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English for Pharmacy Writing


and Oral Communication
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English for Pharmacy Writing


and Oral Communication

Miriam Daz-Gilbert
Assistant Director, Writing Center
Lecturer of English, Humanities Department
University of Sciences in Philadelphia
Philadelphia, PA
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Acquisitions Editor: John Goucher


Managing Editor: Andrea M. Klingler
Marketing Manager: Christen D. Murphy
Creative Director: Doug Smock
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Copyright 2009 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a Wolters Kluwer business.

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DISCLAIMER

Care has been taken to confirm the accuracy of the information present and to describe generally accepted practices. How-
ever, the authors, editors, and publisher are not responsible for errors or omissions or for any consequences from application of
the information in this book and make no warranty, expressed or implied, with respect to the currency, completeness, or accu-
racy of the contents of the publication. Application of this information in a particular situation remains the professional respon-
sibility of the practitioner; the clinical treatments described and recommended may not be considered absolute and universal
recommendations.
The authors, editors, and publisher have exerted every effort to ensure that drug selection and dosage set forth in this text
are in accordance with the current recommendations and practice at the time of publication. However, in view of ongoing
research, changes in government regulations, and the constant flow of information relating to drug therapy and drug reactions,
the reader is urged to check the package insert for each drug for any change in indications and dosage and for added warnings
and precautions. This is particularly important when the recommended agent is a new or infrequently employed drug.
Some drugs and medical devices presented in this publication have Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for lim-
ited use in restricted research settings. It is the responsibility of the health care provider to ascertain the FDA status of each drug
or device planned for use in their clinical practice.

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I dedicate this book to all of the pharmacy students, pharmacy technicians,


and practicing pharmacists I have had the great pleasure of teaching and
learning from, and to the future pharmacy professionals I will teach. They
are the true inspiration for my writing this much-needed book. May they
learn from it in good health. I also dedicate this book to my loving family
for their everlasting support and lovemy husband Jonathan, my
daughter Jonna, and my son Sebastian. I love you!
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Preface

English for Pharmacy Writing and Oral Communication is a language skills textbook that incorporates
pharmacy and medical language and knowledge. The textbook is intended for pharmacy students,
pharmacy technicians, and practicing pharmacists whose first or best language is not English. The book
integrates vocabulary, pronunciation, listening, reading, and writing skills, along with idiomatic lan-
guage. English for Pharmacy Writing and Oral Communication has been written with the following goals
in mind: (i) to serve the English language needs of students and professionals studying and practicing
pharmacy; (ii) to assist pharmacy faculty, who teach pharmacy, and pharmacy technician students,
whose first or best language is not English, with their pharmacy language learning needs; (iii) to help
pharmacy students, pharmacy technicians, and practicing pharmacists develop and gain communica-
tion confidence; and (iv) to help those for whom English is not their first or best language to master a
solid foundation of pharmacy-related language dedicated to patient communication and care.

Organizational Philosophy
Effective and acceptable writing and oral communication skills are essential to success. In pharmacy, lack
of good communication skills can lead to misspellings of words and drug names, medication errors, and
much more. For pharmacy students, pharmacy technicians, and practicing pharmacists whose first or
best language is not English, assessing patients, counseling patients, and documenting subjective infor-
mation from patients who sometimes use idiomatic expressions can be challenging. Assessing, counsel-
ing, and documenting require a good command of spoken and written language and acceptable
pronunciation and listening comprehension skills, as well as a solid knowledge of pharmacy-related
language dedicated to patient communication and care.
English for Pharmacy Writing and Oral Communication is written with the learner in mind. The
language and learning activities are presented in a straightforward, meaningful, purposeful, and engag-
ing manner. The textbook and accompanying audio files found on thePoint (thePoint.lww.com/diaz-
gilbert) will help prepare students to enter their pharmacy education and the profession with the
communication skills, knowledge, and confidence essential to function effectively in the pharmacy
health care setting.

Chapter Organization
The design of each chapter provides students opportunities to acquire new medical and pharmacy-
related language, to practice and reinforce new skills in an interactive and engaging manner, to retain
these new language skills and knowledge, and to then reinforce them in subsequent chapters. Each
chapter is dedicated to a body system and contains meaningful and purposeful medical and pharmacy-
related language related to that body system.
Chapters 1 through 12 are organized similarly. Each chapter begins with a Pre-Assessment sec-
tion containing true/false and multiple choice questions to gauge the students existing knowledge
of language related to that body system, medical conditions, and general medical and pharmacy-
related language. The Post-Assessment section at the end of each chapter contains true/false and
multiple choice questions and listening comprehension dialogues followed by multiple choice ques-
tions to gauge the learners thorough understanding of the chapters content and his or her listening
comprehension skills.

