STATEMENT ON THE CLOSURE OF COFFEE FACTORIES IN

GREATER MASAKA SUB-REGION

MINISTERIAL STATEMENT PRESENTED TO PARLIAMENT OF
UGANDA ON THE CLOSURE OF COFFEE FACTORIES IN
GREATER MASAKA SUB REGION

BY

VINCENT BAMULANGAKI SSEMPIJJA (HON)

MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, ANIMAL INDUSTRY AND
FISHERIES

27TH JULY 2017

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1.0 Introduction

Rt. Hon. Speaker and colleagues this statement is in response to the
concern raised by Hon.Deogratius Kiyingi MP Bukomansimbi South
County on 22/06/17 and his concern was “why Uganda Coffee
Development Authority has closed coffee factories for over two
months now rendering coffee farmers helpless because the closure has
seriously hampered their livelihood and they are therefore unable to
meet basic needs in addition to supporting their families”.

2.0 The Issue

Rt. Hon. Speaker, two months ago, Ministry of Agriculture, through
Uganda Coffee Development Authority (UCDA) did temporarily close
coffee factories in Kinoni, Masaka, Lwengo, Sembabule, Rakai, Kalungu
and Bukomasimbi over poor quality coffee due to poor post-harvest
handling practices.Despite several warnings by UCDA on the
deteriorating quality of coffee produced in the region, the coffee
processors failed to adhere to the standards put in place. Some of the
most harmful coffee harvesting practices included but not limited to the
following;
 Possession of immature coffee cherry (found being dried at the
factories)
 Processing of wet kiboko coffee which had not attained
recommended Moisture content of 13-14%
 Heaping of wet coffee before drying which may lead to mould
growth
 Drying of coffee on bare ground
 Hulling coffee sub-standard equipment
 Processing and marketing coffee in unhygienic conditions
 Drying of FAQ at coffee factories
 Non-compliance to the recommended factory structural guidelines
The above practices if not stopped pose a serious danger to Uganda
coffee competitiveness on global market and health of Ugandans and
consumers abroad. Therefore, after exhausting all other avenues of
stopping the above malpractices, UCDA, using the powers as stated in

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Coffee Act 1994 regulations, moved in to seal off the processing factories
so as to enforce coffee quality standards.

3.0 Background

Rt. Hon. Speaker, Coffee as a cash crop was introduced in Uganda
earlier in the twentieth century, and expanded considerably in the 1950s
and 1960s. Government of Uganda’s liberalisation Policy brought a
number of positive changes to the coffee sector.
The Coffee Sector experienced a boom during the mid-1990s. As a result,
many players came into the coffee sector and stimulated prices at farm
gate level, whereby a Ugandan coffee farmer now gets about 70% of the
international market price level. A number of more processing plants
close to farmers were established, as the total production volume
increased.
However, since the coffee liberalization in 1991, the performance of
Uganda's coffee industry has been declining, mainly due to the impact
of Coffee Wilt Disease (CWD) that wiped out over 50 percent of the
Robusta coffee tree population. Most existing analysis sees the sector's
problems as; quality deterioration, a poor marketing position in the
global market, a challenging regulatory framework, and poor
infrastructure.
Consequently, due to stiff competition and more often due to
unscrupulous elements operating at various levels of the coffee value
chain, coffee quality malpractices have also increased. This is a danger to
our coffee industry both internally and at international level.
In 1991, UCDA was established by an Act of Parliament. This was
followed by the by the 1994 Coffee Regulations, that mandates UCDA to
undertake the following:
a. Register all coffee stakeholders undertaking coffee buying,
processing, marketing and exporting of coffee;
b. Regulating the storing, handling, processing, sale and export of
coffee and the grading, packing and marketing of coffee;
c. Set quality control standards under which coffee is handed,
processed and marketed;
d. Issue certificates in respect to grade and quantity of coffee;
e. Prescribing the manner in which quality and quantity incentive
schemes and any other schemes shall be operated

