requires specialist advice and budgeting. There should be a realistic cultural asset maintenance plan to enable proper budget planning, approvals and accountability. The absence of such planning delivers short and especially longer-term budget risks to Government. 9. There does not appear to be a capital budget beyond specific arts building projects. This puts inevitable pressures on the Arts Minister and on Treasury with a continuing cycle of one-off funding proposals. 10. While it is important that there is greater recognition of the costs to Government associated with providing arts facilities, the ACT Government should continue to contribute to the arts by facilitating access to venues and facilities to assist in further building participation. In the community arts sphere in particular, access to facilities may be the Government’s major contribution. Therefore, it is important to

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fully utilise all potential community arts facilities such as school halls, and where possible, university facilities. Government could broker relationships in this area and possibly even set up a central venue booking system, which could be established in conjunction with relevant agencies. The need to identify times of peak demand was acknowledged to enable efficient use. 11. There does not appear to be clear delineation of the different facility requirements of professional, amateur and community arts, or of rehearsal spaces, compared to performance or exhibition spaces for audiences. 12. It was suggested by some artists that the growth of professional arts practice in the ACT could be aided by careful planning of the range and mix of arts venues. There are many small community venues and there are some large, good quality venues in Canberra such as Llewellyn Hall and the Canberra Theatre, but these are too large for most local artists and certainly too expensive to hire. There seems to be opportunity for more mid-sized venues for professional arts. 13. A clear view from professional artists was that multi-purpose spaces have limited application for professional artists, and that there are not enough purpose-built facilities for some art forms. There is seen to be a shortage of a number of specialist facilities for professional arts practice, display and performance in areas including music, theatre, dance and the visual arts. 14. The observation was offered on several occasions that the availability of suitable venues for some types of professional arts practice, such as dance, is vital to the continued existence in Canberra of those art forms. For example, the Australian Ballet will no longer visit the ACT because there is not seen to be an appropriate venue. 15. Artists in Canberra said that they dream of having an ‘Institution of Culture’ which would incorporate all the arts, including Indigenous, multi-cultural and educational. This facility could incorporate a performing arts centre, which would be highly valued by both Canberrans and visitors. This would be very costly. It is suggested that possibly this, and other ideas of substance and merit, could be considered as part of a consultation process associated with a new Cultural Facilities Plan. 16. Government owned purpose built arts facilities, such as the Belconnen and Tuggeranong Community Arts Centres are highly valued by the community. There was an indication of demand and expectation for more similar facilities in other regional locations. Community Arts Centres may in future become hubs for the use of a range of multi-purpose facilities in the area and for other community arts activity. There is a lot of demand for space at night and weekend. Better use could be made for community arts through using schools as community centres. 17. While the Belconnen Arts Centre is generally recognised as a high quality facility, many people seemed to be confused about whether its purpose and target was for established or emerging artists. It was suggested by some professional artists that if it is for community, possibly too much money was spent to satisfy community needs. If it is for professional artists, there was criticism about a lack of clear, effective consultation, which could have delivered a better, more professional

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result for the same investment. Also in relation to the Belconnen Arts Centre, there was criticism from community and emerging artists that well-known, successful artists had been invited to show there, while opportunities for others seem to be more limited. There were also suggestions that they were attempting to do too much. There apparently was consultation, and Belconnen is appreciated, but the conclusion here is the need to consult more, and clearly communicate on purpose. 18. There are ACT funded organisations that can provide access to studio facilities for artists. These include M16 and ANCA. There are issues relating to quite different models of accommodation, with M16 having had difficulties finding a suitable facility at affordable rental. There is the strange situation with ANCA, where a Government owned building was apparently given to the organisation with unclear expectations from both parties about the future. This is not a desirable situation as, while Government has given up a valuable public asset and therefore has limited control, there still seem to be ongoing needs for Government funding. Other organisations appear to be aware of this situation, which can appear to be inequitable. It would be desirable to discuss and resolve this if possible by reviewing future ownership and funding arrangements. 19. There appear to be changing demands for community arts facilities. For instance there is a rapidly growing interest in dance and creative computer-based activities for young people, which require additional spaces. These kinds of demands could be met with flexibly designed, multi-purpose spaces, including the low-cost redevelopment of existing, under-utilised spaces. 20. The ACT community seems to have developed the expectation of free access to arts facilities. For example, during the consultations there were many artists who suggested that Government should invest in more studio spaces. It was clear that facilities and spaces for the creation of work were highly valued, but there seemed to be little consideration for the real cost of those spaces, and an unrealistic expectation that the spaces should be made available to artists and community arts for little or no cost. There also appear to be communication issues in relation to availability of professional spaces. Though circumstances change, artsACT was aware of spaces that artists did not seem to have been aware of, which could be addressed by some form of central register or other communication mechanism. 21. The issues of both physical access for people with disabilities and transport access for disadvantaged groups need to be considered in considering the provision of arts facilities and venues.

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6.9 Recommendations 1. A full audit of arts and cultural facilities in the ACT is needed across all agencies to develop a consolidated list of community, amateur and professional venues and facilities including the number, location, nature, repairs and maintenance issues, ownership and rental arrangements. 2. artsACT should retain ownership and control of all non-heritage arts facilities, but responsibility for repairs and maintenance should be transferred or outsourced with a realistic budget from the small, dedicated team to external specialists in this area. 3. Rental rates for arts organisations and access to arts studios and facilities for artists are based on a variety of ad hoc and historical arrangements. There is an important and pressing need to review all rents and access arrangements to ensure clarity and consistency, reflecting Government arts goals and priorities.

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6.10 Cultural Facilities Planning Effective planning is vital to provide a vision for the future of the arts in Canberra, as well as to guide major Government investment in arts infrastructure. 6.10 Issues and Analysis 1. The time appears to be right for the Chief Minister to articulate an arts and cultural planning vision for the next 20 to 30 years. The current review of the arts in Canberra is likely to lead to new arts policies and strategies within a new Canberra Arts Policy. 2. A Canberra Arts Policy would in turn inform a longer-term Cultural Facilities Plan. It is important that there is a clear Plan as a single point of reference when deciding future funding priorities for venues and facilities. There also needs to be a Cultural Facilities Asset Management Plan so that costs of asset maintenance are properly planned and built into budgets. 3. A Cultural Facilities Plan would be consistent with arts policy, and include plans for both professional and community arts venues and facilities for the next 20 to 30 years, as well as being integrated into Territory and City planning. Such a Plan would include: core cultural facilities, future arts precincts, heritage buildings, regional arts facilities, multiple use facilities such as school arts centres, other buildings and venues with arts or cultural significance, and the future placement of public art. It would also present a clear vision for new major developments of cultural facilities such as the possibility of a major new Lyric Theatre for Canberra. It must also recognise the need to adapt existing buildings and venues, particularly for community arts use. 4. It is suggested that an Inter-Departmental Committee (IDC) might be established to begin to develop the Government’s Cultural Facilities Plan with CMD taking a central role, but incorporating input from the key areas of Government that currently have responsibility for cultural facilities such as artsACT, the CFC, TAMS, DET, DHCS, the ACT Planning and Land Authority, and Treasury. This steering committee would also oversee the transition in Government to a more coordinated planning approach for cultural facilities. Planning and managing the transition would be important from both operational and budgetary perspectives. 5. The Plan should be developed in an open and inclusive process of consultation with all relevant stakeholders including planning bodies, the National Capital Authority, the arts sector, other relevant agencies, business and the Canberra community. Opportunities for cooperation and possible cost-sharing and other partnerships would be expected to be tested as a part of this process. 6. Accessibility issues including public transport and parking availability, as well as disability access would be expected to be standard, consistent planning considerations. Planned arts facilities would also take account of and connect with existing and planned developments and facilities like schools, commercial, community and residential facilities and accommodation, as well as with other arts

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facilities. The most efficient expenditure of public funds to achieve priority arts outcomes would also be important considerations for Government. 7. The Cultural Facilities Plan would enable a planned, strategic approach to the delivery of everything from community arts facilities, to highly specialised professional arts venues and facilities, to art form-based and multi-art form precincts. Planning would need to take account of facilities across the Capital Region. 8. Master Planning would be likely to be needed for major arts precincts to add necessary planning detail to key developments. City West and Kingston are clear examples. There has been recent recognition by the ACT Government of the need for detailed planning for the Kingston arts precinct with approval for the development of a Kingston Arts Precinct Strategy. This is a very positive development, and this initiative would be further enhanced if it was included as a key component of an ACT Cultural Facilities Plan. 9. Effective planning for arts precincts can be a powerful way to create critical mass for art forms. However, in meeting the needs of individual art forms, care needs to be care taken to avoid the ‘siloing’ of art forms, which can limit the opportunities for creative partnerships across art forms, and the enjoyment of audiences. 10. It was interesting to note the interest of ACT Health during the review in the possible future role of public art in the redevelopment of Canberra Hospital, and other arts in the delivery of a range of health services. An announcement for a major arts facility to be built in a school was also noted. These initiatives are to be applauded, but also demonstrate the value of a Plan, including input from relevant agencies, so that all ACT agencies are aware of Government strategies and priorities for arts facilities across Government and across Canberra. 11. Business also appears to be increasingly showing active interest in public art both inside and outside company buildings. It will be important in involve business, and private owners of cultural businesses and facilities in Government cultural facilities planning. They can contribute ideas, make informed decisions about their own planning, and possibly partner and cost-share with Government in some initiatives. 12. A Cultural Facilities Plan would be a spatial vision and framework for future arts and cultural facilities development in Canberra. It would be expected that the Plan would be reviewed from time to time to ensure it continued to respond to ongoing and emerging needs of the arts, the community, the city and the ACT. 13. There was a good deal of interest during the review in any likely plans for future community arts facilities in other Canberra regions with the opening of the Belconnen Arts Centre. It was suggested that other regions also had needs for community arts facilities and suggested that a long-term plan would be welcomed. There were also several comments about the need for community and arts consultations as part of any future planning process

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14. Another input from review consultations was that a Cultural Facilities Plan, sitting alongside clear arts policies, would help avoid arts sector and public confusion and criticism about what can appear at times to be ad hoc decisions, rather than decisions based on clear plans and policy priorities, about arts expenditure. 15. A further factor that arose during review consultations was that while planning for arts facilities, public art and precincts were highly desirable, arts organisations and artists would have their own views, and to some extent precincts in particular should continue to evolve naturally. These were seen as further reasons for some level of flexibility, responsiveness and lightness of touch, as well as high levels of arts sector and public consultation in the development of a Cultural Facilities Plan. 6.10 Recommendations 1. The ACT Government should develop an ACT Cultural Facilities Plan, to be led by Chief Minister’s Department, consistent with the new arts policy, with plans for professional and community arts venues and facilities for the next 20 to 30 years. The Plan would include: core cultural facilities, future arts precincts, heritage buildings, regional and multiple use facilities, and any new major developments of cultural facilities for Canberra. The Plan should be developed in an open and collaborative process with input from all key stakeholders.

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6.11 Governance 6.11 Issues and Analysis 1. It is essential that funding of any organisation or artist is supported by a proper level of probity and process and considerations about appropriate levels of governance. Governance arrangements are a legitimate concern of the ACT Government in deciding which arts organisations and artists to support and the extent of that support. 2. Government should not seek to be overly interventionist or directive about how non-Government organisations are governed. They should rather require that organisations meet principles and standards of governance and require confirmation that these have been met. 3. Organisations should be responsible for the ways in which governance principles are applied. Government should assist by providing suggestions and advice on how appropriate governance standards might best be achieved. Examples of useful advice could be the inclusion in Board meeting agendas at the beginning of a meeting for Board members to declare any change of circumstance that could lead to a conflict of interest, and during a meeting to withdraw themselves from any discussion or decision where there may be a conflict of interest. 4. Steps were taken by artsACT to improve what were seen to be unacceptable governance arrangements in some Key Arts Organisations (KAOs). There is evidence to support these concerns, so quite reasonably, steps were taken to require improved governance arrangements on KAO Boards. Through the review, while several KAOs acknowledged that there had been some serious conflict of interest in issues requiring attention, very few supported the approach and stance taken by artsACT to address these concerns. 5. Unfortunately, there were some unintended consequences from these actions by artsACT that were aimed at improving governance. artsACT’s requirements in the 2010 Arts Fund booklet generated a great deal of concern from KAOs, which was very evident and consistent through the extensive consultations in this review. “It has created a them and us situation with artsACT”. The requirements included that KAO Board Members “cannot be employed, or otherwise remunerated by the organisation in any capacity. Board or staff members also cannot benefit from the organisation’s programs or services.” There were obviously genuine concerns from KAOs that what were widely seen as overly restrictive guidelines would result in the exclusion of many capable and committed Board members. 6. Even those organisations that believed that supported action said that the inflexibility of the governance guidelines were inappropriate for the ACT. The relatively small population size meant that for some of the KAOs it is very difficult to find Board members who are interested in the art form who won’t be seen to have some sort of conflict of interest. This could lead to the exclusion of those few people with knowledge, experience and passion from involvement in directing the activities of arts organisations.

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7. KAOs involved in community arts argued that having a Board passionate about the art form leads to much better results. There were some proposals to invite more input from outside Canberra onto Boards. This may help with conflict of interest issues as artists with more specialised art form knowledge could be included. 8. ACT Government governance requirements can be seen as overly demanding of non-Government organisations that sometimes receive quite low levels and proportions of their funding from Government. This could have contributed to some broader negative perceptions from KAOs, that were evident in the review. artsACT, while generally respected as being committed and trying to do the right thing, could often be regarded as interventionist, bureaucratic, not listening, and lacking an appreciation of the difficulties of running arts organisations with limited funding, low-paid workers and volunteer Boards. 9. It has been good to note very recently that artsACT has heard and responded to the strong concerns expressed by KAOs. The governance guidelines in the 2011 Arts Fund Booklet are far less directive, but still require appropriate governance arrangements. They now state: “The ACT Government requires all Key Arts Organisation to have in place formal conflict of interest management policies and procedures. The policy/procedures need to include that any board or staff conflicts are declared, discussed and decision made on how the conflict will be managed at board meetings. In general, Key Arts Organisation should limit – to the maximum extent possible – actual or perceived conflicts of interests. Sub-committees including external representatives can be used to assist with avoiding conflicts of interest.” 10. These are now sensible and appropriate guidelines. Unfortunately, it was clear from the review, that while the development of the 2010 guidelines had positive intentions, it did not include sufficient consultation and consideration of unintended consequences. This appeared to have a quite negative and damaging impact on the relationship between artsACT and some KAOs, and on impressions about artsACT’s communication and operational style. While the 2011 guidelines will no doubt help, there is expected to be more work to be done to build relationships and trust. KAOs depend on artsACT recommendations for funding, and were very cautious about the confidentiality of their comments, so it is unlikely that artsACT would be fully aware of the extent and depth of various KAO concerns. 11. It is useful for Government to suggest sources of further information on governance to KAOs. The Australia Council has a booklet on governance called ‘On Board’ and the Australia Business Arts Foundation now provides workshops and information on governance which are valued by KAOs. 12. BoardConnect is an excellent initiative involving a Brisbane consulting firm and supported by Arts Queensland. It is a service designed to provide capacity building and ongoing governance support for boards of arts and cultural organisations in Queensland. BoardConnect has developed a series of public programs and support services including a help line, fact sheets, workshops and round tables. The ACT may not be large enough to justify a separate arrangement but the model would be worth investigation, including testing whether a partnership arrangement in the ACT would be feasible.

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13. With the proposal elsewhere in this report to take steps to consolidate the number of arts organisations receiving funding, this could assist in minimising some of the issues relating to governance and communication. However, a strong consultative mechanism and cooperative approach will be essential from the outset on all future arrangements and Government requirements. 6.11 Recommendations 1. Principles of good governance and risk management in arts organisations should be developed, communicated and promoted in a positive and collaborative way with arts organisations and the arts sector, and information should be provided on where useful governance advice can be accessed, such as through the Australia Council and the Australia Business Arts Foundation.

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6.12 Data and Research 6.12 Issues and Analysis 1. There is a clear need for data and research to inform evidence based arts policy. This has been identified as an important area which is currently lacking adequate resources and focus. 2. There is currently insufficient information available on the arts in the ACT to be able to make fully informed decisions about policy or even Government decisions about priorities. 3. Business cases, performance goals, monitoring and measurement against key performance indicators (KPIs) should be a part of reviewing performance in all area of the arts. 4. Important future Government goals are likely to include increasing participation in the arts, supporting quality art and retaining and attracting professional artists. Performance areas and targets will need to be determined, measured and tracked. 5. One early area of interest for data collection is likely to be about the number of professional artists working in, leaving and returning to the ACT. An associated important issue for data collection is the art forms in which they are involved. 6. An area where data collection is particularly important is measuring the impact of the arts on economic development including the number of people attending arts events and the extent to which the same people are involved in multiple arts activities. 7. There is a need for both quantitative and qualitative information to help inform policy development, including changing public issues and priorities. Qualitative information can be used to track trends in interests and satisfaction over time. 8. It is desirable to give significant consideration at an early stage to what information will be collected in coming years to enable benchmarking and ongoing tracking of performance. The most appropriate measures should be considered for the public, arts audiences, community arts and professional arts. This should take full account of measures adopted in other jurisdictions. 9. More effectively coordinated and regulated ticketing arrangements could provide more current and consolidated information, as well as savings to arts organisations. Data from computerised ticketing is an area which should be able to provide very prompt and useful information for Government, with minimal additional cost. This should be a priority for artsACT investigation and facilitation. 10. An important area where there appears to be a shortage of data or inaccessible data is the level of community access to different art forms in different locations. This makes it difficult to make evidence based decisions around planning for facilities and deciding on funding priorities for community arts.

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11. There is also very limited demographic data in the arts and it is currently difficult to track the involvement of important population groups such as Indigenous, disabled, non-English speaking background, women, ageing and youth. It will be proposed that organisations receiving funding must commit to including these groups, and it will be important for Government to benchmark and track overall progress. 12. There does not appear to be a great deal of cooperation across Government including between agencies in data collection and research. artsACT should work with other agencies, as well as with the National Cultural Institutions (NCIs), universities, arts organisations and others who may be able to assist in data collection and research. . 13. The Cultural Minister’s Council has a Statistics Working Group which provides extensive Australia-wide data and information on the arts and cultural sector. This provides a clear foundation of the kind of information and means of expressing it, which the ACT should use as a guide in establishing a data and research capability within artsACT. 14. All possible opportunities should be taken by artsACT to pursue coordination and to develop partnerships to minimise cost and maximise value. 15. There seems to be little data available on the arts in education and training, ranging from children and young people involved in arts studies to the adequacy of higher level training and professional development in arts practice in the ACT. 16. Systems do not seem to be as well developed for the arts as they are for sport to capture data about participation in and attendance of activities and events. There may be value in investigating whether any of sport’s mechanisms of data collection could be transferable to the arts. 6.12 Recommendations 1. Consistent collection of quantitative and qualitative data and research is essential to inform policy development, enable evidence based decision-making, and assist in tracking performance, which in turn should inform funding and resourcing decisions. There needs to be a commitment to developing a data and research resource and capability in artsACT. 2. Undertake an audit of currently available data, and identify gaps in data and useful and reliable data sources that have been used by other jurisdictions, organisations, agencies, universities or institutions. Develop systems to simplify data collection and analysis, and partnerships to minimise costs in gathering data and research. Coordinated, computerised ticketing arrangements could provide very prompt and useful audience information with minimal additional cost. Maximise the use of costefficient online surveys, including through a new artsACT website.

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6.13 Communication, Marketing and Promotion Effective communication is essential between artists, arts organisations, community arts, the wider arts sector, the media and the public. This is important not only in marketing and promotion, but also in professional development and arts event planning, as well as in awareness of emerging issues, challenges and opportunities in the arts. 6.13 Issues and Analysis 1. There was overwhelming feedback that communication, marketing and promotion of the arts in the ACT are fractured and ineffective. It was recognised that it is not necessarily the Government’s role to promote the arts, but there is a clear need that is not currently being met. Many are aware that artsACT has had involvement with arts promotion through the funding of Canberra Arts Marketing (CAM) and MUSE. The arts sector clearly remembers a commitment from Government to fill the void when these organisations were defunded. 2. When CAM was defunded, the arts community was apparently told that an arts development officer in artsACT would take on this role. This has not eventuated. 3. While there was some acknowledgement that there had been problems with previous arts marketing organisations, these were seen to be more related to execution, than to the principle of a coordinated resource. It is concluded by the reviewers that a centralised and coordinated information service would be very beneficial for artists, arts organisations and the public. However, while some overview would be useful within artsACT it is proposed that a Communications and Marketing Unit would operate best and most-cost effectively outside Government. 4. An arts diary would be highly valued by the arts community. The ‘Daily Capital’ makes a good contribution in this area. However, it is not comprehensive and there is a need for a regularly updated clash diary. Many suggested that a clash diary would be an important planning and partnership tool for arts producers. 5. There is a need for less expensive advertising. The arts community currently find it very difficult to promote their shows in a cost-effective way. It was suggested that promotional partnerships and better communication within the arts community could help to avoid costly duplication, and encourage cooperative marketing with other artists, arts organisations and festivals. 6. Many believed that a small amount of Government support for cooperative marketing would be a good investment in encouraging artists and arts organisations to become more entrepreneurial and to generate a larger proportion of their revenue. 7. Some ideas from various consultations for cooperation included: a cooperative advertisement in the ‘Canberra Times’ on Saturday mornings; a promotions stand in Garema Place; a brochure promoting Government funded arts organisations; and an arts website for the ACT which includes a diary and ideally coordinated ticketing options as well.

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8. There was a consistent view that the artsACT website needs to be upgraded. It was suggested by artists, arts organisations, artsACT staff and the public that there is opportunity for a website that could provide a communication and hub with at least essential information for the ACT arts community. The website could also facilitate engagement, surveys and provide links to relevant sites. 9. There was some criticism of what many saw to be Australian Capital Tourism’s lack of recognition of the importance and potential of the local ACT arts scene. It was suggested that Tourism seem to be aware of the work of the National Cultural Institutions but do not focus on promoting local talent or events. 10. Communication within the arts community, and particularly between artists, is extremely valuable for the health and vibrancy of the ACT arts scene. Many artists and arts organisations were enthusiastic about the idea of regular artist forums to promote direct communication about key arts issues. Others encouraged more opportunities for arts organisations to come together with artsACT in a cooperative environment to share ideas and experiences. These proposals emerging from the review are both seen to be highly desirable. 11. artsACT should investigate and discuss with the sector facilitating an annual or biennial Artists Forum, which should be a very positive event including discussion of current and future arts and cultural issues and ideas for collaboration, with a promotional dimension to raise awareness of the arts in the ACT. 12. artsACT should also discuss with arts organisations and NCIs an initiative to host six-monthly Arts Organisation Forums with ACT arts organisations, including discussions, sharing of information and experiences followed by informal gatherings. It is suggested that the NCIs could be invited to join the group every second meeting. 6.13 Recommendations 1. A cost-effective, centralised and coordinated communication and information unit overseen by arts organisations and artsACT should be established outside Government for artists, arts organisations and the public. There is a need for an arts diary which could be built around an existing initiative. There is also a need for better-coordinated, less expensive advertising, promotion and marketing, which could be part of the unit’s responsibilities. 2. The ACT Government through artsACT should provide leadership on communication and engagement with the arts community. artsACT should discuss with the sector facilitating an annual or biennial Artists Forum, and regular meetings with arts organisations, with half of these including invitations to senior representatives of the National Cultural Institutions.

