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2010-2011

the
Hotchkiss
school
COURSE LISTING

S TAT E M E N T O F TAB LE O F CON T E N T S
GOALS A N D P U R P O SE S

The Hotchkiss School strives to develop in 01 Introduction
students a lifelong love of learning, responsible 02 Foundations of Learning
citizenship, and personal integrity. We are a
03 Diploma Requirements
community based on trust, mutual respect,
09 Classical & Modern Languages
and compassion, and we hold all members of
the community accountable for upholding 20 English
these values. 23 Humanities & Social Sciences
The school is committed to mastery of 35 Mathematics & Computer
learning skills, development of intellectual cu- 43 Science
riosity, excellence and creativity in all disci-
51 Visual & Performing Arts
plines, and enthusiastic participation in
72 Human Development
athletics and other school activities. We en-
courage our students to develop clarity of 73 Interdisciplinary Courses
thought, confidence and facility in expressing
ideas, and artistic and aesthetic sensitivity. We
expect all members of the community, in and
out of the classroom, to subject their views
and actions to critical examination and to ac-
cept responsibility for them. We hope that
our graduates will leave Hotchkiss with a
commitment to service to others and to envi-
ronmental stewardship, and with greater un-
derstanding of themselves and of their
responsibilities in a global society.

Cert no. BV-COC-013529

The cover has 10% PC recycled content, and the text page paper comes from responsibly managed forests.

INTRODUCTION 01

I N T RO D U C T I O N

ACADEMICS COME FIRST AT HOTCHKISS.
Through the breadth and depth of the curriculum and the flexibility of the
diploma requirements, Hotchkiss provides students with the opportunity to craft a
rigorous course of study around their academic interests. This booklet contains
current information on the diploma requirements and course offerings, as well as
guidelines for making course choices.

As is true of many New England boarding schools, Hotchkiss retains its own
traditional nomenclature for different grade levels. In this book, all 9th graders will
be referred to as Preps, all 10th graders will be referred to as Lower Mids, all 11th
graders will be referred to as Upper Mids, and all 12th graders and postgraduates
will be referred to as Seniors.

2 FOUNDATIONS OF LEARNING

FOUNDATIONS
OF LEARNING
The Foundations of Learning are interdisciplinary statements about what students should
know, understand and be able to do by graduation. The Hotchkiss School’s Foundations
of Learning guides students as they strive to become:

Responsible Individuals, who • Assess the ongoing effects of mathematics,
• Live ethically, maintaining their own integrity the sciences, arts, and humanities on society
and extending moral respect to all people; and culture;
• Care for their own and others’ physical, • Demonstrate imagination in defining and
emotional, and spiritual health; solving problems in real-world settings;
• Take the initiative to achieve their goals and
hold themselves accountable for their choices; Expressive Creators, who
• Take risks as learners, accepting failure as well • Demonstrate essential aural, kinesthetic, and
as success; visual skills when creating or performing
works;
Contributing Community Members, who • Conceive an original work or interpret and
• Work well in teams; existing work;
• Recognize, through service, the obligations • Express respectfully and confidently ideas
and privileges of citizenship within school, and feelings when creating or performing;
local, national, and global communities;
• Demonstrate understanding of the diversity Effective Communicators, who
and interdependence of cultures; • Present information and ideas orally in a
• Act as stewards of the environment; clear, correct, and convincing manner;
• Write clearly, with accurate grammar and
Confident Researchers, who mechanics;
• Find and document information, using • Communicate in a language other than their
traditional and contemporary methods and a own, well enough to exchange information
variety of resources; and gain direct entrée to another culture;
• Evaluate the credibility and importance of • Demonstrate critical receptivity as audience
information and opinions; for verbal and non-verbal presentations and
performances; and,
Critical Thinkers, who • Express themselves effectively by using a
• Read, listen to, analyze, and assess complex variety of skills, tools, media, and
ideas and arguments; technologies.
• Apply and build upon complex ideas and
arguments with their own hypotheses,
inferences and conclusions;
• Draw connections among disparate ideas and
sources of information;

