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AVEVA Marine

(12.1)

TRAINING GUIDE
Pipe Router

TM-2231

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AVEVA Marine (12.1)
Pipe Router TM-2231

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Copyright 1974 to current year. 2
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AVEVA Marine (12.1)
Pipe Router TM-2231

Revision Log
Date Revision Description of Revision Author Reviewed Approved
01/11/2011 0.1 Issued for Review W.R
19/12/2011 0.2 Reviewed WR AAM
10/01/2012 1.0 Approved for Training 12.1 WR AAM SH
13/01/2012 2.0 Approved for Training 12.1.SP2 WR WR

Updates
All headings containing updated or new material will be highlighted.

Suggestion / Problems
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Disclaimer
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loss of anticipated savings; loss of goods; loss of contract; loss of use; loss or corruption of data or
information; any special, indirect, consequential or pure economic loss, costs, damages, charges or
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suffered directly or indirectly, or arise in contract, tort (including negligence) or otherwise.

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performance of the AVEVA software shall be limited to 100% of the licence fees paid in the year in which the
user's claim is brought.

1.4 Clauses 1.1 to 1.3 shall apply to the fullest extent permissible at law.

1.5 In the event of any conflict between the above clauses and the analogous clauses in the software
licence under which the AVEVA software was purchased, the clauses in the software licence shall take
precedence.

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Copyright
Copyright and all other intellectual property rights in this manual and the associated software, and every part
of it (including source code, object code, any data contained in it, the manual and any other documentation
supplied with it) belongs to, or is validly licensed by, AVEVA Solutions Limited or its subsidiaries.

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this publication may be incorporated into any third-party software, product, machine, or system without the
prior written permission of AVEVA Solutions Limited, save as permitted by law. Any such unauthorised
action is strictly prohibited, and may give rise to civil liabilities and criminal prosecution.

The AVEVA software described in this guide is to be installed and operated strictly in accordance with the
terms and conditions of the respective software licences, and in accordance with the relevant User
Documentation. Unauthorised or unlicensed use of the software is strictly prohibited.

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shall not be liable for any breach or infringement of a third party's intellectual property rights where such
breach results from a user's modification of the AVEVA software or associated documentation.

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Trademark
AVEVA and Tribon are registered trademarks of AVEVA Solutions Limited or its subsidiaries. Unauthorised
use of the AVEVA or Tribon trademarks is strictly forbidden.

AVEVA product/software names are trademarks or registered trademarks of AVEVA Solutions Limited or its
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Contents

1 Introduction ........................................................................................................................................ 7
1.1 Aim .............................................................................................................................................. 7
1.2 Objectives ................................................................................................................................... 7
1.3 Prerequisites ............................................................................................................................... 7
1.4 Course Structure......................................................................................................................... 7
1.5 Using this guide .......................................................................................................................... 7
2 Introduction to Router ........................................................................................................................ 9
2.1 Work-points................................................................................................................................. 9
2.2 How Router Finds a Route ......................................................................................................... 9
2.2.1 Level One Mode ...................................................................................................................10
2.2.2 Level Two Mode ...................................................................................................................11
2.2.3 Level Three Mode ................................................................................................................11
2.3 Adding Components to a Route ................................................................................................12
2.3.1 Insertion of Reducers at Bore Changes ................................................................................12
2.4 How Router Routes to Free Tails ..............................................................................................12
2.5 How Router Positions Tees .......................................................................................................13
2.5.1 Balanced Tees .....................................................................................................................13
2.6 Nozzles Covered by Obstruction Volumes ...............................................................................15
2.7 Constraining a Route .................................................................................................................15
2.7.1 Locked Components.............................................................................................................15
2.7.2 Routing Rules.......................................................................................................................15
2.7.3 Routing Points ......................................................................................................................15
2.7.4 Routing Planes .....................................................................................................................15
2.7.5 Pipe Racks ...........................................................................................................................16
2.8 Before Starting to Use Router ...................................................................................................16
2.8.1 Branches and Component Attributes ....................................................................................16
3 Basic Routing ....................................................................................................................................17
3.1 Starting to Use Router ...............................................................................................................17
3.2 Creating a New Pipe ..................................................................................................................18
3.3 Accessing Pipe Router ..............................................................................................................19
3.4 Router Defaults ..........................................................................................................................19
3.5 Routing Pipes.............................................................................................................................21
3.5.1 Checking the Status of a Branch...........................................................................................22
3.6 Changing the Order in which Pipes are Routed .......................................................................22
3.6.1 Routing Order Options..........................................................................................................23
3.7 Routing Messages .....................................................................................................................24
3.8 The Branch Details Form ...........................................................................................................24
Exercise 1 Basic Routing ......................................................................................................................24
4 Positioning and Locking Components .............................................................................................25
4.1 Deletable, Positionable and Locked Components ...................................................................25
4.2 Positioning Relative to the Head or Tail ...................................................................................25
4.2.1 Head and Tail Work-points ...................................................................................................26
4.3 Positioning a Component Close to the Head or Tail ................................................................26
4.4 Moving the Head or Tail Work-point .........................................................................................28
4.5 Locking and Unlocking a Component.......................................................................................30
4.6 Manually Routing Non-orthogonal Sections.............................................................................31
4.6.1 Aligned, Locked, Non-orthogonal Components .....................................................................31
4.6.2 Non-aligned Non-orthogonal Components ............................................................................32
4.6.3 Non-orthogonal Sections with Unlocked Components ...........................................................33
4.7 Using Rules for Minimum Tube Length ....................................................................................34
Exercise 2 Positioning and Locking Components ...............................................................................34
5 Creating and Using Routing Points ..................................................................................................35
5.1 Creating a Routing Point ...........................................................................................................35
5.2 Using DATUMs as Routing Points ............................................................................................38
5.3 Moving a Routing Point .............................................................................................................39
Exercise 3 Routing Points .....................................................................................................................39
6 Routing Planes ..................................................................................................................................41
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6.1 Introduction to Routing Planes .................................................................................................41
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6.2 How Router Uses a Plane ..........................................................................................................41


6.3 Using More Than One Plane to Route a Branch .......................................................................42
6.4 Creating Some Pipes (Worked Example) ..................................................................................42
6.5 Creating a Routing Plane...........................................................................................................42
6.6 Using a Routing Plane to Route Branches ...............................................................................44
6.7 Adding Routing Planes Automatically ......................................................................................45
6.8 Components on Planes .............................................................................................................47
6.8.1 Locked Straight-through Components...................................................................................49
6.8.2 Locked Bends and Elbows ...................................................................................................49
Exercise 4 Routing Planes.....................................................................................................................50
7 Creating and Using Pipe Racks ........................................................................................................51
7.1 Introduction to Pipe Racks ........................................................................................................51
7.2 Rack or Plane as Last Constraint..............................................................................................52
7.3 How Pipes are Routed on a Pipe Rack......................................................................................53
7.3.1 Pipe Packing Defaults ..........................................................................................................53
7.4 Methods for Creating Pipe Racks .............................................................................................53
7.5 Converting a Steelwork Structure to a Pipe Rack ....................................................................53
7.5.1 Creating Some Pipes (Worked Example) ..............................................................................54
7.5.2 Creating the Pipe Rack .........................................................................................................54
7.6 Adding a Pipe Rack to a Branch ...............................................................................................56
7.6.1 Automatically Adding Pipe Racks to a Branch.......................................................................56
7.6.2 Manually Adding Pipe Racks to a Branch .............................................................................57
7.7 Creating a Conceptual Pipe Rack (Worked Example) ..............................................................58
7.7.1 Creating Some Pipes............................................................................................................58
7.7.2 Creating the Pipe Rack .........................................................................................................58
7.7.3 Adding Pipes to the Pipe Rack .............................................................................................60
Exercise 5 Pipe Rack .............................................................................................................................60
8 Pipe Packing ......................................................................................................................................61
8.1 Pipe Packing Defaults................................................................................................................61
8.2 Flanges on Routing Planes .......................................................................................................61
8.2.1 Flanges on Single Routing Planes ........................................................................................62
8.2.2 Flanges on Pipe Racks.........................................................................................................62
9 Routing Rules Administration ..........................................................................................................63
9.1 Expressions ...............................................................................................................................63
9.2 Creating a Rule Set ....................................................................................................................64
9.3 Applying a Rule Set to a Branch ...............................................................................................65
9.4 Removing a Rule Set .................................................................................................................66
9.5 Including a Rule from another Rule Set or World .....................................................................66
9.6 Disabling a Rule from a Component .........................................................................................66
9.7 Querying Rules ..........................................................................................................................67
9.8 Modifying Routing Rules ...........................................................................................................67
9.8.1 Travel Plane Rule (Worked Example) ...................................................................................67
9.8.2 Setting Routing Rules (Worked Example Contd.) ..................................................................68
9.9 Setting Routing Plane Function ................................................................................................69
9.10 Creating a New Routing Rule (Worked Example) .....................................................................71
Exercise 6 Routing Rules ......................................................................................................................71
10 Special Routr Attributes ................................................................................................................73
10.1 Branch Member Status Creation Code (RLOC) ........................................................................73
10.2 Branch Member Head Relative Flag (HREL) .............................................................................73
10.3 Branch Positioning Status Code (BRLO) ..................................................................................73

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CHAPTER 1

1 Introduction

Router is a rule-based tool which enables the user to route pipe networks automatically and to position
piping components.

1.1 Aim

To be able to use Router to create simple Pipe Routes using Simple Rules.

1.2 Objectives

Create a simple Pipe Route


Use Routing Points to control the Pipe Route
Route pipes along Routing Planes and Pipe Racks
Create and use of simple Routing Rules

1.3 Prerequisites

It is necessary to have a good understanding of the rules and conventions in the AVEVA Marine Outfitting
systems, the participants should have already completed the AVEVA Marine Outfitting Foundations course
and the AVEVA Marine Pipe Modelling Training Course.

1.4 Course Structure

Training will consist of oral and visual presentations, demonstrations and set exercises. Each workstation
will have a training project, populated with model objects. This will be used by the trainees to practice their
methods, and complete the set exercises.

1.5 Using this guide

Certain text styles are used to indicate special situations throughout this document, here is a summary;

Menu pull downs and button click actions are indicated by bold dark turquoise text.

Information the user has to key-in 'will be red and bold'

Annotation for trainees benefit:

Additional information

System prompts should be bold and italic in inverted commas i.e. 'Choose function'

Example files or inputs will be in the courier new font, colours and styles used as before.