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6.14 Universities The major Universities are not only significant educational institutions in the ACT, but also play an important role as cultural institutions. This is particularly the case for the Australian National University (ANU). In addition to the two major universities, it is understood that the Australian Catholic University and The Canberra Institute of Technology are involved in the arts and offer arts related courses. However, both were invited on two occasions to provide input to this review but did not respond. 6.14.1 Australian National University (ANU) 6.14.1 Issues and Analysis 1. The ANU School of Music and School of Art are widely acknowledged as providing a highly significant and valued contribution to artistic and cultural education and life in Canberra. 2. The ANU, through the School of Music and School of Art, is the recipient of major funding from the ACT Government through the Community Outreach Program which is administered by artsACT. This funding arrangement began as funding from the Australian Government, half of which was transferred to the ACT Government from the start of self-government. 3. While the ANU’s contribution to arts education and the arts generally is widely supported, there are questions from many artists and arts organisations as to whether the high level of funding provided by the ACT Government ($1.6 million per annum) to the ANU continues to be such a high priority and even whether ACT funding of a major national university is appropriate. There were few if any questions about the value of these Schools, but there were serious questions about whether ANU funding should be an Australian Government responsibility rather than drawing so heavily on the limited resources of the ACT Government. 4. At the same time, taking account of the importance of the ANU to the arts in Canberra, there were also comments about the fact that funding levels have not increased from the ACT Government over the life of self-government. 5. Until recently there have been tensions between the ACT Government and ANU in relation to performance expectations and accountability for funding. However, with changes in approach, communication and senior management, there is now a much more positive and productive working relationship. 6. ACT Government funding through the Community Outreach Program now requires the provision of specific programs and services to deliver cultural and educational benefits to the ACT community. While the ANU is keen to engage with the ACT community, it is also strongly interested in engaging with a broader regional population in NSW. With the combination of constraints on both the level of funding and the requirements for how funding is to be applied there is likely to be a further increase of pressure on both the ANU and the ACT Government to be managed.

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7. The ANU has responsibility for vitally important arts venues and facilities. These include Llewellyn Hall, which has stage, acoustic and seating characteristics, that are unique in Canberra. Therefore, access, especially to Llewellyn Hall can be an issue of some tension, especially as it is regarded by ANU as being first and foremost a university facility. 8. As the ACT Government provides $200,000 each year to ANU specifically in recognition of the value of Llewellyn Hall, it is suggested that it should be in a position to reasonably expect greater leverage and acceptance of the fact that this is a shared facility, which should be readily available to the musical artists and public of the ACT. If this is not acceptable, perhaps at least this proportion of substantial ACT public funding could be more productively invested in the arts and music elsewhere in the ACT. 9. While the CSO and the ANU have some key co dependencies around the use of Llewellyn Hall and the educational benefits of a symphony orchestra, there is no formal relationship beyond the provision of National Orchestral Scholarships. There appears to be great potential for better arts outcomes through a stronger partnership between ANU, CSO and the ACT Government. 10. The ANU Schools of Art and Music make a very significant contribution to supporting, producing and sustaining a large number of arts professionals. 11. Many artists recognise that the ANU School of Art is the feeder pool for the local professional Arts scene. The ANU School of Art is a key entity in visual arts and many of the visual arts KAOs cooperate and collaborate with the School. 12. Despite the undoubted great value of the ANU to the arts in Canberra, and the fact that the funding level has not increased, it is one of the largest areas of arts funding, so the benefits to the ACT in terms of delivering on new policy priorities will need to continue to be closely monitored. It is pleasing to see that there is recognition by both parties of the importance of effective communication and clear accountabilities for the funding provided.

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6.14.1 Recommendations 1. The ACT Government should fully acknowledge the vital contribution of the major universities, and particularly the ANU, to the arts and the professional development of artists in the ACT. This should be used as a basis to further develop trusted relationships and new partnerships including with additional parties such as the Canberra Symphony Orchestra and the National Cultural Institutions. 2. The ACT Government provides substantial arts funding to the ANU which is one of its largest recipients of funding. There must be clear performance expectations attached to the funding regarding specific social and arts benefits to the ACT. The ACT Government should work with ANU to attempt to increase Australian Government funding. In this way, funding can increase for ANU’s valuable contributions to arts and education, and ACT can redirect some of its large pool of funding from ANU to new areas of funding priority. 3. Llewellyn Hall is a very important ANU-owned Canberra arts facility. The ACT Government provides $200,000 each year to ANU specifically in recognition of the value of Llewellyn Hall. With such significant funding support, the ACT Government should leverage considerably greater benefits for the ACT arts and public, based more on a sharing arrangement, with extended and more affordable access. If this is not possible, it may necessary to consider whether ACT public arts funding could be more productively invested in the arts and music elsewhere.

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6.14.2 University of Canberra (UC) 6.14.2 Issues and Analysis 1. There appears to be a greater distance and some tension between the ACT Government and the University of Canberra (UC). This is likely to be due to the fact that UC is aware of the high level of funding to ANU and regards itself as Canberra’s community university. UC is clearly frustrated at the lack of funding and what is seen as a minimal level of communication in relation to the arts and other issues. 2. There are impressions at UC that there is at best a lack of interest and at worst an arrogance from the ACT Government in its agencies dealings with the UC, especially in contrast to what UC sees as a much closer, more respectful and collaborative relationship at all levels with the ANU. This may come as a surprise to ACT Government as this is unlikely to be their intention, and there is apparently an MOU in place, though it is not clear who manages and monitors this. Nonetheless UC’s strong perception requires awareness and an early and appropriate response from ACT Government. 3. Building the relationship between UC and ACT Government, and seeking new opportunities for collaboration could begin with clearer lines of communication and a determination to forge a more open and positive relationship. Issues including UC’s interest in arts and culture could be a good starting point. Issues of funding and possible partnerships should be put on the table and discussed, as there appear to be several joint opportunities of potential value to the Arts in the ACT. 4. UC is active in arts education and community engagement on a variety of fronts. This includes: music, literature, Indigenous culture, art and design, audio and video production. 5. UC also plays an important role in the provision of education in digital media and its role in innovation has been recognised through funding from the Australian Government for Creative Industries initiatives. 6. The University is a supporter of the Belconnen Arts Centre, and there is representation from the Faculty of Arts and Design on the Advisory Group. A Performing Arts Centre is envisaged as Stage 2 of the Belconnen Arts Centre development, and there have been conversations around the University from time to time about redeveloping their Boilerhouse Theatre as a performing Arts Centre. There appears to be important potential for further partnerships between the University, ACT Government and the community. Opportunities for greater cooperation, consolidation and cost minimisation should be investigated. 7. UC advised that it is taking a much more strategic approach to developing and maintaining interactions and relationships with governments, industry and the community. It is seeking to lift its relationships from a transactions-based approach to one that is based on partnership and collaboration.

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They are keen to build longer-term relationships which could provide opportunities for both ACT Government and the local community. The time is certainly right to begin to work more closely and openly with UC and artsACT could lead the way in this. 6.14.2 Recommendations 1. ArtsACT should work proactively to improve communication and relationships between the ACT Government and the University of Canberra (UC) and jointly investigate opportunities for new partnerships in relation to arts activities, facilities, skills development and training in traditional and new art forms, creative industries and innovation.

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6.15 National Cultural Institutions (NCIs) The National Cultural Institutions (NCIs) are a vitally important part of Canberra’s arts and cultural environment. Discussions were held with senior representatives of the Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies, the National Library of Australia, the National Portrait Gallery, and the National Gallery of Australia (NGA), which also provided a written submission. There was also less detailed input from representatives of other NCIs. 6.15 Issues and Analysis 1. During the course of the review, the issue of the roles of and relationships with the National Cultural Institutions arose in most discussion forums, including with artists, arts organisations, governments and the public. 2. Though the NCIs are clearly critical stakeholders in the Canberra arts landscape, communications and relationships between the NCIs and the ACT Government, including artsACT, appear to be at best limited, and at worst strained or near nonexistent. This situation clearly requires attention from the ACT Government. 3. From every individual discussion with senior representatives of NCIs and the Australian Government, it was clear that, while their responsibilities and outlook are national, many already have very positive relationships with local artists. They would welcome improved communication and possible partnerships with artists, arts organisations and the ACT Government. 4. Many of the NCIs have shown initiative over some time and are already working with a range of artists across a variety of art forms. The fact that the National Library for example has Curators for Drama and Dance, and draws on local performers, indicates the openness to creative, artistic approaches to generating interest in their Institutions. It also demonstrated their recognition of the potential of using multiple art forms in storytelling and promotion. 5. There were quite consistent and specific suggestions from NCIs that the ACT Government through artsACT could be more active in communication about what is happening and available in arts in the ACT and “looking at ways of engaging/leveraging the public programs of the National Cultural Institutions to engage the ACT community in a more pro-active way.” 6. The NGA for example runs Arts and Alzheimers programs that could reinforce and support ACT health and human services and objectives, and benefit the ACT community. 7. There is also an opportunity for the ACT Government to benefit from the expertise of National Cultural Institution educators in developing specific programs for the ACT community. The National Library and National Gallery for example are keen to look at more ways to engage with the ACT community and would be very open to partnering with the ACT Government to stage more NCI-based and community events.

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8. artsACT should become the first point of contact into ACT Government for NCIs. It should take initiatives to generate bilateral and wider meetings and gatherings to improve communication and awareness of opportunities for ACT arts and artists, as well as for all ACT agencies with the intersection of arts-related initiatives from the NCIs with other areas of ACT Government interest such as health and education. 9. There are also opportunities for the economy and the arts in the ACT through a variety of major NCI arts and other events such as the recent successful collaboration between the NGA and ACT Government with the Masterpieces from Paris Exhibition. There are also benefits for local artists, as for instance during Masterpieces when the NGA directly employed young, local musicians who were students at the ANU School of Music, and their performances were broadcast nationally on ABC Radio. This kind of initiative can deliver a range of benefits for Canberra, though there needs to be effective, early planning to ensure maximum benefits are leveraged for ACT arts and businesses. 10. It was evident that there can be some tension between some areas of the ACT arts sector and the NCIs. This tends to be predominantly from the ACT’s perspective and to be based on what was found to be a general misconception from some arts organisations and areas of ACT Government about a lack of interest from the NCIs. The major problem is a lack of effective communication rather than any lack of interest. Also, at one level the NCIs have a national charter and they cannot be seen to be giving Canberra preferential treatment, but at the same time their staff live locally, the NCIs are part of Canberra and there is a readiness to engage. 6.15 Recommendations 1. The National Cultural Institutions (NCIs) are such an important component of Canberra’s arts and cultural environment that stronger bilateral and multilateral connections should be created and developed with them. artsACT should build relationships, establish regular meetings involving the NCIs and ACT arts organisations, and be a broker and facilitator for possible opportunities and partnerships for NCIs with ACT arts organisations and artists, as well as with other ACT Government agencies.

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6.16 Diversity There is already a great diversity of people involved in the arts in Canberra. With active Government awareness, planning and action there is the opportunity to ensure access for all people to the arts, which will in turn make a difference to every person’s life. Indigenous arts is such an important issue in its own right, it is dealt with in the next section of this report. 6.16 Issues and Analysis 1. In addition to Indigenous people, specific areas of diversity which arts policy should take account of include disability, people from non-English speaking backgrounds (NESB), women, youth and the ageing. 2. It was excellent to find that women clearly have a strong presence in the arts in the ACT. Women are very well-represented across art forms, in both professional and community arts, in leadership and management roles, and across Canberra. 3. Accessibility to arts facilities is an important issue for people with a disability. 4. Awareness of language differences and levels of proficiency in English are important in communicating with people from non-English speaking backgrounds to ensure accessibility. 5. There is currently a focus on multi-cultural arts, including NESB, through the multicultural festival that is run through DHCS. However, awareness of the multicultural nature of Canberra should be a component of many arts activities and festivals and should have a stronger presence within Government arts priorities. 6. Awareness of the importance of diversity should be an essential component of ACT Government arts policy, planning and funding requirements. In addition to disability, Indigenous and NESB people, the inclusion of gender balance, youth and ageing are important. 7. There is a growing ageing population in the ACT and it is important that accessibility, project and program planning for the arts takes specific account of the needs of the ageing. 8. There is an ACT Community Arts Office that works with Indigenous and multicultural communities and individuals, as well as with people with disabilities. The Office sets out to support community arts by assisting artists, individuals and groups through building community capacity, mentoring, assistance in accessing arts funding and facilitating communication between artists, communities and the wider arts community. 9. The ACT Community Arts Office is currently centrally located in Civic and employs three specialists, with one for each of the major focus areas, and a manager. There is absolutely no doubt about the critical importance of diversity, including the three target groups, and there is also no doubt about the commitment of all of the officers employed at the Office and of their achievements.

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However, there have to be questions about whether, in contemporary Canberra, this is the most effective structure and mechanism for the cost involved to achieve the desired diversity outcomes for all population groups. This includes not only the three target areas specifically covered by the Office, but also others including women, youth and the ageing. 10. It may well be the case that an enforced policy approach would be just as effective in delivering new diversity arts policy priorities. It is proposed that a condition of artsACT funding for all organisations would be a requirement for all arts organisations to demonstrate and report on social inclusion and diversity initiatives. In this way, diversity would become the responsibility of every Government funded arts organisation, rather than the responsibility of a person based in Civic. 11. It would be proposed that the resources currently allocated to the ACT Community Arts Office should be outposted to provide local support to community arts, with two positions allocated to Tuggeranong and two to Belconnen Arts Centres, to cover all of the south and north of the ACT. It is envisaged that if existing staff are keen to work closely with the whole arts community, they should be given the opportunity to take up these new roles, including the role of manager of the group, at least for a reasonable initial period. 12. The roles of the new Community Arts Officers would be to ensure that the Government’s high priority of increasing participation in the arts, including all diversity target groups, is being actively supported. These Officers would be expected to be active and highly visible in the field, and their responsibilities would include: providing a wide range of support to community arts organisations; assisting with designing community arts programs; gathering information and providing advice on local arts facilities to meet differing needs and to improve access; assisting community organisations with inclusion and diversity strategies; liaising with artsACT and facilitating communication with other ACT agencies; ensuring the Minister for the Arts, through artsACT, is kept fully informed and, where appropriate, involved in community arts activity; and very importantly providing advice to artsACT about community arts funding priorities and ensuring that this allocated funding is used in the most effective and efficient way possible to deliver increased participation in the arts. This would be a key performance measure. 13. It is proposed that artsACT would gain significantly from having a designated staff position to be filled by an Indigenous person. It would be desirable for this person to work in the policy area as an Indigenous Arts Officer, but they could work on any area of artsACT for which they might be qualified, and would by no means be restricted to Indigenous issues. . It is good that there is a high proportion of women on the staff of artsACT as well as people of non-English speaking background. It would be highly desirable to make strong efforts to try to ensure that there is also a person with a disability on staff. From extensive experience, it is strongly suggested that the inclusion of people with Indigenous and disability perspectives would deliver significant benefits to artsACT, including in its provision of advice, decision-making and communications with the entire arts sector in the ACT.

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6.16 Recommendations 1. Diversity is a very important issue that needs to become a broader shared responsibility of not only the ACT Government but also of all those that receive arts funding. A condition of future artsACT funding should be a requirement for all arts organisations to demonstrate and report on social inclusion and diversity initiatives. 2. The ACT Community Arts Office should be outposted to provide significant local support to community arts, with two positions allocated to Tuggeranong and two to Belconnen Arts Centres, to cover all the ACT. Existing staff should be given the opportunity to take up the roles which would be focused on ensuring increased participation in the arts, including all diversity target groups. Their responsibilities would include: providing support to community arts organisations; assisting with designing programs; providing advice on local arts facilities and improving access; assisting community organisations with inclusion and diversity strategies; and very importantly, providing advice to artsACT about community arts funding priorities. 3. Commitment to all aspects of diversity needs to be demonstrated, and the inclusion of people with Indigenous and disability perspectives would deliver significant benefits to artsACT. As soon as possible, artsACT should have a designated staff position to be filled by an Indigenous person who would work in the policy area as an Indigenous Arts Officer, but would not be restricted only to Indigenous issues. artsACT should also attempt to ensure there is always a person with a disability on staff.

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6.17 Indigenous Arts The importance of the arts and culture cannot be underestimated for Indigenous people. It is a central aspect of expression and identity for both individuals and the community. Canberra is a centre for Indigenous arts for the Region and its status as the National Capital gives it both an opportunity for leadership in ‘Closing the Gap’ and a responsibility to assist in creating a vibrant and sustainable Indigenous arts scene. 6.17 Issues and Analysis 1. The ACT Government has recently allocated some funding and resources to a Strategic Indigenous Arts Development Initiative. Through the review, it became apparent that the Chief Minister is widely recognised by the Indigenous community as being personally interested in and supportive of Indigenous arts. However, at present, while there are examples of activity, there does not appear to be an ongoing strong ACT Government commitment or a clear strategy for the development of Indigenous arts in the ACT. This is a serious omission which should be corrected. 2. It is recognised that the ACT Indigenous Arts Development Officer, who is part of the ACT Community Arts Office, receives funding through artsACT. However, both through the Indigenous consultations and subsequent research, it was found that the ACT is the only State or Territory that does not have an Indigenous Arts Officer within the arts bureaucracy. Neither does the ACT Government appear to support an Indigenous Key Arts Organisation, an Indigenous Arts Centre, or a specific arts funding category for Indigenous art. This is not to suggest that there have been no initiatives or that all of these matters should be acted upon. However, there is a need to take a range of early actions as proposed in this report, and to work collaboratively with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to develop an ACT Indigenous Arts and Cultural Strategy, as has happened in other jurisdictions. 3. There are significant frustrations from Indigenous artists about gaining access to ACT Government funding support through current funding categories. Only two Indigenous applications were funded in 2009. It was suggested by several artists that interpretation of words like “excellence” can get in the way of supporting Indigenous artists. Different groups of people have different definitions and interpretations of “excellence” and many of these are culturally based. The point was made very strongly that there needs to be more Indigenous representation on peer assessment based funding panels deciding funding for Indigenous artists. 4. Many Indigenous artists find the grants application process overly complicated and feel that their applications are often judged more on the writing of the application than on artistic merit. They also find repeated rejection disheartening and can tend to lose faith in ACT Government interest in supporting Indigenous art. 5. Both project and program funding are important for Indigenous artists, but Government can also make a significant contribution to Indigenous arts through other practical support mechanisms. Some of the pertinent suggestions from the Indigenous consultations included funding an Indigenous Arts Business Manager, which was a successful Federal initiative at Northern Rivers Art Centre in NSW.

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Other possible capacity building initiatives worthy of consideration include: establishing targeted business and financial skills development programs; encouraging industry relationships and private sector support for Indigenous arts; and developing mentoring programs for Indigenous artists. A further initiative from another jurisdiction for possible consideration involves the provision of seed funding for an Indigenous arts export agency along the lines of the Queensland Indigenous Arts Marketing and Export Agency (QIAMEA). 6. While the Indigenous population in the ACT is not particularly large, participation in arts and cultural events in a variety of art forms is higher than the national average. In addition, the ACT is home to some very strong professional Indigenous artists including national prize winners in arts and fashion. For example, the Indigenous Textiles and Glass Artists Group (ITAG) was honoured with an International Women’s Day Award. However, many of these artists are working in isolation. The ACT Government has an opportunity to build on these strengths through support for professional development, mentoring, recognising both existing and emerging talent and very importantly assisting with the provision of spaces and facilities for these artists to create and display their work. 7. Throughout the review, artists repeatedly reinforced their need for adequate spaces and arts facilities. The Indigenous artists were especially forceful in prioritising this need for appropriate spaces and arts facilities. In summary, there were three core areas of need identified by Indigenous people and others, including artists and the public, with interests in Aboriginal arts in the ACT: 7.1 An Indigenous Arts and Cultural Centre During the Indigenous consultations artists advised that there had been an earlier concrete plan to create a major Aboriginal Cultural Centre for the ACT on a site on the Acton Peninsula which never eventuated, but has not been forgotten. The ACT Government has, since the review’s Indigenous consultations, recently provided some support for the Burringiri Association cultural centre, which should be acknowledged. But it is understood that Aboriginal artists had something centrally located, larger and more far-reaching in mind. If a new Indigenous Arts and Cultural Centre did receive consideration, it would need to be in a central, accessible location to create Indigenous, ACT community and wider tourism benefits. This would give the ACT the opportunity to take an important initiative in the cultural tourism space to generate tourist interest and real potential economic benefit. Cultural tourism in Canberra is currently built almost entirely around the National Cultural Institutions, but there are opportunities for more partnerships with the ACT, and this is one example of a potential independent ACT initiative.

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The Indigenous workshop suggested that the Fitters’ Workshop in Kingston would be an ideal space for an Indigenous multi-arts centre with studios, a gallery and spaces for the performing arts. The building was seen as very central and could become a meeting place for Indigenous people working in the arts. They believed that this would be a magnificent Centenary project. Alternatively, depending on the scope of such an initiative, consideration could be given to forming partnerships with the Australian Government and with interested National Cultural Institutions such as AIATSIS, where the CEO was consulted as a part of this review. The ACT Government may wish to test interest in a joint venture with the Australian Government and with Aboriginal people to create a significant Aboriginal Cultural Centre in the national capital which would include input and art from local Indigenous people. 7.2 A centrally-located Indigenous Gallery and Retail Outlet The establishment of a centrally-located Indigenous gallery and retail outlet was seen as an important priority by Indigenous artists. Such a shop-front would display the work of Indigenous artists from the ACT rather than from Central Australia and elsewhere and would create some economic sustainability for Indigenous artists in the ACT. Either a separate location might be identified, or during the review, the Secretariat of the National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) suggested the possibility of a partnership with ACT Government to establish such a facility in the foyer of NACCHO House in Canberra city. The ACT Government may not have a major role to play in identifying and establishing such a facility, which should be driven by Indigenous people. However, there is little doubt that at least awareness and support through facilitation by artsACT would be likely to be appreciated. 7.3 An Indigenous Community Arts Facility Indigenous people recognise the need for the ACT Government to not only support professional artists but also to encourage greater Indigenous community participation in the arts for the multitude of benefits that this would deliver. It was suggested by the Indigenous workshop that the current Billabong Aboriginal Development Corporation already had strong links to the Indigenous arts community. Billabong has a great number of facilities and resources including textile machines, kilns, knitting machines, buses for transportation and spaces for art creation. Its current manager is respected by Indigenous people and has impressive vision, commitment and resourcefulness.

