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The Buck and Ball

Philadelphia Campaign 2010
Buck and Ba! wi! Conquer A!

A CALL TO ARMS

Two upcoming events will depart from the event site "for
commemorate the 1777 location, see website:
Philadelphia Campaign, which www.philadelphiacampaign.org# on
included the largest land the afternoon of Friday,
action of the American September 24, marching up
Revolution "ie. Brandywine#, the Brandywine along dirt
sharp skirmishes and arduous roads and wooded paths, and
marches, land and sea$borne crossing the river at original
sieges of major fortifications, fords. After an overnight
the occupation of bivouac at one of the fords
Philadelphia by British, that was guarded by American
German and Loyalist forces, a militia during the Battle of
nasty foraging war in the Brandywine, we’ll return to
hinterland, and the Valley the event site early Saturday
Forge encampment. morning, dazzling the masses
with the kick ass campaigner
attitude that the ACM is
On September 24$26, we famous for. For those who
will have an opportunity to cannot arrive until Friday
march along the historic night, we are working on a
banks of the Brandywine and pickup and shuttle to the
participate in the CL/BB bivouac site for late Friday
Philadelphia Campaign event night. Stay tuned for details.
at Brandywine Creek State A Rifleman of 1777
Park in Wilmington,
Delaware, just south of the The Philadelphia
Brandywine Battlefield and Campaign theme continues
near the area where with the much$anticipated A remarkable mark in the tail!
Continental and militia forces Wellbourne Farm immersion
gathered during the weeks tactical on November 6$8.
leading up to the Battle of This event will give
Brandywine. participants an opportunity to
The Brandywine event experience the uncertainty
will include an immersion and excitement of the
march and bivouac on private forgaging war of fall 1777. For
property located on the more info, check out the
southern edge of the event website:
Brandywine battlefield. We’ll www.welbourne2010.60thrar.org

! PAGE 1
The Buck and Ball
OUR BRANDYWINE IMPRESSION
Head Quarters, Wilmington, August 28,
We will portray a company of Pennsylvania militia 1777: A corps of Light Infantry is to be
from Dunlap’s Partisan Regiment. This corps was
formed out of rifle-armed militia who had been formed, to consist of one Field Officer,
called up on a two month tour in August 1777. two Captains, six Subalterns, eight
Dunlap’s regiment was initially attached to
Maxwell’s corps of light infantry, and fought at
Serjeants and 100 Rank and File from
Cooch’s Bridge, Brandywine, the White Horse each brigade.
Tavern and Germantown.

While there are no known clothing issues to the
unit, it is likely from various sources that they were
supplied with knapsacks, canteens and other field John Armstrong to President Thomas
equipment. Bring your Warners! Rifles if you got Wharton, Chester, 29 August 1777
em! “. . . In concert with General Potter I have
formed a Rifle Regiment, and put a Colonel Dunlap
Extract from the Minutes: In Congress, July at the head of it, a prudent man, and not
31, 1777: Resolved that the militia of the states unacquainted with the business of a Partizan. I
hope this step will not be disagreeable to Council,
of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware and as from it we hope to derive an earlier and more
Maryland be immediately called out to repel frequent service than can well be expected from
any invasion of the enemy in the said states. the Battalions. This Battalion marches tomorrow
morning from the Hook. This morning General
Charles Thomson, Secretary.
Potter sets out to command the first Brigade.
One hundred and sixty from Billingsport to pass
JAMES PATTEN this way to Wilmington, whom with the Rifle
Battalion of 300 privates are exclusive of the
number mentioned above.”
That in July 1777 he entered the service of the
United States as a private solider in the militia Head Quarters, Wilmington, August 30,
of Pennsylvania (of which state he was then a 1777: Brigadier Genl. Maxwell will take the
resident & had been from his nativity having
been born in that state) under the command of Command of the corps of light Infantry.
Capt John Williams as a drafted militia man.
He rendezvoused with the troops at Carlisle
and was marched to Marcus Hook a little town WELLBOURNE IMPRESSION
below Philadelphia on the Delaware River. At
this point there was a call for men to volunteer Dunlap’s Partisan Regiment was disbanded in
October. For the forgaging campaign of
from the ranks of the infantry as Rifle-men & he
November 1777, the composite militia company
volunteered and joined a rifle company commanded will include rifles, fowlers and military arms.
by Captain (George) Crawford—Dunlap was the Issue equipment would include early war
Colonel of this Rifle Regt. . . [Continued on p.5] cartridge boxes, knapsacks and wooden staved
canteens. See below for hints on clothing.