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Pipe Router TM-2231

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CHAPTER 2

2 Introduction to Router

Before the user can start to use Router, they must first create the pipes needed, and connect or position
their Heads and Tails. Router begins routing from the head of a pipe and ends the route at the pipes tail.
The flow direction is always from Head to Tail.

When the user routes a pipe, Router will automatically;

Create clash-free orthogonal routes which use the minimum length of pipe and as few elbows or
bends as possible. The user can include non-orthogonal sections of pipe manually.
Add elbows, reducers, flanges, gaskets and welds, providing they are available in the catalogue.
Position piping components such as valves.

2.1 Work-points

When the user adds a pipe to Router, it is given a head and tail work-point. These are the points where a
route begins and ends. Router positions work-points at a distance from the branch head or tail which allows
for any connection components that are required. i.e., if the head of a branch is a flanged nozzle, then
Router will automatically add a gasket and a flange. Router will then begin routing the pipe from the end of
the flange, as shown below.

2.2 How Router Finds a Route

Router creates a route using an algorithm which minimises material cost while avoiding clashes with other
objects. The algorithm has three modes of operation, described as Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3 modes.

Router first searches for a route using Level 1 mode. If no clash-free route at Level 1 is found, a search is
made using Level 2 mode, and if no clash-free route is found using Level 2 route, then the Level 3 mode is
used.

The details of the three levels are explained in the following sections. The designer does not normally need
to know this, it is just detailed here for information.

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2.2.1 Level One Mode

In level one mode, Router searches for an orthogonal route between the head and tail work-points of a pipe,
using the minimum number of bends or elbows. Below is shown the examples of the routes available in level
one mode.

Box 1

The default route is ABC, as this requires only two bends. If this route
is blocked, Router will try route ADE which uses three bends.

Box 2

If Router cannot find a route using the routes shown on box one, it will
attempt the routes shown on box two, where route ABC uses three
bends, and ADE uses four bends.

Box 3

Finally, if it is still unsuccessful in finding a route, Router will attempt


the routes shown on box three, where both routes use four bends.

Example of a Level 1 Route


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2.2.2 Level Two Mode

If all first level routes are blocked, Router will attempt to find second level routes. In the second level mode,
Router will withdraw the route into the box by a distance which enables the pipe to bypass the obstruction.
Router then attempts the same routing patterns as those used in level one mode. An example of a level two
route is shown below.

Example of a Level 2 Route

2.2.3 Level Three Mode

If Router cannot find a clash-free route using first and second level routes, it will attempt to find a third level
route. In the third level mode, Router extends the box outwards until it bypasses the obstruction and then
attempts to route the pipe using level one routing principles. An example of a level three route is shown
below.

Example of a Level 3 Route www.aveva.com


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2.3 Adding Components to a Route

Once Router has worked out a route, it constructs the Branch by adding whatever (Elbows or Bends) that
are required.

To be efficient, Router imposes a low upper limit on the number of Elbows it will add to a Branch. It
does not attempt to be a maze solver

The user can also modify a routed Branch by adding other components, i.e., Valves or Instruments, by
clicking the Show pipe component creation form icon on the Pipework Toolbar and creating the components
in the normal way.

Only the principal piping components need to be added. Router will add Flanges, Gaskets, Lap joint stub
ends and Welds as necessary, using the COCO (Connection Compatibility) tables to create the correct
types.

Components can be locked into a given position, in which case they will not be moved, even if the Branch is
re-routed.

Pipes can be routed through particular constraints that are placed on a Branch, i.e., passing through a given
point or plane.

2.3.1 Insertion of Reducers at Bore Changes

Before Router positions any components on a Branch, it checks the Branch to see if it contains any
components whose bore is different from the preceding component. If one is found, then by default Router
will select the first suitable Reducer that it finds in the specification, regardless of whether it is concentric or
eccentric. The user can set rules to specify whether concentric or eccentric Reducers are used.

Router treats bores as being equal if they are the same within 5mm

2.4 How Router Routes to Free Tails

If a Branch has a free Tail, that is, if the Tail is not connected to another Branch or the user has not
specifically defined the Tail position, Router will automatically position the Tail once it has positioned all of
the components in the Branch and applied all constraints.

If this fails, i.e., because there is a clash or a component positioning rule cannot be satisfied, then it will
introduce an Elbow after the constraint, before the first component. Router will then position the elbow in a
direction that results in a clash-free route, and which satisfies component positioning and orientation rules.

If the Branch does not have any constraints, the position of the Tail depends on the position and orientation
of the Branch Head. Often, this may be a Tee. Tee positioning is explained in the next section.

The TDIR (Tail direction) attribute for a free tail is never set if the last constraint is a plane or a rack. In
all other cases, TDIR is taken from the direction of the last component

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2.5 How Router Positions Tees

Router checks each Branch for connections to other Branches, which means it looks for Tees or other
components which have a Connection Reference (CREF) or a Connection Reference Array (CRFA) attribute
set.

If the Branch which connects to the Tee has a free Tail, then the Tee is treated the same as any other
component. In all other cases, the Tee will influence the route taken by the original Branch. In general,
Router will select the closest route to any constraints in the connecting Branch. If there are none, then it will
select the route closest to the other end of the connecting Branch. Tees which can be balanced will then be
positioned.

Where a Branch contains more than one Tee, the first Tee in the Branch will influence the route taken.
Router will position any subsequent Tees as close as possible to the next constraint, or the other end of the
connecting branch.

The user can control the position of a Tee by locking it in position, or by constraining the route, using a
routing point.

2.5.1 Balanced Tees

Router will try to position a Tee to achieve a balanced flow.

The tee must be symmetrical about a plane through Parrive. Router will change the arrive
Ppoint to achieve this if the bores on the Ppoints are equal. It will then check the leave-bore and
connect-bore. If the bores are equal then Router will assume that the tee is T-shaped.

The Tail directions of /B1 and /B2 must either be equal and not in the axial direction between the
Tail positions of the branches or opposite and in the axial direction between the Tail positions of
the branches.

There must be no locked components on branch /B2, or any locked component after the Tee on
branch /B1.
If there are multiway components in the Branches after the Tee, the Branches connected to
them;
Must have equivalent lists of component specifications,
Must be unconstrained
Must have free tails
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The Tail positions of /B1 and /B2 must be equal in two of the three orthogonal co-ordinates.

-X and Y coordinates different -X and Y coordinates the same

The specifications of the components that can be positioned after the tee on /B1 must be the
same as the specifications of the components on branch /B2.

Same specifications for Different specifications for


Valves after Tee: balanced Valves after Tee: unbalanced

The Tee will be positioned so that the Tee is clash-free. There is enough room for all
components between the Tee and the end of the Branch and this position does not result in a
route to the tee with an elbow close to the Tee.

If any of these conditions is not satisfied Router will try moving the Tee back along the arrive direction (or
forward along the leave direction).

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2.6 Nozzles Covered by Obstruction Volumes

When Router is routing a Branch there may be several others waiting to be routed. The best route for the
current Branch may take the Pipe straight in front of other Nozzles. This is most likely to happen when
routing from a line of Vessels. It can be avoided by;

Changing the order in which the Pipes are routed.

Ensuring that the Nozzles or Equipment owning them have obstruction volumes extending
beyond their Nozzles. This prevents other Pipes crossing in front of the Nozzle. The Branch
connected to the Nozzle will ignore this clash and successfully route onto the Nozzle.

The obstruction volumes should be defined in the catalogue, defining them in Outfitting may result in
less satisfactory routes

2.7 Constraining a Route

Except in very simple cases, the user will probably find that they need to give Router more information about
the route required to achieve a satisfactory route. The user can constrain a route using the following;

Locked components
Routing Points
Routing Rules
Routing Planes
Pipe Racks

These constraints are described briefly in the following sections, and described in detail in later chapters.

2.7.1 Locked Components

A locked component is a component whose position has been fixed before routing takes place. Router will
route the Branch through the component. Locked components can be used to manually modify the route
taken.

In cluttered areas, Router may not be able to find a clash-free route, in which case it will put in the simplest
clashing route and inform the user about the clash. The user will then need to modify the route to obtain a
clash-free route, by moving components away from the clashes, locking them and re-routing. Both principal
piping components and Router-created components (i.e., Elbows), can be moved and locked.

2.7.2 Routing Rules

One of the principal features of Router is its built-in rule engine. The user can use routing rules to control the
selection, position and orientation of piping components, and to control how pipes use routing planes and
pipe racks.

2.7.3 Routing Points

Routing Points are points through which a pipe must pass. The user can specify the position of a routing
point, and the direction in which a pipe arrives at and leaves a routing point.

2.7.4 Routing Planes

Routing planes are orthogonal planes which attract pipes to them and then guide the pipes in the direction of
the plane. Routing planes are useful, i.e., where the user wants to group pipes together, perhaps running up
a bulkhead or under a deck.

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2.7.5 Pipe Racks

In Router, a pipe rack is composed of a group of routing planes which enables the user to model the route
used on a physical pipe rack. There are two ways in which the user can create a pipe rack. The user can
create pipe racks on existing steelwork structures or model them simply as a group of planes. The user may
find the second method useful whilst working on a conceptual design and does not want to spend time
creating steelwork structures. Once the user has created a pipe rack, it can be used with routing rules to
specify how different sorts of pipe run on the rack.

2.8 Before Starting to Use Router

Before the user starts using Router with one of the projects, they will need to perform the following tasks;

Set up the Catalogues and Specifications that are to be use.


Ensure that the user has specified which components are to be used by Router as default. The
user must specify the default bends and elbows. They must have default (LSTU) Leave
specification Tube.
Define any obstruction volume required to avoid covering Nozzles.
Do not use design parameters for components that Router automatically creates, i.e., bends and
elbows.
Set up routing rules.
Define all the equipment and other obstructions used in outfitting, if the user is going to allow for
flanges when packing Pipes on routing planes and Pipe Racks, they must ensure that there is a
default Flange set in the specification, as the width of the default Flange will be used in
calculating the spacing.
Create the Pipeline Branches, without any components added, which is going to be routed.

2.8.1 Branches and Component Attributes

Before the user can use Router, they need to ensure that the following are set.

Define the starting position of each Branch which is going to be routed, either by connecting it
or by setting the Head position, orientation and bore.
The user will usually want to define where the Branch is going to, either by connecting the Tail,
or by setting the Tail position, direction and bore. The user can route to a free tail, but the Tail
bore must be set.
If the Branch contains components, these must be selected.