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If the ACT Government wanted to act on this proposal to support an Indigenous community arts facility, Billabong has the great financial and cultural advantages of being an existing, established facility which is used and trusted by Indigenous people as well as the wider community. To some extent, through its own initiatives, it is already on the way to being a community arts facility as part of its role as an Indigenous community facility. However, Billabong suffers from very low levels of funding and cash flow and a chronic lack of human resources. 8. Many Indigenous people are involved in the arts both at the community and professional levels. However, the contribution that Indigenous professional and community artists make does not appear to be fully recognised by Government in terms of funding and other forms of support. Community arts are also critical for improved health, social and other outcomes for Indigenous communities. 9. Insufficient data seems to be a problem across the arts in the ACT. This has a significant effect on planning, policy and strategy development for the arts for Indigenous people and communities. It also creates a feeling within the Indigenous community that there is a lack of transparency and evidence base to some aspects of Government decision-making. 10. It has been pointed out that less than 1% of the ACT population (less than 4000 people) identify themselves as Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, and that there are both Indigenous artists from the ACT and Indigenous artists working in the ACT. The reviewers have noted this information, but do not see this affecting the importance of recognising that whatever the percentages, numbers or origins of Indigenous people living in the ACT, their needs and interests as professional artists and in community art and culture should in future be a very high policy and strategic priority for the ACT Government.

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6.17 Recommendations 1. There should be an Indigenous specific funding category in the ACT Arts Fund. Within this category, it would be highly desirable to have separate allocations: one for individual Indigenous artists and one for Indigenous groups or organisations. An Indigenous grant category must not diminish opportunities for Indigenous artists and organisations to apply for any area of the Fund. artsACT should work closely and collaboratively with Indigenous people to ensure that all decisions about an Indigenous category are informed and that implementation is successful. Capacity building initiatives, including assistance with application and reporting requirements are strongly encouraged. 2. The recommendations of the Strategic Indigenous Arts Development Initiative should generally be supported and acted upon. In particular, expanding skills development programs in identified areas of high interest for Indigenous artists; programs aimed at long-term professional development; and support for Intergenerational projects; and a youth music project. There should be a collaborative process aimed at setting priorities for action within available resources. There is a real opportunity with these important initiatives for artsACT to actively pursue and develop partnerships with other agencies and external parties. 3. The ACT Government may wish to consider testing feasibility and interest in a joint venture with the Australian Government, possibly National Cultural Institutions and with Aboriginal people to create a significant Aboriginal Arts and Cultural Centre in the national capital which would include input and art from local Indigenous people. 4. It is highly desirable for ACT Government to build on existing Indigenous infrastructure as it has done recently with the Burringiri Association. It should support successful community arts initiatives such as the Billabong Aboriginal Development Organisation which has undertaken several positive initiatives. It is an established Indigenous community focal point with support from Aboriginal artists, Government funding support through a range of agencies, and other potential sponsors or partners. It would be likely to deliver increased Indigenous community particiption in the arts, leading in turn to significant social benefits. 5. The establishment of a centrally-located Indigenous gallery and retail outlet for ACT Indigenous artists was seen as an important priority as it would bring artists together and could help create some economic sustainability for Indigenous artists in the ACT. This view is supported, and the ACT Government through artsACT should actively investigate options, with the preferred option being to provide a space in a future Canberra Gallery in Civic for local Indigenous art.

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6.18 Accessibility There are a variety of aspects of accessibility to be taken account of in arts policy considerations, including for different groups of people who may wish to access arts facilities, access to facilities in different locations across the ACT, aspects of transport, and public access to arts venues and facilities. 6.18 Issues and Analysis 1. The accessibility needs of professional artists, particularly young and emerging artists, is an important consideration. Key concerns include access to affordable housing and appropriate arts facilities. Difficulties with access to these essential requirements can be a trigger for artists to leave the ACT. 2. Depending on their art form, established artists can also struggle to have ongoing access to appropriate arts facilities and venues. 3. Access to appropriate facilities provides a variety of challenges in different art forms. There was very strong feedback in various consultations, especially from new and emerging artists, that there is strong competition for limited studio space in the visual arts. They seemed to indicate that some older artists apparently had ongoing tenure over spaces. While there were doubts from a small number of people as to whether this problem was real, the concern from several artists appeared to the reviewers to be very genuine, and based on the direct experiences of many young and emerging artists. If studio facilities are available, communication processes about arts facilities do not appear to work well. 4. A number of people highlighted the arts benefits of the ‘Renew Newcastle’ scheme, which has been established to find short and medium term uses for vacant buildings in Newcastle’s CBD. The initiative aims to install artists, cultural projects and community groups into the vacant buildings until they become commercially viable. 5. While high-cost specialist venues and facilities are less an issue in community arts, access to spaces is no less an important issue. The availability of facilities in some parts of the city does not mean that these are accessible, especially by younger people and people who are socio-economically disadvantaged. 6. The availability of community and public transport is an important access issue. For people without access to motor vehicles, there is a heavy dependence on public transport. Public transport issues like the hub and spoke design of many transport routes, and the reduced availability of buses at night and on weekends can restrict access to arts facilities. There also appears to be very limited availability of community transport for this purpose. 7. Access for people with disabilities is an important priority for access to all venues and facilities, including arts facilities.

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8. In the area of diversity, there needs to be cultural sensitivity and awareness of the appropriateness of arts facilities and their location so that access is not unintentional restriction of access. 9. For a large proportion of Canberrans, motor vehicles are their major form of transport. The availability of parking was raised on several occasions as an important issue for people accessing arts facilities (Belconnen Arts Centre was raised as an example) and audiences accessing arts venues. 10. It should also be noted that it became clear through the review that there are some historical and cultural issues about the extent to which people are prepared to travel reasonable distances in the Canberra context to other areas of the city to access facilities. Even though facilities may be available in the city, motorists do not necessarily believe that they are accessible. 6.18 Recommendations 1. There needs to be clarification of policy on all aspects of access and accessibility. Many of these, such as transport and disability access, should be included in the development of a Cultural Facilities Plan. There is a requirement for improved awareness of and access to arts facilities that should be addressed through better information and communication about what is available.

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6.19 Arts and Education 6.19 Issues and Analysis 1. Investment in the arts is a long-term investment and begins with young people and education. There is a clear benefit in directing funding emphasis for the arts and education at the early stages of a child’s development. The Federal Minister for the Arts was very clear about this benefit in his outline of a National Cultural Policy: “We know that learning is boosted when it includes the arts and when opportunities are provided for children to express themselves through art and music.” 2. There is a lot of opportunity for the ACT arts sector to engage more effectively with the education sector and be to mindful of the national curriculum in the cooperative development of arts in education policy. There should be a clear articulation of the contribution that the arts can make to education in the ACT. While few children will become professional artists, it is important to consider the benefits of the arts and creativity to education and to society. The arts and creativity can contribute to education and social development in areas such as: avoiding social dislocation; creating opportunities for children with special needs; building self-esteem and a sense of identity; and encouraging a life-long learning and engagement with the arts. These benefits will be seen with educational experience across art forms, and will begin the development of professional artists and future audiences. 3. A whole-of-Government approach to arts and education is seen to be very important and this had been lacking in the ACT Government prior to last year. The Arts and Education Consultative Committee was initiated by the Education and Training Department in May 2009. The Committee draws together stakeholders from education, the arts and other relevant areas. As well as holding regular meetings, the Committee organised the inaugural 2010 Arts Education Conference, ‘Arts Up Front: Leading Arts Learning’, which was attended by 165 delegates from across the education and arts sectors. Having read the Conference Evaluation Report, it was clear from feedback from attendees that this was a very good initiative with valued content. It is encouraging to see that planning is underway for another conference next year. 4. The Education Consultative Committee and associated annual Arts Education Conferences are excellent initiatives, but arts in education was found to be an area of great interest to the arts sector and the public, and there were many suggestions of areas of opportunity. The links and communication between artsACT and Education have recently improved with enthusiastic commitment from the artsACT officer. This is an important development to be built upon with an agenda of shared interests, some of which will need to be pursued at senior levels. An area for early consideration is the desirability of establishing an Arts Education Officer to be a focus of communication and advice on arts and education. 5. Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) are an important resource for schools, education, community and social development. Currently, KAOs have a lot of the engagement with the education sector by providing arts programs after school hours. Many arts organisations believe there are opportunities for stronger engagement with Education to have more artists in schools during school hours as an integral component of education. This would be beneficial for both the artists and children.

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6. The Artists-In-Schools (Early Childhood) initiative is part of the Creative Education Partnership: Artist-In-Residence program and is a very good initiative for both the arts and education. In 2009, the Australia Council provided $20,000 to the ACT Government for five artist-in-residencies which were designed to stimulate the creative capacity of children, increase access to the arts, provide a quality experience of participation in the arts, and promote cultural citizenship. The ArtistsIn-Schools program supports a balance of art forms, depending on the skills of the artist, and priority is given to maximising impact on children’s learning and the school environment. Encouragement should be given by ACT Government to continue with this excellent initiative. 7. There are many successful arts-related projects and activities in Education Departments around Australia that could be adapted to the ACT. It would be desirable for artsACT and Education and Training to work together to consider possible opportunities. One example of an initiative in a smaller jurisdiction that apparently works very well is Exit Art, which is an annual exhibition of outstanding contemporary artwork created by Northern Territory Year 12 visual art, craft and design students. The exhibition gives an insight through art into young Territorians’ experiences and their influences. It is an avenue for students to bring their thoughts to life and an opportunity for the public to gain a unique perspective through viewing these works. The most outstanding works are selected for their excellence, innovation and creativity in a range of modes including painting, drawing, photography, ceramics, printmaking and digital presentations. Similar art works could be featured in a gallery space like CMAG, which is readily accessible. 8. Feedback was received through the review that the ACT currently has very limited capacity to train teachers of the arts, particularly beyond theory to the practical aspects of teaching music and drama. It was suggested that an old school could be converted into a music camp where students and particularly teachers can be taught by professional artists to improve arts outcomes in schools. 9. There was consistent feedback, particularly from emerging artists, that tertiary education and training for young artists in the ACT can be limited and variable. It was pointed out that even at the highly-regarded ANU School of Music many of the staff have held positions for 20 to 30 years, which can create a somewhat stagnant, dated and less dynamic learning environment. This is situation was seen to be amplified when combined with the pressure from within universities to reduce practical aspects of art studies, and to concentrate almost entirely on theory. The lack of an effective tertiary Drama course in the ACT was also cited. 10. Despite some of the perceived limitations of tertiary training in the ACT, there were also comments that artists who have not been trained at a tertiary institution can often feel discriminated against by funding bodies and institutions, because of requirements for tertiary qualifications. The structure of tertiary studies can be seen as limiting for some artists, including those from minority groups.

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6.19 Recommendations 1. There needs to be a clear articulation of the very valuable contributions that the arts, culture, and creativity can make to all aspects of education in the ACT. Stronger communication and coordination across the arts and education sectors, as well as with communities and across governments, should be encouraged, such as the initiative last year to establish the Arts and Education Consultative Committee. This important initiative should be built upon with an agenda of shared interests, and there should be early consideration of establishing an Arts Education Officer to be a focus of communication and advice on arts and education. 2. There are many excellent arts in education initiatives in the ACT and in other jurisdictions that could be adopted or extended. artsACT and Education should work together to identify, along with potential partners, what might be adapted to meet the needs of the ACT. Also, Artist in Residence school programs, including the Artists-In-Schools (Early Childhood) initiative, have demonstrated real value in the ACT and these should be retained and extended, with support expected from the Australia Council.

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6.20 Arts, Health and Social Development The arts are an important component of society and contribute directly to individual physical health and emotional well-being, as well as to stronger, more cohesive communities. 6.20 Issues and Analysis 1. There is increasing evidence indicating the importance of the contribution of the arts in achieving improved outcomes in both health and social development. 2. It is encouraging to note that the arts tend to be increasingly recognised in their potential contribution to addressing health and social challenges and contributing to recovery. They are often included in health recovery and rehabilitation programs, as well as for people with disabilities, and in some cases in the correctional system 3. While there have been some recent improvements, the arts tend to be less well recognised for their potential in early intervention and prevention of health and social development difficulties, where relatively small investments can assist in avoiding costly and difficult problems. For example in health, the arts can and do play a valuable but largely unrecognised role in addressing and avoiding the huge cost of obesity. The arts have also demonstrated value in providing outlets, choices and alternative opportunities for expression for ‘at risk’ youth, Indigenous people and people struggling with mental illness. 4. There is a positive role from Health and Human Services in supporting various arts initiatives in the ACT. It was noted that a number of Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) deliver programs in a range of art forms. ‘Music for Everyone’ is one of the KAOs with a strong focus on social development programs, including youth and people with disabilities. 5. Artists and arts organisations appreciate these investments in the arts. However, there is concern that these investments are seen to be based on rather fragile and vulnerable funding arrangements where purpose, priority and longer-term strategy are not generally clearly articulated or understood. 6. There also appears to be little whole-of-Government coordination. It would be both desirable and useful for Government to have a more complete picture of its funding of the arts across health and human services agencies and related Government portfolios, including in the criminal justice area.

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7. Additionally, it would be desirable for there to be closer engagement and specialist arts advice from artsACT to all these agencies that invest in the arts. It would also be useful to identify ways to better identify current and potential connections between the arts and culture with all areas of ACT Government, non-government and community with interests in and responsibilities for health and social development. 8. It would be desirable in looking at data collection and research to investigate whether there are acknowledged specific measures of health and social benefits from arts and cultural activities. There is considerable research evidence available both nationally and internationally that could assist ACT agencies in developing informed strategies for investment in the arts. 6.20 Recommendations 1. While there are a variety of positive initiatives in the ACT, there should be a wider appreciation of the benefits of arts and culture to health and social development, including in early intervention and prevention of a multitude of issues such as reducing the risk of alienated youth entering the criminal justice system. There needs to be greater awareness and coordination, including from artsACT, of arts initiatives across agencies so that connection with and investment in arts organisations is more visible and strategic, and there is less fragility and uncertainty for the arts sector.

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6.21 Arts Innovation and Economic Development There are strong connections between the arts and economic development, though these are not always recognised or understood. This is an increasingly important area for clarity of awareness, communication and opportunity. 6.21 Issues and Analysis 1. The economic value of the sector is increasingly being recognised, with Australia's arts and cultural industries valued at around $32 billion or 3.5% of GDP, supporting around 474,000 jobs in 102,000 enterprises. 2. It is somewhat strange that the economy is seen by some people with interests in the arts as either irrelevant or as a potential enemy of the arts. This review found that this is rarely the case for professional artists, especially young and emerging artists who want to make a living from the arts. 3. The intrinsic value of the arts is arguably their greatest value. Many activities in the arts do not contribute to the economy, but must continue to be supported because of their immeasurable benefits to individuals and society. However, this contention does not need to be at odds with artists in art forms ranging from music, theatre and dance to sculpture, film and the digital arts wanting to be paid as full time artists, thus also contributing to the economy. Love of art drives many to pursue their art whatever the financial returns. 4. The professional arts should be valued highly for what they deliver to society as a whole, and hence this should be a very high policy priority, including the place of the professional arts in the economy. There is an apparent lack of clear connection between the arts and the economy in ACT Government, as well as a lack of policy direction for the role of the arts in the economy. 5. It is also not unreasonable, and is in fact desirable, for Government to expect that one aspect of its return on investment in the arts is the economic benefits that the arts deliver to the ACT economy. 6. Investment in the arts for economic benefit to the ACT does not need to be limited to investment in local art and artists. For instance, the Government’s investment in the recent NGA’s Masterpieces exhibition received some criticism early in this review. Several people said the money should have been invested in local arts. This view failed to appreciate the fact that this was a considered investment with the aim of economic benefit, and could as easily have been invested in any industry. It was an astute joint business venture involving the most senior people at the NGA and the ACT Government, who recognised this as a sound investment opportunity for both the Gallery and the ACT economy. This initiative delivered close to 500,000 visitors to the NGA, with about 80 per cent being visitors from outside Canberra, and there was an excellent return on investment. This also reinforced the image of Canberra as a national centre for the arts, and incidentally gave Canberrans direct access to some of the world’s finest art.

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7. There is a clear nexus between creativity, the arts, innovation, research, digital technology, education, training, creative industries, business investment and government funding. Government and the arts sector have opportunities to work together, and in partnerships with others to leverage full advantage from these connections. 8. Creativity and creative industries are increasingly recognised as adding value to social and economic well-being. The well-known author Richard Florida paved the way for new thinking about how creativity is revolutionising global and local economies, and his analysis of commercial innovation and regional development warrants consideration in the ACT, particularly in relation to arts and innovation. His ideas are being used globally to change the way regions and nations do business and transform their economies. The arts and ACT Government have important roles to play in new thinking about creativity and the future of the ACT economy. 9. Most Federal funding for creative industries, and related education and training initiatives comes from the Innovation rather than the Arts portfolio. There could be more active positioning of the ACT as a leader in arts, ideas and creativity, positioning it well for a number of new and emerging creative industries. There is interest from Universities in the ACT, and there are opportunities for partnerships with business. The NCIs are other potential partners. artsACT should be encouraged to broaden its policy scope to build capacity, knowledge and expertise in the areas of economic development, innovation and creative industries. This would enable them to work more closely and actively as specialist advisers with the ACT Innovation and Industry Development Unit within the Business and Industry Development Branch of CMD, as well as with the many interested parties and potential partners outside Government. 10. There appear to be excellent opportunities for the arts to create stronger relationships and partnerships with other areas of Government and business in a range of areas including tourism, events and festivals. There needs to be a clear policy framework to provide a full awareness of importance of the arts, alongside sport for instance, to the future economic development in the ACT. 11. Digital content production industries bring together high-level skills in the arts and technology and have demonstrated great achievement and future potential in at least the screen (including games) and defence industries, as well as in areas such as planning and architecture. Consideration should be given to developing ACT Creative Industries and/or Digital Economy Strategies. NSW recently launched a comprehensive Digital Economy Strategy at the CEBIT Conference. 12. The benefits and opportunities that can generated by the arts are often overlooked. It is understood that there have been recent initiatives by Government to support live music through a range of initiatives including reviewing the unintended restrictive impact of some areas of regulation and legislation.

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This is to be applauded. Live music and other areas of arts activity, when working constructively and creatively with the hospitality industry and with Government, can encourage the growth of Canberra’s night-time economy. 6.21 Recommendations 1. While there have been excellent recent initiatives including ACT Government investment in screen industries and ‘Masterpieces’, there needs to be a clearer recognition and promotion by all stakeholders of the strong connections between the arts, creativity, innovation and economic development. There is need for a more strategic approach to achieve the ACT’s full potential through the collaborative development of ACT Creative Industries, Digital Economy and Cultural Tourism Strategies. Business, the arts community, universities and the National Cultural Institutions should all be included. These facets of life and work in the ACT should also be integrated into Canberra’s image and identity through ‘Brand Canberra’.

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6.22 Arts, the Environment and Sustainability Art has always played a critical role in provoking thought and generating dialogue in all areas including the environment, climate change and ecological sustainability. Art can be a catalyst for individuals, communities and governments to focus on environmental values and to raise environmental awareness. There are a range of dimensions to this subject including: art generating environmental awareness, art being inspired by the environment, and art, arts activities and facilities being ecologically sustainable. Sustainable art is art that is produced with consideration for the wider impact of the work and its reception in relationship to its environments, including the ecological environment. Environmental art used to be mostly associated with sculpture but now encompasses many media, and is essentially about being in harmony with the natural environment. There are real opportunities in the ACT for more active connection between the arts, sustainability and the environment. 6.22 Issues and Analysis 1. One of the great natural features and attractions of the ACT for many artists is the environmental setting. Artists talked of the inspirational setting and the fact that the natural environment is either part of Canberra or at least on it’s doorstep. 2. Some artists and art organisations also spoke of using materials from and reflecting the environment. There was also recognition of the importance of commitment to environmental sustainability and awareness of climate change principles in the creative process. 3. Residencies for artists in Parks and on nearby properties provide great opportunities. 4. The arts have a great opportunity through visions and plans for precincts and for all cultural facilities to set high standards for environmental sustainability for the future. 5. A wide variety of public art and landscape architecture provide opportunities for further connections between the arts and environment. 6. The Arboretum is an outstanding initiative that has wonderful potential for many future initiatives, including with a variety of the performing and visual arts. At least some of this potential has been recognised at an early stage by the drivers, designers and managers of the Arboretum, and a sponsored opera has already been announced.

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7. It is suggested that there should be discussions with the Arboretum about the possibility of establishing some form of Arboretum arts and cultural group, including input from ACT and Australian Governments, business/sponsors, arts organisations and artists, to consider design and infrastructure requirements and opportunities for appropriate arts-related and cultural events. 8. There should be greater awareness of sustainability by artsACT and in turn funded arts organisations taking account of issues such as carbon neutrality. 6.22 Recommendations 1. The ACT Government and artsACT should embed commitments to environmental sustainability into all aspects of its arts policies and activities. There is great awareness of the importance of the environment in the arts and in the ACT and there is an opportunity to provide leadership in linking positive arts and environmental outcomes. Any new or redeveloped arts facilities should be built to the highest environmental standards, and there should be a commitment that funded organisations, events, festivals and activities should be aware of the need to be environmentally responsible and to aim to be carbon neutral. 2. The Arboretum is a wonderful initiative with great potential that was recognised from the outset to connect with and enrich the arts. There should be discussions with the Arboretum about the possibility of establishing some form of Arboretum arts and cultural group, including input from ACT and Australian Governments, business/sponsors, arts organisations and artists to consider design and infrastructure requirements and opportunities for appropriate arts-related and cultural events.

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6.23 The Public The public demonstrated their strong interest in the arts throughout this review through the media, public forums, online, email and other inputs. 6.23 Issues and Analysis 1. Many of the public who provided input to the review were active in different areas of the arts, across all art forms and across the ACT. Some had experience as artists and several were involved in a variety of large and small arts organisations. A consistent theme was the importance of all Governments recognising the multiple value of creativity, artists and the arts to a healthy society. These benefits were seen as ranging from the intrinsic value of the arts to individual and community wellbeing, to the more specific benefits of social engagement and economic opportunity. 2. There was a consistent view that the arts are under funded. This was based on a strong belief that there can be significant social, education and heath benefits from relatively small investments in the arts. 3. The public expressed the importance of clear and transparent policies guiding decisions about Government expenditure on and investment in the arts. There was quite a widespread view that Government decision-making on support for the arts appeared to reflect personal whim, preconceived views, ad hoc decision-making, a lack of openness and communication. This was often seen to be combined with slow, unresponsive and an overly bureaucratic processes of decision-making. 4. The public also are an important component of the arts scene in Canberra as audiences as well as participants. They have strong views on a range of issues as audiences. 5. Some of the issues raised by the public as audiences included: • the importance of access to arts facilities, including parking, public transport, Indigenous and disability access, and access for people who may be socially and economically disadvantaged. there does not appear to be any plan for arts facilities and there seem to be gaps in venues such as a lyric theatre, venues suitable for dance and opera, and community-based facilities in some areas which could be met in part by more creative thinking about multi-function spaces such as in schools. they don’t usually separate their opportunities and experiences as arts consumers between ACT Government, NCIs and venues in other cities. It is all part of what is available to them, though there is some disappointment that for some events like the Australian Ballet and Opera and particular shows it is necessary to travel to see them.