! PAGE 2
The Buck and Ball
WHAT WERE THEY ISSUED?

Supreme Executive Council,
Philadelphia, June 12, 1777: Colonel At a Meeting of the Pennsylvania Board
Morgan, Lieutenant of the County of of War, Philadelphia, June 12, 1777:
Berks, applied for One hundred and fifty Colonel Benjamin Flower, Commissary
Knapsacks, Two hundred and fifty General of Military Stores, was
canteens, One hundred and fifty Cartouch requested to Deliver Col. Jacob
Boxes, for the Militia of Berks Co., and Morgan, Lieutenant of the County of
an order was drawn on the Continental Berks, 150 Cartouch Boxes. Mr. Towers
Board of War for the Same, to be to deliver him 250 canteens, & Mr.
delivered to him or his order. Moses Young to deliver him 150
Knapsacks for the use of the Militia of
Supreme Executive Council to the County
said county.
Lieutenants, Philadelphia, August 27, 1777:
General Howe having landed an army in
Maryland, less that seventy miles from this John Adams to Abigail Adams
26 August 1777
city, & the event thereof being uncertain &
perhaps at some distance, it is proper to inform General Washington was at
you that, before long, it may be necessary to Wilmington last Night, and his
draw out more of the militia of this state, to Army is there to day. The Militia
replace those who are now in the field, but are turning out with great Alacrity
whose term of two months is passing . . .the both in Maryland and Pensilvania.
unarmed state in which too many of the They are distressed for Want of
battalions come out, is very distressing. What Arms. Many have none -- others
arms are to be had here, will be readily have only little fowling Pieces.
furnished, but the Council of Safety delivered However, We shall rake and scrape
out so liberally & so long, that it will be enough to do Howes Business, by the
difficult to arm numbers of the men, who have favour of Heaven.
already been sent down. Your most serious
attention and diligent endeavours to provide
arms are therefore essentially necessary. . .As
men you are skilled in the use of rifles, may be
picked out of the companies, send down all the good
rifles you can meet with.