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CHAPTER 3

3 Basic Routing

Here the user will learn how to define the head and tail of pipes and then route the pipes, using Router. The
worked example uses the sample project MAR supplied with AVEVA Marine application.

3.1 Starting to Use Router

To enter the Training Project (MTP) in the Outfitting Module, select Start > All Programs > AVEVA Marine
> Design > Marine 12.1 > Outfitting

The AVEVA Marine Outfitting Login form is


displayed, the Project, Username and MDB are
chosen by using the option arrows adjacent to each
entry, whilst the Password must be entered using the
keyboard. The options are determined by the project
set-up triggered when AVEVA Marine is initialised.

Enter the Project Training, Username PIPE,


Password PIPE, MDB PIPEFWD, and then click the
Login button.

Once the Design application has been started, check that the user is running in
the required Design application, this can be seen on the top of the design
framework, if it does not say Pipework, then select Design > Pipework, this will
then change to the correct application.

The Default Specifications form is displayed; select


the Piping Specification SP_SWC and then click
the OK button.

Now using the Design Explorer navigate to the Design WORL* and then drag in to the command window the
macro file Equipment.txt, this will add the required equipment to the Drawlist.

Now the users are going to route Pipelines between the equipments of pumps PMP-1 and PMP-2, and
vessels VESS-1 and VESS-2.
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3.2 Creating a New Pipe

In this section, the users will define the heads and tails of two pipes which they will later route. Start by
defining the head and tail of the pipe between the pump PMP-1 and the vessel VESS-1.

Using the Design Explorer navigate to the ZONE 311-PIPE, click the Show pipe creation form icon, the
Create Pipe form is displayed. Create a pipe as shown. Key in the Pipe Name P1, select the Pipe
Specification SP_SWC, Bore 100 and then click the Apply button.

The Modify Pipe form is now displayed. Click the Change button in the Head Connection section to modify
the branch head connection.

Click the Pick button, then select the discharge Nozzle on the top of pump
/PMP-1and then click the Connect button to connect the Branch Head.

Repeat the process and connect the Branch Tail to the nozzle on the top of
VESS-1

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Create a second pipe between the pump PMP-2 and the vessel VESS-2 with the same details and name the
pipe P2. Connect the head of the pipe to the vertical nozzle on the pump and the tail to the vertical nozzle on
the vessel as shown below.

3.3 Accessing Pipe Router

Router is accessed from the AVEVA Marine main pull down menu by selecting Utilities > Pipe Router,
the Pipe Router form will be displayed.

3.4 Router Defaults

Router is supplied with defaults which the user can change if required. This chapter explains the defaults,
which are accessed from the Router Defaults form. The user can work through the worked examples using
the default settings.

From the Router form, select Settings > Defaults

The Pipe Router Defaults form is displayed. The user can save
and load default settings using the options under the File pull
down menu. Any changes made to the defaults will require the
user to select File > Save

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The following items could be changed but for the purposes of the Training they will be left as default:

The Directory path where the Output message files are stored.

The Fieldname where the name given to the Output message file is given.

Overwrite / Append option pull down list allows the user to Overwrite i.e. overwrites the existing
Output messages file or, Append the Output messages file by adding each new message to
the end of the existing file.

The Action on error pull down list allows the user to specify the action taken by Router in the
event of an error occurring, select one of the following from the Action on error option button.
Stop stops all further routing. Pause displays an alert box which the user must acknowledge
before Router can continue routing. Continue continues routing, even if an error occurs.

The Change direction using pull down list allows the user to specify the method used to change
the direction of pipes, i.e., Bend, Elbow or Rule. If the Rule option is set, Router will look for a
rule which defines which type of component to use. The user must create the rule as described
later.

If Bends are to be used, then the BendMacRef


attribute needs to be set to a valid bending
machine

The Default rule set / world, allows the user to set a default rule set for all Branches by entering
the name of the Rules set in the Default rule set text field and selecting Branch from the
Applied to all pull down list. The rule set / world will be automatically assigned as a low priority
rule set. If there is a set of company-wide rules the user could enter the name here.

Router can automatically associate routing planes and pipe racks with a branch to route the
pipe on. To do this it searches for routing planes and pipe racks between the branch head and
tail. The user can ask Router to extend the search outside this volume by entering the
distances in the In Z Direction (vertical) and In X / Y Direction (horizontal) fields.

Router will only automatically use a routing plane or pipe rack to route a pipe if the distance that
it will travel along the plane or rack is greater than a minimum travel distance. Enter the
minimum distance, in the Minimum Travel Distance field.

The user can specify the Minimum Pipe Gap between pipes on racks (and other planes) using Pipe Rack
Spacing. The user can also specify that the gap size will be rounded, which can help minimise construction
errors.

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3.5 Routing Pipes

In this section, the newly created pipes will be added to the Router form, and then routed. The user can add
pipes individually or in groups. In this worked example, pipes will be added individually.

By default, Router routes pipes in the order in which the user adds them to the Router form. The
routing order can have an effect on the route taken by pipes. This is explained later

Using the Design Explorer navigate to the pipe /P1. Now using the Router form, Select CE from the Add pull
down to add the selected pipe to the Router form.

The Network option under Add loads the selected branch and any other branches on which the
branch is dependent, or which are dependent on it

Repeat this process for pipe /P2. The Router form should now look like this;

On the Router form, select the two pipes P1 and P2 so they are highlighted; now select Selected from the
Route pull down menu.

Router routes the selected pipes, adding elbows, gaskets and flanges from the pipe specification, as
required.

A Cancel Process form is displayed, if the user is routing


several Branches, and realise that a mistake has been
made, clicking the Cancel button will stop the process
after the next Branch has been routed. However it will
not stop the process in the middle of routing a Branch
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The two pipe routes created by Router are shown below having added BLOCK F204 elements.

Automatically Routed Pipes P1 and P2

If the route is to be removed and returned to


the dashed line connected between the two
equipment, select the Branch required from the
Pipe Router form and then select Modify >
Branch > Reset Branch

3.5.1 Checking the Status of a Branch

Select Display > Status Summary from the main pull


down menu on the Router form. The Pipe Router Status
Summary form will be displayed, showing that two Branches
have been routed successfully.

The Undo and Redo buttons at the bottom of the


Router form can be used to undo or redo a series of
routing operations, changing settings as required,
back to the last Save Work

3.6 Changing the Order in which Pipes are Routed

Router routes pipes in the order in which the user adds them to the Router form. The user may need to
change the routing order of particular pipes if:

To ensure that Router routes the most expensive pipes first.


The user is working with pipes that are in close proximity to one another or where pipes cross
paths.

Select Modify > Routing Order >


Manual > Pipes on the Pipe
Router form.

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On the Pipe Router - Reorder Pipes form, select /P1 in the Reorder text pane, set the option pull down list to
After, and select P2 in the right-hand section of the form. Click the Apply button and then the Dismiss
button to close the form.

Reselect the pipes /P2 and /P1 in the Router form and set the Route pull down list to Selected

The route obtained is shown below in this instance; Router first routed the pipe P2. The route taken by P2
has blocked the most practical route for the pipe P1, and can only complete the route by clashing with the
other route of P2.

Result of changing the routing order (P2 routed before P1)

3.6.1 Routing Order Options

The other options under Modify > Routing Order from the Router form are as follows;

Auto This option automatically reorders branches according to routing dependencies, that
is, if a pipe is dependent on another pipe, then that pipe will be routed first. Select
this option, i.e., after reordering by bore.

This option only affects piping networks. It will have no effect on unconnected Pipes

Manual > Pipes This option enables the user to manually specify the order in which Router
routes each pipe, using the Reorder Pipes form.
Manual > Branches This option enables the user to manually specify the order in which Router
routes each branch, using the Reorder Branches form.
By Attribute This option enables the user to reorder pipes according to particular
attributes, using the Reorder by Attribute form, as shown below.

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From the Reorder by Attribute form, select one of the following radio buttons.
Head Bore, Tail Bore, Temperature or Other. The Other radio button would be
used to specify an alternative attribute to those available on the form.

To reorder pipes according to their specification, select the Group by specification


check box. This reorders the pipes so that they are displayed in alphabetical order
of their specification names, i.e., all pipes which use the specification A150,
followed by all pipes which use the specification B150, etc.

The user can use these options in conjunction, i.e., the user may reorder pipes so
that all Router displays all pipes which use the specification A150 in descending
order of their Head Bore, followed by all B150 specification pipes.

3.7 Routing Messages

As Router routes a pipe, it examines each branch and


generates a message about any routing errors that it finds.
These messages can help the user understand and correct
errors. The user can view these messages both during and
after pipe routing, providing a file in which to store the router
messages, as described earlier.

Select Display > Routing Messages. The Routing


Messages form is displayed, as shown below.

The form will be empty if Router routes all pipes without any errors

3.8 The Branch Details Form

Router enables the user to view details of the components and constraints in a branch, using the Branch
Details form. From this form, the user can select options which place constraints upon the route taken by a
branch. i.e., the user can lock components in position, create routing points and add routing planes and pipe
racks to the constraint list. All of these facilities are explained in later chapters.

To display the Branch Details


form, select one of the routed
Branches from the Router form
and click the Branch Detail
button.

The Branch Detail form, which contains details of the


selected branch, is displayed as shown below.

Exercise 1 Basic Routing

1. Create a route pipe P1 and P2 as described above, and investigate changing thewww.aveva.com
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CHAPTER 4

4 Positioning and Locking Components

Here the user will be shown how to add components to Branches after they have been routed, and how to
control where they are positioned. It also describes the effect that positioning and locking components will
have when a Branch is re-routed.

The user can set up rules to control the selection, positioning and orientation of components, and
these are described later

4.1 Deletable, Positionable and Locked Components

Router sees all piping components as deletable, positionable or locked. If the user displays the Branch
Details form for a branch that has been routed by Router, it will be seen that all the components are listed as
deletable.

The components that Router creates in a branch are described as Deletable. If the use re-routes
the branch, Router will delete all the components that it has created and re-create them.
After a Branch has been routed, the user can add components manually in the normal way.
These components are described as Positionable. If the user re-routes the branch, these
components will not be deleted, but they may be moved to fit on the new route.
Positionable components can be locked into a given position, in which case they will not be
moved, even if the branch is re-routed.