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6. Another vitally important role for the public is as volunteers. As in so many other areas of life, volunteers make a vital contribution to the arts. Passion for the arts and for participation in the arts motivates many to volunteer. Many areas of the arts would either operate far less effectively, or in some cases, would not operate at all without the input of volunteers. For at least two reasons, the contribution of volunteers should receive encouragement and recognition from Government. The first is that without current levels of support from volunteers, Government would either be faced with additional costs, or would see priority areas of the arts under-resourced and hence unable to perform as expected in the wider public interest. The second is that if ‘increasing participation in the arts’ is one of the Government’s priority goals, volunteering is an important way of achieving this. As in many areas of volunteering, the risk should be noted that the average age of volunteers is increasing. Government leadership and encouragement of new generations of volunteers will be an important component of Government action to at least retain current levels of volunteering. 6.23 Recommendations 1. The ACT public are actively supportive of and engaged with the arts and obviously appreciated being consulted extensively in this review. The public and arts audiences should be a key focal point of improved communication for artsACT, including through its new website. They should be kept advised of developments in future arts policies and strategies. Volunteers need to be highly valued in all areas including the arts and should receive recognition through Awards for outstanding contributions to the arts.

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7. Funding The ACT Government makes a substantial financial and resource contribution to the arts. As a result there appears to be a higher level of expectation of and dependence on Government arts funding support than in other jurisdictions. The level of funding, as well as interest in the arts from the Chief Minister, is generally appreciated in the ACT. Arts funding delivers a range of programs, projects, activities, facilities and other support that are mostly highly valued. However, there is widespread recognition that funding is currently spread too thinly to be fully effective and is ‘gridlocked’. This situation needs to be addressed quite urgently and strategically, including reviewing how the current funding model might more effectively reflect policy priorities. Funding models for the arts have continued to evolve across jurisdictions, and it is timely to review current funding arrangements and models in the ACT. While such reviews are not easy, and can generate arts sector and public concern, they are important to ensure that funding continues to take account of recent and likely future developments, as well as reflecting Government arts priorities. An important trend over recent years, which is seen by the Australian Government and other Governments as requiring attention, is the fact that funding for individual artists has fallen relative to funding for major institutions and arts organisations. The Australia Council’s consideration of the evolution of funding models is accompanied by a reframed view of the role of the arts and of artists who create art. The Australian Government Minister for the Arts, in launching his discussion about a National Cultural Policy, indicated that he saw a need to reestablish a balance in funding between organisations and artists. He said his focus was on providing greater support for more artists, as well as building audiences and participation, and developing new national and overseas markets for the arts. He called for a “greater openness to new and emerging talent, to the pioneers and experimenters in the digital era as well as the more traditional art forms…. to incubate and encourage the risky and the innovative as well as focusing on success and excellence”. The Minister also highlighted the need to recognise that “as well as a rising tide in the numbers of Australians viewing and valuing the arts, audiences are changing, participation rates are growing and flexibility of programming and diversity of content are increasingly expected, particularly by younger audiences. The economic value of the sector is also increasingly recognised. We need to take account of these changes as we prioritise the use of public money and encourage greater community and corporate support.” The analysis, findings and recommendations about funding related issues in this review are consistent with the approach of the Australian Government and several other jurisdictions.

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7.1 Arts Budget Reflecting Policy Priorities It is essential that the goals of Government are clear in their funding of the arts. This should begin with the broadest goals of what Government wants the arts to deliver in the ACT. Goals and priorities then become more specific in different aspects of arts policy. 7.1 Issues and Analysis 1. There is a pressing need to free up or unblock funding to enable appropriate responses to meet current and emerging Budget priorities. All current funding arrangements will need to be reviewed and adjusted to reflect Government and arts policy priorities. 2. While some acknowledge recent improvements, most artists and arts organisations consulted through this review are dissatisfied with current funding arrangements, and the vast majority sees the need for change. A common view was the desirability of Government funding to be based on clear and transparent Government arts goals and policy priorities so that the reasons for funding decisions could be better understood. 3. Other jurisdictions have been clarifying their goals and policy priorities for the arts. The NSW Government for instance has a State Plan Priority within “Stronger Communities” which is one of 44 Government priorities “to increase the number of people participating in the arts and cultural activity” by 10% by 2016 as measured by the ABS. Similarly specific overall goals for ACT Government would provide a guide to funding priorities and decisions for the arts. 4. There are also a number of Australian and ACT Government policy priorities beyond the arts that should be taken into account by artsACT in deciding strategic priorities and activities. These higher-level priorities should also be considered in setting Government priorities for arts funding. An example of such a priority for both Governments is COAG’s commitment to “Closing the Gap” for Indigenous people, and the ACT Government’s priority in the Canberra Plan to “Delivering a better future for Indigenous Canberrans”. These kinds of priorities should also be reflected in Arts Fund categories and funding priorities. 5. Many in the ACT arts community and public believe that because the arts make such a valuable contribution, and funding is already so tight, that no areas should have their funding reduced. In fact they argue quite strongly that the arts budget should be increased. However, in the current budget climate in the ACT, there is an expectation that it would be a challenge to increase overall funding for the arts a great deal, if at all. Focus Funding More on Quality Art and Professional Artists, rather than on Organisations and Administration 6. It is suggested that policy clarification to guide funding priorities should begin with key reasons why the ACT Government funds the arts, or in other words its key goals, and what it expects in return.

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7. It is proposed these goals or overarching priorities should be: 1. Increasing participation in the arts 2. Attracting and developing artists and quality art The first goal has broad community benefit and the second would be expected to benefit society and/or the economy in the ACT. Changes to achieve sustainability of the arts is also very important, but is seen to be inherent in the above two goals. 8. There was a strong desire from most who were consulted for clarity and consistency in funding arrangements. So Government funding should only be directed towards delivering on these goals or overarching priorities, and other specific arts policy priorities. Those seeking funding would need to demonstrate, in applications and acquittals, real, preferably measurable, arts benefits. 9. Over recent years, as in many other jurisdictions, a growing proportion of the arts budget has been directed to funding arts organisations. Artists certainly recognise this trend. There was quite a strong view through consultations, and from other jurisdictions, that there needs to be a higher proportion of the arts budget allocated to artists and the production of quality art. This should include more funding for the professional development of emerging artists and for innovative arts that appeal to new and younger audiences and participants in the arts. 10. There is a real need and current opportunity to increase funding to artists. Areas of new focus should include: new funding categories for emerging artists and Indigenous artists; additional budget available throughout the year for Quick Response Grants delivered promptly by artsACT; and a small proportion of the Arts Fund set aside for allocation by the Minister and artsACT for great ideas or initiatives, new art forms or innovation that deliver on the Government’s goals. Reduce Government Funding of Duplication and Administration 11. In breaking open the current funding gridlock, an important challenge will be to achieve sustainability. As it is expected that any significant funding increase would be unlikely, there will need to be action taken to reallocate existing funding away from arts organisations and towards artists. Even without the current very tight funding, change is seen to be necessary. 12. Many of the 22 Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) struggle to operate effectively with current levels of funding and funding arrangements. Continuing to separately fund 22 KAOs in the same way they are funded at present would appear to be unsustainable. This is not the fault of either the ACT Government or the KAOs, but rather the result of developments over time that now must be addressed. There will need to be some form of consolidation of funding, provided to fewer arts organisations, or clusters of organisations. It is also suggested that, with the current number and variety of KAOs, there be a move away from the notion of ‘Key’ Arts Organisations’.

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13. It is not appropriate or possible for the ACT Government to force consolidation of non-government organisations into new organisational structures. However, there will need to be discussion and strong encouragement, supported by funding arrangements, to achieve significant improvements in sustainability with greater communication, cooperation, coordination and co-location. 14. Where national art form or similar bodies exist, it will be necessary to work with these, at both national and local levels, to find new arrangements to streamline funding allocation arrangements. 15. It will need to be made clear that in future the focus of funding will be on Government goals and priorities of producing quality art and/or maximising participation in arts activity. 16. Duplication and multiple administrative arrangements will not be able to be funded in future. It will be necessary to allow reasonable time, perhaps one to two years, for staged implementation of new arrangements such as consolidation around art forms and/or precincts. Close consultation will be essential. 17. Government should also work with organisations to lead an initiative to shift its funding for administration from individual organisations to professional, shared corporate services outside the public sector which would in future provide support for, and be responsive to, arts organisations. 18. Shared corporate or administrative services would include areas such as finance, human resources, property, office services, and IT. At present organisations struggle to find, attract and pay qualified, often part-time, people. 19. A single hub for coordinated information, communications and marketing of the arts, which is seen by many in the ACT arts sector as a major issue and challenge, should also be established. This important professional function would be distinct from administrative functions, but may be a separate part of the shared services structure, and they could be collocated to maximise cost efficiency. 20. In some elements of its operations, the Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC) provides an example of duplication of management and administration. While the CFC adds significant value in some areas, it appears to add little value in others. 21. These consolidation actions would also allow some savings to be redirected from administration to the Arts Fund to deliver more quality art and greater participation. Differentiate Funding Needs of Professional Arts and Community Arts 22. There needs to be greater clarification of the differentiation between the ACT Government’s funding priorities for, and expectations of, professional and community arts and artists. There are important synergies and opportunities for cooperation, some level of sharing, and in a small percentage of cases migration from community to professional arts.

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However, the needs of professional artists are often distinctly different from people involved in community arts activity and these differences should be recognised by Government to maximise desired outcomes and efficiency. An example was given by artists that multi-purpose facilities often work well for community art, but specialised facilities are most often essential for professional artists. The apparent lack of recognition of these real professional needs was also given as a reason why some artists may decide to move away from Canberra. 23. Priorities and criteria for funding should reflect the different needs of professionals and community. The major focus of Government arts funding should be on quality and professional art, combined with a more clearly targeted focus on strategies to increase participation in community arts. 24. Individual and community participation in the arts is a key priority to be encouraged and assisted by Government, especially through the provision of appropriate, reasonable-cost, multi-purpose, regional or local facilities. 25. There should not need to be a major cost to Government for community arts support, where the primary focus should be on ensuring access to facilities. 26. However, there will also be some continuing need for funding for community arts activities, where processes should be streamlined and decentralised. 27. In deciding community arts funding needs in the future for both facilities and activities, Government should give clear priority to dynamic community organisations and groups that are seen to be valued and that clearly contribute to the key goal of increased public participation in the arts. 28. There should be a central booking facility to make greater use of under-utilised school facilities. The Chief Executive of Education would be supportive of this initiative which would extend the availability of facilities for community arts with minimal additional costs. 29. With priority support for essential community arts facilities and activities that deliver increased participation, it will be quite reasonable for the ACT Government to expect community organisations to be entrepreneurial in seeking other sources of revenue, as many already do very successfully. Beyond essential elements of Government support, it should be the aim of community arts organisations to be as close as possible to being self-funding and independent of Government. Next Steps 30. If recommendations are accepted, the ACT Government will need to clearly advise all stakeholders about future funding policies and arrangements, as well as discussing timing. Government could also advise that in focusing on new policies, it will set out to be more responsive, less process-driven and ad hoc in its funding decisions.

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In future, it would be totally focused on achieving its arts priorities of supporting professional artists, delivering the highest quality art and increasing participation in the arts. In the future, arts proposals that do not recognise and respond to the requirement for efficient consolidation, as well as contributing directly to these priority goals and outcomes, will not be able to receive funding. 31. A genuine arts funding reform process would involve a fresh look at everything Government currently funds to ensure that in the future there are real and measurable improvements in outcomes from the ACT Government’s investment in the arts. It will be necessary to allow a reasonable time for individuals and organisations to be made aware of and to adjust to new priorities and arrangements. During this time of staged transition, Government would communicate fully and effectively, consult genuinely, and work closely with all stakeholders about implementation. 32. If there is agreement to establish a new ACT Arts Fund Panel, this Panel would be clearly guided in all its considerations and recommendations by Government arts policy priorities. 33. This report also includes comments and recommendations on the funding of arts venues and facilities. Relevant issues include: ownership and management responsibilities, requirements for specialist, multi-purpose and community arts facilities, decision-making in capital investment, the need for more consistent and appropriate rental arrangements, access to facilities, heritage buildings and assets, repairs and maintenance, and arts facilities planning. In all these issues, funding decisions should be clearly guided by the ACT Government’s goals, policy priorities, or, if agreed an ACT Cultural Facilities Plan. 7.1 Recommendations 1. Current funding for the arts in the ACT is ‘gridlocked’. There is considerable dissatisfaction with current funding levels and arrangements, widespread recognition of the need for change, and a pressing need to free up funding to respond to current and emerging arts priorities. The ACT Government needs to clearly articulate its expectations from arts funding, including clear and transparent goals and policies, to guide future funding and resourcing priorities. 2. ACT Government should have two key arts goals: to increase participation in the arts, and to attract and develop artists and quality art. Funding should consistently be directed towards achieving these goals or overarching priorities, which would be supported by other more specific arts policies. All those seeking funding would need to demonstrate real arts benefits against policy priorities. 3. Over recent years a growing proportion of most arts budgets around Australia have been directed to funding arts organisations. There needs to be a shift in budget priority towards professional artists, leading to the production of quality art. This should include more funding for the professional development of emerging artists and for innovative arts that appeal to new and younger audiences and arts participants.

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4. Many of the 22 Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) struggle to operate effectively with current levels of funding and funding arrangements, and continuing to separately fund 22 KAOs is not unsustainable. Government will need to strongly encourage consolidation through consultation and funding for fewer arts organisations or clusters of organisations to reduce administrative duplication and improve sustainability with greater cooperation, coordination and co-location. Government should also move away from the notion of ‘Key’ Arts Organisations. 5. As well as having costs associated with duplication, many organisations struggle to attract and pay qualified people. ACT Government should work with organisations to establish a professional, shared corporate services unit outside the public sector to provide cost-effective, responsive support to arts organisations. In the future Government would only fund administration through this shared administrative services unit, which would include finance, human resources, office services, and IT. A hub for communications and marketing of the arts should also be established, and could be collocated with this. These initiatives would allow arts organisations to give greater focus to the arts. 6. There needs to be greater clarification of the differentiation between the ACT Government’s funding priorities for, and expectations of, professional and community arts and artists. The major focus of ACT Government’s arts funding in the future should be on the support for and development of professional artists and quality art. Increased participation in community arts should remain a high priority, to be encouraged and assisted with more clearly targeted strategies, and especially through the provision of reasonable-cost, multipurpose facilities. 7. New ACT Government arts policies and funding priorities, including the need for efficient and effective consolidation, would need to be clearly communicated to all stakeholders. There would need to be a fresh and open look at all current funding arrangements in light of new policies. At the same time, there should be a commitment giving greater emphasis to communication, transparency, flexibility, simplicity and responsiveness from Government. Extensive consultation and a reasonable timeframe for implementation of changes will be essential. 8. The arts are highly valued by a large number of people in the ACT, and the ACT Government should give serious consideration to a modest increase in arts funding. While there will be some opportunities to reallocate some elements of existing funding, there are a number of significant policy changes recommended in this report, and a modest increase in funding at this time would demonstrate that the arts are also highly valued by Government.

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7.2 Funding Categories, Processes and Decisions 7.2 Issues and Analysis 1. There have been real improvements in recent years in various aspects of the scope, presentation and operations of the ACT Arts Fund that reflect the commitment of dedicated artsACT staff, the Cultural Council and the ACT Government. These efforts and improvements should be properly acknowledged. 2. However, strong and widespread perceptions remain that the ACT’s arts funding decisions are overly process driven, bureaucratic, slow, unresponsive, inflexible, difficult to understand and generally not well geared to the needs of artists or arts organisations. It is possible that to some extent these perceptions and criticisms are based on a history of funding decisions and ongoing frustrations with funding levels, but dissatisfaction with funding arrangements are prevalent and real. 3. Concerns were expressed through the review, especially from artists and arts organisations, about what is seen to be inadequate funding overall for artists, as well as some ‘gaps’ in funding categories for artists. The lack of availability of relatively small amounts of funding during the year for pressing needs was identified as another problem needing to be addressed. 4. It was expressed that it can be difficult for some groups of artists, including young and Indigenous artists, to ‘break in’ to win funding support. This may be because of lack of expertise or required technique in writing applications successfully, or because of perceptions about differences in interpretations, relating to issues such as age and culture, and about what constitutes ‘quality’. 5. Government arts funding processes should be consistent with principles including: being accessible to all potential applicants; decisions made on merit and advised as quickly as possible; having appropriate levels of risk management taking account of levels of funding and risk to Government; and ensuring necessary governance, probity and independence. 6. The extent and depth of concern expressed by artists, arts organisations and even the public about various aspects of funding in the ACT clearly indicated a need for changes to current funding structures and processes to address concerns about gaps, delays, unresponsiveness, communication mechanisms, and the balance of funding to professional artists, community arts and arts organisations. Peer Assessment through an ACT Arts Fund Panel 7. There was found to be extensive support from both those providing input in the ACT and from other jurisdictions to retain the principle of a peer panel approach. However, there were varying views about what might work best for the ACT. The review process, including research and discussions with other jurisdictions, has indicated that while changes are needed, some form of peer assessment should be retained as an important component of decision making about funding allocations to demonstrate that significant decisions are both informed and independent.

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8. It is proposed to continue with a peer assessment approach for higher levels and longer terms of program and project funding in the ACT. Other jurisdictions, including the Australian Government, are committed to peer assessment: “Peer assessment and decisions at arm’s length from the Australian Government are fundamental tenets of the Australia Council’s structure and decision-making process.” Ensuring that the principle of informed, independent, merit-based decision-making about funding is important in every jurisdiction, but is particularly important with a smaller population, such as in the ACT. 9. Independence in funding decisions through a peer panel approach would be further reinforced in the ACT, where there are fewer specialist professional artists than in most jurisdictions, by establishing decision making at a higher level to operate across the arts sector. A proposed peer panel would draw on a range of arts and other relevant expertise and would reflect the ACT community. 10. Retaining a peer panel does not need to add to costs or delays, in fact there would be fewer ‘steps’ in the proposed new funding process, with Panel meetings held over two to three days and recommendations from the ACT Arts Fund Panel going directly through artsACT to the Chief Minister. Panel assessment would be combined with direct decision-making for lower level, responsive decisions such as Quick Response Grants, which would be decided promptly by artsACT. 11. As noted in section 6.4.1, while the Cultural Council has played a very valuable role in funding recommendations and decisions, it is proposed that it should not continue to be the major body making funding recommendations. This would in future be the role of the ACT Arts Panel. In future the Council should become focused on a primary role as a Ministerial Advisory Committee, meeting quarterly, and providing independent policy advice and arts sector feedback on a range of issues. 12. While most Cultural Council members see the provision of policy advice as their main purpose, the Council currently spends the great majority of its time considering funding applications. This results in the Council becoming somewhat distanced from the arts, because of concerns about possible probity issues in relation to funding decisions, and therefore limiting their value in providing current, informed advice. It is suggested that the Cultural Council should in future focus its advice on the overall effectiveness of funding arrangements in delivering Government priorities and on the review of any arts policies if and when required. 13. A broadly based ACT Arts Fund Panel should be established, to be appointed by the Chief Minister, that would be able to call on other art form specialists if and when required to provide further advice on grant applications. The Panel would in future make all Arts Fund funding recommendations. It would include: respected artist and art organisation representatives from the main art forms and from across the arts; one representative from other relevant areas such as finance or law; one from artsACT; and possibly one or two from interstate. This would ensure quality advice based on a range and depth of knowledge and judgement.

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The Panel would be expected to have approximately nine members, who should also broadly reflect the ACT community in gender balance, and should include voices for youth, Indigenous and other cultural backgrounds, and preferably also for disability. 14. There could be consideration given to establishing two Panels, with one focused on individuals and the other on organisations. However, the numbers of applications are not considerably large (190 in ‘11), and the benefits of having a single Panel are believed to be substantial in having a single view of funding priorities and applications for all of the arts in the ACT; developing a broader view of potential linkages, partnerships and opportunities; and maximising operational efficiencies. 15. Discussions with the Director of Arts Tasmania about Panel arrangements were found to be interesting and very relevant to the ACT, taking account of similar issues of population size, some level of isolation and her experience of working in the arts in Canberra. There are two Panels in Tasmania, one for individuals and one for organisations, each with nine members, but the Director saw the proposal for a single Panel for the ACT to achieve the above benefits as “really interesting”. Other approaches in Tasmania that are worthy of note in the ACT include: 1. Because of the size of population, there was a move away from art form panels to a broader-based peer panel for all the arts. 2. The inclusion on the Tasmanian Arts Advisory Board, which oversees funding recommendations, of three people from interstate to help provide fresh perspectives and avoid any perceptions of conflicts of interest. 3. The Advisory Board and funding Panels are made clearly aware of the necessity of a Government policy overlay to guide funding decisions. 16. The ACT’s Arts Fund Panel’s decisions should be strongly based on Government priorities of supporting professional artists and quality art, delivering positive arts outcomes and/or increasing the widest public participation in the arts. 17. It is entirely reasonable to suggest that when funding is provided by ACT Government through artsACT, a condition of funding should be that all funded organisations must display the artsACT logo to raise public awareness of support. ACT Arts Fund Categories 18. The ACT Arts Fund is a very significant, direct form of funding by ACT Government for the arts. It supports a diversity of art forms, through a variety of funding categories across the full spectrum of the arts from community arts to the fine arts, as well as individuals, groups and organisations. The Fund sets out to focus on arts development through activities and programs and also on maximising opportunities for audience engagement.

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19. The 2010 ACT Arts Fund Booklet was the document discussed throughout the majority of consultations. It was a well-written, well-produced and thorough document, providing extensive, detailed information for potential applicants and providing information on accessibility commitments and options. There was information on Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) (for up to five years); Program (for up to two years); Project (for one-off projects in 2010); Community Arts (for one-off projects) and funding; as well as Creative Arts Fellowships (up to two); the Book of the Year Award (one award) and the Poetry Prize (four prizes). There was also information about funding for Out of Round, Festivals, Facilities and Public Art on the artsACT website. 20. During the process of the review there was considerable feedback given to the Steering Committee about likely directions of proposed changes to artsACT and to the Cultural Council. It is very pleasing to note that some of the review’s proposed changes in relation to governance, Fellowships, and young and emerging artists have already been adopted and included in the recently released 2011 ACT Arts Fund. This followed an annual evaluation of the previous 2010 booklet by artsACT and the Cultural Council. 21. The key changes in the 2011 Arts Fund were: refined governance procedures; a refocused community arts category targeting community organisations wanting to work with professional artists; a focus on audience engagement; a requirement for applicants to the Creative Arts Fellowships category to propose public engagement activities that would be undertaken as part of their Fellowship year; separating the literature awards from the grants process; and ‘start up’ grants for young and/or emerging artists. 22. The 2011 ACT Arts Fund opened on 7 April 2010, and closed on 31 May for all categories except Key Arts Organisation Funding, which closed on 18 June. All applications to the ACT Arts Fund (except Out of Round Funding and the forthcoming ‘start up’ grants) are assessed by the ACT Cultural Council and its peer panels. All announcements are expected to be made by October. The 2011 ACT Arts Fund has seven categories: 1. Project Funding: for one-off arts projects undertaken 2. Communities Working With Artists: for one-off community-initiated arts projects that engage professional artists. 3. ACT Creative Arts Fellowships: up to two Fellowships in any art form for individual artists that has achieved a level of expertise and excellence in their arts practice. 4. Program Funding: for not-for-profit incorporated arts organisations, for up to two years of funding, for significant programs of activity. 5. Key Arts Organisations Funding: for key arts organisations that provide significant infrastructure, services and/or programs of activity, for up to five years of funding.