! PAGE 3
OUR ARMS, THEY ARE RIFLES, OUR MEN VOLUNTEERS.
WE’LL FIGHT AND WE’LL CONQUER, YOU NEED HAVE NO FEARS.
The Pennsylvania Gazette, August 27, 1777:
Pennsylvania Gazette, November 13, 1776:
DESERTED from Captain ISRAEL
SIXTEEN DOLLARS Reward. DESERTED
JONES'S company of militia, an Irishman,
from Captain DANIEL OLDENBRUSH'S
who calls himself John Burk, by trade a
company, in Col. JAMES CUNNINGHAM'S
shoemaker, a stout well made fellow, marked
battalion of the Flying Camp, a certain John
with the smallpox, 5 feet 7 or 8 inches high; had
Dollinger, aged 19 years, about 5 feet 4 or 5 inches
on, when he went away, a dark coloured hunting
high, dark complexion, smooth faced, blackish
shirt, his other clothes not known. Whoever
straight hair; had on, a dark hunting shirt and
apprehends him in any goal in this State, shall
trowsers, and had a short rifle with him. Whoever
have the above reward, and reasonable charges,
apprehends the said deserter, and secures him, so
paid by WILLIAM COATS, Lieut.
that he may join my company, shall receive the
Philadelphia county. NB: The above deserter
above reward of Sixteen Dollars; but in case the
is a substitute, and has received his bounty; he
said deserter returns in 3 weeks from this date, he
said he had worked in Frankford at his trade.
shall be pardoned, or else whenever found shall be
Pennsylvania Gazette October 9, 1776 dealt with as a traitor to his country. DANIEL
SIXTEEN DOLLARS Reward. DESERTED OLDENBRUSH, Captain. N.B. All officers or
from Captain Samuel Hines company, of the first soldiers of the militia , and others, who have the
battalion of flying camp, of Philadelphia county, justice of the American cause at heart, ought, and
commanded by Colonel John Moore, two soldiers, are requested to use what in their power lies to
viz. William Bell, an Irishman, about 5 feet 8 apprehend so base a deserter from so glorious a cause.
inches high, 21 years of age, a stout well made
fellow; had on, when he deserted , a white hunting
shirt and trowsers; he was enlisted out of Captain The Pennsylvania Gazette, August 27, 1777
Mercer’s company of the Lancaster county EIGHT DOLLARS Reward. DESERTED , on
militia , and it is probable he will try to get to the 12th instant, from Captain John Reynard
Lancaster county. And John Cooper, a middle company, 2d battalion Philadelphia county militia ,
aged man, about 5 feet 7 inches high; his clothes commanded by Colonel Moore, a certain John
not remembered; he has a scar about one of his Moyers, by trade a tanner, about 5 feet 10 or 11
eyes, is very talkative, has been in the service nine inches high, of a sandy complexion, straight short
months at Boston. Whoever secures the said hair, this country born, speaks both Dutch and
deserters, and sends them to the company at Perth English; had on a dark hunting shirt, striped twilled
Amboy, shall have the above reward, or Eight trowsers, but sometimes wears buckskin breeches and
Dollars for either, and reasonable charges, paid by cloth leggings; it is likely he will make for Virginia,
SAMUEL HINES, Captain. as his people live there. Whoever secures said
deserter, so that he may be conveyed to his
regiment, shall have the above reward, and
The Pennsylvania Gazette: July 30, 1777: Billings
reasonable charges, paid by JOHN REYNARD,
Port, July 27, 1777: EIGHT DOLLARS
Captain. The above deserter is a substitute, and
REWARD. DESERTED about the 20th instant,
has received his bounty.
from Capt. Ezekiel Letts company, of the first
battalion, of Philadelphia militia , commanded by
Col. William Bradford, a certain Charles Millon, a Supreme Executive Council, Philadelphia,
shoemaker by trade; he has been out in the first Saturday, June 21, 1777: An order was drawn on
battalion of Pennsylvania regulars, last year, and Capt Campbell, in favor of Robert Smith, Esqe,
sometimes wears old uniform, viz. brown faced with Lieutenant of the county of Chester, for four
green; he is about 25 years of age, about 5 feet 6 hundred Canteens, four hundred Knapsacks, four
inches high. Whoever apprehends the said deserter, hundred priming wires, four hundred brushes, and
and secures him in any goal on the continent, or four hundred cartouch boxes, for the militia of that
brings him to his company, at Billing Port, shall County.
have the above reward, and reasonable charges, paid
by EZEKIEL LETTS, Captain.
JAMES PATTEN