not-for-credit course. must receive a minimum of 13 credits. must satisfy the various departmental requirements regarding level of study and proficiency. In order to do so. for each semester course passed. depending must receive a minimum of 9 credits. class dean. Seniors must pass different number of courses. they all of their courses. HI360. must receive permission from their advisor. students must earn credits in certain subjects depending on the year in which they enter Hotchkiss. Mid and Senior years. C O U R S E L OA D R E Q U I R E M E N T S the case of some yearlong music ensembles. on the year in which they enter Hotchkiss. some students may wish to take a student receives one-half credit. one- Students normally carry five courses each semester. therefore. including geometry or the equivalent. Nine ■ A student entering in the Senior class must of the total credits must be earned in the Upper receive a minimum of 4 credits. ENTERING PREPS English Four credits Mathematics & Computer Mathematics through the third level. but the framework of a student’s educational experience at Hotchkiss. or HI390) Classical & Modern Languages Through the third-year level of a language offered at Hotchkiss by placement or study Visual & Performing Arts One credit Human Development Taken in the lower mid year . by placement or completing a 300-level course Science Two credits in laboratory science Humanities & Social Sciences One credit in U. In order to be eligible for a diploma. DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS 3 DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS In order to qualify for a diploma. and must complete successfully the requirements listed below. students must be currently enrolled and in good standing in the School. The School wants students to take responsibility for their own education. a receive a minimum of 17 credits. students ■ A student entering in the Upper Mid class must earn a certain number of credits. in addition to ■ A student entering in the Lower Mid class the normal five-course load. History (HI350. and the Dean of Studies. twice-weekly. half credit). unless the student enters Hotchkiss in the Senior class.S. it provides them with the freedom and flexibility to design an academic program around their intellectual interests. a On occasion. All Lower Mids are ■ A student entering in the Prep class must required to complete Human Development. For each yearlong course passed a student receives one credit (or in SUBJECT REQUIREMENTS In order to be eligible for a diploma. These requirements do not constitute a complete course of study.

unless the Department has granted special permission.S. Returning students and new students entering at other grade levels are required to earn one credit.S. or by earning one credit Postgraduates are not required to take a language. Students who complete Prep or LM Humanities satisfy the visual and performing arts requirement. Prep and LM Humanities satisfy the Prep and LM English requirement. History (HI350. HI360.4 D I P L OMA R E Q U I R E M E N TS ENTERING LOWER MIDS English Three credits Mathematics & Computer Mathematics through the third level. by placement or completing a 300-level course Science One credit in a laboratory science Humanities & Social Sciences One credit in U.S. by placement or completing a 300-level course Postgraduates are not required to take math.S. history requirement. .S. History can apply to the Humanities & Social Sciences Department for a waiver of this requirement. History (HI350. including geometry or the equivalent. or HI390) Classical & Modern Languages Through the third-year level of a language offered at Hotchkiss by placement or study. Students who complete Prep and LM Humanities satisfy the U. This version is available at the Hotchkiss bookstore. including geometry or the equivalent. History and to write a research paper to Hotchkiss standards within that year. or through the second-year level of one language offered at Hotchkiss by study ENTERING SENIORS AND POSTGRADUATES English One credit Postgraduates may petition the Department to have this requirement waived. Notes: The Mathematics & Computer Department requires all students to own a Texas Instruments TI-Nspire CAS calculator. Classical & Modern Languages Through the third-year level of a language offered at Hotchkiss by placement. including geometry or the equivalent. The Classical & Modern Languages Department requires that the language requirement be completed in successive years. then the students are required to take another year of history or art history in place of U. Students taking Prep or LM Humanities earn three credits. or HI390) Classical & Modern Languages Through the third-year level of a language offered at Hotchkiss by placement or study Visual & Performing Arts One credit Human Development Taken in the lower mid year ENTERING UPPER MIDS English Two credits Mathematics & Computer Mathematics through the third level. Mathematics & Computer Mathematics through the third level. Entering Preps are required to earn two credits in laboratory science. Entering students who have taken a year of U. HI360. If this waiver is granted. by placement or completing a 300-level course Science One credit in a laboratory science or high school credit for the equivalent of one year of biology. respectively. chemistry or physics Humanities & Social Sciences One credit in U. The School is phasing in a new science diploma requirement.