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6. Out of Round Funding: for artists that have an unexpected professional development opportunities that arises outside the timing of the main funding rounds within the 2010/2011 financial year. 7. Commencing 1 July, the ACT Arts Fund will offer ‘start up’ grants of up to $500 for young and/or emerging ACT artists. In parallel to the ACT Arts Fund are the literature awards, which remain largely unchanged from 2010, were opened on 26 February 2010 and closed on 26 March, with the Minister to be briefed in September. 23. During the review process, detailed discussions were held on issues including funding arrangements, processes and categories with the heads of Government Arts agencies with the Australian Government (Secretary DEWHA), Australia Council (CEO and Executive), NSW, Queensland, South Australia and Tasmania. This was particularly useful in knowledge of policy directions, what works and what does not work, as well as being able to test options for funding arrangements in the ACT.

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7.2 Recommendations 1. There should be acknowledgement of real improvements in recent years in the scope and administration of the ACT Arts Fund reflecting the commitment of artsACT staff, the Cultural Council and the ACT Government. However, there need to be responses to widespread, serious concerns about current funding structures and convoluted processes to address issues including category gaps, delays, unresponsiveness, definitions (eg ‘quality’), communication mechanisms, and the balance of funding allocations. As a broad checklist, Government arts funding processes must be: accessible to all potential applicants; merit based; decided and advised as promptly as possible; have appropriate risk management; and ensure necessary governance, probity and independence. It is very pleasing to see that some areas highlighted over some months through this review in relation to governance, Fellowships, and young and emerging artists have already been included in the 2011 Arts Fund, but further change will be needed. 2. Peer assessment should be retained as this ensures informed, independent, meritbased decision-making about funding. Independence should be further reinforced in the ACT, where there are fewer specialist professional artists than in most jurisdictions, by establishing one assessment panel at a higher level to operate across art forms and the arts sector. This would be combined with direct decisionmaking for lower level, responsive decisions such as Quick Response Grants, which would be decided by artsACT. 3. A single new ACT Arts Fund Panel should be established with about 9 members, who would be appointed by the Chief Minister, and this would replace the roles of individual panels and the Cultural Council. The Panel would in future make all Arts Fund funding recommendations. It would include respected artist and art organisation representatives from the main art forms and from across the arts industry; one representative from other relevant areas such as finance or law; one from artsACT; and possibly one or two experienced people from interstate. The Panel should also broadly reflect the ACT community and would be able to call on art form specialists if required to provide advice on grant applications. This would ensure quality advice based on a range and depth of knowledge and judgement. 4. There should be fewer ‘steps’ in the proposed new funding process with significantly reduced delays. The ACT Arts Fund Panel meetings could be held over about three days, and recommendations from the Panel would go directly through artsACT to the Chief Minister for approval. With the same closing dates for applications, the Minister should in future be in a position to make most announcements months earlier, in June, rather than having applicants required to wait for decisions until as late as October. 5. The ACT’s Arts Fund Panel should be made fully aware of Government’s arts goals and policy priorities. The Panel’s decisions should be strongly guided by these goals, policies and priorities. 6. It should be a condition of funding that all funded organisations use the artsACT logo and artists acknowledge funding support.

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7.3 Future Funding Priorities 1. It is proposed to shift funding focus more towards professional arts and artists and away from duplication and administration in organisations. It will be highly desirable to simplify funding processes wherever possible. 2. Take steps to increase funding to artists, with new areas of focus including new funding categories for: 2.1 Emerging artists 2.2 Indigenous artists 2.3 Additional budget should be made available throughout the year for Quick Response Grants of up to $3,000, decided by artsACT within four weeks with a target turnaround of two weeks. This would be based on real, demonstrable needs leading to real outcomes, such as being accepted for a professional development course. 2.4 Approximately 10 percent of the Arts Fund should be set aside for allocation by the Minister and artsACT for great ideas or initiatives, new art forms or innovation that deliver on the Government’s goals but may not fit established categories or funding rounds. 3. It will be important in establishing new categories for Indigenous and emerging artists to be aware of the importance of capacity building, encouragement and support, including working with artists to raise awareness and develop skills to meet requirements for Grant applications. It is also likely to be desirable to have input to decision-making from additional Indigenous and young artists, possibly from outside the ACT. Mentoring is also desirable for many artists, but especially for these groups. 4. It is proposed to move away from the current situation of funding 22 ‘Key’ Arts Organisations to funding for priority arts activities in arts organisations that demonstrate: appropriate governance arrangements; recognition of the need to work cooperatively with other organisations in the same precincts or with interests in the same art form; and are prepared to give maximum focus to arts activity rather than administration by working towards a sharing of corporate services. It would be expected that with necessary consolidation, and a strong focus on improved arts outcomes, a smaller number of organisations would be funded. 5. Seriously consider adopting a policy of not continuing to separately fund administration in arts organisations. Replace this with a shared corporate services unit that would be likely to receive the majority of its funding from Government. At least the core of this unit would be collocated as a non-government business unit providing services to approved arts organisations. The combined services would include finance, human resources, ICT and office services, property and procurement.

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6. It will be necessary to undertake a business and financial analysis of the best way to structure shared corporate services and to determine accurately the expected savings that would be redirected to new arts priorities through the Arts Fund. The main two options are expected to be to have a core of management and essential consistent points of contact and to outsource functions that make financial and operational sense, such as payroll. Alternatively, a largely fully staffed operation could be established. Government could either fund the shared services operation directly or by payments though arts organisations, so they continue to have a sense of ownership and control. Government and arts organisations would work together to establish these new arrangements, and there would be expected to be standard service level agreements with organisations. 7. It is suggested that a future funding priority should be ‘centres of excellence’, where Canberra has current or potential capability to be a leader on the national or global stage. The Glassworks is one clear example of an excellent initiative deserving specific support. The Glassworks also requires special recognition of its role as the focal point of an exciting new Kingston arts precinct which should be the subject of appropriate master planning, in the context of both the local area and a future Canberra Cultural Facilities Plan. 8. A funding initiative in Tasmania, which is so far unique within Australia, should also be considered for the ACT to encourage the local and Australian public to buy or commission artworks from living ACT artists. The scheme called ‘Collect’ in Tasmania, (the Collect arts purchase scheme) is based on the UK Arts Council’s successful ‘Own Art scheme’. In Tasmania, ‘Collect’ involves providing interest free loans of between $750 and $7,500 for up to 12 months to buy artworks ranging in price from $400 to $10,000 through about a dozen participating commercial galleries which take part in the scheme. Where artists are commissioned, a 25 per cent deposit is paid and 75 per cent can be borrowed interest free up to the limit payable. If adopted in the ACT, such a low cost scheme would provide strong promotion for the purchase of local artworks, support career development of visual artists, stimulate the economy, encourage new art collectors, provide important support for commercial galleries and extend ACT visual art across the nation. In a similar situation to Tasmania, where there is a smaller population, a level of isolation, strong local arts interest, and many visitors, it would be expected to work well. 9. There is also an innovative system of low interest loans in Tasmania at 2.16 per cent for up to 10 years for artists, arts organisations and small museums for any purpose that delivers an arts outcome. Applications are assessed on merit and capacity to repay. Merit criteria are based on the quality of the proposal, including: strength of concept; creativity and innovative nature of the work; capacity to manage and deliver the project; benefit to the artist’s creative development, professional practice and/or the community. Indigenous and disability benefits are given positive weighting, and this weighting could be extended in the ACT to contributions to arts policy priorities. This loan scheme warrants serious consideration in the ACT to assist artists and organisations without placing significant additional stress on the Arts Fund.

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10. Three linked initiatives that take account of the population and location circumstances of the ACT are proposed for serious consideration for future funding: 1. As mentioned in section 6.6.3, Artists in Residence programs attract artists from around the nation and the world to either come to or return to Canberra to work and share their experience and ideas. 2. Mentoring was raised a number of times during the review and was seen as a highly desirable component of professional development, especially for emerging artists 3. Cultural Exchange Programs, if properly established and targeted can also be very positive to exchange cultural and artistic experiences with artists from elsewhere in Australia or from overseas. These initiatives do not need to be particularly expensive, and in the case of mentoring may only require organisation, but could add significantly to enriching the cultural life of Canberra and could be influential in retaining artists in Canberra or attracting them to live in the ACT. 11. The ACT has provided up to two Creative Arts Fellowships valued at $45,000 each. From research through the review, it would appear that while some of these have provided real benefits, others have seemed to be of doubtful value when compared to other funding priorities. There do not appear to be clear expectations of how the funds from Fellowships will be used, and in some cases people receiving them already had full-time, non-arts positions. Compared to other priorities, Fellowships in their current form are very costly and of unclear value. It is suggested that if one is to be retained, it should be for full time artists, and there should be a requirement for engagement or reporting back on outcomes to the arts community and the public. 12. The ACT has a Book of the Year Award and four Poetry Prizes which appear to be valued. However, there were some concerns that ‘strongly demonstrating an ACTbased practice’ was not as strong and clear as a requirement for the applicant to be living and working in the ACT. 13. While greater funding certainty with longer-term funding arrangements have been generally welcomed, they have not been universally welcomed. They are often seen as inflexible and blocking innovation and opportunity based on ideas that emerge during the funding cycle. Organisations should be able to apply for limited project funding in certain circumstances. Government should also be very cautious about being ‘locked in’ for several years as this reduces funding flexibility. Discussions with other jurisdictions indicated a very firm view that three years should be an absolute maximum for funding, and even this duration should only be considered in very specific circumstances. 14. Reduction of processing time and costs through long term funding arrangements was seen to carry real risks. There needs to be confidence that organisations will continue to evolve and perform against more firm future performance criteria. ‘Sunset clauses’ can be useful in maintaining flexibility, focus, performance and value for Government investment.

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Improving Process 15. Maximising simple and easy access for all who wish to apply for grants should be a priority, including the earliest possible introduction of online applications and acquittals. This may need to be part of a wider reform process of Grants Administration in the ACT Government so that online funding processes do not result in paper-based log-jams within Government agencies. In any case, as recommended in section 6.3, there is now a pressing need for a major overhaul of the artsACT website to: streamline funding and other processes; provide quick and relatively inexpensive survey information and feedback; improve communication, engagement and interaction with the entire arts sector and the public in the ACT; and to provide essential information in a highly accessible way to all including business and other potential arts sponsors and other Government agencies. 16. With greater funding emphasis on quality professional arts, it is suggested that the ACT Government considers streamlining the funding process for community arts activities. It is highly desirable to minimise administrative processes, delays and costs associated with the provision of relatively small grants to communities. It is suggested that the ACT Government should in future decentralise funding arrangements by allocating funds through regional hubs at Tuggeranong and Belconnen. This would place decision-making closer to community activity for allocation to appropriate community groups to achieve the Government goal of increasing public participation. 17. Conditional upon governance and accountability arrangements, funding could be provided to representatives of clusters, based on art form or precinct, for distribution to organisations and artists.

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7.3 Recommendations 1. Increase the overall percentage and quantum of funding to artists, with new areas of focus including two new funding categories for: 1. Emerging artists 2. Indigenous artists These new categories will require a commitment to communication, capacity building, mentoring, encouragement and support, including working with artists to raise awareness and skills to meet requirements for Grant applications. It may be desirable to have input to decision-making about Grants from Indigenous and young artists, from outside the ACT. 2. Additional budget should be provided throughout the year for Quick Response Grants of up to $3,000, decided by artsACT within four weeks with a target turnaround of two weeks. This would be based on real, demonstrable needs leading to real outcomes, such as being accepted for a professional development course. 3. Approximately 10 percent of the Arts Fund budget should be set aside for allocation by the Minister and artsACT for great ideas or initiatives, new art forms or innovation that deliver on the Government’s goals but may not fit established categories or funding rounds. 4. ACT Government should encourage consolidation of Key Arts Organisations and other arts organisations by funding a smaller number of about 8 clusters of organisations or Arts Hubs built around art forms and/or arts precincts. These may be new organisations or groupings of current organisations, but they will need to demonstrate: appropriate governance arrangements; recognition of the need to work cooperatively with others in the same art forms and precincts; and be prepared to give maximum focus to arts activity rather than administration by sharing corporate services. There should be a strong and clear funding focus for organisations on consolidation, reducing administrative duplication, and particularly on improving arts outcomes against Government goals and policy priorities. 5. In establishing a new non-Government shared corporate services unit, it will be necessary to undertake a business and financial analysis of the best way to structure this and to determine accurately the expected savings that would be redirected to new arts priorities through the Arts Fund. The main two options are: a core of management and essential consistent points of contact with outsourced functions such as payroll; or a largely fully staffed operation. Government would either fund the shared services operation directly or by payments though arts organisations, so they continue to have a sense of ownership and control. Government and arts organisations would work together to establish these new arrangements, and there would be expected to be standard service level agreements with organisations.

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6. A future funding priority should be ‘centres of excellence’, where Canberra has current or potential capability to be a leader on the national or global stage. The Glassworks is one clear example of an excellent initiative that should receive specific support in its own right, and special recognition of its role as the focal point of an exciting new Kingston arts precinct. 7. Apply a UK and Tasmanian funding initiative to the ACT to encourage the ACT and Australian public to buy or commission artworks from living ACT artists. The scheme would involve providing interest free loans of between $750 and $7,500 for up to 12 months to buy artworks ranging in price from $400 to $10,000 through participating commercial galleries. Where artists are commissioned, a 25 per cent deposit would be paid, and 75 per cent could be borrowed interest free up to the limit payable. This low cost scheme would provide strong promotion for the purchase of local artworks, support career development of visual artists, support local commercial galleries, stimulate the economy, encourage new art collectors, provide important support for commercial galleries and further enable ACT visual art to be collected and shown across the nation. It would be expected to work well in the ACT where there is a smaller population, strong local arts interest, and a large number of visitors. 8. Introduce loans for up to 10 years for artists and arts organisations for any purpose that delivers an arts outcome. Applications would be assessed on capacity to repay and merit criteria including: quality of the proposal including strength of concept; creativity and innovative nature of the work; capacity to manage and deliver the project; benefit to the artist’s creative development and/or to the community. Contributing to ACT arts policy priorities would be an essential component and Indigenous and disability benefits would be given positive weighting. 9. Funding should be provided for the professional development of artists through mentoring and cultural exchange programs. Mentoring is highly desirable, especially for emerging artists; and properly established cultural exchange programs with artists from around Australia or overseas can deliver very positive cultural and artistic experiences for ACT artists, and add to the benefits of Artist in Residence programs. These initiatives do not need to be particularly expensive, and would: significantly enrich the cultural life of Canberra; promote the ACT internationally as an arts centre; and be influential in retaining artists in Canberra or attracting them to live in the ACT. 10. The ACT has previously provided up to two Creative Arts Fellowships valued at $45,000 each, but there have not been clear expectations of how the funds from Fellowships will be used. In future this prestigious Fellowship should only be awarded to full-time professional ACT artists, and should be based on nomination or direct recommendation by the Panel and decision by the Chief Minister, rather than on application. It is suggested that there should only be one Fellowship each year valued at $60,000, to enable an outstanding full time artist to be able to live with minimal financial concerns and to concentrate on their art. There should be a requirement for minimum levels of engagement or reporting back on outcomes to the Government, the arts community and the public, and an expectation that there would be a resulting body of work. The Fellowship would have considerable visibility and status and could be awarded by the Chief Minister at new annual Canberra Arts Awards.

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11. Long-term funding for organisations have been generally welcomed, but can be inflexible and stifle innovation and opportunity with ideas that may emerge during the funding cycle. In future three years should be an absolute maximum for funding. Government needs to be confident that organisations will continue to evolve and perform against more clear and firm performance criteria. Organisations should be able to apply for project funding in certain clear circumstances, including demonstrating innovation and initiative consistent with new Government priorities. 12. Government should maximise simple and easy access for all who wish to apply for Grants, including the earliest possible introduction of online applications and acquittals. This may need to be part of a wider reform process of Grants Administration in the ACT Government, so that online funding processes do not lead to or result in paper-based log-jams within Government agencies. 13. There should be an overall commitment from ACT Government and artsACT to improve and streamline all administrative processes by cutting red tape, including any requirements for written information, forms, processes, reporting or other requirements that are not absolutely essential in contemporary administration. This would be a relief for the arts sector, and would minimise administrative workloads in Government, in a similar way to what Government will be expecting from arts organisations. Delays between all arts applications and decisions should be cut to a minimum. The new ACT Arts Panel should operate with these commitments from the outset.

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7.4 Funding Sources 7.4 Issues and Analysis There is currently a particularly heavy reliance on Government sources of funding for the arts in the ACT. It is important for the sustainability of the arts in the ACT to actively pursue greater independence from Government, new partnerships and more diverse sources of funding. 1. There was a strong impression from all stakeholders that the ACT did not receive the level of Australian Government support for arts activity that it should in proportionate terms, and in relation to the level of arts interest and activity in the ACT. Analysis of funding trends from the Australia Council to jurisdictions reinforces the validity of this view. This tends to unfairly increase pressure on the ACT Government, with its limited funding capacity, to fill the gaps. 2. There needs to be a greater recognition, led by Government, of the need for private sector sponsorship, philanthropy as well as personal and community responsibility. Government could encourage other sources of funding for the arts, including by leveraging funding support from other sources and using data to demonstrate the benefits of supporting the arts to business. 3. In discussions with other jurisdictions it was clear that all are facing similar Government funding challenges and encouraging greater self-reliance, a more entrepreneurial approach and further diversification of funding sources. There were a number of examples of changes in Government priorities leading to the inability to continue to fund all organisations that had previously been funded. While the reviewers were told that this was quite challenging for a number of arts organisations and community groups at the time, many had since reported that no longer being dependent on Government funding had been liberating and had led to new and creative ways of continuing to operate, and in a number of cases to flourish. 4. The Australian Government Minister for the Arts recently listed “the partner role, namely private sector support” as one of his four new highest priorities for the arts, alongside keeping culture strong, engaging the community, and powering the young. Minister Garrett went on to say: “Over the past decade, our nation has seen considerable growth of private sector support through business sponsorships and private giving. We are a generous nation and we are increasingly recognising the role that the arts play in developing our communities, shaping our culture and supporting our economy. Whether through the human equity of volunteering, workplace giving or private trusts and larger foundations, there is great potential to enlarge the pie and broaden the reach of the arts through increased private sector connections.” It is suggested that this is a sensible and realistic approach which is already being pursued in many jurisdictions and should be actively pursued in the ACT.

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5. In most cases, recipients of Government funding, including community, should be expected to generate some revenue from: membership fees, sale of art, ticket sales, tutoring, facilities rental, foundations, philanthropy, or sponsorship. ACT Government should not be the sole source of funding for any organisation. There needs to be encouragement of a culture shift away from the view that if Government does not fund something in the arts, it is unlikely to be able to happen. 6. Business sponsorship of the arts will be a crucial area for further development in the future in the ACT. The ACT Government will have an important leadership and promotional role to play in this strategy. 7. The Australian Business Arts Foundation (ABAF), which has now had a part-time representative in the ACT, is quite active in raising business’ awareness of the potential benefits of partnerships with and sponsorship of the arts. The ACT Government should seriously consider supporting the conversion of this position from part-time to full-time.

8. Philanthropy, and the establishment and development of Arts Foundations should not be overlooked. It has been the experience with the National Cultural Institutions and in other jurisdictions that there is real potential interest from people with strong interests in the arts to provide money both during their lives and in their wills to specific areas of the arts. Indigenous, young and emerging artists, and arts in education and disability are some areas where there could be interest from both sponsorship and philanthropy. 9. Another aspect of funding vulnerability is funding from other areas of ACT Government, where there have been varying levels of investment in education, health, disability, Indigenous, criminal justice, and early intervention and prevention for areas like youth at risk. There is concern from artists and arts organisations about the way in which funding challenges for agencies can quickly result in major reductions or the ceasing of funding arrangements. There does not appear to be a clear understanding of the ACT Government’s overall contribution to the arts, or effective whole-of-Government coordination which could be led by artsACT. 10. There is some level of sponsorship of the arts in the ACT, but there is very heavy reliance on support from ActewAGL. Without the vision, awareness and strong support from the current senior management of ActewAGL, there would be some vulnerability for the arts. Diversification of sponsorship sources, preferably with the assistance of ActewAGL, will be an essential element of risk management. 11. There are also new dynamics at work in the arts. These include the further development of cultural industries, including aspects of innovation and emerging arts industries, as well as new ideas and motivations from a new generation of artists. Young people are pursuing education and training, wanting greater independence from Government, and connecting with other aspiring and emerging artists directly and through online social networking. They are in pursuit of full-time employment on the local and global stage as artists in traditional arts and in areas of huge opportunity such as digital art in industries including screen, games and Defence.

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Young artists want creative satisfaction and jobs, so Governments will need to adapt to the changing funding realities and changing needs of artists. While targeted funding to achieve clear outcomes will remain important, new approaches and skills will be required from Government to meet needs beyond the allocation of funds. 12. It is increasingly the experience in many jurisdictions that the greatest value from Government for the arts is to provide what artists and arts related organisations are unable to provide for themselves. This includes: being in active communication with the arts sector; brokering and delivering support and connection with Government and industries; demonstrating initiative about potential opportunities (for example Arts Tasmania’s work with stakeholders on a Cultural Tourism Policy); providing facilitation in areas such as identifying emerging industry needs for artists and bridging skills gaps. These changes are consistent with a greater emphasis on independence, initiative, creativity and a more entrepreneurial approach to funding in the arts.

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7.4 Recommendations 1. There needs to be a greater recognition, led by Government, of the benefits from increased private sector sponsorship, philanthropy, and personal and community responsibility. The ACT Government should encourage less financial dependence on government and encourage a diversity of funding sources for the arts. This should include leveraging funding support from other sources by joint funding initiatives, including for arts infrastructure and facilities. Data should also be collected and used to demonstrate to business the benefits of supporting the arts. 2. The ACT Government should encourage greater cross-promotion between arts organisations and precincts, as well as wider, more dynamic audience engagement and development. artsACT should initiate opportunities for arts organisations to come together at quarterly meetings to discuss experiences, partnerships, ideas, potential revenue sources and possible joint ventures. 3. The activities of the Australian Business Arts Foundation (ABAF) should be actively supported. It has potential, with ACT Government support, to attract engagement and revenue from business. There should be strong encouragement, including funding support, to convert the part-time ABAF position to full-time. 4. There should be recognition and acknowledgement of the extremely valuable vision, awareness and strong support provided to the arts by ActewAGL as a model sponsor. The senior leadership could be called upon to highlight benefits and to encourage other potential sponsors, assisting diversification of sponsorship from other sources and reducing the risk of high-level dependence on ActewAGL. 5. Targeted funding to support the arts and achieve clear Government outcomes will continue to be vitally important, but new approaches and skills are now required from Government to meet more needs in the arts beyond the allocation of funds. What artists and arts organisations need most is what they are unable to provide for themselves, including: communication with the arts sector; brokering and delivering support and connection with Government and business; providing facilitation to identify emerging industry needs for artists; and bridging skills gaps. This will certainly require a new outlook from Government. It is also likely to require a change of culture and skills, away from process, distributing funding responsibly, and enforcing rules and guidelines, and towards an entrepreneurial, proactive, collaborative and supportive approach aimed at delivering positive arts outcomes.