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viii Preface

The first half of each chapter is devoted to the following written language skills and exercises:
Medical VocabularyIn this section, students are presented with medical vocabulary related to the
chapter body system.
Parts of SpeechIn this section, students will learn, develop, enhance, and demonstrate their
knowledge of the English parts of speech and word forms using sentences related to the chapter
body system.
Typical Medical Conditions and Patient ComplaintsIn this section, students will learn, develop,
enhance, and demonstrate their knowledge of the English parts of speech and word forms using sen-
tences related to typical medical conditions and patient complaints related to the chapter body system.
Medical Vocabulary ComprehensionIn this section, students will demonstrate their under-
standing and comprehension of the content presented in the Parts of Speech and Word Forms sec-
tion and in the Typical Medical Conditions and Patient Complaints section by answering true/false
multiple choice questions.
Writing ExerciseIn this section, students will demonstrate their comprehension and their abil-
ity to write about designated medical conditions and diseases presented in the chapter.
These sections will help students to learn, read, recognize, and retain language found in written med-
ical and pharmacy-related language in the context of the body system, medical conditions, and patient
complaints. The student will also practice his or her reading comprehension, writing, and spelling skills
by completing the various exercises.
The second half of each chapter is devoted to the following aural, oral, and pronunciation skills and
exercises:
Listening and PronunciationIn this section, students will listen to the audio files found on the-
Point (thePoint.lww.com/diaz-gilbert) for correct pronunciation of the medical vocabulary pre-
sented in the Medical Vocabulary section and will practice the pronunciation of the provided terms.
Listening/SpellingIn this section, students will listen to dictated sentences in the audio files
found on thePoint (thePoint.lww.com/diaz-gilbert) related to the chapter, and then write down
what they hear. Students will integrate their listening and writing skills and practice and demon-
strate their ability to write what they hear.
Pharmacist/Patient DialoguesIn this section, students will listen to authentic dialogues in the
audio files found on thePoint (thePoint.lww.com/diaz-gilbert) typically found during pharmacist/
patient communication in a pharmacy and other pharmacy-related health care settings. The dia-
logues integrate the content from the chapter with authentic patient medical conditions and dis-
orders, prescriptions, side effects, and general patient counseling. Students will practice listening to
authentic spoken communication between a pharmacist and patients and then demonstrate their
comprehension skills by answering a series of multiple choice questions.
Idiomatic ExpressionsIn this section, students will learn idioms that contain body parts vocab-
ulary. They will learn the meaning of the idioms and listen to mini-dialogues in the audio files
found on thePoint (thePoint.lww.com/diaz-gilbert) that contain the idiom. The students will then
demonstrate their comprehension through a short multiple choice exercise.
These activities will help students to learn, recognize, aurally and orally comprehend, write, and pro-
nounce language commonly encountered in pharmacy and medical settings and in pharmacist/patient
communication. Each chapter also contains a sidebar of English sounds that are difficult for speakers
of other languages to pronounce.
Chapter 13 consists of a Pre-Assessment section containing true/false and multiple choice ques-
tions that gauge the students knowledge of pharmacy documentation vocabulary, medical and phar-
macy abbreviations, and pharmacy documentation forms. The Post-Assessment section contains
true/false and multiple choice questions to gauge the learners comprehension of that chapters con-
tent. The chapter is devoted to the following written pharmacy documentation skills and exercises:
Pharmacy Documentation VocabularyIn this section, students are presented with key vocab-
ulary related to written pharmacy documentation.
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Preface ix

Pharmacy Documentation Vocabulary and AbbreviationsIn this section, students are pre-
sented with abbreviations related to medical and pharmacy documentation. The students will prac-
tice and demonstrate their ability to recognize pharmacy documentation language and abbreviations
through fill-in-the-blank and multiple choice exercises.
Pharmacy and Medical Abbreviations ExercisesIn this section, students will practice and
demonstrate their ability to read written documentation in the form of short passages and provide
abbreviations for designated vocabulary words from the passages.
Abbreviations Writing ExercisesIn this section, students will put into practice their ability to
comprehend abbreviations by rewriting abbreviated sentences into complete sentences.
Pharmacy Documentation Abbreviations ComprehensionIn this section, students will
demonstrate comprehension of written pharmacy documentation and abbreviations presented in
the chapter by answering multiple choice and true/false questions.
Pharmacy Documentation and Standardized Patient FormsIn this section, students will be
introduced to the SOAP note and the Patient History and Physical Database models of patient phar-
macy documentation. Students will be introduced to a patient scenario and will practice complet-
ing a SOAP note and a Patient History and Physical Database to demonstrate their comprehension.
Pharmacy Documentation Forms ComprehensionIn this section, students will demonstrate
their understanding of the patient scenarios documentation and abbreviations in the patient sce-
nario by answering true/false and multiple choice questions.
These sections will help students to read, recognize, and write patient pharmacy documentation and
abbreviations, and to successfully complete a SOAP note and the Patient History and Physical Database.
Students will practice and enhance their written pharmacy documentation skills.