The order of Positionable components in the branch members list will be maintained, and so will their order
relative to any constraints in the branch. i.e., if the user adds a valve before a Locked Tee, the valve will not
be moved past the Tee.

The user may wish to make changes to a branch, and then re-route it. The user can keep some or all of the
components that Router has added by making them Positionable, rather than Deletable. The user can also
lock them.

To change the status of a component, select it in the list on the Branch Details
form, and then select one of the options under Modify on the Branch Details form
menu. The choices are Constraint, Toggle Head Lock, Toggle Tail Lock,
Lock Position, Make Positionable, Make Deletable, Toggle Head / Tail
Relative, Head W-P, and Tail W-P

4.2 Positioning Relative to the Head or Tail

Each component in a branch is positioned relative to the Head or Tail of the branch.

If a component is Head relative, then Router will place that component as close as possible to
the Head of the branch, allowing for other components and any constraints.
If a component is Tail relative, then that component is positioned as close as possible to the Tail
of the branch.

Router routes a pipe from Head to Tail and so all components are initially created Head relative.

The user can change the Head / Tail relative property of any Positionable component. Select it in the list on
the Branch Details form, and then select Modify > Toggle Head / Tail Relative

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4.2.1 Head and Tail Work-points

Each branch has a Head Work-point and a Tail Work-point as described earlier. The user can insert
components between the Head (or Tail) and its work-point(s), which can be used, i.e., to position a valve
directly onto a nozzle.

4.3 Positioning a Component Close to the Head or Tail

In this section the user will be shown how to position piping components relative to the head or tail of a
branch.

Re-route the pipes as shown below and place a Globe Valve on the pipeline P2.

Reroute pipe P2. The graphical display should be as shown below. Notice that the valve is positioned close
to the head of the pipe.

Head-relative valve position

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Click the Branch Detail button to display the Branch Details form.

Select VALVE1 from the list of Components/Constraints, now from the pull down menu on the Branch Detail
form select Modify > Toggle Head/Tail Relative. Now from the Router form, select the Route Selected
option from the pull down list. Router re-routes the Pipe and positions the valve close to the Tail of the pipe,
as shown below.

Tail-relative Valve position

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4.4 Moving the Head or Tail Work-point

The user can position the Head W-P after a particular component in a branch, or, they can position the Tail
W-P before a particular component.

Similar to before, create a valve on the pipeline P1. Re-route the branch; the view should be as shown
below with the valve positioned at the Head of P1.

On the Router form, click the Branch Detail button to display the Branch Details form. On the Branch
Details form, select Modify > Tail W-P

The Modify Tail W-P form is displayed. Select VALVE 1, and then click the OK button.

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From the Router form, select the Route Selected option button. Router re-routes the Pipe from the Head
Work-point to the Tail Work-point, which is now positioned before VALVE 1, as shown below. The valve is
positioned after the Tail Work-point.

To check the position of the valve, display the Branch Details form for the branch, then scroll to the bottom
of the Component/Constraint list. The details should now look like as shown below. Notice that the Tail
Work-point is now positioned before VALVE 1.

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4.5 Locking and Unlocking a Component

Router enables the user to lock piping components in position. The user may need to do this, i.e., to ensure
that a branch component remains in its current position, even if the user re-routes the branch.

To lock a component in position from the Branch Details form, select the component that is required to be
locked in position, and then select Modify > Lock Position

To unlock a locked component, select Modify > Make Positionable for main piping components, or Modify
> Make Deletable for Router generated components.

Use the Model Editor to move first the elbow and then the
valve up 600mm. Select the valve on the Branch Detail form
and select Modify > Lock Position. The branch can now be
rerouted.

The valve has been left in the same position and the pipeline adjusted to suit the valves new location.

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4.6 Manually Routing Non-orthogonal Sections

Router is an orthogonal router, if non-orthogonal sections of pipe in a branch are required, then the user will
have to route these sections manually. The user can then lock all the components (including the start and
end bend or elbow) and route the remainder of the pipes using Router.

4.6.1 Aligned, Locked, Non-orthogonal Components

If two locked components with non-orthogonal arrive and/or leave direction are aligned, with no intervening
components, so that a straight piece of tube can run between them without clashing, Router will use this
route. This will also happen if the first component is aligned with the head or the last component is aligned
with the tail.

In the example below both Elbows are locked in position so the non-orthogonal route is maintained.

Using aligned and locked elbows to give a non-orthogonal route

If the straight, non-orthogonal routes clash, only orthogonal routes will be considered to avoid the clash. This
is the default orthogonal route between the pump and the vessel.

Navigate to Design WORL* in Design Explorer and drag the Reserved_Space.txt macro file to the
Command Window. Thus a box has been placed in the none-orthogonal section of the pipe.

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In all other cases Router will try to insert a bend or elbow to turn into an orthogonal direction as close as
possible to the component.

As can be seen in the example the box clash has forced Router to re-route the pipe orthogonally to avoid the
clash. The locked elbow remains in position and orientation whilst a new elbow has been added.

This will be a first choice elbow in this case a 45 degree elbow

4.6.2 Non-aligned Non-orthogonal Components

If non-orthogonal components are not aligned, only orthogonal routes between them will be considered.

Non-aligned components will still give an orthogonal route


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4.6.3 Non-orthogonal Sections with Unlocked Components

If there are other, positionable, components between non-orthogonal locked components, orthogonal routing
will be used. Router may add connection components on to the locked components, but note that no bore
change (which would require the addition of a reducer) will be permitted.

A positionable valve has been inserted in the branch with a Tail Work Point, which has caused Router to
revert to an orthogonal route, using additional elbows.

Detail of the area close to the Valve

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The route achieved with the Valve locked

Users can lock several non-orthogonal components in a row. i.e., they can lock two 45 degree elbows to
give a non-orthogonal section of pipe and place a locked valve on this section of pipe. Router will then not
route any part of the Branch between the elbows, providing that the straight pipe does not clash; and it will
add any necessary connection components to the valve. However, the valve must be locked: if it is
positionable Router will route orthogonally between the elbows.

It may be better to continue in a non-orthogonal direction from a nozzle until a route has passed an
obstruction, because this might give a shorter route with fewer elbows.

4.7 Using Rules for Minimum Tube Length

The user may find that components such as Olets and Stub-in Tees will be positioned immediately next to
another component, if COCO tables allow. They can use the Upstream and Downstream Rules provided
with Router to specify minimum lengths of Tube.

Exercise 2 Positioning and Locking Components

1. Using the above examples try experimenting with routing pipes with locked components.

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CHAPTER 5

5 Creating and Using Routing Points

Routing points are points through which a branch will pass. The user can define the coordinates of a point
and the direction in which a branch arrives at and leaves a point.

The user can add as many routing points as required. They must create routing points at the correct position
in the sequence of constraints.

Delete the previously added VOLM Reserved_Space from ZONE 311-EQUIP, Move EQUI PMP-2 500mm to
Port (Y=500) then delete the Branch elements members from the pipes P1 and P2. Auto route the two
pipelines P1 and P2 once again and add a valve at the tail working point on both pipelines and auto route
once again.

5.1 Creating a Routing Point

The users will now add a routing point to the pipe P2. The routing point will ensure that Router routes the
pipe so that it is parallel with pipe P2.

Add the pipes P1 and P2 to the


Router form. Select the branch
/P2/B1, then click the Branch
Detail button. The Branch Detail
form is now displayed, from the
pull down menu select Create >
Routing Point

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The Create Routing Point form is displayed. The user can simply enter the coordinates on the Create
Routing Point form or use the options on the menu, which are similar to that of the AVEVA Marine
positioning control options.

Positioning Control is covered in the AVEVA Marine Outfitting Foundations (TM-2201) Guide

For this example, the position of routing point will be specified relative to an existing component.
The user can only position routing points after positionable or locked components.

From the Create Routing Point form pull down menu, select Cursor >
Element, then pick Elbow 3 of the pipe /P1/B1, as shown in the
following illustration.

Router creates a routing point at the position of the elbow.

The user will now move the routing point so that it is 1000 mm Forward of the Elbow. From the Create
Routing Point form, select Move > Distance. The Move Point form is displayed. Enter X (Forward) in the
Direction field. Enter 1000.0 mm in the Distance field. Click the Apply button to confirm the move, then click
the Dismiss button to cancel the form.

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The user can lock the point at the specified


positions using the Lock buttons on the
Create Routing Point form, if required.

To ensure that pipe P2 travels parallel with pipe P1,


the direction will be define in which pipe /P2 arrives at
and leaves the routing point. In AVEVA Marine Design,
the arrive direction should point to the Head, and the
leave to the Tail.

From the Create Routing Point form,

Select the Arrive / Leave radio button. Enter -Y (Port) in the Arrive
direction field and Y (Stbd) in the Leave direction field.

Ensure that the After option pull down list is set to Head W-P

When the user clicks the OK button Router creates the routing point at
the position. This can be seen in the Branch Detail form.

Route Pipe P2 again using Router and the pipe will be routed through the routing point.

By specifying a different arrive and leave direction, the user will cause a bend or elbow to be inserted at the
position of the routing point. If a change of direction is not required, select the Through Direction and specify
the required direction of the pipe at that point. If the user leaves the direction unset, Router will select the
best direction to minimise the number of bends or elbows used.

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5.2 Using DATUMs as Routing Points

There is an option on the Create Routing Point form which allows the user to use an existing DATUM point
as a routing point. Two branches should not use the same Datum point as a constraint since they would
then clash. If it is required to use a Datum where two branches meet, just one of the branches should have
the point as a constraint. i.e., Branch /P1/B1 ends at a Battery Limit and Branch P2/B1 connects to its Tail.
Branch /P1/B1 should have the Datum as the last constraint and a Free Tail. The Head of Branch /P2/B1 will
be positioned at the Tail of /P1/B1.

In the following example a Datum called /P2-DATUM has been created.

Using the Design Explorer navigate to the ZONE 311-PIPE, then using
the Command Window key in New DATUM /P2-DATUM and then
change the position attribute by keying in Position X 124150mm -Y
6025mm Z 7788mm

Firstly create a routing point again by selecting Create > Routing


Point, then Click the Use Datums radio button, now from the Datums
pull down section select the newly created datum. Key in the Arrive Y,
Leave Y and then click the OK button.

This Datum is then used as a Routing point similar to what was described earlier.

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5.3 Moving a Routing Point

The user can modify the position of a routing point, at any time.