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Currently, Uganda is ranked as the 8th coffee producer in the World
having declined from the 3rd position in 1995 as the largest coffee
producer in the world and having been overtaken by Vietnam,
Honduras, Indonesia.
Whereas Uganda lost ground as indicated above, the policy of
liberalization brought positive coffee market changes to the coffee
industry. For example, many players came into the coffee sector and
stimulated prices at farm gate level whereby a Ugandan coffee farmer
now gets about 70-75% of the international market price level. This is
positive and has created vibrancy in the coffee industry.
However, due to stiff competition and more often due to unscrupulous
elements operating at various levels of the coffee value chain, coffee
quality malpractices have also increased. This is a danger to our coffee
industry both internally and at international level. We do not want to
face the danger of the international community rejecting Uganda coffee
as it did to fish a few years ago.
Since the year 2014, the Government of Uganda intensified its campaign
to improve household incomes, using coffee as one of the main pillars in
this campaign. As a result of increased Government support to the
coffee sub-sector, coffee seedlings planting has increased from the
previous 20 million seedlings per annum to the current 200 million
seedlings per annum, the effect of climate change that often impact on
survival rates notwithstanding. The targeted planting level is 300 million
seedlings per year up to 2018/19 coffee year.

The 2020 coffee roadmap, whose target is to produce 20 million 60-kilo
bags by the year 2025 - 2030 was recently launched by his Excellency
President Yoweri Kaguta Museveni. Through my MAAIF and the
Agency responsible for coffee, we plan to continue planting high
yielding and disease tolerant coffee varieties in addition to improving
coffee productivity per tree by ensuring that Good Agricultural Practices
(GAPs) are undertaken by the coffee farming communities. Proper tree
management, improved post-harvest practices including hygiene and
phyto-sanitary sanitary conditions shall go a long way to having
Uganda coffee regain its premium quality Number 1 position at the
global scene.

In order to favourably position in the global competition, Uganda needs
to export high grade premium coffee and also enter specialty markets by
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adding value through certification schemes that give premiums for good
quality Uganda coffee.

Rt. Hon. Speaker, allow me to show a comparison of Uganda coffee and
Vietnam, two countries that are geographically similar and grow
Robusta coffee.

As you can clearly see from the Vietnamese experience, implementing
the 2020 coffee roadmap is achievable, but requires unwavering support
from all stakeholders, including Members of Parliament.

4.0 Events leading to closure of Coffee Processing Factories in Great
Masaka Region

1. Rt. Hon. Speaker, in September 2011, His Excellency President
Museveni issued a directive to arrest farmers spoiling coffee and
arrest traders who buy wet coffee, guiding that this negatively affects
coffee quality and compromises incomes to farmers and the nation.

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2. On 11 September 2011, the Inspector General of Police also issued a
directive to all Regional Police Commanders and all
District/Divisional Police Commanders, instructing them to:
(i) Stop the harvesting and marketing of immature coffee (green
beans)
(ii) Stop the drying of coffee beans on bare ground
(iii) Stop the drying of FAQ (Kasse) in the sun
(iv) Stop coffee processing factories that do not have husk collection
chambers
(v) Ensure that dealers in coffee have valid licenses
(vi) Prosecute whoever does not comply with the Coffee Regulations
1994
3. MAAIF through UCDA communicated the above directives
together with its guidelines to all coffee value chain stakeholders
using radio programmes, Guidelines Charts, Print media and
training sessions.
4. In 2014,MAAIF was functionalised by an Agricultural Police Unit
in an effort to beef up standards and regulations enforcement.
5. Since 2011, there has been a series of meetings with coffee farmers,
buyers and coffee processors in addition to sensitizations through
the media, especially through radio, print media and the UCDA
technical extension services. Refer to Annexes 4, 5 and 6 hereby
attached.