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8. Recommendations Recommendations should generally be read in conjunction with issues and analysis provided in each section of the report. 6.1.1 Arts, Culture and Heritage - What Role for Government? 1. The ACT Government must provide clear policy direction on the arts. New goals, policies and strategic priorities need to be established, based on the extensive consultation, and wide ranging feedback, analysis and recommendations provided through this review. 2. The ACT Government needs to promote a wider recognition of the intrinsic value of the arts, as well as the importance of the arts and culture in education, health, social well-being, and as an important component of economic development. 3. Undertake an audit of all the areas across Government where the ACT Government makes a contribution to the arts through funding, resources and facilities. Pursue opportunities for better coordination, greater efficiency and more integrated planning to achieve clear policy goals and outcomes. 4. There is a high level of dependence on Government funding for the arts in the ACT. Government leadership is required to actively investigate alternate sources of funding and revenue. This should include encouraging greater business interest in sponsorship as well as philanthropy. 6.1.2 Australian Government, Other Jurisdictions and Policy Alignment 5. A new ACT Arts Policy should be aligned with policy principles, developments and priorities in the Australian Government and in other jurisdictions. It will be necessary to continually review policy developments and funding initiatives in other jurisdictions and to actively investigate sharing arrangements to minimise costs and increase alignment. 6.1.3 Chief Minister, Minister for the Arts and Heritage 6. The Chief Minister should consider establishing annual ACT Arts Awards for all areas of the arts in Canberra. As part of these Awards, there should be a Chief Minister’s Arts Achievement Award. 6.1.4 Chief Minister’s Department, Other Agencies and Whole-of-Government 7. Having taken positive initiatives on structural change by bringing Australian Capital Tourism, Special Events and the Centenary of Canberra together with the ACT Heritage Unit and artsACT in CMD, opportunities should now be actively pursued for closer connection, cooperation and coordination between each of these areas.

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8. CMD should drive and support improved communication and better coordinated whole-of-Government responses to the arts to be led by artsACT. This needs to ensure improved, more responsive service delivery, greater efficiency and performance measurement against Government arts priorities. 9. There should be strong encouragement from CMD for agencies to work together, with the support of artsACT, on developing and promoting arts initiatives such as Poetry in ACTION, which is excellent, and should continue to receive support. CMD and other agencies should seek policy and strategic advice from artsACT on any arts or cultural issues or proposals relating to their agencies. 6.2 ACT Government Arts Policy Overview 10. A new ACT Arts Policy should set clear goals and priorities to transparently guide ACT Government decisions about all areas of future funding and support. New ACT Government Goals for the Arts should be: Increasing participation in the arts; and attracting and developing artists and quality art. 11. In writing a new ACT Arts Policy, there are several ideas and proposals in this section of the report including comments on vision, principles and priority areas, which should be given careful consideration for inclusion. ! ! 6.3 artsACT 12. The new ACT Arts Policy should guide artsACT’s future roles, functions, structures, systems, priorities for decisions and actions, and enable them to provide effective policy advice and leadership in the arts. 13. There needs to be a significant shift in focus for artsACT, particularly including much stronger capability in policy, data collection and communication. This will require some changes to functions and culture, and a review of current skill sets and structures to deliver on new Government priorities. 14. artsACT should be the ACT Government’s focal point for policy. Its advice must be both proactive and quickly reactive to emerging circumstances and challenges. artsACT must demonstrate leadership, communicate and consult widely with the arts sector, have access to research, and be aware of arts issues so they are able to offer informed, evidence based advice to other agencies as well as to the Chief Minister. 15. The artsACT website should be upgraded to improve the flow of information to and engagement with, artists, arts organisations and the public. Improvements should include: streamlining funding and other processes; providing quick and relatively inexpensive survey information and feedback; improving communication, engagement and interaction with the entire arts sector and the public in the ACT; and to provide essential information in a highly accessible way to all stakeholders, including business and other potential arts sponsors and other Government agencies.

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16. Streamline all processes and minimise administration, while retaining appropriate management of risk. This should include the areas of funding and grants allocation. 6.4.1 Cultural Council 17. The Cultural Council should have its role refocused to become a Ministerial Arts Advisory Council which would become the principle source of advice from the arts sector reporting directly to the Chief Minister. The new Council would generally meet quarterly to respond to specific issues raised by the Minister as well as providing its own ideas and initiatives. 18. The new Ministerial Arts Advisory Council would not have a role in assessing funding as this could limit the members’ ability to remain closely connected to the arts community without any perceived probity issues. Funding would become the responsibility of a new advisory body. 6.4.2 Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC) 19. The CFC has provided effective administration and has added particular value in relation to historic properties. In future the CFC would be relieved of other areas of its current responsibilities. 20. A reconstituted CFC would in future be called the Historic Places Trust (HPT) and would become the single focus of management for all ACT heritage properties and assets, as well as for appropriate properties and places. 21. The Canberra Theatre Centre should operate in future as a separate, fully ACT Government owned entity, directed by a Board and reporting to the Chief Minister, with a clear statement of purpose and performance expectations. 22. There would be significant changes, to be overseen by artsACT, to the structure and operations of CMAG. The Museum and Gallery aspects of CMAG would separate, with each function having different management and partnership arrangements. On behalf of the Chief Minister, artsACT would continue to oversee the operations of a new Canberra Gallery, and those museum arrangements that would in future be managed by other Institutions. The HPT would take over responsibility for an exciting and unusual new Canberra Museum. 23. The Museum aspect of CMAG would in future have two components of operation. The first component would involve a negotiated partnership, similar to that with the ANU, preferably with two National Institutions with strong museum curatorial expertise to feature objects and documents reflecting Canberra’s history. The second component would be a dynamic, non-collecting, curated, living, non-static Canberra Museum which would not be located in any one place and would reflect the social history, people and culture of Canberra. The new Canberra Museum would be the responsibility of the HPT and would make use of its properties, places and assets.

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24. The new Canberra Gallery would be the ACT Government’s visual arts gallery, would be located in the current CMAG building, and would focus on all aspects of visual arts in the ACT including an Indigenous component. 25. Civic Square would become the policy and strategic responsibility of CMD, with TAMS having day-to-day management responsibility. It will be essential for CMD to work with all key stakeholders in the precinct and the city to enliven the Square and the area and to make it an attractive place for all Canberrans. 26. Any savings resulting from reduced administration costs associated with the reduced scope of responsibilities for the CFC should be directed to the ACT Arts Fund to fund new arts priorities, such as emerging and Indigenous artists and additional quick response grants. 6.4.3 Heritage and Proposed Historic Places Trust (HPT) 27. A new ACT Historic Places Trust (HPT) would take responsibility for, and bring together, all ACT Government heritage assets and buildings (other than by exception) as well as appropriate historic and significant properties and places. There would be clear policies and protocols to guide priorities and acquisitions. The HPT would ensure protection of all assets, manage the new Canberra Museum, be entrepreneurial to maximise public access and tourism potential, and provide information and interaction through publications and a website. The NSW Historic Houses Trust (HHT) would be the model. 28. The HPT would have a Board of Trustees including: the Chair of the ACT Heritage Council to ensure effective linkages, at least one person with knowledge of history, and at least one with experience in architecture. It would be expected that some current members of the CFC Board may be offered trusteeships on the HPT, and there would be at least some level of senior management continuity. While there would be significant changes to administer requiring genuine commitment, these arrangements would provide useful continuity. 29. An early audit of ACT heritage properties and assets and of historic and significant properties and places is likely to be required to assist in determining which should become the responsibility of the HPT. Policies and protocols would need to be developed as soon as possible to guide the HPT in making decisions about what should be included in either their direct or overview responsibility. 6.5 Arts Organisations 30. Government should support all art forms including emerging art forms such as new media and digital arts. However, it should also identify art forms, organisations, facilities and activities that demonstrate clear potential as a national or international area of excellence, such as the Canberra Glassworks, and provide additional support.

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31. All funded arts organisations should be encouraged to develop strong partnerships. Cross art form collaboration is also important in any jurisdiction but is particularly important in a smaller arts environment such as the ACT. Collaboration and partnerships between arts organisations and art forms need to be encouraged through communication and funding support for creative joint ventures. 32. There are currently too many Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) and a lack of clarity about what constitutes a KAO. Government should significantly reduce funding for duplication and administration by funding a smaller number of clusters of organisations. The aim would be for seven or eight ‘arts hubs’ to emerge based on art form and/or precinct. Government should also discontinue use of the term ‘Key Arts Organisations’. 33. A non-Government, shared corporate services system should be established to minimise duplication of administration, and maximise the focus of funding on achieving priority Government arts goals and outcomes. Government would then only provide funding for administration to this shared services entity which would need to be responsive to the needs of both arts organisations and Government. 34. Government needs to require all funded arts organisations to maximise sources of revenue through a variety of means such as ticket sales, merchandising, paid courses and the sale of artistic materials. 35. Government should only fund organisations that can demonstrate strategies for the delivery of outcomes that support Government policy priorities of increased participation and quality art. 6.6 Professional Artists 36. As part of establishing a clear arts policy focus to frame Government funding and other support for the arts, there must be a consistent understanding of key terms, including alignment as far as possible with other jurisdictions. This should include definitions of both emerging and established professional artists, amateur artists, people participating in community arts and hobbyists. These terms are currently confused by governments, arts organisations, the media, arts audiences, the public and many in the arts sector. 37. There needs to be a shift in ACT Government arts policy priorities to give greater focus to practising professional artists, including both established and emerging professionals, as well as encouraging the production of quality art. In future this should be at the centre of Government funding and support priorities. 38. In focusing greater support on professional artists, there should be stronger recognition of the importance of identifying the needs of, and giving additional support to, emerging artists and younger artists to ensure the long-term strength of the ACT arts sector. Associated with this, is the need to identify and support new and emerging art forms, as well as being aware of potential future arts audiences who may want to access, engage with, and participate in the creation of the arts through a range of technologies and media.

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39. There is a need to generate and support mentoring programs for Canberra artists, especially emerging artists. This would include initially identifying interested, suitably qualified, established ACT artists, and also attracting professional artists of all ages and from many art forms from interstate and overseas. 40. The issue of affordable accommodation for artists in the ACT needs to be investigated. This should include the impact of public housing requirements, and the relationship and potential connections between accommodation and working spaces for artists. 6.6.1 Established Artists 41. Future Government grants application and commissioning processes for artists need to be as simple, quick and flexible as possible while properly meeting essential probity and risk management requirements. Artists see current processes as inflexible, difficult to deal with, and not well geared to art and artists, and therefore artists should be consulted in developing these processes in future. 42. Identify, welcome and provide any necessary connections or support to new and returning professional artists to the ACT so that Canberra’s commitment to professional artists and quality art is clearly demonstrated. Work with professional artists to promote the extensive value of the arts to the ACT. 6.6.2 Emerging Artists 43. Emerging artists are particularly important to the future of the arts in the ACT. A specific funding category for ‘Emerging Artists’ should be included in the ACT Arts Fund. This should be promoted widely along with information about new, simplified application processes. 44. ACT Government support for emerging professional artists should extend beyond funding to include proactive engagement, assistance and advice in areas such as: availability of arts facilities, arts organisations and connecting with other artists, administrative and financial planning, preparing business cases, applying for grants, marketing and promotion, and professional skills development including mentoring and training. Ensure that a new artsACT website has separate information geared to the needs of professional artists, with specific information for emerging artists, and perhaps an ‘artist’s hotline’. 6.6.3 Artists In Residence 45. There should be a significant suite of ongoing ACT Government funded Artists in Residence programs in the ACT. This would provide major benefits to professional artists, the arts community, education and the public. Canberra is ideally placed to promote these programs as part of the national capital’s commitment to the arts and should seek funding support from the Australia Council.

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46. A comprehensive strategy and action plan will be essential if a major commitment to Artist in Residence programs is to be fully successful. This would include: priority artist and art form needs; interested partners in arts organisations, National Cultural Institutions, schools, training institutions, universities and other agencies; planning for suitable artist studios or other facilities; accommodation; opportunities for innovation; marketing and promotion; standard agreements so that all resources and costs are known, and the expectations (such as mentoring, workshops, art exhibitions, etc) and entitlements of artists are clearly spelt out. 47. A commitment to direct participation in residency and mentoring programs should be a requirement of any future ACT Government investment in arts facilities such as the new studios for the Canberra Potters Society. 6.7 Community Participation in the Arts 48. The ACT Government’s primary goal in support for community arts should be to increase participation in the arts, rather than to achieve artistic quality or excellence. 49. The main focus of funding for community arts should be the provision of appropriate, accessible facilities. 50. In most cases, community arts recipients of Government funding or support, should be expected to generate revenue from a variety of sources including membership fees, workshops, the sale of art, and support from local businesses, with the aim of becoming as self-sufficient and independent as possible. 51. Community artists who have outstanding talent and interests in becoming professional artists should be identified and supported. Effective consultation and communication mechanisms need to be established with community arts organisations. 52. The ACT Government should test community opinion before becoming directly involved in community arts activities, festivals or events, to ensure that Government involvement would be needed, beneficial and welcomed. 53. Government should give priority funding to dynamic organisations and groups that are open, connected and welcoming to their communities and share the Government’s commitment to increasing public participation in the arts. 54. Funding for community arts should, as far as possible, be allocated at the regional level through Tuggeranong and Belconnen Arts Centres, with oversight from artsACT. In this way, decisions about community arts priorities would be decentralised and administrative costs minimised.

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6.8 Public Art 55. There have been real public concerns about some aspects of Public Art, but the initiative has had significant, widely recognised benefits for the ACT. Concerns about the need for a clearer policy on selection and placement should be addressed, but the vast majority of people through this review strongly pressed to retain Public Art, preferably with the percent for art scheme, and to extend the initiative beyond sculpture to incorporate other arts. This view is supported and recommended because Public Art has generally been an excellent initiative with major current and future benefits to the arts and particularly to the image and amenity of ACT. 56. Public Art needs a clear policy framework to set direction and address concerns. A future Cultural Facilities Plan should indicate future placement of Public Art, as well as associated consultation and decision-making processes. The Public Art policy would include funding arrangements, who recommends and decides what is bought, commissioned or received as a gift, when, where and from whom. artsACT would have a policy role including ensuring ongoing curatorial oversight, with another appropriate organisation handling installation. After the Public Art Panel’s term expires, the Arts Fund Panel should make recommendations, with any appropriate specialist Public Art advice. 6.9 Venues and Facilities 57. A full audit of arts and cultural facilities in the ACT is needed across all agencies to develop a consolidated list of community, amateur and professional venues and facilities including the number, location, nature, repairs and maintenance issues, ownership and rental arrangements. 58. artsACT should retain ownership and control of all non-heritage arts facilities, but responsibility for repairs and maintenance should be transferred or outsourced with a realistic budget from the small, dedicated team to external specialists in this area. 59. Rental rates for arts organisations and access to arts studios and facilities for artists are based on a variety of ad hoc and historical arrangements. There is an important and pressing need to review all rents and access arrangements to ensure clarity and consistency, reflecting Government arts goals and priorities. 6.10 Cultural Facilities Planning 60. The ACT Government should develop an ACT Cultural Facilities Plan, to be led by Chief Minister’s Department, consistent with the new arts policy, with plans for professional and community arts venues and facilities for the next 20 to 30 years. The Plan would include: core cultural facilities, future arts precincts, heritage buildings, regional and multiple use facilities, and any new major developments of cultural facilities for Canberra. The Plan should be developed in an open and collaborative process with input from all key stakeholders.

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6.11 Governance 61. Principles of good governance and risk management in arts organisations should be developed, communicated and promoted in a positive and collaborative way with arts organisations and the arts sector, and information should be provided on where useful governance advice can be accessed, such as through the Australia Council and the Australia Business Arts Foundation. 6.12 Data and Research 62. Consistent collection of quantitative and qualitative data and research is essential to inform policy development, enable evidence based decision-making, and assist in tracking performance, which in turn should inform funding and resourcing decisions. There needs to be a commitment to developing a data and research resource and capability in artsACT. 63. Undertake an audit of currently available data, and identify gaps in data and useful and reliable data sources that have been used by other jurisdictions, organisations, agencies, universities or institutions. Develop systems to simplify data collection and analysis, and partnerships to minimise costs in gathering data and research. Coordinated, computerised ticketing arrangements could provide very prompt and useful audience information with minimal additional cost. Maximise the use of costefficient online surveys, including through a new artsACT website. 6.13 Communication, Marketing and Promotion 64. A cost-effective, centralised and coordinated communication and information unit overseen by arts organisations and artsACT should be established outside Government for artists, arts organisations and the public. There is a need for an arts diary which could be built around an existing initiative. There is also a need for better-coordinated, less expensive advertising, promotion and marketing, which could be part of the unit’s responsibilities. 65. The ACT Government through artsACT should provide leadership on communication and engagement with the arts community. artsACT should discuss with the sector facilitating an annual or biennial Artists Forum, and regular meetings with arts organisations, with half of these including invitations to senior representatives of the National Cultural Institutions. 6.14.1 Australian National University (ANU) 66. The ACT Government should fully acknowledge the vital contribution of the major universities, and particularly the ANU, to the arts and the professional development of artists in the ACT. This should be used as a basis to further develop trusted relationships and new partnerships including with additional parties such as the Canberra Symphony Orchestra and the National Cultural Institutions.

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67. The ACT Government provides substantial arts funding to the ANU which is one of its largest recipients of funding. There must be clear performance expectations attached to the funding regarding specific social and arts benefits to the ACT. The ACT Government should work with ANU to attempt to increase Australian Government funding. In this way, funding can increase for ANU’s valuable contributions to arts and education, and ACT can redirect some of its large pool of funding from ANU to new areas of funding priority. 68. Llewellyn Hall is a very important ANU-owned Canberra arts facility. The ACT Government provides $200,000 each year to ANU specifically in recognition of the value of Llewellyn Hall. With such significant funding support, the ACT Government should leverage considerably greater benefits for the ACT arts and public, based more on a sharing arrangement, with extended and more affordable access. If this is not possible, it may necessary to consider whether ACT public arts funding could be more productively invested in the arts and music elsewhere. 6.14.2 University of Canberra (UC) 69. ArtsACT should work proactively to improve communication and relationships between the ACT Government and the University of Canberra (UC) and jointly investigate opportunities for new partnerships in relation to arts activities, facilities, skills development and training in traditional and new art forms, creative industries and innovation. 6.15 National Cultural Institutions (NCIs) 70. The National Cultural Institutions (NCIs) are such an important component of Canberra’s arts and cultural environment that stronger bilateral and multilateral connections should be created and developed with them. artsACT should build relationships, establish regular meetings involving the NCIs and ACT arts organisations, and be a broker and facilitator for possible opportunities and partnerships for NCIs with ACT arts organisations and artists, as well as with other ACT Government agencies. 6.16 Diversity 71. Diversity is a very important issue that needs to become a broader shared responsibility of not only the ACT Government but also of all those that receive arts funding. A condition of future artsACT funding should be a requirement for all arts organisations to demonstrate and report on social inclusion and diversity initiatives.

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72. The ACT Community Arts Office should be outposted to provide significant local support to community arts, with two positions allocated to Tuggeranong and two to Belconnen Arts Centres, to cover all the ACT. Existing staff should be given the opportunity to take up the roles which would be focused on ensuring increased participation in the arts, including all diversity target groups. Their responsibilities would include: providing support to community arts organisations; assisting with designing programs; providing advice on local arts facilities and improving access; assisting community organisations with inclusion and diversity strategies; and very importantly, providing advice to artsACT about community arts funding priorities. 73. Commitment to all aspects of diversity needs to be demonstrated, and the inclusion of people with Indigenous and disability perspectives would deliver significant benefits to artsACT. As soon as possible, artsACT should have a designated staff position to be filled by an Indigenous person who would work in the policy area as an Indigenous Arts Officer, but would not be restricted only to Indigenous issues. artsACT should also attempt to ensure there is always a person with a disability on staff. 6.17 Indigenous Arts 74. There should be an Indigenous specific funding category in the ACT Arts Fund. Within this category, it would be highly desirable to have separate allocations: one for individual Indigenous artists and one for Indigenous groups or organisations. An Indigenous grant category must not diminish opportunities for Indigenous artists and organisations to apply for any area of the Fund. artsACT should work closely and collaboratively with Indigenous people to ensure that all decisions about an Indigenous category are informed and that implementation is successful. Capacity building initiatives, including assistance with application and reporting requirements are strongly encouraged. 75. The recommendations of the Strategic Indigenous Arts Development Initiative should generally be supported and acted upon. In particular, expanding skills development programs in identified areas of high interest for Indigenous artists; programs aimed at long-term professional development; and support for Intergenerational projects; and a youth music project. There should be a collaborative process aimed at setting priorities for action within available resources. There is a real opportunity with these important initiatives for artsACT to actively pursue and develop partnerships with other agencies and external parties. 76. The ACT Government may wish to consider testing feasibility and interest in a joint venture with the Australian Government, possibly National Cultural Institutions and with Aboriginal people to create a significant Aboriginal Arts and Cultural Centre in the national capital which would include input and art from local Indigenous people.

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77. It is highly desirable for ACT Government to build on existing Indigenous infrastructure as it has done recently with the Burringiri Association. It should support successful community arts initiatives such as the Billabong Aboriginal Development Organisation which has undertaken several positive initiatives. It is an established Indigenous community focal point with support from Aboriginal artists, Government funding support through a range of agencies, and other potential sponsors or partners. It would be likely to deliver increased Indigenous community participation in the arts, leading in turn to significant social benefits. 78. The establishment of a centrally-located Indigenous gallery and retail outlet for ACT Indigenous artists was seen as an important priority as it would bring artists together and could help create some economic sustainability for Indigenous artists in the ACT. This view is supported, and the ACT Government through artsACT should actively investigate options, with the preferred option being to provide a space in a future Canberra Gallery in Civic for local Indigenous art. 6.18 Accessibility 79. There needs to be clarification of policy on all aspects of access and accessibility. Many of these, such as transport and disability access, should be included in the development of a Cultural Facilities Plan. There is a requirement for improved awareness of and access to arts facilities that should be addressed through better information and communication about what is available. 6.19 Arts and Education 80. There needs to be a clear articulation of the very valuable contributions that the arts, culture, and creativity can make to all aspects of education in the ACT. Stronger communication and coordination across the arts and education sectors, as well as with communities and across governments, should be encouraged, such as the initiative last year to establish the Arts and Education Consultative Committee. This important initiative should be built upon with an agenda of shared interests, and there should be early consideration of establishing an Arts Education Officer to be a focus of communication and advice on arts and education. 81. There are many excellent arts in education initiatives in the ACT and in other jurisdictions that could be adopted or extended. artsACT and Education should work together to identify, along with potential partners, what might be adapted to meet the needs of the ACT. Also, Artist in Residence school programs, including the Artists-In-Schools (Early Childhood) initiative, have demonstrated real value in the ACT and these should be retained and extended, with support expected from the Australia Council.