From the Router form, select the branch to be modified. Click the Branch Detail button. The Branch Detail
form is displayed. Select the routing point to be modified from the Components/Constraints list, select Point
2 and then select Modify > Constraint. The Modify Routing Point form is displayed.

Select one of the following options, depending on the type of modification you want to make.

Move > Distance is used to move a routing point a distance in a


specified direction either from the current location, or relative to
another element which can be identify using the cursor or another
method.

Move > Towards is used to move the point a specified distance


towards another element, which can be identify using the cursor, by
specifying a named element or, which may be the head, tail or, the
next element in the branch.

Make sure that the routing point is still in a sensible position in the list of constraints, otherwise a very
convoluted route may be obtained

If a DATUM is used as a routing point, the user can use the standard AVEVA Marine positioning
options to modify its position

Exercise 3 Routing Points

1. Using the above example experiment using Routing Points, try modifying them and changing the
through direction.

2. Make sure that the Routing Points created are in the correct order.

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CHAPTER 6

6 Routing Planes

6.1 Introduction to Routing Planes

Routing planes are rectangular planes which are used to guide pipes along their length. The user will find
routing planes useful, i.e., in routing groups of pipes along a bulkhead or underside of a deck, or simply to
group pipes close together. The example below shows how to use two routing planes, one above the other.

The upper routing plane is used to carry all pipes in the Port / Starboard (transverse) direction and Lower
routing plane is used to carry all pipes in the Forward / Aft (longitudinal) direction. The user can use one or
more single routing planes.

A Pipe Rack is defined as a group of routing planes for Router. Pipe Racks are described later

6.2 How Router Uses a Plane

Router will ensure that pipes take the best route available from the previous constraint to the routing plane. If
the most direct route to the plane is blocked, Router will select an alternative route which ensures that the
pipe enters the plane at the earliest opportunity, which is usually just after the obstruction. The pipe will exit
from the plane at the point which enables it to take the most direct route to the next constraint. If the most
direct route to the next constraint is blocked, the pipe will exit from the plane just before the obstruction.

Pipes are routed along the length of a routing plane

The user can set whether the centre, top or bottom of pipes will be aligned on the routing plane. If a pipe is
insulated, the plane will automatically take the insulation into account by positioning the pipe at a height
which allows for the insulation.

The user can also make allowance for shoe heights using a SHOE rule

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6.3 Using More Than One Plane to Route a Branch

The user can use more than one routing plane to route a branch. However;

The user should have routing points or locked components between the planes. If this is not
desired, Router may encounter difficulties in deciding when to leave one plane and enter
another.
The user should not use two adjacent planes with the same travel direction and no
perpendicular offset between them.
For turns in the same plane, planes should touch, within 100 cm, corner to corner, but not
overlap.

User can use groups of routing planes to create Pipe Racks, this is described later.

6.4 Creating Some Pipes (Worked Example)

Before the users can create and use a routing plane they need to create the pipes which they will later route
via the plane.

Using the Design Explorer navigate to the Design WORL* and drag the Additional_Equip_and_Pipe.txt
macro into the Command Window. The pipes and equipment shown in the following illustration will be
created. Add the pipes to the Router form in the order P3, followed by P4 and finally, P5.

If the pipes have not already been routed, the user may wish to route the pipes before they create and add
the routing plane. This will enable visual feedback on the effect that the routing plane has on the route taken
by the pipes.

6.5 Creating a Routing Plane

Navigate to the ZONE 311-PIPE.

From the Router form, select


Create > Routing Plane. The
Create Routing Plane form is
displayed.

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In the Name field key in PLANE1, this is the name that is displayed
in the Design Explorer and the Branch Detail form.

Key in the Description Routing Plane 1 and select Pipe Positioning


Centre of pipe WRT Plane

The other Pipe Positioning options available are:

Top of pipe Positions the top of the pipe on horizontal routing planes, or in front of vertical
routing planes adjusting for any insulation

Bottom of pipe Positions the side of the pipe below horizontal routing planes, or behind vertical
routing planes, adjusting for any insulation

If the user needs to run sections of Pipes which include Flanges along routing planes, it can be specified
that the gap value will be applied as a wall-to-flange (WF) gap, if the flanges can be staggered, or as a
flange-to-flange (FF) gap, if the flanges are side-by-side on the plane. The default is wall-to-wall (WW)
spacing. When wall-to-flange spacing is used, the greater of the flange widths for the current pipe and the
adjacent pipe will be added to the wall-to-wall spacing. When flange-to-flange spacing is used, the flange
width of both pipes will be added to the wall-to-wall gap.

There are two packing methods available in the Packing Method option list. Router will either place a pipe on
a plane as near as possible to the edge of the plane if Nearest edge is selected, or pack heavy pipes at the
edges of racks and light ones at the centre. The packing method is an attribute of the Routing Plane. It can
be set for the Travel Plane of pipe-racks and for individual planes.

If selects the By Weight method, the PLPM (Plane Packing Method) attribute of the plane will be set to
WEIG, and Router will look for a weight rule, (PURP set to WEIG), i.e. the purpose of the element is set to
WEIG to determine whether pipes are light or heavy.

The User can use weight rules to determine whether pipes are packed at the top or bottom of vertical
planes.

Top is the Z direction of the Plane which is shown with an arrow

Horizontal Routing Planes In the weight-related packing method on horizontal planes, for
heavy pipes Router will search inwards from both edges looking for
a free slot with a large enough gap between it and any adjacent
pipe. The heavy pipe will be placed closest to whichever edge a slot
is found. For light pipes Router will first look in the middle of the
plane or rack to see if this slot is free. Router will then search in
both directions outwards looking for a free slot and use the closer to
the centre. Pipes for which no rule exists will be treated as light
pipes and placed in the centre of the rack or plane.
Vertical Routing Planes The weight-related packing method can also be applied to vertical
routing planes with a horizontal travel direction. If the weight-related
packing method is used then, for light pipes, Router will search
downwards from the top edge of the routing plane edges looking for
a free slot with a large enough gap between it and any adjacent
pipe. For heavy pipes Router will search upwards from the bottom
edge of the plane. Pipes for which no rule exists will be treated as
light pipes.

The user cannot use weight-related packing for a vertical plane with a vertical travel direction

Click OK button, the Routing Plane Dimensions form is displayed. www.aveva.com


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The Anchor is the position from which the routing plane takes its dimensions.
There are two options available, Centre and Corner. Set the Anchor option pull
down list to Centre

Set the coordinates to X 134250.0mm, Y 4500.0mm and Z 8500mm.

Key in the Length 7000mm and select Dir -X (Aft).


This will cause pipes to be routed along the Aft/ Forward direction
(Longitudinal) of the plane.

Key in the Width 2500mm and select Dir -Y (Starboard).

Click on Apply button to create the plane and then Dismiss button.

The user can create a vertical routing plane by setting one of the Dir fields to be Z or -Z (up or down).
The up/front direction of the plane will be indicated by a construction arrow in the graphical view which
is drawn perpendicular to the plane. To reverse the direction, reverse either the length or width
directions, i.e. from X to -X

6.6 Using a Routing Plane to Route Branches

To route a branch via a routing plane, the user must add the routing plane to the constraint list for the
branch. From the Router form, select the branch /P3/B1, then click on the Branch Detail button.

The Branch Detail form is displayed which contains details of the branch /P3/B1.

Select Add > Routing Plane >


Selection

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From the Planes list, select the plane /PLANE1. Ensure that the Insert
After list is set to Head WP.

The Last on Plane checkbox allows the user to specify that positionable
components will be placed on the plane.

Click OK button. The routing plane is added to the constraint list for the
branch.

Repeat the procedure for the branches /P4/B1 and /P5/B1. Route the branches, using the Router form.

Router routes the branches via the routing plane. The route taken by the branches should now look like this;

6.7 Adding Routing Planes Automatically

Router provides facilities to automatically add pre-defined routing planes to a branch. This could be useful if
i.e. it was required to run all Y / -Y (Transverse) running pipes at one elevation and all X / -X (Longitudinal)
pipes at another.

Router can add either one vertical plane, or two horizontal planes, providing the horizontal planes are
oriented perpendicular to one another.

The routing planes will be added at the head of the branch. The planes must be able to be reached directly
from the head for them to be included. If there are more planes than are required, the closest ones to the
head will be chosen.

If there are constraints in the branch, such as routing points, or locked components, an additional two
horizontal or one vertical plane will be searched for at the tail of the branch. These must be reachable
directly from the tail and will be added to the Component / Constraint list as the last constraints before the
tail.

Planes will be searched for in a box defined by the head and tail of the branch. The box will be extended by
the values specified in the Router Defaults form. Only pipes that travel along routing planes a distance
greater than the Minimum Travel Distance will be considered.

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To demonstrate Automatic Plane selected an extra Plane will be created at 90 degree to the first.

Create a new Routing Plane named /PLANE1A and set the coordinates to X
130750.0mm, Y 4500.0mm and Z 8500.0mm.

Key in the Length 1500.0mm and select Dir X (Forward).


This will cause pipes to be routed along the Forward / Aft (Longitudinal)
direction of the plane.

Key in the Width 5000.0mm and select Dir Y (Port).

Click on Apply button to create the plane and then Dismiss button.

To add routing planes automatically, from the Router form, select the branch desired to add routing planes
to /P5, then click on the Branch Detail button. Navigate to the element /PLANE1 first and select Remove >
Constraint > Selected then select Add > Routing Plane > Automatically. Names appear in the Command
Input & Output window but not on the Status bar.

The Components / Constraints list on the Branch Details form will be updated with the selected routing
planes.

The user will need to change the


Settings > Defaults from the Pipe
Router form pull down menu, and
change the Minimum Travel
Distance i.e. 300

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In this example two planes could be added to the Branch /PLANE 1 and PLANE1A.

The user will get better results by having the planes and different elevations as described later

6.8 Components on Planes

The Last On Plane checkbox on the Add Routing Plane form (and the Add Pipe Rack form) allows the user
to specify that positionable and locked components will be placed on the plane. When it is switched on, the
neighbouring list will show all the positionable and locked components in the Branch. The user should now
select the one required; all the positionable and locked components after the Plane, up to and including the
component given as Last On Plane, will be positioned on the plane.

The user can have several positionable components on a plane or rack.


The user can also have more than one locked component on a rack providing they are aligned.
Reducers are not permitted as positionable or locked components on a plane.