(cont’d from p. 2:). . . He was then marched in this Rifle Regt to Wilmington in Delaware and was then
stationed in the Brandywine Mills about one mile from Wilmington. General Maxwell had the command
of this corps of the militia. That while the troops to which he belonged were so quartered in the mills
parties were continually kept out upon the scout watching the movements of the British & preventing
them as far as possible from foraging in the country. The troops to which this applicant belonged had
frequent skirmishes with the British and amongst the rest a considerable fight at a place called Iron Hill in
which this applicant was engaged. The British succeeded in this conflict in driving the American troops
and the latter retreated to a place called Christiana a few miles from Iron Hill. The British had just before
that time landed near the Head of Elk. After that skirmish at Iron Hill this applicant with the corps to
which he belonged was marched to Chadd’s Ford on the Brandwine and there encamped all night on the
next day the battle of Brandywine was fought in which this applicant participated. The corps to which
this applicant belonged assisted at this battle in covering the retreat of General Wayne and aided in
drawing his cannon up a hill or steep to the heights of that place. After the Battle of Brandywine and
during the same night they retreated to Chester below Philadelphia. The next day they marched from
Chester to Philadelphia. This applicant has but an indistinct recollection of the place to which they next
marched but in a few days after the battle of Brandywine he was in an engagement with the British at a
place near the White Horse Tavern between Philadelphia and Lancaster; but owing to a tremendous rain
that fell that day the small arms were out of order and but little execution was done on either side. The
American troops however retreated to a place the name of which he has forgotten; but in a few days
afterwards this applicant was in another conflict with the British at Schuylkill where the British army
crossed on their way to Philadelphia. The American troops again retreated before the British army and
the corps to which this applicant belonged retired to a place called the Trapp, situated either in the county
of Bucks or Berks in the state of Pennsylvania. Here they lay for a few days when they were marched to
Germantown where he was in a severe battle. The corps to which he belonged again retreated to “the
Trapp” and there he remained until he was duly discharged which he thinks was about the last of October
1777 and during all this time he served as a private militia soldier. He thinks that it was as early as the 15th
of July that he entered the service as above stated & that therefore his services during this year exceeded
three months all of which service he performed as a volunteer Rifleman from the time he did so volunteer
as above stated. He states that he was during this term of service in several other skirmishes but the
names of the places at which he was so engaged [on] the particular events he does not remember except
that to his great regret the Americans were on all those occasions unsuccessful. He remembers that while
he was on this campaign General Wayne was defeated at Paoli and on the same night that Wayne was
defeated the corps to which this applicant belonged crossed the Schuylkill a few miles from the place
where General Wayne was an encamped in some old fields. He knew but few of the regular officers
because he was generally kept out upon the wings and in stations distinct from the regular troops. He
knew General Washington when he saw him. He also knew General Wayne when he saw him and
perhaps some others. He knew a General Armstrong but this applicant thinks he commanded the militia.
He remembers that before the troops marched to Germantown & fought the battle there that General
Armstrong came to “the Trapp” and made a speech to the troops requesting the militia to volunteer a little
longer as they had now some experience and as more confidence could be placed in them than in raw
troops; but where they were going or what particular service he desired them to perform he did not at that
time disclose. In accordance with this request of General Armstrong this applicant remained in the service
although the term for which he had originally entered the said service had then expired or was about
expiring, and he then was marched to Germantown & was in the battle at that place as before stated.
JAMES DUNCAN

In the month of August in 1777 I was again drafted under Capt. John Scott of Lancaster Co. PA & marched
to Old Chester on the Delaware River where we met the whole Pennsylvania Militia under the command of
General Armstrong. At this place there were two regiments of Rifle men, made up from the militia. Our company
with the exception of one member, under Capt. Scott, entered the first regiment, which was placed under the
command of Col. James Dunlap of Cumberland Co. PA. Our regiment immediately marched onto the State
of Delaware and were stationed on the lines at the head of Elk River. The day after our arrival here, we
returned to Newark in Delaware, where there were a (plenty) of British who immediately retreated to their
main body at Elk. We flanked them on their march till they reached Brandywine. The day after our arrival
there, the 11 of Sept. 1777, we fought the battle of Brandywine under Genl. Washington & Lafayette & others
& were defeated. On the same night, we retreated to Old Chester, thence to Philadelphia, thence up the road
near to Downings town. Then we went to Schuylkill & lay for about one week at Potts grove. We then went
down to Germantown, and on the next day after we met the British & fought the Battle of Germantown &
defeated the enemy. On the next day after the battle, we proceeded to a place called White Marsh & were
then discharged after a service of two months.