5.0 Implementation Approach

Rt. Hon. Speaker and Honourable members, during every coffee
harvesting season we intensify coffee quality and regulatory
enforcement operations. This season, we first started in Masaka region
because it is the main harvesting season in the area. For quite some time,
we have witnessed deteriorating standards in handling coffee in this sub
region region. From Masaka, the exercise will continue to Busoga,
Luwero, Mubende as the harvest season proceeds in these sub regions.
We will continue to sensitize the stakeholders especially the farmers,
traders and coffee factory processors to appreciate the benefits of good
post-harvest handling, good quality coffee etc. We will only close the
factories, when all other avenues have been exhausted.

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6.0 Impacts of UCDA’s interventions measures and responsiveness
by the different areas/Districts

Rt. Hon. Speaker, the overall the outcome has been positive as over 80%
of coffee is now being dried on tarpaulins rather than on bare ground as
was the case and moisture content on coffee being processed in coffee
factories has improved to 13-15%. The coffee quality has improved and
consequently farmers have started getting better prices for their dried
coffee rather than wet coffee which fetches lower prices.
In most districts in South Western Region, particularly Bushenyi,
Sheema and Ibanda and in Eastern Region particularly in Mounta Egon
districts of Mbale, Bulambuli and Sironko, good harvesting and drying
practices is notably high, due to the compliance to the coffee regulations.
Most of the coffee cherry is harvested when red ripe and dried on
tarpaulins and clean local mats. I therefore thank those districts who
have done well and encourage them to maintain high quality standards

7.0 Steps taken by UCDA since closure of factories
Before undertaking the quality control campaign in the Greater Masaka
districts, about 80% of the coffee was being harvested while still
immature (green beans); dried on bare ground and sun drying of
processed coffee (FAQ/kasse/clean) was a common sight at processing
factories. The reverse is currently happening and coffee quality and
price has greatly improved. Phyto-sanitary conditions and hygiene at
buying stores and factories has also improved. This improvement has
been attained through UCDA undertaking the following:

a) Issuing out Press Releases to sensitize affected stakeholders and
the general public on importance of maintaining good coffee
quality standards
b) Holding meetings with affected stakeholders to sensitize and
resolve the issues
c) Disseminating sensitization messages on Radio Buddu, News Print
in The New Vision, The Monitor Newspapers and (Bukedde and
NBS TV Stations
d) Increasing outreach and monitoring visits to malpractice prone
areas
e) Re-assessment of progress made by affected stakeholders and
unsealing/opening up all the factories that made progress in
fulfilling the required standards and coffee regulations 1994. This

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exercise will continue in all affected districts in the Masaka zone
and will spread to all districts in the country.
f) Reviewing the coffee factory infrastructure and machinery
standards and guidelines to guide stakeholders’ compliance to
coffee quality standards and The Coffee Regulations, 1994.

Rt. Hon. Speaker and Honourable Members, allow me to mention that
before any coffee stakeholder is closed/sealed, the UCDA Inspector
would have checked and ascertained that, the affected stakeholder has
not complied with:
 The registration and licencing requirement
 The coffee being harvested not ready (immature)
 Hygiene and Phyto-santary conditions for good storage and/or
processing of coffee
 Recommended machinery for processing coffee

In the event that the stakeholder does not comply with any of the above,
the stakeholder’s Registration is suspended by having the facility sealed
and is given a specified timeframe to rectify and put right the identified
anomaly,after which the seal may be removed upon ascertaining
compliance. In other words, opening up suspended and sealed
stakeholders depends on their readiness to comply with remedial
actions in respect to ensuring compliance to standards and regulations.
Even before I was requested to explain in Parliament, a number of
affected stakeholders that had complied had already been opened and
were fully in operation.

ANNEX 1, attached shows a pictorial of malpractices that were a cause
of the suspensions and also gives a list the affected stakeholders.