Typically the As stated above. 2013.S. natural/physical science. mathematics or ■ 2 additional years of English. Division I Division II 16 Core Courses: 14 Core Courses: ■ 4 years of English. In order to be eligible to play interscholastic sports at Division I or II schools. ■ 2 years of mathematics (Algebra I or higher). For example. Most competitive colleges expect students to have a solid foundation in a NCAA INITIAL ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS Students should also be aware of certain practical considerations. making sure that they will be ■ 2 years of science (one life. History devise a course of study that at least includes: requirement. interests. DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS 5 CLASSICS DIPLOMA wide array of disciplines and to have advanced to A student may qualify for a Classics Diploma with as high a level as possible in those disciplines. ■ 3 years of extra courses (from any area above. ■ 1 extra year of English. one non-U. lab if offered by high school).) and complete a course of study that is challenging ■ 1 year of arts (visual or performing) and and comprehensive and that complements their ■ 1 semester of philosophy or religion. ■ 4 years of English C O U R S E O F S T U DY ■ 3 years of mathematics Students should take great care in planning their ■ 3 years of language entire curriculum. student-athletes interested in playing interscholastic sports at any Division I or Division II college or university must meet the NCAA initial eligibility requirements. The School recommends that most students for this diploma are released from their U. mathematics or natural/ physical science. ■ 2 years of social science.org) for details. the Hotchkiss diploma student completes four levels of Latin and three of requirements are a framework within which Greek. Student-athletes should visit the NCAA Clearinghouse website (http://eligibilitycenter. student-athletes must have earned credits in certain core course areas.S. . ■ 4 years of extra courses (from any area above. ■ 3 years of mathematics (algebra I or higher). or five levels of Latin and two of Greek. one physical) able to meet the Hotchkiss diploma requirements ■ 2 years of history (one U.S. and to a classics independent study. students planning to attend an NCAA Division II institution will be required to complete 16 core courses. or students have the flexibility to design a course of four levels of Latin and two of Greek in addition study that best develops their talents. extensive work in Latin and Greek. Students qualifying skills.. ■ 2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of ■ 2 years of natural/physical science (1 year of lab if offered by high school). foreign language or nondoctrinal religion/ foreign language or nondoctrinal religion/ philosophy) philosophy) Please note: Beginning August 1. interests and talents. ■ 2 years of social science. ■ 3 years of English.