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6.20 Arts, Health and Social Development 82. While there are a variety of positive initiatives in the ACT, there should be a wider appreciation of the benefits of arts and culture to health and social development, including early intervention and prevention of a multitude of issues such as reducing the risk of alienated youth entering the criminal justice system. There needs to be greater awareness and coordination, including from artsACT, of arts initiatives across agencies so that connection with and investment in arts organisations is more visible and strategic, and there is less fragility and uncertainty for the arts sector. 6.21 Arts Innovation and Economic Development 83. While there have been excellent recent initiatives including ACT Government investment in screen industries and ‘Masterpieces’, there needs to be a clearer recognition and promotion by all stakeholders of the strong connections between the arts, creativity, innovation and economic development. There is need for a more strategic approach to achieve the ACT’s full potential through the collaborative development of ACT Creative Industries, Digital Economy and Cultural Tourism Strategies. Business, the arts community, universities and the National Cultural Institutions should all be included. These facets of life and work in the ACT should also be integrated into Canberra’s image and identity through ‘Brand Canberra’. 6.22 Arts, the Environment and Sustainability 84. The ACT Government and artsACT should embed commitments to environmental sustainability into all aspects of its arts policies and activities. There is great awareness of the importance of the environment in the arts and in the ACT and there is an opportunity to provide leadership in linking positive arts and environmental outcomes. Any new or redeveloped arts facilities should be built to the highest environmental standards, and there should be a commitment that funded organisations, events, festivals and activities should be aware of the need to be environmentally responsible and to aim to be carbon neutral. 85. The Arboretum is a wonderful initiative with great potential that was recognised from the outset to connect with and enrich the arts. There should be discussions with the Arboretum about the possibility of establishing some form of Arboretum arts and cultural group, including input from ACT and Australian Governments, business/sponsors, arts organisations and artists to consider design and infrastructure requirements and opportunities for appropriate arts-related and cultural events.

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6.23 The Public 86. The ACT public are actively supportive of and engaged with the arts and obviously appreciated being consulted extensively in this review. The public and arts audiences should be a key focal point of improved communication for artsACT, including through its new website. They should be kept advised of developments in future arts policies and strategies. Volunteers need to be highly valued in all areas including the arts and should receive recognition through Awards for outstanding contributions to the arts. 7.1 Arts Budget Reflecting Policy Priorities 87. Current funding for the arts in the ACT is ‘gridlocked’. There is considerable dissatisfaction with current funding levels and arrangements, widespread recognition of the need for change, and a pressing need to free up funding to respond to current and emerging arts priorities. The ACT Government needs to clearly articulate its expectations from arts funding, including clear and transparent goals and policies, to guide future funding and resourcing priorities. 88. ACT Government should have two key arts goals: to increase participation in the arts, and to attract and develop artists and quality art. Funding should consistently be directed towards achieving these goals or overarching priorities, which would be supported by other more specific arts policies. All those seeking funding would need to demonstrate real arts benefits against policy priorities. 89. Over recent years a growing proportion of most arts budgets around Australia have been directed to funding arts organisations. There needs to be a shift in budget priority towards professional artists, leading to the production of quality art. This should include more funding for the professional development of emerging artists and for innovative arts that appeal to new and younger audiences and arts participants. 90. Many of the 22 Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) struggle to operate effectively with current levels of funding and funding arrangements, and continuing to separately fund 22 KAOs is not unsustainable. Government will need to strongly encourage consolidation through consultation and funding for fewer arts organisations or clusters of organisations to reduce administrative duplication and improve sustainability with greater cooperation, coordination and co-location. Government should also move away from the notion of ‘Key’ Arts Organisations. 91. As well as having costs associated with duplication, many organisations struggle to attract and pay qualified people. ACT Government should work with organisations to establish a professional, shared corporate services unit outside the public sector to provide cost-effective, responsive support to arts organisations. In the future Government would only fund administration through this shared administrative services unit, which would include finance, human resources, office services, and IT. A hub for communications and marketing of the arts should also be established, and could be collocated with this. These initiatives would allow arts organisations to give greater focus to the arts.

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92. There needs to be greater clarification of the differentiation between the ACT Government’s funding priorities for, and expectations of, professional and community arts and artists. The major focus of ACT Government’s arts funding in the future should be on the support for and development of professional artists and quality art. Increased participation in community arts should remain a high priority, to be encouraged and assisted with more clearly targeted strategies, and especially through the provision of reasonable-cost, multipurpose facilities. 93. New ACT Government arts policies and funding priorities, including the need for efficient and effective consolidation, would need to be clearly communicated to all stakeholders. There would need to be a fresh and open look at all current funding arrangements in light of new policies. At the same time, there should be a commitment giving greater emphasis to communication, transparency, flexibility, simplicity and responsiveness from Government. Extensive consultation and a reasonable timeframe for implementation of changes will be essential. 94. The arts are highly valued by a large number of people in the ACT, and the ACT Government should give serious consideration to a modest increase in arts funding. While there will be some opportunities to reallocate some elements of existing funding, there are a number of significant policy changes recommended in this report, and a modest increase in funding at this time would demonstrate that the arts are also highly valued by Government. 7.2 Funding Categories, Processes and Decisions 95. There should be acknowledgement of real improvements in recent years in the scope and administration of the ACT Arts Fund reflecting the commitment of artsACT staff, the Cultural Council the ACT Government. However, there need to be responses to widespread, serious concerns about current funding structures and convoluted processes to address issues including category gaps, delays, unresponsiveness, definitions (eg ‘quality’), communication mechanisms, and the balance of funding allocations. As a broad checklist, Government arts funding processes must be: accessible to all potential applicants; merit based; decided and advised as promptly as possible; have appropriate risk management; and ensure necessary governance, probity and independence. It is very pleasing to see that some areas highlighted over some months through this review in relation to governance, Fellowships, and young and emerging artists have already been included in the 2011 Arts Fund, but further change will be needed. 96. Peer assessment should be retained as this ensures informed, independent, meritbased decision-making about funding. Independence should be further reinforced in the ACT, where there are fewer specialist professional artists than in most jurisdictions, by establishing one assessment panel at a higher level to operate across art forms and the arts sector. This would be combined with direct decisionmaking for lower level, responsive decisions such as Quick Response Grants, which would be decided by artsACT.

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97. A single new ACT Arts Fund Panel should be established with about 9 members, who would be appointed by the Chief Minister, and this would replace the roles of individual panels and the Cultural Council. The Panel would in future make all Arts Fund funding recommendations. It would include respected artist and art organisation representatives from the main art forms and from across the arts industry; one representative from other relevant areas such as finance or law; one from artsACT; and possibly one or two experienced people from interstate. The Panel should also broadly reflect the ACT community and would be able to call on art form specialists if required to provide advice on grant applications. This would ensure quality advice based on a range and depth of knowledge and judgement. 98. There should be fewer ‘steps’ in the proposed new funding process with significantly reduced delays. The ACT Arts Fund Panel meetings could be held over about three days, and recommendations from the Panel would go directly through artsACT to the Chief Minister for approval. With the same closing dates for applications, the Minister should in future be in a position to make most announcements months earlier, in June, rather than having applicants required to wait for decisions until as late as October. 99. The ACT’s Arts Fund Panel should be made fully aware of Government’s arts goals and policy priorities. The Panel’s decisions should be strongly guided by these goals, policies and priorities. 100. It should be a condition of funding that all funded organisations use the artsACT logo and artists acknowledge funding support. 7.3 Future Funding Priorities 101. Increase the overall percentage and quantum of funding to artists, with new areas of focus including two new funding categories for: 1. Emerging artists 2. Indigenous artists These new categories will require a commitment to communication, capacity building, mentoring, encouragement and support, including working with artists to raise awareness and skills to meet requirements for Grant applications. It may be desirable to have input to decision-making about Grants from Indigenous and young artists, from outside the ACT. 102. Additional budget should be provided throughout the year for Quick Response Grants of up to $3,000, decided by artsACT within four weeks with a target turnaround of two weeks. This would be based on real, demonstrable needs leading to real outcomes, such as being accepted for a professional development course.

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103. Approximately 10 percent of the Arts Fund budget should be set aside for allocation by the Minister and artsACT for great ideas or initiatives, new art forms or innovation that deliver on the Government’s goals but may not fit established categories or funding rounds. 104. ACT Government should encourage consolidation of Key Arts Organisations and other arts organisations by funding a smaller number of about 8 clusters of organisations or Arts Hubs built around art forms and/or arts precincts. These may be new organisations or groupings of current organisations, but they will need to demonstrate: appropriate governance arrangements; recognition of the need to work cooperatively with others in the same art forms and precincts; and be prepared to give maximum focus to arts activity rather than administration by sharing corporate services. There should be a strong and clear funding focus for organisations on consolidation, reducing administrative duplication, and particularly on improving arts outcomes against Government goals and policy priorities. 105. In establishing a new non-Government shared corporate services unit, it will be necessary to undertake a business and financial analysis of the best way to structure this and to determine accurately the expected savings that would be redirected to new arts priorities through the Arts Fund. The main two options are: a core of management and essential consistent points of contact with outsourced functions such as payroll; or a largely fully staffed operation. Government would either fund the shared services operation directly or by payments though arts organisations, so they continue to have a sense of ownership and control. Government and arts organisations would work together to establish these new arrangements, and there would be expected to be standard service level agreements with organisations. 106. A future funding priority should be ‘centres of excellence’, where Canberra has current or potential capability to be a leader on the national or global stage. The Glassworks is one clear example of an excellent initiative that should receive specific support in its own right, and special recognition of its role as the focal point of an exciting new Kingston arts precinct. 107. Apply a UK and Tasmanian funding initiative to the ACT to encourage the ACT and Australian public to buy or commission artworks from living ACT artists. The scheme would involve providing interest free loans of between $750 and $7,500 for up to 12 months to buy artworks ranging in price from $400 to $10,000 through participating commercial galleries. Where artists are commissioned, a 25 per cent deposit would be paid, and 75 per cent could be borrowed interest free up to the limit payable. This low cost scheme would provide strong promotion for the purchase of local artworks, support career development of visual artists, support local commercial galleries, stimulate the economy, encourage new art collectors, provide important support for commercial galleries and further enable ACT visual art to be collected and shown across the nation. It would be expected to work well in the ACT where there is a smaller population, strong local arts interest, and a large number of visitors.

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108. Introduce loans for up to 10 years for artists and arts organisations for any purpose that delivers an arts outcome. Applications would be assessed on capacity to repay and merit criteria including: quality of the proposal including strength of concept; creativity and innovative nature of the work; capacity to manage and deliver the project; benefit to the artist’s creative development and/or to the community. Contributing to ACT arts policy priorities would be an essential component and Indigenous and disability benefits would be given positive weighting. 109. Funding should be provided for the professional development of artists through mentoring and cultural exchange programs. Mentoring is highly desirable, especially for emerging artists; and properly established cultural exchange programs with artists from around Australia or overseas can deliver very positive cultural and artistic experiences for ACT artists, and add to the benefits of Artist in Residence programs. These initiatives do not need to be particularly expensive, and would: significantly enrich the cultural life of Canberra; promote the ACT internationally as an arts centre; and be influential in retaining artists in Canberra or attracting them to live in the ACT. 110. The ACT has previously provided up to two Creative Arts Fellowships valued at $45,000 each, but there have not been clear expectations of how the funds from Fellowships will be used. In future this prestigious Fellowship should only be awarded to full-time professional ACT artists, and should be based on nomination or direct recommendation by the Panel and decision by the Chief Minister, rather than on application. It is suggested that there should only be one Fellowship each year valued at $60,000, to enable an outstanding full time artist to be able to live with minimal financial concerns and to concentrate on their art. There should be a requirement for minimum levels of engagement or reporting back on outcomes to the Government, the arts community and the public, and an expectation that there would be a resulting body of work. The Fellowship would have considerable visibility and status and could be awarded by the Chief Minister at new annual Canberra Arts Awards. 111. Long-term funding for organisations have been generally welcomed, but can be inflexible and stifle innovation and opportunity with ideas that may emerge during the funding cycle. In future three years should be an absolute maximum for funding. Government needs to be confident that organisations will continue to evolve and perform against more clear and firm performance criteria. Organisations should be able to apply for project funding in certain clear circumstances, including demonstrating innovation and initiative consistent with new Government priorities. 112. Government should maximise simple and easy access for all who wish to apply for Grants, including the earliest possible introduction of online applications and acquittals. This may need to be part of a wider reform process of Grants Administration in the ACT Government, so that online funding processes do not lead to or result in paper-based log-jams within Government agencies.

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113. There should be an overall commitment from ACT Government and artsACT to improve and streamline all administrative processes by cutting red tape, including any requirements for written information, forms, processes, reporting or other requirements that are not absolutely essential in contemporary administration. This would be a relief for the arts sector, and would minimise administrative workloads in Government, in a similar way to what Government will be expecting from arts organisations. Delays between all arts applications and decisions should be cut to a minimum. The new ACT Arts Panel should operate with these commitments from the outset. 7.4 Funding Sources 114. There needs to be a greater recognition, led by Government, of the benefits from increased private sector sponsorship, philanthropy, and personal and community responsibility. The ACT Government should encourage less financial dependence on government and encourage a diversity of funding sources for the arts. This should include leveraging funding support from other sources by joint funding initiatives, including for arts infrastructure and facilities. Data should also be collected and used to demonstrate to business the benefits of supporting the arts. 115. The ACT Government should encourage greater cross-promotion between arts organisations and precincts, as well as wider, more dynamic audience engagement and development. artsACT should initiate opportunities for arts organisations to come together at quarterly meetings to discuss experiences, partnerships, ideas, potential revenue sources and possible joint ventures. 116. The activities of the Australian Business Arts Foundation (ABAF) should be actively supported. It has potential, with ACT Government support, to attract engagement and revenue from business. There should be strong encouragement, including funding support, to convert the part-time ABAF position to full-time. 117. There should be recognition and acknowledgement of the extremely valuable vision, awareness and strong support provided to the arts by ActewAGL as a model sponsor. The senior leadership could be called upon to highlight benefits and to encourage other potential sponsors, assisting diversification of sponsorship from other sources and reducing the risk of high-level dependence on ActewAGL. 118. Targeted funding to support the arts and achieve clear Government outcomes will continue to be vitally important, but new approaches and skills are now required from Government to meet more needs in the arts beyond the allocation of funds. What artists and arts organisations need most is what they are unable to provide for themselves, including: communication with the arts sector; brokering and delivering support and connection with Government and business; providing facilitation to identify emerging industry needs for artists; and bridging skills gaps. This will certainly require a new outlook from Government. It is also likely to require a change of culture and skills, away from process, distributing funding responsibly, and enforcing rules and guidelines, and towards an entrepreneurial, proactive, collaborative and supportive approach aimed at delivering positive arts outcomes.

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9. Appendices 9.1 Appendix 1: Public Submissions Summary Review of the forum in Canberra: Summary of Public Submissions Please note that the views contained in this document are not the views of the ACT Government or Peter Loxton and Associates Pty Ltd, rather a summary of information provided by hardcopy and electronic written submissions. Arts Landscape
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Canberra is blessed with an abundance of arts and cultural activities. Promote the growth of Canberra as a cultural capital. It is necessary to ask: “What ‘arts landscape’ do we want to create for Canberra?” What are the city’s strengths and how well are these supported by government priorities, funding and action? The School of Art and Music at ANU play a valued role in strengthening professional practice. The appearance and vitality of Civic needs to be prioritised – make it a destination. Canberra has a negative stigma interstate and the arts provide a vital way to change this perception. The ACT needs a vision for developing arts and culture, and cultural tourism.

Community and Access

Broad participation in the arts should be encouraged as it helps to build a critical mass of artists and arts activity. Arts organisations that work with children are critical infrastructure for building cultural understanding, self-confidence and many other life skills. Volunteers are vital to arts organisations and need more recognition and support. Volunteers working in community arts organisations are generally not trained to apply for and acquit grants, so there should be only minimal, essential process. Community arts organisations don’t have a voice that is heard by government. Arts organisations that encourage and facilitate community participation and engagement are highly valued. Community arts officers should be valued and funding should continue.

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There should be cheaper ticket categories to aid access for financially disadvantaged groups.

Communication, Coordination, Partnerships and Promotion

The creation of an online forum, perhaps run by artsACT, would be a very useful resource for ACT artists and organisations to communicate. Prioritise the development of a service/services for the communication, coordination and promotion of arts activities. There needs to be more market research about audience needs and wants. There must be stronger partnerships between arts organisations, artsACT and Australian Capital Tourism. A focus on audience development would improve the arts landscape and artist income. Canberra Arts Marketing was not a good model. It is problematic funding a nonarts organisation that runs under a corporate model charging funded arts organisations for services. There should not be laws against postering and other arts promotions activities.

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Artists and Professionalism
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There needs to be a professional orchestra in the ACT. Nicholas Milton’s contribution to the Canberra Symphony Orchestra has been outstanding. The lack of professional performing arts companies is a concern. There should be greater investment in artist training and mentoring. The cost of public liability insurance is debilitating for artists. It is very difficult for professional artists to find full-time work, so most leave Canberra. Professional dance should be supported more. Not enough support for young and emerging artists, particularly in the performing arts. Maybe more thinking around the role of the Street Theatre could improve support levels. An arts funding body needs to recognise professional practice in the arts and support the professional development of emerging artists through workshops and the creation of centres of professional arts practice. The ANU School of Music and the School of Art provide a focus for such training and development, but theatre does not have such a resource.

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Professional artists often have to move interstate to progress artistically and to make a living.

Government

The Arts Action Statement should contain measurable objectives.

Funding

When an artistic endeavour emerges sufficiently, it is forced to comply with the institutional funding structures that marginalise new and innovative work. In the Netherlands, there is a right to draw the dole as an arts subsidy. There should be more support for publishing of literature. There should be more money for grants, where funding has decreased, and less for arts organisations. Recognise the intrinsic value of the arts in its value to society. There should not always need to be some other benefit including return on investment. Funded organisations are reluctant to express dissent too vigorously, in case this affects their funding. The peer assessment model always acts to protect the status quo. There should be a policy to support artists and arts organisations to gain funding from the Australia Council. Funding is biased towards institutions rather than artists. Funding for youth and professional development is inadequate. Arts funding in Canberra should demonstrate value and require a cost benefit analysis. There doesn’t seem to be any accountability or process for review of funding decisions. Identify, support and promote excellence in the arts. There should be less spending on public art and on struggling artists, and more money for arts education in schools. Funding allocations should be decided by a panel of arts industry experts. Arts funding is spread too thin. Would like more money spent on fewer, quality artists and organisations There should be more targeted funding for the different art forms. It is problematic to have artsACT managing funding when they can not have detailed knowledge of each of the art forms which have such different needs.

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Maybe funding should be decentralised to specialist art form panels/organisations?
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Too much funding for community projects, not enough for professional practice. Longer term funding would be welcomed. There should be more support for environmental and ethical arts. Funding for community arts should be administered separately to professional arts funding as they have such different needs. The private sector needs to get behind local arts organisations. Visual arts seem to get a disproportionately large amount of funding compared to other art forms. There should be more support for Indigenous art and artists.

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Public Art

Decisions on commissions and purchases should occur at arms-length from the Arts Minister. New pieces should be determined by a panel with specific expertise in public art. Public sculpture is highly valued. Public art funding should be put towards commissioning work from ACT artists. The ‘percent for art’ scheme should be restored to continue funding of public art. No more money should be spent on public art.

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Venues/Facilities • Some groups find the cost of certain venues prohibitive. This could be alleviated by a rental subsidy, especially for emerging artists who often work without resources. Former school sites would be ideal arts venues for groups with a strong community base. A partnership between the Department of Education and artsACT might make some of these venues available. Licensed commercial venues that support live music and the arts suffer from noise restrictions. Live music should be supported by Government by reducing unnecessary regulations. ACT galleries and art spaces support the production of new, experimental and challenging work.

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Support for key infrastructure should be a long-term commitment. This requires proper planning for the future. Large affordable studio spaces are needed for practising artists. Belconnen Arts Centre is not inclusive or welcoming. Public institutions like the library and the Canberra Museum and Gallery are valued.

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Festivals

Canberra has given up two noteworthy performing arts festivals that deserved continuing support. There should be more Government support for quality arts festival/s. The defunding of the Fringe Festival in favour of the Folk Festival is disappointing and the reasons behind the funding shift don’t seem to be very clear or transparent. Major festivals can effectively stimulate creative industries, tourism and the economy. The Folk Festival is a major contributor to the ACT economy. Restore a professionally curated Multicultural Festival.

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9.2 Appendix 2: Public Consultations Summary Public Consultations Summary

Arts Landscape • There is a strong arts sector in Canberra, with most art forms well supported. This is helped by the presence of the National Cultural Institutions (NCIs). However, the arts sector in the ACT is fragile. The city has lost a number of high quality arts institutions and professionals, particularly in the performing arts. Arts in the ACT should do more to leverage off NCIs. The Canberra public display a high level of passion for, participation in and consumption of the arts. However, the same people tend to participate a lot rather than new people coming through. Visual arts sector is particularly strong. More support needed for film and emerging digital arts. Youth arts is a great strength in Canberra. Young people may participate actively in the arts while at schools or university but they don’t tend to become professional artists or even audiences. Peer pressure and finances are issues for young people. Canberra has an image problem. It is regarded by the rest of the country and by youth in particular as boring. The Fringe Festival had the potential to make Canberra more “cool”. Need to foster pride in the arts. e.g. Victoria promotes the arts very strongly even/particularly in their regional areas. Canberra has a history of promoting the arts in the mid-80s and 90s. Since then there has been a bureaucratisation of the arts. The sector is missing the spontaneity, creativity and communication of the 80s. Being an artist is now more like being a business person. Government needs to acknowledge the work of volunteers and foster growth within arts volunteering through pragmatic incentives for individuals and businesses to volunteer. Recommend an in depth, mass survey of the ACT public to find out what they want in the arts. Arts organisations lose good people due to inequitable salaries. Government should invest in best practice in the arts. There is excessive promotion of sport on prime-time media: Government and the arts community should encourage more promotion of the arts through the media

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The broadening of ‘Arts’ to ‘Culture’ is very relevant to Canberra ANU School of Art and School of Music; the Community Arts Office; and CSO are highly valued.

Community and Access • • • Community centres are very important, particularly in regional areas. They foster an appreciation of the arts and bring out creativity and purpose in life. Need more support for community practice in line with local government councils in NSW. Belconnen Arts Centre is an excellent facility but is seems to be better aligned with amateur and semi-professional arts than with the needs of a community arts centre and parking is inadequate. It is difficult to find out about arts activities for community or semi-professional artists. Impression that Community Arts Officers aren’t recognised adequately for their contribution. Equal access is vital particularly in community arts – disability, Indigenous, minority communities, etc should be encouraged and enabled to have access Perceived gaps in disability support, particularly when they leave the school system. Participation is more important than quality of arts produced for community arts. Not enough emphasis on the arts in Southern Canberra. Professional arts should be centrally located near transport hubs. Perception of a lack of adequate parking around arts venues. Many people in the Aboriginal Community don’t have a drivers’ license, so there are practical obstacles to accessing the arts as both participants and audiences. Limited public transport options around arts venues at night create access issues for low-income and disadvantaged groups.