8.0 Way forward

Rt. Hon. Speaker, I want to assure Honourable members of Parliament
that this is a routine activity across the country and that all regions will
be reached. All this effort is done for the good of coffee stakeholders and
the nation.
I would like to inform Parliament that the campaign is heading to
Busoga, Luwero, Mubende as the harvest season proceeds to these sub
regions. We will continue to sensitize the farmers, traders and coffee
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factory processors in good post-harvest handling, and good coffee
quality standards to avoid further closure of the coffee factories and
buying stores.

9.0 Conclusion

Rt. Hon. Speaker, Honourable Members, the quality of Ugandan coffee
and our other products is the only way we can assure competitiveness of
our products on the global market. Therefore, the sealing of coffee
processing factories at Kinoni and other areas in Greater Masaka was
done in good faith to curb the deteriorating coffee quality and was in
line with the Coffee Regulations, 1994. We shall continue to dialogue
with the affected parties to see to it that they all play their key roles in
maintaining Uganda’s coffee quality and whenever issues of
malpractices are detected, they are resolved and processing plants are
reopened as quickly as possible. I therefore, submit this statement to you
together with the attached documents including; MAAIF/UCDA
Guidelines for Coffee Factories and pictorial evidences of malpractices
in coffee post-harvest handling in the Greater Masaka sub region.
I thank all Members of Parliament that showed concern during the
closure and the support and correct guidance given to affected factory
operators
Noting that demand for coffee worldwide is still high and increasing as
many young people take on the coffee drinking culture, it is important
that Uganda takes advantage of this opportunity and focuses on coffee
productivity and quality enhancement for maximum returns from the
coffee enterprise.

I beg to present.

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ANNEX 1
A: Pictorial illustration of Poor Coffee Processing Practices during
Taskforce operation in Kinoni and Greater Masaka Region

Poor coffee processing machines Poor coffee processing machines

Poor handling practices in coffee factories Poor handling practices in coffee factories

Poor coffee storage practices Poor coffee storage practices
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B: Pictorial illustration of poor coffee handling practices during
Taskforce operation in Kinoni and in Greater Masaka Region

Mouldy coffee on bare ground Immature coffee on bare ground

Mouldy coffee on bare ground Drying coffee on bare ground in Lwengo

Drying coffee on bare ground Wet coffee bagged

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C: Coffee factories complying with recommended coffee processing
practices in the Greater Masaka
Name of Coffee factory Location
Kibinge Coffee Farmers Kyabiri, Kibinge, Bukomansimbi, Bukomansimbi
Ngobe Coffee Farmers Kyamulibwa, Kalungu
Celebrate Hope Ministries Kabano, Kasasa S/C, Kakuuto, Kyotera

D: List of factories not licenced in the Greater Masaka
Name of Coffee factory Location
Lukaya, Lukaya T/C, Kalungu E,
Bemba Coffee Farmers
Kalungu
7 Factories belonging to:
a) Katongole Vicent/Mazima Bugaga, tel: 0700 363477
b) Haji Issah Lubega tel. 0752 345940
c) Ntale Nicholas, tel. 0774 723579 Matete, Matete, Mawogola,
d) Haji Muwonge owelukaya, tel. 0751 815376 Sembabule
e) Abudallah Muga
f) Serwadda
g) Semwogere Gonzaga/Kabogere 0750 926200
3 Factories Sanje, Kyotera
3 Factories Kiwangala, Lwengo
1 Factory Kikondo, Kalisizo, Kyotera
2 in Kyotera Town Council
2 Factories Mbirizi, Lwengo
2 Factories In Kyazanga, Lwengo

E: List of factories licenced but not compliant with Coffee Regulations
(1994) in the Greater Masaka
No. Non-compliance
Coffee factory Location
issues
1 Unsafe structure with
Mugerwa Misanvu, Kibinge, Bukomansimbi, Bukomansimbi poles eaten away by
ants
2 Poor hygiene with
Kuula Misanvu, Kibinge, Bukomansimbi, Bukomansimbi bats inside factory,
small husk chamber
3 No working space, to
Maleku Buyoga, Kibinge, Bukomansimbi, Bukomansimbi
small with no access
4 Incomplete floor,
Kyambogo Buyoga, Kibinge, Bukomansimbi, Bukomansimbi
unsafe electricity
5 Contaminated with
St Jude Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo
maize floor
6 Lareve Kalisizo, Kalisizo, Kyotera, Kyotera Poor hygiene always
7 Buwenda Kirumba, Mask Muni, Bukoto, Masaka Poor hygiene