The 1## = First level of a multi-year sequence Humanities & Social Science Department. with each digit providing ##9 = Full-year course worth one-half credit information about sequence. the ##0 = Full-year course Registrar (HMechare@Hotchkiss. for Courses targeted at Preps example. Courses targeted at Lower Mids 360 or 390 or Prep and LM Humanities. #6# = groups of students) on an advanced. the Dean of Studies Third digit (TWoelper@Hotchkiss. Faculty #1# = Foundation level courses members work with individual students (or small #2#. Hotchkiss uses a two-letter three-semester sequence begun the and three-number system to indicate the discipline previous year and level of each course. is as follows: Most departments discourage students from taking courses out of grade level sequence. 3## = Third level of a multi-year sequence Courses targeted at Upper Mids Adding or Dropping Courses Most courses that prepare for the SAT Students who wish to add or drop a course after the Subject Tests first two weeks of a semester should discuss the Elective courses designed for students matter with their advisor. then please call 860-435-3186 or e- mail either Tom Woelper. #9# = AP courses in a fixed sequence or If you have any questions about our course offerings typically taken at a certain grade level or procedures. or Heather Mechare. Some Elective courses designed primarily for advanced courses may be taken only with Preps and Lower Mids departmental approval.org). Semester or yearlong courses dropped Elective courses designed primarily for after the first marking period in the first semester Upper Mids and Seniors and semester courses dropped after three weeks in Courses with a 300-level prerequisite the second semester will remain on a student’s 5## = Fifth level of a multi-year sequence transcript with the cumulative grade at the time the Courses approximating introductory course was dropped. class dean. #5#. Further #7# or #8# = information about the ISC option can be obtained Honors or advanced level courses from the registrar or the Dean of Studies. #3#. but no credit will be earned. level or scheduling. discourages students from taking 400-level 2## = Second level of a multi-year sequence history courses before they complete either HI350. or the Dean of from any grade level Studies.org). independent Standard level courses course proposed by the student. The logic of the ##5 = Semester course offered both semesters numbering system. No course can be entered after the first 4## = Fourth level of a multi-year sequence two weeks of a semester without permission of the Courses targeted at Seniors instructor. ISCs are optional courses of study for Second digit Seniors and Upper Mids with permission. ##1 = First semester course ##2 = Second semester course . #4#.6 D I P L OMA R E Q U I R E M E N TS COURSE LEVELS ##3 = First semester course which completes a In addition to the title. college level Courses with a 400-level prerequisite Independent Study Courses Teaching assistant courses An Independent Study Course (ISC) can be of 6## = Courses beyond introductory college level great value for the students who have exhausted the 9## = Independent Study Courses (ISC) published curriculum within an academic department.

student for admissions. Prep Year: Preps typically do not take any standardized tests. the School . writing and math to taking returned to the students in December. Senior Year: Seniors will be able to take SAT length. Results are critical reading. January as well. For those preferring directed review. Results are preparation for the SAT Reasoning Test is a broad returned to the students in December. the School recognizes that in Test with their classroom teacher. to help students in these areas. or not they are prepared to take an SAT Subject At the same time. students benefit college advisor. Remember. Hotchkiss suggests courseschool) which consists of 18 self-paced. Lower Mids should discuss whether time during the school year on their course work. writing. Using the School’s Reasoning or Subject Tests in October. from Upper Mid Year: All Upper Mids are registered diagnosing their strengths and weaknesses in by Hotchkiss for the PSAT in October. Lower and deep education. SAT Reasoning Test Preparation Lower Mid Year: Lower Mids have the option The Hotchkiss School believes that the best of taking the PSAT in October. the SAT Subject Tests. Hotchkiss is a testing Upper Mid year. The School provides two services used for National Merit Scholarship consideration. Most colleges look first at Students sit for these tests at different points in students’ course selection. Some official SAT online course offered by the College colleges require a total of three SAT Subject Test Board (see http://collegeboard. that testing is only one November 6. after interactive lessons corresponding to the SAT’s the completion of yearlong courses and the review critical reading. that students take SAT Subject Tests in June. one lesson for the PSAT/NMSQT) and six full. Given this belief and the rigor Mids should take SAT Subject Tests in June if they of the Hotchkiss curriculum. Many colleges accept the in a position to recommend or discourage the ACT in place of the SAT Reasoning Test and/or services rendered by such groups. January 22. and math sections (plus of our own exam period. individual testing plans should be discussed with the student’s college 2010-2011 SAT Test Dates advisor. assigned during the upper mid year. November account number. Hotchkiss is a testing site for the October 9. the Reasoning Test in January and again in May. students can still test in place where they have access to the Internet. May 7. however. students from any grade level (both generally valid for early decision applicants) may take this course at any time and from any and December. official practice SATs. The School The School advises all Upper Mids to take the SAT subscribes to the SAT Readiness Program. and most semester. the School have performed well in appropriate courses (see recommends that students focus their energy and chart below). advisor and/or a the months leading up to the SAT. The School is not affiliated with any students take at least one Advanced Placement other test preparation company or tutors and is not exam while at Hotchkiss. but not the ACT. December 4. followed by their their Hotchkiss career: academic achievement in those courses.com/satonline scores of the student’s choice. This test is practice exams. cost of these sessions is sent to the parents of The SAT Reasoning Test and the SAT Subject Upper Mid students at the end of the first Tests are required at most colleges. Information about the dates and site for the PSATs and the SATs. and factor that colleges consider when evaluating a June 4 SATs and for the October 13 PSAT. from instruction on test-taking strategies. If need be. DIPLOMA REQUIREMENTS 7 COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATION contracts with an outside test preparation company BOARD (CEEB) TESTS to provide interested students with ten hours of Students are required to take certain standardized instruction and practice during the spring of their tests for college admission.