RICHARD CUNNINGHAM
. . . He then returned to his mother’s and remained there until about harvest A D 1777 when he again entered the
service of the United States as a volunteers in a company commanded by Captain George Crawford who resided about
six miles from Mercersburg. [obscured] applicant joined the company at Shippensburg in Franklin Co. Pa and
volunteered as a private soldier for a term of two months and marched under the command of Captain Crawford by the
way of Lancaster into the State of Delaware and was in a battle or skirmish that was then called the battle of the Iron
Hill and in a skirmish at a place called the White Horse and in both instances the regiment or battalion to which he
belonged was commanded by Col. Dunlap- During this term he was also in the battle of Brandywine and in this battle
Dunlap was his Col. and Patten was his general’s name, and in this battle he received a slight wound in the head.
About his time the term for which he volunteered expired but as another battle was shortly expected with the British
he and the company of Captain Crawford were retained and in a short time he was in the battle which was fought at
Germantown. He was not at this time under the command of General Potter but was in this battle under the
command of General Armstrong who was in the army called whistling Jack. He was not discharged for about a week
or ten days after this battle and was in the service at this time three months and a few days or three months lacking a
few days and he cannot state which. He was then discharged between Germantown and Valley Forge he cannot say at
what place and received an order for fourteen in continental money to be paid at Lancaster for his extra time. the 15th
of July that he entered the service as above stated & that therefore his services during this year exceeded three months
all of which service he performed as a volunteer Rifleman from the time he did so volunteer as above stated. He states
that he was during this term of service in several other skirmishes but the names of the places at which he was so
engaged [on] the particular events he does not remember except that to his great regret the Americans were on all those
occasions unsuccessful. He remembers that while he was on this campaign General Wayne was defeated at Paoli and
on the same night that Wayne was defeated the corps to which this applicant belonged crossed the Schuylkill a few
miles from the place where General Wayne was an encamped in some old fields. He knew but few of the regular
officers because he was generally kept out upon the wings and in stations distinct from the regular troops. He knew
General Washington when he saw him. He also knew General Wayne when he saw him and perhaps some others. He
knew a General Armstrong but this applicant thinks he commanded the militia. He remembers that before the troops
marched to Germantown & fought the battle there that General Armstrong came to “the Trapp” and made a speech to
the troops requesting the militia to volunteer a little longer as they had now some experience and as more confidence
could be placed in them than in raw troops; but where they were going or what particular service he desired them to
perform he did not at that time disclose. In accordance with this request of General Armstrong this applicant remained
in the service although the term for which he had originally entered the said service had then expired or was about
expiring, and he then was marched to Germantown & was in the battle at that place as before stated.
The Pennsylvania Gazette, September 25, 1776:
Philadelphia Barracks, Sept. 23, 1776. DESERTED,
last night, from Captain HOLMES company of MUST READ!
militia , of the first battalion, of Cumberland county, Thomas J McGuire,
a certain JAMES COLE, about 21 years of age, fair The Philadelphia
hair, about 5 feet 8 inches high, is slim made, a good Campaign (2 vols.)
looking lad; had on a hunting shirt and leggings, of a
light lye colour, a striped jacket, good shoes, a small Moccasins on 1776 campaign!
brimmed hat. Whoever takes up said deserter, and
secures him in any goal, so that he may be delivered James Galloway
to his company , now on their way to camp, shall
have FOUR DOLLARS reward. ANDREW
HOLMES , Captain. In the year 1776 he lived with his father near the
mouth of Auchwick on the Juniata river in
Cumberland County state of Pennsylvania, and
John Torrence about the latter part of harvest in the mnth of July
in said year, while reaping his father’s grain, and
In the month of August in the year 1777 he was being leader of about thirty hands, Capt James
drafted as a Malisha man two months under Adams, Captain of the company of militia to
Captain Eskew, he does not remember the which he belonged, came into the field to procure
name of the Lieutenant. He then lived in the volunteers to go against the British, and this
County of Cumberland in the State of deponent told him that he would go after he had
Pennsylvania, the Company he thinks was
finished reaping the [row] he was then at; Adams
attached to a regiment of malitia under the
asked for his sickle, which deponent gave him and
command of Colonel Dunlap as well as he can
now remember, they marched from Shippins went home, and made two pair of moccasins the
burgh, through Carlisle and Lancaster to same day, and other preparations for the tour, and
Marcus Hook where we staid some time, & marched next day for Carlisle the place of
whilst there General Washington march’d his rendezvous, from which he marched in Capt John
army through that place, to meet the British McHattons company, James Adams & Thomas
that had landed at the head of Elk, and some Brown Lieutenants, and Marshall Stanley Ensign.
short time after he fought the battle of That he served three months in the service of the
Brandywine at which time the regiment was United States in the company aforesaid in Col
attached to the command of General Potter who Watts Regiment. From Carlisle he marched with
commanded the Malitia Brigade which were his company, crossing the Susquehanna river about
down the creek to the left of the army during 2 miles below Harris’s Ferry, passing through
the engagement but was not brought into the Lancaster, Downings Town and Philadelphia,
engagement. The Army marched that Nite to
where we took water to Trenton in New Jersey,
Chester, and the next morning toward
thence to Princeton & New Brunswick to Amboy;
Philadelphia, and on arriving at Philadelphia, he
took sick, and was in consequence thereof sent at which place we lay when the Battle of Long
home his time being nearly out. Island began. . .
FOR THE LADIES:
The women in this country attach very little short, she will give you in a single day the same
importance to a thousand petty things which in provocations which one of our women could not
France our women make us pass as the greatest do, without being thought too free, after a month’s
favors, which we regard as so much more acquaintance. You are often no further advanced
decisive from the fact that they rarely fail of with them for all that. It all vanishes like a
being crowned with success. Here a woman will dream, and they are laughing with you; at least
kiss you all day; will do a thousand foolish things that is what has happened to me.
with you—crush your foot, make your arm black
and blue by dint of pinching you while walking From: Letters of a French Officer, Written
with you, and will give you a couple of slaps; in at Easton, Penna., in 1777-1778.