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8 Drying kiboko at
Kakuuto Kakuto, Kakuto, Kakuto, Rakai
factory
9 Kamu Kamu Lukaya,Lukaya T/C, Kalungu E, Kalungu Poor hygiene
10 T.F Kilumba, Katwe Butego, Mask Muni, Masaka Poor hygiene
11 K.L.W Coffee Poor hygiene
Kilumba, Katwe Butego, Mask Muni, Masaka
Factory
12 Serwada Kilumba, Katwe Butego, Mask Muni, Masaka Poor hygiene
13 Bukenya Lukaya,Lukaya T/C, Kalungu E, Kalungu Poor hygiene
14 Kyabakuza Young Poor hygiene
Kyabakuza, Kyabakuza, Mask Muni, Masaka
Coffee
15 Bijanda Kyabakuza, Kyabakuza, Mask Muni, Masaka Poor hygiene
16 Drying kiboko at
Muwonge Family Lukaya,Lukaya T/C, Kalungu E, Kalungu
factory
17 Agaba Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo Poor hygiene
18 Keera John Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo Poor hygiene
19 Kyabeene Lukaya,Lukaya T/C, Kalungu E, Kalungu Poor hygiene
20 Incomplete structure
Sensiko Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo and limited space for
operation
21 Gwenange Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo Lacking hygiene
22 Kaboyo Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo Lacking hygiene
23 Incomplete and
Bbaale Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo
limited space
24 Lwamatengo Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo Lacking hygiene
25 Limited working
Jb & Bonus Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo
space
26 Amazima Leakig husk chamber
Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo
Bwebugaga
27 Nyanzi Kamulu Poor hygiene
Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo
Juma
28 Manyi Gamukama Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo Incomplete structure
29 Bivamuntuyo Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo Incomplete structure
30 Kiyemba Kamalu Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo Poor hygiene
31 Batulabudde Incomplete floors esp
Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo
Coffee Processing veerandah
32 Yagaliza Muno Kaboyo, Kinoni T/B, Bukoto, Lwengo Incomplete floor
33 Drying of kiboko at
Bemba Bigasa, Bigasa, Bukomansimbi, Bukomansimbi
factory
34 Bukomansimbi, Bukomanimbi T/C, Lacking hygiene
Kitaasa
Bukomansimbi
35 Bukomansimbi, Bukomanimbi T/C, Lacking hygiene
Wakko
Bukomansimbi
36 Bukomansimbi, Bukomanimbi T/C, Lacking hygiene
Bbuye
Bukomansimbi
37 Bukomansimbi, Bukomanimbi T/C, Lacking hygiene
Musoke
Bukomansimbi
38 Kyabazinga Bukomansimbi, Bukomanimbi T/C, Incomplete structure,
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Bukomansimbi unplastered walls
39 Bukomansimbi, Bukomanimbi T/C, Extremely poor
Mutala Alali
Bukomansimbi hygiene
40 Bukomansimbi, Bukomanimbi T/C, Lacking hygiene
Lumala
Bukomansimbi
41 Sm Butenga, Butenga, Bukomansimbi, Bukomansimbi Incomplete floor
42 Bukomansimbi, Bukomanimbi T/C, Lacking hygiene
Sibanja Ali
Bukomansimbi
43 Bukomansimbi, Bukomanimbi T/C, Lacking hygiene
Twegatte
Bukomansimbi
44 Bukomansimbi, Bukomanimbi T/C, Poor hygiene
Selwanja
Bukomansimbi
45 Ssendege Incomplete structure
Sembabule Ind Area, T/C, Sembabule
Emmanuel
46 Poor hygiene and seal
Busoga Kyamulibwa, Kalungu
bypass
47 Kalema Peter Masaka Ind Area, Municipaity, Masaka Poor hygiene
48 Magala Masaka Ind Area, Municipaity, Masaka Poor hygiene
49 Tomusange Ronald Mbulire, Bigasa, Bukomansimbi N, Bukomansimbi Incomplete structure
50 Kakeeto Poor hygiene
Kyotera, Kyotera, Kyotera
Emmanuel
51 Wannume Gerald Kirumba, Mask Muni, Bukoto, Masaka Poor hygiene
52 Katamba A Kyotera, Kyotera, Kyotera Poor hygiene
53 Kiganda Poor hygiene
Kyamulibwa, Kalungu
Elemengio
54 Bugembe Manisuli Kilumba, Katwe Butego, Mask Muni, Masaka Poor hygiene
55 Natural Feeds Poor hygiene
Lwebitakuli, Sembabule
Coffee Processors
56 Nantume Jackie Misanvu, Kibinge, Bukomansimbi, Bukomansimbi No husk chamber
57 Matembe Kilumba, Katwe Butego, Mask Muni, Masaka Poor hygiene
58 Ngobe Kyamulibwa, Kalungu Incomplete structure
59 Kibinge Coffee Incomplete floor, and
Misanvu, Kibinge, Bukomansimbi, Bukomansimbi
Farmers lacking hygiene
60 Poor hygiene, drying
Lyazi & Sons Butenga, Butenga, Bukomansimbi, Bukomansimbi
of kiboko at factory