Using the Design Explorer navigate to the Design WORL*, and then drag into
the Command Window the Additional_Equip_and_Pipe_and_Plane.txt

From the datal, pipes, equipment and a Routing Plane named /PLANE2 are
created.

The coordinates for the plane are set to X 133500.0mm, Y 4700.0mm and Z
6600.0mm.
The Length has been set to 6000 mm and Dir set to X (Fwd).
This will cause pipes to be routed along the Forward / Aft (Longitudinal)
direction of the plane.
The Width has been set to 1750 mm and Dir set to Y (Port).
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This can be checked by selecting Modify > Routing Plane >


Dimensions from the main pull down menu of the Pipe Router form.

The routing plane PLANE2 has been already added to BRAN P3/B1, BRAN P4/P1, and BRAN P5/P1, giving
the pipe layout as shown below.

Alternatively Routing Plane PLANE2 could be moved, with a Z value of


7100.0mm using Modify > Routing Plane > Dimensions from the Pipe
Router form, and be used to route all the pipes more efficiently.

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6.8.1 Locked Straight-through Components

The user can place locked components on planes, but note the following conditions.

Locked components will define the slot on the plane for the Branch. If there is more than one
locked component for a branch on a plane or rack, all of these components must lie in the same
slot.
The user must have sufficiently wide gaps on the plane to fit in any component required. This
could be achieved, i.e., by using a large enough basic gap, or using WF / FF spacing with large
enough flange widths.
The Arrive and Leave directions must be along the travel direction.

6.8.2 Locked Bends and Elbows

Since locked bends or elbows define the start or end of the slot;

Locked bends and elbows will define the start or end of the slot on the travel plane as well as
the slot itself. Hence there can be at most one entry bend/elbow and one exit bend/elbow.
For a locked bend or elbow used to enter the travel plane from the entry plane, the arrive-
direction must be from the entry-plane and the leave-direction along the travel plane.
For a locked bend or elbow used to leave the travel plane, the arrive direction must be along the
travel plane and the leave direction must be to the exit plane.
If there are no rules about choosing entry/exit planes, Router will use the entry and exit
bend/elbow to help it to choose suitable entry/exit planes.

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Exercise 4 Routing Planes

1. Using the Equipment and pipes created from the previously loaded datal file, change PLANE2 to be
at the same height as the discharge from the pumps. Add PLANE3, which is to be parallel to the
bulkhead /F204_LB_2, The position of the planes should be similar to below.

2. Use centre of the pipes as their positioning criterion.

3. The pipes may require their sequence changed to allow the routing to be successful without any
clashes.

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CHAPTER 7

7 Creating and Using Pipe Racks

In Router, the term pipe rack is used to describe a group of routing planes which enable the user to
automatically model the routing patterns used on a physical pipe rack. In this chapter, the will learn how to:

Create pipe racks


Route pipes via a pipe rack

The user should understand the concepts of Routing Planes, explained in the previous chapter,
before starting this chapter

7.1 Introduction to Pipe Racks

A pipe rack is made up of routing planes (RPLAs) created within a routing plane group (RPLG). The planes
represent travel planes and entry / exit planes.

The user can create pipe racks with several levels, i.e. several travel planes. For each level of a pipe rack,
the user must create a travel plane to control the direction in which pipes travel along the rack and at least
one entry / exit plane to ensure that pipes enter onto and exit from the rack perpendicularly, either from
above or below. Each pipe rack must have at least one travel plane and at least one entry / exit plane. The
direction of travel is the X direction (length) for travel planes and the Y direction (width) for entry and exit
planes.

Router assumes that the RPLAs in an RPLG have their centres on a vertical line. The entry and exit planes
must be;

At least as long (in the X direction) as the travel Plane(s)


Wider (in the Y direction) than the travel planes
At least twice the bend length

When the user creates entry/exit planes, they must specify the distance by which they overhang the travel
planes. The overhang ensures that the vertical legs of pipes which enter and exit the rack are clear of the
pipe rack structure. A pipe rack may have an upper entry/exit plane, a lower entry/exit or both, depending on
the way in which desired pipes to enter and exit a pipe rack. In a pipe rack that has several levels, an
entry/exit plane can be used by more than one level.

An example is shown
opposite.

Examples of Routing Plane Groups www.aveva.com


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The user can manually associate a pipe rack with individual branches or can tell Router to automatically
search for and make use of any pipe racks which exist within the search volume of a branch or branches.
The default search volume is the volume between the head and tail of a pipe, as shown below, and it can be
extended as specified on the Router Defaults form.

Search Volume for Automatic Pipe Racks

Router will select the closest pipe rack to the head in the search volume, whose direction will take the pipe
closer to the tail, and providing that when using it, the pipe will travel on the rack for longer than the
Minimum Travel Distance as defined on the Router Defaults form.

7.2 Rack or Plane as Last Constraint

If the user is responsible for one area of a compartment and a different designer is responsible for an
adjacent one, a branch may run out of the first area on a pipe rack. The users may want to put the rack in
the constraint list and run the branch to their limits. The user can do this using the free tail option from the
branch details. A branch has a free tail when the tail is either not connected or is directly connected to
another branch; and the tail is not locked.

A free tail can be specified immediately after a pipe-rack or plane. When a branch has a plane or rack as its
last constraint and a free tail, Router will route the branch onto the plane or rack. It will travel in the direction
implied by the tail direction until it reaches the edge of the plane or rack. This will then become the tail
position. i.e., let User-A be responsible for one compartment and User-B be responsible for an adjacent one.
A branch /P100/B1 runs out of the User-A's compartment on a pipe-rack. User-A puts the rack in the
constraint list with the end of the travel plane at the limits, and specifies the tail direction and that the tail is
free. Router will then pack the pipe onto the rack and run it to the end of the rack. User-B connects the head
of a Pipe /P200/B1 to the tail of /P100/B1 and begins routing from this point. User-B must ensure that the
position of the head of branch /P200/B1 is initially unset. Router will use the Branch Lock so that the head
/P200/B1 moves if the connected tail moves. If the pipe starts by travelling along an extension of the rack in
User-A's compartment then User-B has a rack with its starting edge at the limit to represent this.

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7.3 How Pipes are Routed on a Pipe Rack

By default, Router avoids pockets by first finding the travel plane. If the Head is above the plane, the Pipe
will enter from above the plane. If the Head is below the plane, the Pipe will enter from below the plane. Exit
from the plane is similarly controlled by the position of the Tail relative to the plane.

There are three routing rules which enable the user to set which planes are used as entry, exit or travel
planes on pipe racks.

Pipe rack travel plane selection Use this rule to specify which level of a multilevel pipe rack
desired to use to route a particular type of branch.

Pipe rack entry plane selection Use this rule to specify the way in which pipes enter onto a rack,
based on the contents of the pipe. In order to use this rule, the user
must set up an attribute which defines the pipes contents, i.e.
steam or liquid.

Pipe rack exit plane selection Use this rule to specify the way in which pipes exit from a rack,
based on the contents of the pipe. In order to use this rule, the user
must set up an attribute which defines the pipes contents. If no rule
exists, the entry plane will be used.

7.3.1 Pipe Packing Defaults

By default, Router will run pipes along Routing planes with the wall-to-wall Pipe Gap, with any rounding
factor for the positioning, as given on the Router Defaults form. Information on how pipes are packed is
given later.

7.4 Methods for Creating Pipe Racks

The user can create a pipe rack using either of the following methods:

Convert an existing steelwork structure into a pipe rack, using elements of the steelwork as
reference points for the position and dimensions of the planes.
Create the routing planes which model the behaviour of a pipe rack and then add the steelwork
later, once satisfied with the route. In Router, this is referred to as a conceptual pipe rack.

7.5 Converting a Steelwork Structure to a Pipe Rack

Here the users will learn how to create a pipe rack, using elements of a steelwork structure as reference
points to position the planes. The users will also create the pipe rack, using the steelwork FRMW PipeRack-
001/PR-1.

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7.5.1 Creating Some Pipes (Worked Example)

Using the Design Explorer navigate to the Design WORL* and drag into the Command Window the
PipeRack_Equipment_and_Pipe.txt macro file this will create the all the required Pipe Rack, Equipment
and Pipes as shown below.

7.5.2 Creating the Pipe Rack

Now using the Design Explorer navigate to the STRU PIPERACK-001

The user can only create routing plane


groups inside a STRU element, and so
the current element must be a STRU,
FRMW or SBFR

From the Router form, select Create > Pipe


Rack Planes. The Create Pipe Rack form
will be displayed.

Key in the Name PR-1

The name of the STRU element which


owns the pipe rack elements is shown
under the Name field

Click the Convert button. Pick an element in


the steelwork in response to the prompt. The
Positioning Control form will be displayed to
help the user control which element is picked if
necessary.

Positioning Control is covered in AVEVA


Marine Outfitting Foundations (TM-2201)
Guide
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The Pipe Rack Definition form is displayed.

This form allows the user to define values which apply to all the
planes in the Rack.

When the user is creating a pipe rack in this way, the following
parameters have been derived from the existing structure and
the user cannot change Elevation of Anchor Plane, Elevation
between planes, Number of Travel Planes and the Number of
Entry / Exit Planes at this point

The Anchor Plane is the lowest travel plane in the rack

The user can change the Overhang of Entry / Exit planes, the default value is set on the Router Defaults
form. In the top left corner of the graphical window a message informs the user to Create Rack from (Snap)
Snap:, now with the cursor click the vertical leg of the pipe rack.

The Pipe Rack Definition form now populates and the OK button activated, click OK button on the Pipe Rack
Definition form.

Routing planes are added with transparency. The user can control the degree of transparency using
the Drawlist

The Create Pipe Rack form will now appear as follows.

Router has automatically filled in the Rack


Direction, and the Dimensions of the rack. The
details of the Planes will be shown in the list of
Planes at the bottom of the form. The Plane
Attribute values shown are those for the plane
selected in the Planes list.

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The user can edit the Plane Attributes for individual planes by changing the values in the form and then
clicking Include button to create a new plane or Replace to replace the plane selected in the list.

7.6 Adding a Pipe Rack to a Branch

In this section, the user will route the pipes created in earlier via the pipe rack PR-1. There are two ways in
which the user can associate branches with a pipe rack.

The user can manually add a pipe rack to the list of constraints for a branch and do this either
from the Router form or from the Branch Details form.
The user can tell Router to automatically make use of any pipe racks that exist within a certain
area between the head and tail of a branch.