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Communication, Coordination, Partnerships and Promotion • • Better communication is needed between Government Departments; arts organisations; and with the public. Need to improve marketing and communication to help artists reach their audiences. The demise of Canberra Arts Marketing, Muse, and the artsACT mail-out left a huge gap.

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Collaboration across art forms should be encouraged. Share resources such as a marketing person, technical production professionals, etc. Collaboration requires connection – forums (maybe including online) for artists. It is unusual to get different arts sectors in the room together but this would open up a lot of exciting opportunities if it can be organised. Creative funding models could encourage partnerships rather than competition between artists There should be more consideration of the impact of NCIs and possible benefits of closer collaboration with the ACT arts community. Artists would love to have access to some of the materials that get discarded after use by the NCIs. Maybe the ACT Government could help to arrange this. Maximise collaboration with universities at least in research, data and statistics. Encourage collaboration, partnerships and sponsorship with private industries. Consider the Australia Council example of grants rounds for residencies. A full-time AbaF position would be very useful for the arts community in Canberra.

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Artists and Professionalism • • • There is a tension between professional and amateur artistic activity in Canberra. Need to support and encourage professional practice. Envisage career pathways and work out how to support these. We shouldn’t try to stop artists leaving Canberra but we should be very proactive in maintaining strong ties and encourage professional artists to visit as mentors or in residencies. But the ACT does need to develop/retain some critical mass of professional artists (less of an issue for music and visual arts which are stronger and are supported by ANU) More leadership from eminent artists should be encouraged. Maybe develop a funded program to encourage leading professionals to mentor emerging artists. There should be more Government support for sustainable, environmentally aware, ethical art practices. Public Liability insurance is a big issue because the cost discourages arts activity. Recognise that Trade Unions can provide important support for artists.

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Government • • • Government should be a facilitator and an advocate rather than a directive force. Would like more transparency in Government decisions. Ensure decisions are evidence based. There is a real connection between arts and health. Encourage consumer spending on arts rather than pokies or cigarettes. Government money from gambling could be reinvested in the arts. Government should ensure every child is exposed to and participates in music at school. Tourism awareness of and engagement with the arts in the ACT seems to be quite low. Need to promote ACT Arts interstate beyond the National Cultural Institutions (NCIs). People will travel to Canberra for arts activities. Arts in the ACT could piggyback off NCI promotions. There are world-class arts events in Canberra (e.g. consulate shows as well as ACT arts) but they are not promoted well which affects the branding and image of Canberra nationally, which could and should be stronger. Low cost housing is vital for artists who generally live on low incomes. This is one of the strengths of the Newcastle arts scene. Housing ACT doesn’t seem to understand the real needs of artists, particularly in relation to capital expenditure. Maybe artsACT could play more of an advocacy role across Government as well as with external partners. The Canberra business community is not well connected to the arts. Maybe tax deductions for sponsorship of local ACT arts organisations would encourage a more philanthropic culture? Need to measure the economic and other impacts of the creative industries in the ACT.

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Funding • • The ACT is very fortunate to have artsACT supporting project funding. With the new program funding model, artists and arts orgnisations would potentially only have to apply every few years, which is a good thing because, particularly in an amateur/volunteer run organisation, writing funding applications takes a lot of time, effort and cost. Less emphasis on return on investment would be welcome in arts funding. artsACTs peer review program works well because it helps to avoid issues with government and arts organisations boards that may have their own agendas.

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Peer review and Key Arts Organisations (KAOs) reinforce the status quo and the skew towards the community/amateur scene rather than professional. Too much focus on administration and governance rather than creativity and responsiveness in funding guidelines. Not enough small grants, the funding application process takes too long and is inflexible to artists’ needs. It is also difficult to get funding for cross art form projects. If artists don’t get funding there should be a second tier offering non-monetary support such as mentoring or support through facilities, etc. Impression that inter-state artists sometimes get funded by the ACT Government at the expense of local artists. Understand the importance of encouraging Bell Shakespeare and Musica Viva to come to Canberra but some of that program funding could go to local artists. ACT Government should better fund local arts scene rather than contributing to NCI programs. Why does Artsound get funded but not Radio 2XX?

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Public Art • • Public art fund seems to favour international and interstate artists. The ACT Arts community should have supported the ‘percent for art’ scheme in the face of public criticism. Maybe ‘percent for art’ should go beyond public art to performing arts, etc. Public art pieces are too expensive. This is an opportunity cost for rest of the arts in the ACT. Public art gives the city vibrancy and enriches the cultural landscape of Canberra by displaying the work of world-renowned artists.

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Venues/Facilities • • • More arts facilities charging community rents would be appreciated. Purpose-built venues and performance spaces are too expensive to hire. A new lyric theatre could pose challenges to the local arts sector as they would only show interstate blockbusters, would be expensive and may take audiences away from local artists. Shortage of purpose built venues for dancers. Easy access to venues is important. Need more galleries in central and accessible areas of Canberra.

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Canberra lacks long-term industrial art spaces. Affordability of studio spaces is a problem as is tenure. There are many closed schools that artists and community arts groups could use. Contemporary gallery settings don’t provide affordable and accessible spaces for young artists. There are a number of unused shop-fronts that could be accessed through low-cost, short-term leases similar to ‘Renew Newcastle’.. Canberra doesn’t have enough good venues for live music. Bureaucracy and regulations discourage live music. This needs to change. Fund the infrastructure and facilities which give artists an opportunity to earn an income. KAOs and availability of arts facilities often provide employment for artists, particularly as tutors, etc which is important to enable them to continue to survive as artists. The Cultural Facilities Corporation (CFC) should be encouraged to give a certain percentage of access to local artists and organisations to show their work. e.g. the CMaG Fishtank Gallery has three month exhibitions which could be shortened to allow space and time for local artists. There needs to be planning for the future for venues and facilities for professional and community arts. This planning should include Queanbeyan venues.

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Festivals • • • • There are too many festivals and they have become formulaic. Festivals don’t currently satisfy community need. Better management of festivals is needed and artists should be invited to contribute. There should be a Canberra Arts Festival.

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9.3 Appendix 3: Online Public Survey Summary

COMMUNITY CONSULTATION SUMMARY OF SURVEY RESULTS

Introduction
On the 4 September 2009 the Chief Minister and Minister for the Arts and Heritage, undertake a review of the arts in the ACT. Funding was provided in the 2008-09 Budget for the review as Arts Canberra, the ACT Government’s current action statement for the arts, expired at the end of 2008. The timeframe for this statement has been extended until a new arts strategy is released following the review. The approach to the review included research into best-practice arts policy from around Australia and overseas, as well as working with the local ACT arts community and the broader community to review the current policy and its implementation to date. A new arts strategy will be released in mid to late 2010 and will continue to reflect the ACT Government’s commitment to and investment in the arts in Canberra. Jon

Stanhope, announced the appointment of consultants Peter Loxton and Associates Pty Ltd to

Community Consultations and Survey
A number of different consultation mechanisms are being included in the review process and community consultations are an integral part of the review. People living in the ACT were invited to have their say on the arts in the ACT by completing a community survey or attending one of the community forums held in Civic, Tuggeranong and Belconnen. This document provides a summary of the results of the online component of the survey. The community survey was available online and in hardcopy at Canberra Connect Shopfronts and ACT Public Libraries. Submissions to the survey closed on Friday 13 November 2009. There were 220 responses in total (207 online and 13 hardcopy). Responses and feedback obtained from the survey will help to provide a way forward. The survey asked for community responses about priorities, opportunities, issues, program delivery, and funding methods and included the following areas: !
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Participation in the arts in the ACT;! Arts events attended and how often;! Most valued arts organisations;! Whether ACT Government spending on the arts is effectively allocated;

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Changes to the way the arts operate and are funded; Whether the ACT Government spends too much in some arts areas and not enough in others; Arts venues used in the ACT and whether they could be more effectively used; The importance of the arts to creative industries, tourism and the ACT economy.

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Summary of Online Survey Responses
There were 207 responses to the online survey from a range of age groups and interests in the arts. The majority of respondents (170) indicated that they participated in the arts, either directly or as a consumer. Most participated in music events, visual arts, and performance, but other art forms were well represented in the survey, including textile, design and print making, pottery, photography, film, writing and craft. The mix of art genres was seen as important to maintaining and encouraging diversity and creativity and a general cultural well being in the ACT, and all art forms were valued by the majority of respondents. Responses were largely from ACT residents, although a few were received from people living in the region, and two from Sydney. A significant proportion of respondents were resident in Canberra’s inner north and south, and all other areas of Canberra were represented. Most respondents were in the 41 to 60 age cohort (105), with 78 being between 21 and 40, 3 under 20 and 23 over 61. Although young people under 20 were not well represented as survey respondents, a significant proportion of parents responding to the survey provided information and priorities for their children.

Priorities for the Arts in the ACT
Most respondents felt that the ACT Government was not allocating arts funding effectively (141). A number believed that more support should be given to local and emerging artists and innovative art forms, others felt that venue access and hire costs were often discouraging. Arts education and promotion were seen as important as access to the arts in creating demand. Priorities for supporting various art forms attracted a diverse range of views, often reflecting the area a respondent either practiced in or preferred as an arts consumer. Some respondents felt funding was unequally allocated and, for instance, the visual arts needed more support. Others felt that performance, such as dance, theatre and music, particularly for young people, needed more focus in terms of funding and promotion. Some considered that there needed to be broader representation on grants selection panels to reflect a greater diversity of arts expertise, including informed consumers. Some felt less should be spent at the “high end” of art and more provided for local, community and emerging artists. Others felt that the ACT needed to present itself as a city of high-quality, nationally competitive arts and funding should be focussed more on those who have a proven track record and/or were more likely to attract larger audiences.

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However, it should be noted that a significant number of respondents felt that the ACT Government was allocating arts funding appropriately (70). There were a few who felt that the arts should be self supporting and funds presently allocated to the arts should be redirected to areas such as health. Others felt that there should be more accountability and transparency in the allocation of funds, and what art forms are supported, particularly in relation to the outcomes expected.

Spaces, Venues and Facilities
Respondents generally valued existing art spaces in Canberra, including Megalo, Canberra Contemporary Art Space, ANCA, QL2, M16, Strathnairn, Street Theatre, Corinbank, Craft ACT, Hand-made markets, and assets like Canberra Theatre and Playhouse, Llewellyn Hall and the ANU School of Arts. Tuggeranong and Belconnen Art Centres were seen to have provided considerable opportunity to local artists and were generally appreciated by local arts practitioners and consumers. Some respondents pointed to the importance of CCAS because it strengthened the art scene in Canberra with a mix of local and national artists involved in exhibition programs. There was also support for other organisations and venues, such as the Canberra Musicians Club, PhotoAccess, and the Watson Pottery Centre. These local facilities were considered to be important in fostering an involvement in and appreciation for art, and gave the community opportunities for learning and networking. A number of respondents also considered that community art spaces were places where local artists were able to find advice, encouragement and assistance in relation to the arts. A significant number of practising artist respondents felt that the hire costs and availability of venues for exhibitions and events were often discouraging, particularly in relation to emerging artists, innovative art forms, and community amateur groups. As one respondent put it “creative industries need space”. There were suggestions that existing public community space, such as schools, could be used more effectively to provide affordable art space, including space for exhibitions, dance and music. It was also felt that larger community and professional organisations receiving funding could share their premises by hiring them at a nominal rent to community and local amateur groups. A number of respondents noted the high cost of hiring venues from professional organisations. On the other hand, a significant proportion of respondents were concerned about Government funding support and the viability of significant organisations such as CSO, given their highquality professionalism and importance to Canberra.

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The lack of affordable, appropriate venues for amateur classical, choral and opera performances is of concern to some local musicians and music audiences, including young and emerging performers. Contemporary musicians and audiences equally felt a need for more accessible performance spaces. Some suggested providing non-traditional venues, such as street and other public spaces and, for instance, opening up places like the Manuka Arts Centre to performances. Commercial galleries were appreciated by respondents as they were seen as providing a valuable mix to the art scene, strengthening it with interesting exhibitions, a varied range of artists’ work and providing an opportunity to buy works of art. Some respondents visited private art galleries regularly. Some respondents would like to see existing art spaces expanded to include a dedicated photography gallery and a dedicated dance and acting space. A few considered that Albert Hall could be returned to the performing and visual arts. There was also some concern about the need for appropriate space for chamber music. A few respondents felt that most arts facilities were concentrated on the north side, particularly the inner north, and felt the south side would benefit from more art space. However, others felt that location was not so important if venues were properly marketed to the general public and were centrally accessible for innovative and emerging art and artists

Public Art and Public Art Selection Processes
There was a range of views on public art, particularly in relation to large roadside sculptures. However, most respondents who discussed public art were strongly supportive of the concept, and valued the existing public art (applauded it as one respondent put it). On the other hand, there were some who indicated they did not support the existing public art or the concept of public art, as they thought it was too expensive, thus draining money from other areas of art and from public expenditure generally. Several respondents who supported public art found some of the existing public art work ugly, inappropriate and/or out of place, while others liked it. Many respondents felt that there needed to be more transparency in the selection processes for public art. Some suggested reviewing selection panels to ensure greater input from a broader mix of community and professional artists and informed art consumers. A few respondents felt that the current selection process had resulted in hasty decisions and inappropriate and expensive public artworks in a number of locations. There was a view from some that the selection process appeared to be weighted to reflect the views of “the bureaucracy” too heavily. Also, politicians should not be involved in the selection of public art or artists. Some indicated that they would like to see public art created by artists with a strong local connection. Selection of artists and public art should be facilitated through an open tender process so it is transparent.

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There were several respondents who wanted to see the 1% levy for public art reintroduced and a considerable number of others who expressed disappointment that the public art program might have effectively ceased and encouraged its continuation. Some respondents felt that public art should be considered in the context of its location and within the context of a cohesive vision for Canberra (eg. themes for suburbs). Other respondents felt that public art should be smaller and more easily accessible in public spaces (such as Garema Place, community shops and parks) so that people could get near and touch them. These respondents felt that accessible public art should receive priority over large-scale roadside public art. Others felt that the current public art program was too traditional (“conservative and boring”) and should be more innovative to fit with Canberra’s defined spaces, such as sound/performance/video installation that could “capture the public’s imagination”. A significant number appreciated the existing public art and wanted it to continue in the same vein.

Emerging Artists and Innovative Art
A significant number of respondents indicated that they would like to see more support for emerging artists and innovative art forms. Some felt this could best be achieved by providing less expensive access to exhibition and performance spaces. A number of respondents discussed the recently increased costs of performance venues, particularly those managed by professional organisations. There were suggestions that public spaces, including open spaces, could be offered to emerging artists, and more funding provided for those emerging artists who were not eligible for youth funding. Some felt that there was too much spent on expensive imported art, such as roadside and park sculptures, rather than on developing local emerging and innovative artists. One respondent mentioned that professional companies also needed more funding to be innovative. Some felt that more attention should be given to local amateur theatre and acting while others expressed appreciation for organisations like Impro Theatre ACT/Ickle Pickle Productions which offered innovative improvisation classes for all ages and abilities. Street Theatre was also noted for its innovative programming. There was also a concern that innovative music and emerging musicians were not supported well enough. Some respondents felt that a focus on traditional arts discouraged emerging and innovative art forms. Others referred to a reluctance to encourage innovation from more established areas of the arts. It was suggested, for instance, that there should be more funding for innovative public art and support for emerging artists to contribute to this. One respondent discussed the predictable nature of the current standard arts mix within facilities which discouraged interesting collaborations that can arise from having, for instance, environmental education and sculptors in the same space. The Toronto Artscape Inc was mentioned as an example. Others mentioned the need for more innovative architecture to make Canberra a more interesting and

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attractive city. Many believed that innovation was critical to the development of a healthy art scene and more support should be given to it to ensure the vibrancy of Canberra’s arts. It was felt that there could be a multi-tiered funding system set up to maintain professional organisations and on the other hand to foster the development of emerging artists and innovative art. This would address concerns about how emerging artists and innovation were supported. It was also suggested that other funding mixes could be examined that would spread the existing funding dollar further, such as matching funds for the arts where an organisation receives 50% from Government and the other 50% is from sponsorship.

Arts Education and Promotion
A significant proportion of respondents were involved in art education as teachers, either professionally or at a community level, as well as being arts consumers. There were a variety of views about how arts education and promotion of the arts should be pursued. Many felt that there were critical aspects to creating demand and an appreciation of the arts, and giving young people an important “tool for life” through the arts. A significant number of respondents felt that more funding should be directed to arts education in community art spaces and at schools. It was also felt that some funding should be available for promoting emerging arts, in particular for costs of advertising for local amateur artists and performers. Others felt that some education and guidance should be given to emerging artists to assist with issues like grant applications and self promotion. It was also considered by some that stronger links should be created between the arts and educational institutions in the ACT and between all levels of government departments. One respondent suggested that wellknown performing or visual artists visiting the ACT could, for instance, be asked by the government to spend a day at schools promoting the importance of the arts. This, it was said, could create general awareness and publicity across Canberra for the arts, as well as inspiring young people in their appreciation of the arts and its role in maintaining a “healthy” society. It was also considered that local media could assist the community in terms of art education and promotion. A number of respondents felt that local commercial media should be encouraged to increase its attention to the arts. A number of respondents felt that if there were more funds to support exhibition and performance costs, including street performances, it could encourage those not traditionally involved in the arts to attend. This would have an important educational benefit.

Respondents who were strong supporters of the arts generally felt that the ACT was fortunate to have one of the best art schools in Australia at the ANU, as well as an excellent music school. Some believed that these and other local and national organisations and institutions, such as Continuing Education, CIT, UC and CMAG created a good learning environment. It

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was felt that CMAG, for instance, provided an outstanding education program and it should be supported in this area. A number of respondents pointed to the importance of funding and resourcing developing arts education facilities to make Canberra a city of choice for young creative/artistic people. This could include boosting the learning environments in existing organisations and institutions, particularly at local art spaces such as CCAS. conscious “green art”. A smaller number of respondents felt that developing more art education was not necessarily important for Canberra. Several respondents believed that there were opportunities in arts education to raise people’s consciousness about environmentally

Arts Events and Festivals
A majority of respondents felt that arts events and festivals provided a sense of community and an occasion to celebrate the arts generally. They also support cultural heritage and diversity as well as giving Canberra an improved image and economic opportunities. Most indicated that they attended or participated in one or more of Canberra’s arts events and festivals, including festivals like NAIDOC, outdoor arts events such as opera, the CSO at Government House, choral music, band events and contemporary music. The importance of the Canberra short film festival/Troppfest and the international film festival was also discussed and appreciated as accessible and reasonably priced events that helped broaden people’s perspectives and promoted social inclusion. The National Folk Festival was a highlight for many, as was the Multicultural Festival and Floriade. There were some who felt the Multicultural Festival was declining in its attractiveness, and some disappointment that the Fringe Festival had been moved. There was a general feeling that local arts events and festivals should be well supported by the government and that support and assistance with promotion should also be provided to the lesser known festivals and events such as Vivid, the photography festival, craft events, and amateur classical, contemporary and band music and visual art events. A number of respondents mentioned the need for festivals to be better marketed and more dynamic. There was support for more fringe style festivals and arts events outside galleries to make them more broadly accessible.

While there was strong appreciation of Canberra’s festivals and outdoor arts events from a large majority of respondents, a few indicated that they were not supportive of them and didn’t attend any. Some felt that too much money was spent on festivals and not enough spent on arts promotion. However, others appreciated local arts events and the “many excellent festivals that had started in Canberra in the last few years”, believing that they “help cement

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Canberra as a great place for young people to live, and offering cultural experiences relevant to young people”.

Economic, Social and Tourism Benefits
Some respondents felt that more status should be given to the importance of arts to human well-being and a healthy society rather than to economic benefit or return on investment.. It was further considered that creative thinking was critical to equipping people to adapt to today’s rapid changes and demands. Several respondents discussed the importance of arts to individuals and to society’s health, where the “benefits are enormous” for mental and emotional health, which in turn impact on the ACT economy. Generally, most respondents believed that arts were indispensable to a vital and vibrant economy, and that it was not possible to just create and sustain “high end” arts without building them up from the community, Community-based arts therefore needed to be supported. A number of examples of arts events and festivals providing considerable economic benefit were given, including the Edinburgh Festival, the Tamworth Festival, the ACT’s Floriade and National Folk Festival. It was considered that these and other events in Canberra, contributed significantly to tourism and subsequently financially to the ACT economy. There was acknowledgement by a number of respondents that “blockbusters” at national cultural institutions were responsible for large visitor numbers. However, local festivals and art events, particularly outdoor arts events, CMAG exhibitions, Canberra Theatre and ANU School of Music and School of Art exhibitions and performances also attracted visitors. Several respondents talked about their experience of these local events and facilities attracting visitors from interstate and overseas. There was a widespread belief amongst respondents that a vibrant local art scene also attracted and retained younger residents and creative industries which provided important economic and social benefits. It was strongly felt that a vibrant arts community, as well as public art, made cities more attractive places in which to live and work and contributed both directly and indirectly to the economy. It was considered that a strong arts sector attracts creative people and creative industries and “generally nourishes people”. It was pointed out that a strong arts sector also employs a range of people in different industries, including trades people, and provides a positive outlet for young people in a range of circumstances. However, there was a view that Canberra needed to move away from the image of a “small”, “unimportant” and culturally weak place to which people moved as a last resort. It was felt that this was because the strong, local art movement in Canberra was a little “underground”, and needed to be supported and promoted more effectively both within the ACT and nationally. This was particularly true, according to a number of respondents, in relation to lesser known events. In this respect, one respondent referred to the Vivid national photography festival as a case in point, and another referred to Conflux, the Canberra speculative fiction convention

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which “draws more than four times the number of its Sydney equivalent and about the same number as Melbourne”. Others felt that some of the better known festivals were not what they used to be and could be better supported to ensure continued tourism, economic and social benefits. Some respondents felt that local arts organisations, like the Canberra Musicians Club, could be a “fantastic tourist draw” if they were supported to extend their events and integrated into more public spaces. A number of respondents felt that local arts needed to structure themselves within the framework of the major national cultural institutions, which are the lifeblood of ACT tourism. In this way local arts could gain strength from the national institutions. There was also a view from a few that local arts contributed little to the economy and could in fact be a drain on the economy.

Conclusion
There was a wide range of very divergent views expressed by survey respondents, making it difficult to quantify responses. As one respondent put it; “At end of day, the problem is that the perception of balance is driven by people's particular taste and preferences”. Many people felt that not enough was being spent in a number of areas of the arts. However, there were of course differing priority areas for expenditure depending on interests. A number of issues emerged as being of great interest to the public, including the vital role of the arts in community engagement, education, social and economic development. The arts are highly valued in Canberra and appropriate venues for community and professional arts are recognised as important . The arts should be accessible and public art is appreciated. A majority of respondents supported emerging and innovative arts, more local arts spaces, professional and amateur arts, and strongly valued arts events and festivals. The public generally recognise the value of the arts and that Government has an important leadership role to support the arts through funding, promotion and positive partnerships. It was felt that to address people’s perceptions about priorities “the Government needed a transparent process that showed that activities had been funded according to demand/need and opportunity for improvement”. Contributions to the survey have provided very useful and valued ideas for the review team, and will become an important contribution to the ACT Government’s future arts strategy.

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