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ANNEX 2
Good Harvesting and Drying Practices in Bushenyi District

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ANNEX 3
Good Factory Machinery Infrastructure in Rakai District

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ANNEX 4:

UCDA RADIO PROGRAMMES SCHEDULING

Lot Radio Stations Language Hours (30 Qty TOTAL
minutes) Minutes
1 Radio Paidha Alur 30 minutes 12 360
2 UBC West Runyakitara 30 minutes 12 360
3 VOT Rutooro 30 minutes 12 360
4 CBS Luganda 30 minutes 12 360
5 BFM 4Rs 30 minutes 12 360
6 Basoga Baino Fm Lusoga 30 minutes 12 360
7 Open Gate Fm Lumasaba 30 minutes 12 360
8 Radio Rukungiri 4Rs 30 minutes 12 360
9 Radio Rupiny Luo 30 minutes 12 360
10 Kasese Guide Radio Rukonjo 30 minutes 12 360
11 Buddu Broadcasting Luganda 30 minutes 12 360
Services
12 Radio West (Vision Runyakitara 30 minutes 12 360
Group)

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ANNEX 5

GUIDELINES ON FACTORY STRUCTURE, HYGIENE AND
QUALITY CONTROL FOR COFFEE PROCESSORS

As mandated by the Uganda Coffee Development Authority Statute
(1991) and in fulfilment of Part VII, Regulation 28 of the Coffee
Regulations (1994), the Guidelines on factory structure, hygiene and
quality control for coffee processors (Annex I) aim at improving
hygiene, preserving the quality and image of Uganda coffee. These
guidelines are issued to be followed by all coffee processors with
immediate effect.
The following are the provisions of the guidelines:

A. SITE
1. The factory should be located in an area designated for industries,
accessible by a motorable road and well away from water drainage
areas.
2. No factory should be built in a swampy area to avoid pollution of
water sources and risk of re-wetting the coffee and mould growth.
3. No factory shall be built in a residential area.
4. A coffee factory should not be adjacent to mills for agricultural
produce such as maize or ginger mills or others that emit contaminant
substances.

