You are on page 1of 40

CS 154: Networks I

Set 3 ­ Network 
Classifications / Types
What is a network?
It is the concept of connecting 
computers and other devices to enable 
sharing of resources.

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 2
Shared Resources
Computers that are part of a network can 
share:
 Data

 Messages

 Application software

 Hardware resources

 Peripherals

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 3
Application Software
The network:
 can be used to standardize software 

applications used by users
 help ensure that all users use the same 

software
 makes support easier

 makes version control easier

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 4
Online Communication
 users can communicate through online 
messaging systems

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 5
Decentralization
Networking allows decentralization of:
 resources

 data processing

 computers

 hardware

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 6
Network Components
 Server
 Client
 Medium (e.g. cable)
 Hardware resources 
(or peripheral 
devices)

printers, 
modems, 
external hard 
disk drives
SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 7
Network Classification
Based on distances or space, networks 
can be classified as one of three types:
 LAN ­ local area network
 MAN ­ metropolitan area network
 WAN ­ wide area network

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 8
Local Area Network (LAN)
 Covers a relatively small geographical 
region
 Higher bandwidth and less error­prone
 Privately­owned communication line
 Examples:

Ateneo has a Campus LAN

The Faura Network is a LAN

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 9
Wide Area Network (WAN)
 Covers a relatively wider geographical region
 Smaller bandwidth and more error­prone
 Third party provides communication channel
 Example:

The Ateneo WAN connects its Loyola and Makati 
Campus

The San Miguel WAN connects its different 
distribution sites and warehouses nationwide

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 10
Metropolitan Area Network
 Middle ground of LAN and WAN
 Used for city area networks
 There are a number fiber networks in 
Manila (Ortigas­Makati CBD):

Fibercity / Philcom

Globe

PLDT

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 11
Technology Snapshot
ATM
Bandwidth (Mbps)

Fast
Ethernet FDDI

Ethernet,  MAN & SMDS Frame Relay


Token Ring

ISDN BRI
Distance

LAN MAN WAN


Copied from Emerging Communication Technologies, 2e, Uyless Black
SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 12
Technology Snapshot
 GigE – Gigabit Ethernet (1 Gbps)
 ATM – Asynchronous Transfer Mode 
(622 Mbps)
 FDDI – Fiber Distributed Data Interface 
(100 Mbps)
 ISDN BRI – Integrated Services Digital 
Network basic rate interface (144 kbps)
SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 13
Network Classification
(Node­Based)

 Server­Based
 Peer­to­Peer

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 14
Peer­to­Peer
 no dedicated server
 no hierarchy ­ all computers function as 
both client and server
 also called a workgroup
      Examples:
Windows for Workgroups
Windows NT
Windows 95
SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 15
Peer­to­Peer
 simple and inexpensive
 requires all users to be their own 
administrators

plan their own security

determine which data and resources to 
share
 for small number of users (<= 10)

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 16
Server­Based
 dedicated servers
 > 10 users

can process large volume of requests  and 
provide data security
 presence of Network Administrator
 there can be more than 1 server depending 
on need (Multiple Server Environment)

each server can handle a specific task, i.e. 
specialized servers

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 17
Server­Based
Advantages:
 allows for easy back­up

 provides redundancy systems as data 

can be replicated on multiple servers

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 18
Combination Network
 combines peer­to­peer and server­
based
 2 kinds of OS work together to 
provide the complete networking 
solution
Example:

Unix/Linux/MS Windows NT/2000 Server to allow sharing of 
files/printers (“server­based”) services and applications

Windows 95/98/ME users can still share data using peer­to­peer 
networking 

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 19
Combination Network

Possible Issues/Disadvantages:
 Requires extensive planning


Increased complexity

Security issues
 Requires user training

Same peer­to­peer network issues

Which resources are located where?

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 20
Network Classification
Topology­based:
 Different layouts for different needs

 Topology determines the types and 

arrangement of computers, cables and 
other devices
 Topology also determines the 

communication method used
 Can be both physical and logical

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 21
Topologies
 Bus

 Star

 Ring

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 22
Bus Topology
 cable is called the trunk or backbone or 
the segment


process

addressing

terminator 
   

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 23
Bus Topology
Advantages:
 Easy to implement and extend

 Quick to setup

 Typically the cheapest topology to 

implement
 Failure of one station does not affect 

others
SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 24
Bus Topology
Disadvantages:
 Difficult to administer and troubleshoot

 Limited cable length and number of 

stations
 A cable break can disable the entire 

network
 Performance degrades as additional 

computers are added
SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 25
Star Topology
 all computers on the network are 
connected to a centralized component 
called the hub.

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 26
Star Topology

Advantages:
 centralized management

 more resistant to fault as failure of one 

PC and/or cable does not affect the 
whole network

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 27
Star Topology
Disadvantages:
 large amount of cabling required


all workstations have to directly connect to the 
hub
 failure of hub = failure of network

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 28
Ring Topology
 all nodes (eg. computers) connected 
on a single ring of cable
 no terminated ends
 active topology as each node      
boosts signal before                 sending 
it to next node
 operation: data travels in               one 
direction addressing 

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 29
Ring Topology
Advantage:
 Active topology

 Good for Real­time applications

Disadvantage:
 failure of any node affects the entire 

network (because the data signal 
passes through each node)

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 30
Hybrid Topology
 combination of bus, star and ring
 for large networks

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 31
Star­Bus Topology
 several star networks are linked using 
linear bus trunks                             
(connect hubs together)

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 32
Star­Ring Topology
 also known as star wired topology
 hubs of multiple star topologies are 
connected in a star pattern to a central 
hub

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 33
Topology Examples
 10baseT Ethernet

Physically star

Logically bus
 10base2 Ethernet

Physically and logically bus
 ARCNet Token Ring

Physically star

Logically ring
SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 34
Networking: Why?
 Sharing of resources and cost 
reduction
 Data and info transfer, exchange, 
and sharing
 Electronic mail (email) and 
communication
 Etc, etc.
SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 35
Networking: Issues
 Interoperability
 Integrated services

Voice, video, data

Value­added services
 Higher bandwidth requirement
 Network management tools

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 36
Interconnectivity
Images

LAN
Data Voice

Backbone / WAN

Video Video

LAN LAN
Data Voice
Images Data

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 37
Integrated Services

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 38
Network Management

SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 39
Goals of Emerging Technologies
 Support for integrated services 
(multiple application)
 High capacity networks

Higher throughput and faster network 
operations
 Internetworking, interoperability 
(multiple vendors)
 Better network management tools
SY 2004­2005 CS 154 ­ Networks I       (Set 3) 40