7.6.1 Automatically Adding Pipe Racks to a Branch

To tell Router to automatically make use of pipe racks, select the branches /P3/B1, /P4/B1, and /P5/B1, from
the Router form and then select Modify > Branch > Add Pipe Rack > Automatically

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7.6.2 Manually Adding Pipe Racks to a Branch

To manually add a pipe rack to the list of constraints for a branch from
the Router form, select the branch /P3/B1, then select the Modify >
Branch > Add Pipe Rack > Selection. The Add Pipe Rack form is
displayed which contains a list of the pipe racks that are available for
selection. Select the rack /PR-1 and click the OK button to add the rack
to the constraint list for the selected branch.

Repeat this for all the pipes P4/B1, and P5/B1. Then use Branch Detail
button and check that the Plane /PR-1 has been added to the pipe
branches.

This could also be done on all as multiple selection affects all pipes

Route all of the branches, using the Router form. The route taken by the pipes should look like this:

The default route creates pockets in three of the Pipes. By default, Router routes all pipes that associated
with a pipe rack along the first travel plane that it finds in the routing plane group (RPLG).

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7.7 Creating a Conceptual Pipe Rack (Worked Example)

Here the user will learn how to create a conceptual pipe rack, that is, a pipe rack without any associated
steelwork. The steelwork can be added later.

7.7.1 Creating Some Pipes

Before a conceptual pipe rack can be created, the


user needs to create some pipes to route via the
rack. Using the Design Explorer navigate to the
Design WORL*and drag into the Command
Window the
Equipment_and_Pipe_for_PipeRack.txt macro
file this will recreate the pipes /P3, /P4, and P5
together with equipment /PMP-3, PMP-4, and
PMP-5 as shown.

7.7.2 Creating the Pipe Rack

Firstly add the three pipes /P3, /P4 and /P5 to the Pipe Router form, the user can only create routing plane
groups inside a STRU element. To create a conceptual pipe rack navigate using the Design Explorer
navigate to the ZONE 311-STRCT

From the Router form, select Create > Structure for Planes

The Name Structure for RPLG form is displayed, key in the Name
PRS2 and click the OK button.

From the Router form, select Create > Pipe Rack Planes

The Create Pipe Rack form is displayed.

Key in the Name PR-2. Set Rack Direction


option button to Y/-Y

Select Corner 1 from the drop-down list, then


key the values X 130400.00mm, Y
5750.00mm, Z 7000.00mm.

Select Corner 2 from the drop-down list, then


key the values X 135900.00mm, Y
4000.00mm, Z 7000.00mm.

The Length of Rack and Width of Travel Planes are calculated automatically www.aveva.com
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The Create Multiple Planes button will now be active. Click this button to display the Pipe Rack Definition
form. In this case all the options on this form will be active.

Key in the Elevation between planes box -750.00mm. This will create
the Entry / Exit plane 1000 mm below the Anchor (travel) plane.

The other options can be left at their default values, then click OK
button.

Router creates an outline of all the planes for the rack and displays an arrow on the travel planes to indicate
the travel direction of the rack. This enables the user to check whether the plane is as required.

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7.7.3 Adding Pipes to the Pipe Rack

Add the pipe rack to the Branches by selecting Modify > Branch > Add Pipe Rack > Automatically, or
Modify > Branch > Add Pipe Rack > Selection and route the pipes the route taken by the pipes will look
like this

Router routes the pipes to it best ability, pipes may require slight modification after routing for any
unavoidable clashes

Exercise 5 Pipe Rack

1. Using the above examples create the Routing Planes for a Pipe Bridge and create a Conceptual
Pipe Rack in both cases and route some pipes using them.

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CHAPTER 8

8 Pipe Packing

This chapter describes how to specify the gaps between Pipes on Routing Planes, which includes Routing
Planes defining Pipe Racks.

This chapter only deals with setting values for pipe packing using the Router forms. The user can also
control pipe packing by means of rules.

Using Routing Rules are covered in The Routing Rules Administration Chapter 9

8.1 Pipe Packing Defaults

By default, Router will run pipes along Routing planes with the wall-to-wall Pipe Gap given on the Router
Defaults form.

Gaps only apply to pipes on planes or racks. The user should use obstruction volumes to model
clearance of pipes from columns, etc.
Gaps will always be the sideways displacement. Any vertical difference between the centrelines
of pipes will not affect packing. Very small pipes will not be packed under the edge of very large
diameter pipes.

The Pipe Gap is calculated as shown below.

With a 50.0mm wall-to-wall gap, the centre of a branch


of OD 200.0mm will be placed 225.0mm from the centre
of an adjacent branch of OD 150.0mm.

The Defaults form, which can be activated by selecting Settings > Defaults from the Pipe Router form,
also has a Pipe Gap Rounding option. This option ensures that the centres of pipes are positioned at
rounded coordinates relative to the edge of the routing plane. Coordinates are always rounded up. If no
rounding is required, leave this value as 0. Router obtains values from the OD (for the current Pipe) or the
geometry (for adjacent Pipes), and assume that these are consistent. i.e., consider two Pipes, OD 145.0mm
and 60.0mm, on a plane for which the gap is 100.0mm. If the rounding factor is set to 10, the centre of the
first Pipe will be placed at 80 (rather than 72.5).

The centre-to-centre distance will be;

72.5 + 100 + 30 = 202.5 which will be rounded up to 210. Hence the


centre of the second Pipe will be placed at 290.

8.2 Flanges on Routing Planes

If it is required to run sections of Pipes which include Flanges along routing planes, the user can specify that
the gap value will be applied as a wall-to-flange (WF) gap if the flanges can be staggered. If the flanges can
be side by side on a plane, the gap value is defined as a flange-to-flange (FF) gap. The default is wall-to-
wall (WW) spacing. The spacing is controlled by the Plane Wall to Wall PLWW attribute of the Routing Plane
RPLA. PLWW can be set to WW, WF or FF.

The Flange spacing options can be set using either Flanges on Single Routing Planes or Flanges on Pipe
Racks.
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8.2.1 Flanges on Single Routing Planes

For single routing planes, select Create > Routing Plane on the
Pipe Router form menu. This displays the Create Routing Plane
form which shows the Pipe to Pipe options.

The user can also change the settings for an existing routing plane
on the RPLA Specification form, displayed by selecting Modify >
Routing Plane > Specification on the Router form.

8.2.2 Flanges on Pipe Racks

For pipe racks, set the options on the Pipe


Rack Definition form, displayed by clicking OK
on the Create Pipe Rack form. The user can
also change the settings for an existing Pipe
Rack on the Modify Pipe Rack form, displayed
by selecting Modify > Pipe Rack on the
Pipe Router form. Click Modify All Planes
button.

The flange width is the width of the default flange (i.e. the flange
which is obtained with a AVEVA Marine SELECT, this is the syntax
for creating a flange NEW FLANGE SELECT, the select gets the
information from the specification, so the syntax could be SELECT
with STYPE WN for the branches at their current bore, even if there
are other flanges on the pipe rack.

The flange width is taken as 0 if no rule is applied or if


the user tries to specify WF or FF spacing between
branches either of which does not have a default flange

If necessary the user can change the spacing using the additional pipe-specific gap on the Router Defaults
form.

When wall-to-flange spacing is used, the greater of the flange widths for the current pipe and the
adjacent pipe will be added to the wall-to-wall spacing.
When flange-to-flange spacing is used, the flange width of both pipes will be added to the wall-
to-wall gap.

The size of flanges is found using the Flange Width (FLWI) rule, which is applied to the default flange for
each branch at its current bore.

Using Routing Rules are covered in The Routing Rules Administration Chapter 9
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CHAPTER 9

9 Routing Rules Administration

Routing Rules are special AVEVA Marine rules which are used to control:

How components are selected, positioned and orientated as Branches are routed.
How Pipes are packed on Pipe Racks and Routing Planes.

This chapter describes how to use the sample routing rules supplied with the product. The users can also
define their own routing rules as covered later in this chapter.

For more general information about defining rules for setting attributes, see the AVEVA Marine
DESIGN Reference Manual

The user can apply routing rules to individual branches or all branches within a particular site, zone, or pipe.
Rules can also be applied to and removed from individual components as required.

9.1 Expressions

A routing rule consists of AVEVA Marine expressions. The examples in this training guide should give the
user a starting point for writing the expressions needed for routing rules.

AVEVA Marine expressions consist of the following:

AVEVA Marine element types. i.e., VALV, BRAN, TEE. This also includes OWNER and
MEMBER.

AVEVA Marine attributes and pseudo-attributes. i.e., HDIR, ABOR.

For a list of AVEVA Marine attributes, see the AVEVA Marine Software Customisation Guide.

Logical operators. The operators available are;

EQ equal to
NE not equal to
GE greater than or equal to
GT greater than
LE less than or equal to
LT less than

Keywords. There are a wide variety of keywords, illustrated in the rest of this chapter. i.e., ALL,
WITH, UP, IS.

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9.2 Creating a Rule Set

From the Pipe Router form, select Settings > Routing Rules

The Routing Rules form is displayed, select Create > Rule World, the Create Rule World form is now
displayed, key in the Name PIPE-RULES and then click the OK button.

Now from the Routing Rules form, select Create > Rule Set, the Create Rule Set form is displayed, key in
the Name PACK-RULES, Function PIPE and then click the OK button.

Now from the Routing Rules form, select Create > Rule > New, the Create New Rule form is displayed,
key in the Name FLANGE-WIDTH and then click the OK button.

The Rule Attribute form is now displayed, Key in the Description Flange Width is 25% of ABOR, set the
Purpose to Flange Width requirement, key in the Selection ALL BRANCH MEMBERS, key in the Action (
0.25 * ATTRIB ABOR ) and then click the OK button.

The Rule Set can be Modified by selecting the


required rule set i.e. /PACK-RULES from Current
Rule Set option list and select the rule in Routing
Planes form and select Modify > Rule

This Flange Width Rule to influence the route of the


pipes, the Plane specification must have the Pipe to
Pipe gap option set to Wall to Flange or Flange to
Flange. In this case ensure the Planes are set to
Flange to Flange.

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9.3 Applying a Rule Set to a Branch

Once a rule set is created, it can be applied to a branch. The rules will then take effect on the components in
the branch. To do this from the Design Explorer, navigate to the branch which requires a rule set associated
to it, in this case /P3/B1.