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B. CONSTRUCTION
1. A coffee processing factory should be built of brick/block walls (at
least half way up) and roofed with leak-proof material (iron sheets or
tiles).
2. The factory floor and veranda must be well cemented, with a smooth
(Neal) finish (for ease of cleaning).
3. The walls should be well plastered.
4. A coffee factory must have an adjacent ample sized coffee brick/block
walled store that is well cemented, walls plastered, leak proof roof
and dedicated for storing coffee only.
5. An ample spaced clean yard should be available for coffee reception
and collection purposes.
6. The processing room should be well ventilated, with adequate
lighting.
7. Each coffee factory must have an exterior husk disposal chamber for
collection of coffee husks and dust before commencement of
operations.
8. Each processing factory must have safety guards against moving
machinery parts (e.g. pulleys and belts) and a Fire Extinguisher.

C. HYGIENE
Coffee is food! All due care must, therefore, be taken to preserve its quality,
image and safety to consumers.
1. All factory premises (internal and external) must be kept clean at all
times, free of debris and excessive dust.
2. The coffee factory floor and veranda must be clean mopped (with
water) at least once a week during operations.
3. Machinery and other internal factory installations must be cleaned of
dust and cob webs at least once a month.
4. During and after processing, no coffee beans should remain on
factory floor (all coffee beans must be collected and stored in gunny
bags).
5. Coffee husks and dust must not spill over from the husk collection
chamber (to avoid environmental pollution and contamination).
6. During processing, all workers in the processing room must wear
nose/mouth masks to protect them from dust.
7. Toilets (VIP type preferred) should at least be a minimum of 100 feet
away from the factory.
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D. REGULATIONS & QUALITY CONTROL
1. No factory is allowed to process coffee unless it is registered and
licenced by UCDA for that Coffee Year (Coffee Regulations - 5 (1) &
(2) b and 6 (3))
2. Every Coffee Processor must at all times display a copy of the
Licence at the factory premises (Coffee Regulations – 27 (c))
3. No factory is allowed to start processing coffee (kiboko or
parchment) unless the cherries are properly dried and have attained
13% - 14% MC or below (Coffee Regulations – 20 (6))
4. Any coffee factory found processing wet coffee (of above 14% MC)
commits an offence and appropriate action shall be taken, including
prosecution.
5. Drying of any type or grade of coffee at factory yards is not allowed.
6. Factories are prohibited from processing coffee if the one who has
brought the coffee is not a farmer or a registered and licensed Coffee
Buyer.
7. Factories are prohibited from using equipment and/or processing
machinery that will lead to grade or quality defects of the coffee.
8. Every coffee processor must keep at the premises a proper and
accurate record of amount of coffee processed daily and the total
amount for each month submitted to UCDA in a report specifying
the quantity and grades of coffee processed. (1994 Coffee Regulations
– 27 (1) a & (2))
9. Any assault or use of abusive language to UCDA officers or any
other authorized persons on duty is an offence.
10. Whoever does not abide by the regulations and/or above coffee
guidelines will have committed an offence and will be liable for
prosecution (1994 Coffee Regulations – 28 and 29 (1), (2) & (3))

For further information, contact:
The Managing Director
Uganda Coffee Development Authority
Coffee House, Plot 35 Jinja Road
P.O. Box 7267 Kampala, Uganda
Tel: 256 414 256940 / 233073 or 256 312 260470
Fax: 256 414 232 912 / 256994 E-mail: ucda@ugandacoffee.go.ug
Website: http://www.ugandacoffee.go.ug

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ANNEX 6

REGULATORY GUIDELINES FOR COFFEE FARMERS AND
BUYERS

As mandated by the Uganda Coffee Development Authority Statute
(1991) and in implementation of Part VII Regulation 28 of the Coffee
Regulations (1994), the following guidelines aimed at preserving the
quality and image of Uganda coffee are issued to be followed by coffee
farmers and buyers with immediate effect:

FARMERS

1. The farmer must employ good husbandry practices in the coffee
garden – keep it weed free, pruned, shade provided, mulched and
Coffee Wilt Disease (CWD) affected trees uprooted and burnt on spot.
2. Farmers must harvest only the RED RIPE cherry (unripe cherry
spoils quality).
3. It is the farmer’s responsibility to dry the coffee up to the required
Moisture Content level (13% - 14% MC or below) before selling.
(1994 Coffee Regulations – 20 (1) a & c and (6))
4. After harvesting, DO NOT HEAP the cherry and take long to dry it as
this may lead to development of fungi (Ochratoxins - OTA) which are
a health hazard. Dry each harvested cherry immediately.
5. Farmers are not allowed to sell coffee that is not yet well dried and
likewise, buyers are not allowed to buy such coffee from farmers.
(1994 Coffee Regulations – 20 (1) a & c and (6))
6. Coffee should not be dried on bare ground/soil but on mats,
tarpaulins, brick-lay floor, wire mesh or other materials that do not
lead to quality defects.

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7. Farmers are not allowed to sell coffee while still on trees in the garden
or just after harvesting before it is fully dried. This is against the
Coffee Regulations and also it leads to loss of better revenue.
(1994 Coffee Regulations – 20 (1) a & c)

8. ANYBODY found harvesting or storing or drying immature coffee
that is comprised of GREEN cherry shall be taken to be a THIEF and
will be apprehended and prosecuted.

BUYERS

1. Any person interested in buying coffee from farmers or other
traders MUST first apply and register with the Sub-county in which
his/her store is located, after approval pay the registration fees (Shs.
50,000/=) to the Local Authority and get a receipt which is forwarded to
UCDA to obtain a Buyer’s Store Registration Certificate (Licence).
Failure by Local Governments to register Buyers, UCDA shall undertake
the registration. (1994 Coffee Regulations - 6 (1) & (2) and 7 (1))

2. A coffee buyer must have a dedicated store for coffee – certified
that it is good (cemented floor, plastered walls, leak proof roof and well
ventilated).

3. A coffee buyer must buy only the well dried coffee from farmers
(13% - 14% MC or below). (1994 Coffee Regulations – 20 (1) a & c and (6))

4. Only properly calibrated and certified Scales and Moisture Meters
should be used in weighing quantity and testing Moisture Content
levels of coffee. Use of un certified weights and measures will be taken
as fraudulent and culprits shall be prosecuted.

5. Every coffee buyer must keep at the premises a proper and
accurate record of amount of coffee bought daily and the total amount
for each month submitted to UCDA. (1994 Coffee Regulations - 27a)

6. Drying of coffee at Buying Stores or in Trading Centres or at
Factory Yards is prohibited.

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7. Hulling of coffee should only be effected on properly dried kiboko
or parchment of 13% - 14% Moisture Content or below. (1994 Coffee
Regulations – 20 (6))

8. Do not add foreign matter (e.g. stones, black beans, husks, etc) to
good coffee as the practice is against the regulations because it spoils the
quality and image of coffee.

9. Processed coffee (FAQ/kasse) should not be sun dried.

10. No person is allowed to buy coffee without first being registered
and obtaining a Buying Store Registration Certificate (Licence) issued
by UCDA. (1994 Coffee Regulations - 5 (1) & (2)a and 6 (1) & (2))

11. Every Coffee Buyer must at all times display a copy of the
Registration Certificate (Licence) at the Store premises. (1994 Coffee
Regulations – 27 (c))

12. Any assault or use of abusive language to UCDA officers or any
other authorized persons on duty is an offence.

13. Whoever does not abide by the regulations and/or above coffee
guidelines will have committed an offence and shall be liable for
prosecution (1994 Coffee Regulations – 28 and 29 (1), (2) & (3))

For Further Information, Contact UCDA

Coffee House, Plot 35 Jinja Road
P.O. Box 7267 Kampala, Uganda
Tel: 256 414 256940 / 233073 or 256 312 260470
Fax: 256 414 232 912 / 256994 E-mail: gucda@ugandacoffee.go.ug
Website: http://www.ugandacoffee.go.ug

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