Using the Textbook and the Website


English for Pharmacy Writing and Oral Communication and the accompanying website have been
designed to meet, develop, and enhance the English language needs of pharmacy students and profes-
sionals whose first or best language is not English. It can be used as a supplement in a pharmacy com-
munication class, as a textbook in ESL classes composed of pharmacy technician students and pharmacy
students, and as a self-taught textbook for practicing pharmacy technicians and practicing pharmacists
who cannot be in a classroom setting but who are able to use the textbook and website at their own
pace and in the comfort of their home, the workplace, or school. The website can be accessed at
thePoint.lww.com/diaz-gilbert.

For Instructors and Students


English for Pharmacy Writing and Oral Communication contains several appendices to further aid learn-
ing. The online Answer Key provides the answers to the exercises in each chapter (available at
thePoint.lww.com/diaz-gilbert). Students and instructors can quickly check answers as soon as they
complete an exercise and monitor their progress. Appendix A contains all the scripts from the pharma-
cist/patient dialogues and the mini-dialogues that are on the accompanying website. Students and
instructors can quickly refer to the scripts for further practice or for clarification. Appendix B contains
a sample Pharmacotherapy Patient Work-Up, which students and instructors will find a useful addi-
tional source of patient pharmacy documentation.
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Acknowledgments

I would like to thank the reviewers of my book proposal and my manuscript. Their fabulous reviews,
positive feedback, and support kept me energized as I wrote each chapter. I cant express my gratitude
enough to my Managing Editor, Karen Ruppert. I could not have done it without her support and
enthusiasm for each chapter. We laughed out loud a lot through our e-mail exchanges. I would also like
to thank David Troy, Senior Acquisitions Editor, and Barrett Kroger, Acquisitions Editor, for their
enthusiasm and support through the writing of the manuscript. A great big thanks to Andrea Klingler,
Managing Editor, Michael Marino, Managing Editor-Ancillaries, Ed Schultes, Jr. and Freddie Patane
from Media Services at Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Michael Licisyn, and to voice over artists
Michael Yurcaba, Deneane Richburg and Karen Ballerini for their enthusiastic participation in the suc-
cess of my book. And to Rasika Mathur, for assisting me with marathon proofing.
Finally, I want to thank my student staff and tutoring staff in the writing center for their sup-
port, for being excited for me, for putting up with my kookiness, and for patiently listening to my
dialogue ideas. They are Jenny, Melanie, Gayana, Sneha, Alice, Tonia, Jamie, Judi, Norma, Michelle,
and Mary Ellen.

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Reviewers

Rachel Abrishami, PharmD Beverly Hawkins, CPhT


USC/Ralphs Community Pharmacy Resident Lab Instructor
University of Southern California AH/Pharm Tech
Compton, CA Chattanooga State Community College
Chattanooga, TN
Linda Albrecht, RPh, MBA
Instructor and Externship Coordinator Karl Hess, PharmD
Richland College, UT Austin Community Pharmacy Practice Resident
Arlington, TX University of Southern California
Los Angles, CA
Jennifer Borowski, PharmD
Assistant Professor Scott Higgins, MA
Long Island University and Bronx East Technology Education College
Montefiore Medical Center Columbus, OH
Bronx, NY
Doris C. Kalamut, RPh, BScPhm
Coordinator in Professional Practice
Tracy Call-Schmidt, MSN, FNP University of Toronto
Assistant Professor Toronto, Ontario
University of Utah
Salt Lake City, UT Candace Smith, PharmD
Associate Clinical Professor
Shelley Chambers-Fox, PhD Clinical Pharmacy Practice Department
Associate Professor St. Johns University
Washington State University College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions
Pullman, WA Queens, NY

Patricia Darbishire, PharmD Kristy J. Spetz, PharmD


Purdue University Concord Pharmacy
Lafayette, IN Glen Mills, PA

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Contents

Preface vii
Acknowledgments xi
Reviewers xiii

Chapter 1: Skin, Hair, and Nails 1

Chapter 2: Ears and Eyes 25

Chapter 3: Mouth and Nose 51

Chapter 4: Endocrine and Lymphatic System 77

Chapter 5: Chest, Lung, and Respiratory System 103

Chapter 6: Heart and Cardiovascular System 129

Chapter 7: The Abdomen and Gastrointestinal System 155

Chapter 8: The Musculoskeletal System 181

Chapter 9: Neurologic System and Mental Health 207

Chapter 10: The Urinary System 231

Chapter 11: Hepatic System 253

Chapter 12: Reproductive System 275

Chapter 13: Writing Pharmacy Documentation 301

Appendix A: Dialogues 333

Appendix B: Pharmacotherapy Workup Notes 393

Index 401

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English for Pharmacy Writing


and Oral Communication
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