Then from the Pipe Router form select Settings > Apply Rules > To Branch. The Apply Rules form is
displayed.

Select the rule world which contains the rule sets


desired to be applied to the branch from the RULE
WORLD option list. The Apply to list contains the
Branch selected in the Design Explorer. Select the
rule set that is to be applied from the Rule sets
available in current world list.

The user can add the rule set as high priority or


low priority. Router first checks to see if there are
any rules that will apply to a component from the
high priority rule sets. If there are none then
Router checks if there are any rules that will apply
in the low priority rule sets. Click the Add HIGH
button to add the rule set to the High Priority Sets
list. Click Apply and Dismiss button. Route the
branch to apply the rules, it can be seen that
nothing is changed.

Now modify the Routing rule and route the pipes once again. i.e. ( .25 * ATTRIB ABOR ) the effects of the
rule can be seen.

If a valve were added to the pipeline P3/B1, and


the pipe lines P4/B1 and P5/B1 routed once
again, there should be now a greater gap
between the pipe lines taking into account the
routing rule.

Note that the Settings > Apply Rules options on the Router form allow the user to apply the rule sets to a
SITE, ZONE or PIPE. In these cases all branches which are owned in the hierarchy will also have the rule
sets applied, unless they have rule sets specifically applied.

If the user applies rules to an element which contains many Branches, i.e., a ZONE, then each
time a Branch is routed, Router will check every Branch to see if the rules apply. This may take
some time

By default, Router applies all the rules in the specified sets to a branch, providing they are appropriate. The
user can, however, remove a rule from a particular component in a branch, or add one from another rule set.

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9.4 Removing a Rule Set

To remove a rule set from the Design Explorer form, select the branch the rule set needs to be removed
from.

Select Settings >Apply Rules >To Branch. The Apply Rules form is displayed. Select the rule set
desired to remove, then click on the Remove HIGH or Remove LOW button as appropriate. Click Apply
and then Dismiss.

If a Rule Set has been applied to a PIPE, SITE or ZONE, it will be removed from all Branches in that PIPE,
SITE or ZONE.

9.5 Including a Rule from another Rule Set or World

If a rule is to be applied to a component from another rule world or rule set, from the Router form select the
branches to apply the rule to. Click on the Branch Detail button. Then click on the Component Rules
button on the Branch Detail form.

The Component Rules form is displayed which can be the used to add additional rules from the available
rule sets, or from another rule world.

From the Current Component option list, select the


component that the rule will be applied to.

The letter that precedes the rule description in the


Rules applying to current component list shows
where the rule was originally applied. The letters
used are:

B Branch
P Pipe
Z Zone
S Site

From the Rules available list, select the rule to be applied to the selected component, then click on the
Include button. The rule is added to the list of rules which applies to the component. Click the Dismiss
button.

9.6 Disabling a Rule from a Component

To prevent Router from applying a rule to a particular component in a branch from the Router form, select
the branch which desired to work. Click on the Branch Detail button to display the Branch Detail form.
From the Branch Detail form, select the component from which desired to exclude the rule.

Click on the Component Rules button. The Component Rules form is displayed. From the list of rules that
apply to the current component, select the rule desired to disable from the component, then click on the
Disable button.

Router places an asterisk (*) to the left of the rule description to indicate that the rule is now
excluded from being used.

To re-enable a disabled rule, select the rule, then click the Enable button.

The rule will now appear in the Rules applying to current component list, preceded by a plus sign (+)
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9.7 Querying Rules

The user can query which rules are applied to a Branch, which may be
found useful if many rules are in use, and the result is not as expected.
Display the command line by selecting Display > Command Window
from the main pull down menu, and then in the Command Window type Q
ROBRRU

This command Q ROBRRU is only valid if the current element is a Pipe, Branch or a Branch
Member

9.8 Modifying Routing Rules

9.8.1 Travel Plane Rule (Worked Example)

Create a new travel rule, select Settings > Routing rules from the Pipe Router form, the routing Rules for
is displayed, select Create > Rule Set, the Create rule set form is now displayed, key in the Name
TRAVEL-RULES , Function PROCESS and then click the OK button.

Once the rule set is created, select Create > Rule > New from the Routing Rules form, the Create New
Rule form is now displayed, key in the Name PROCESS-TRAVEL and then click the OK button.

The Rule Attribute form is now displayed, Key in the Description Process Travel Rule, set the Purpose to
Pipe Rack travel plane selection, key in the Selection ALL BRANCH WITH ( ATTRIB PURP OF OWNER
EQ PROC ), key in the Action ( ATTRIB FUNC EQ PROCESS ) and then click the OK button. The
Routing Rules form is displayed, Select Current Rule World as /PIPE-RULES and Current Rule Set as
/TRAVEL-RULES

The Travel Rule can now be used to specify that all pipes with a purpose of PROC will be routed on a
specific Travel Plane.

The Rule Attributes can be Modified by selecting Modify > Rule from the pull down menu on the Routing
Rules form. This displays the Rule Attributes form, the rule shows that all branch owners or Pipes with a
Purpose (PURP) of PROC will be placed on a Travel Plane with the function of the plane set to PROCESS,
click the OK button and then click the Cancel button to close the form
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9.8.2 Setting Routing Rules (Worked Example Contd.)

The Routing Rules used in the above example will need to be set against design elements. In this case the
user will set Travel Rules against the ZONE 311-PIPE.

Using the Design Explorer, navigate to Zone 311-PIPE


and then select Settings > Apply Rules > To Zone

The Apply Rules form is displayed, select /TRAVEL-RULES in the Rules sets available in current world then
click Add HIGH button, click the Apply and then click Dismiss button.

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9.9 Setting Routing Plane Function

Using the Design Explorer Navigate to the ZONE 311-STRCT and drag the macro Routing_Plane_Rack.txt
into the Command Window. As can be seen from the previous example in order to use the Routing Rule the
user must set the Plane Function to PROCESS.

Using the Design Explorer navigate to the Routing


Plane Group RPLG PR-1

From the Pipe Router form select Modify > Pipe Rack from the
main pull down menu on the Pipe Router form.

The Modify Pipe Rack form is displayed, from


the Planes section at the bottom of the Modify
Pipe Rack form Select the Level 2 travel
plane 7622

In the Functions text box key in PROCESS,


then click the Replace button, and then click
the Dismiss button to close the form.

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Using the Design Explorer navigate to


pipe /P3, now select Modify >
Attributes Global from the main
pull down menu

The Global Attribute Change form is displayed, select the


Purpose Attribute and in the Replace section of the form
click the radio button for All attribute data and in the with text
box key in PROC and then click the Apply button.

A Confirm message form is now displayed, asking the user OK to modify element, click the Yes button. A
second Confirm message box is displayed asking the user OK to keep changes? again click the Yes
button. Repeat this for pipe P4.

Before rerouting manually add the pipe rack PR-1 to each branch and then reroute, and add the rule to the
piping Zone i.e. Settings > Apply Rules > To Zone, then route all the pipes once again. The user should
see the Pipe P3 and P4 have now been routed on the top travel plane as shown.

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9.10 Creating a New Routing Rule (Worked Example)

In the following example the users will create a new Rule for insulated pipes, if the Pipe Branch has the
Ispec Attribute set then the Pipe will be lifted 100mm above the pipe rack steelwork.

Create a new Rule World by selecting Create


> Rule World. Name new Rule World as
INSU-WORLD.

Having selected INSU-WORLD in the


Current World option list, create a new Rule
Set by selecting Create > Rule Set. Name
new Rule Set as INSU-SET and set the
Function to INSU

Create a new Rule by selecting Create > Rule > New. Name new
Rule as INSU-RULE

Define the newly created Rule as given.

Key in the Description Shoe Height 100 if Ispec is


set, select Purpose Shoe height requirement

Type the Selection as ALL BRANCH MEMBERS


WITH ( ATTRIB ISPE OF OWNER NEQ ID
NULREF ) and Action as (100 mm)

Then click the OK button.

Exercise 6 Routing Rules

1. Create a Routing Rule as shown above.

2. Using the above example reroute PIPE P3 using Travel Routing Rules.

3. Change the function Level 2 Entry and exit Planes to ENTRY and investigate the results.

4. Add the routing rule /INSU-RULE created in the worked example above to the zone, Add ISPEC /W
to Pipe branch /P4 and reroute the pipes, Pipe /P4 should be 100mm above the steelwork.
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CHAPTER 10

10 Special Routr Attributes

Below shows the special attributes that can be used by router:

10.1 Branch Member Status Creation Code (RLOC)

Attribute of branch members. This determines whether element is to be deleted or repositioned by router

RLOC = -1 Unset
RLOC = 0 Non-deletable and positionable
RLOC = 1 Locked
RLOC = 2 Deletable

10.2 Branch Member Head Relative Flag (HREL)

Attribute of Branch Member. This determines if a component should be placed as near to the Head as
possible (True) or as close to the Tail as possible (Flase). If a component is tail relative it will force all
components between it and the next locked component or constraint towards the Tail. The default value is
set to True.

10.3 Branch Positioning Status Code (BRLO)

Attribute of a branch set, the users should not normally set the BRLO. If the user is routing a branch which
has already been positioned it is better to unset the BRLO attribute and then set the LHEAD and LTAIL as
appropriate. This indicates whether the Head and /or the Tail of the branch is fixed or free. If the Head /or
Tail is connected to a nozzle or a piping component, the value of BRLO is ignored.

If the HREF is unset then the head must be positioned (LHEAD true) and the head of the branch is fixed.
Thus the head lock is only relevant when the head is connected to the tail of another branch. If the head is
fixed, the tail of the connected branch will be positioned where the head of the branch is, but if the head is
not fixed the head of the branch will be positioned at the tail of the connecting branch.

If TREF is unset the tail can be positioned and the tail of the branch fixed; or the tail can be free when router
will calculate a position for it. When the tail is connected to the head of another branch it will be positioned
where the head of that branch is unless the tail is fixed.

Router does not consider the possibility of branches connected head to head or tail to tail

BRLO = 0 Unset, router will use LHEAD / LTAIL to calculate BROL if necessary
BRLO = 4 Free head and free tail
BRLO = 5 Fixed head and free tail
BRLO = 6 Free head and fixed tail
BRLO = 7 Fixed head and fixed tail

If BRLO is not set before calling the router application, then HREF, LHEAD, TREF and LTAIL attributes
are used to set a suitable value

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