“very lusty made”
The Pennsylvania Gazette, April 30, 1777:
EIGHT DOLLARS Reward. RUN away from
the subscriber, living in Evesham township, in
the State of New Jersey, Burlington county, on
the 20th of April, 1777, a certain SARAH
McGEE, Irish descent, born in Philadelphia;
she is about 23 years of age, about 5 feet 7 inches
high, and very lusty made in proportion; she had
on, when she went away, a snuff coloured
worsted long gown, a spotted calicoe petticoat,
stays and a good white apron, a snuff coloured
cloak, faced with snuff coloured shaloon, a black
silk bonnet, with a ribbon round the crown: She
was seen with her mother, in Philadelphia, who
lives in Shippen street, where it is supposed she
is concealed. Whoever takes up said servant and
brings her to her master, or puts her in
confinement, so that her master gets her again,
shall have the above reward, and reasonable
charges, paid by BARZILLAI COAT.
N.B. She has a cross on her right arm, put in
with gun powder, and the two first letters of her
name and the date of the year.
Quote Courtesy of A. Gutchess

Image Courtesy of Gerry Embleton
!

MY LIBERTY I’LL HAVE OR DEATH Looking Ahead

2010 Calendar
September 24-26, 2010
Brandywine March and Event
www.philadelphiacampaign.org

October ??, 2010
Somerset living history weekend

November 6-8, 2010
Wellbourne Farm, Virginia
www.welbourne2010.60thrar.org

December ??, 2010
Return to Landis Valley

The Buck ‘n Ball
c/o Alan Kraus