S. 350 or above Mathematics Level 1 MA452 or above Mathematics Level 2 Science BI350 or BI550 Biology M CH350 or CH550 Chemistry PY350. Ideally students should take the Literature subject test after as much English study as possible. Students should consult their classroom teacher.e. in their Senior year History HI390 U. the Testing Coordinator. please call Laurie Grusauski. History Students enrolled in HI350 or HI360 who want to take the U. SAT language tests with listening are offered at the November test administration only Mathematics MA310. and/or a college advisor. .S.. Discipline Course Subject Test English EN350/EN360 or above Literature Students should not take the Literature subject test until they have completed EN350 or 360 at a minimum. at a minimum. they have completed the above courses. advisor. at (860-435-3614) or e-mail (lgrusauski@hotchkiss. History Subject Test should ask their teachers about supplemental test preparation materials Languages CN350 or above Chinese with Listening FR350 or above French or French with Listening GM380 or above German or German with Listening SP350 or above Spanish or Spanish with Listening Students should progress as far through the language sequence as possible before taking a language Subject Test.org).8 D I P L OMA R E Q U I R E M E N TS SAT Subject Test Guide Students should consider taking an SAT Subject Test after completing certain courses. i. PY540 or PY580 Physics If you have any questions about CEEB testing or test preparation. per the chart below. They should not take a language Subject Test unless.

CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES 9 CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES Language shapes the way humans perceive. and Aristophanes. Thucydides. such as instructor determine the subject matter. Authors read are typically authors of Greek. the dialect of classical Athens. in Viterbo. Prerequisite: GK150 or placement exam This course completes the study of Greek G K 4 5 1 / G K 4 5 2 – A DVA N C E D G R E E K grammar and syntax begun in GK150. enabling students to study the ancient world as intimately as possible by reading texts written by the ancients themselves. . selected students may complete one of their Hotchkiss years. The mutual interests of students and drawn from the classical era of Athens. and Xenophon. The Students in this course will hone their reading majority of Greek grammar and syntax is and translation skills by reading Greek poetry in covered in this class.May be taken both semesters This course provides an introduction to Attic Prerequisite: GK250 or placement exam Greek. CLASSIC AL LANGUAGES ____________________________________________________ The Classics faculty offers a rigorous program in both Greek and Latin languages. with the School Year Abroad program. Year course Euripides. Through formal study of foreign languages and cultures. to grasp how language works. Studying another language provides an opportunity to experience a different mode of thought from one’s native language. the original with a view toward literary interpretation. Authors typically read include GK250 – READINGS IN GREEK HISTORY Homer and the Greek playwrights Sophocles. culture. and time. A student may qualify for a Classics Diploma with extensive work in Latin and Greek (see Introduction). our Latin offerings are divided into two tracks: a standard track and an accelerated track that leads more quickly to the AP course. to make forays and connections across the barriers of language. The study of Latin or Greek offers the added benefit of improving one’s knowledge of English vocabulary and grammar. and communicate. After the first three semesters. students develop the skills to help them cross those barriers. In addition. think.May be taken both semesters then begin to apply their knowledge of Greek Prerequisite: GK351/352 or placement exam toward reading texts illustrative of Greek history This is usually a small class for advanced students and culture. Italy. either the Upper Mid or Senior year. Plato. Lysias. and to see how it shapes our understanding of the world. Students One-semester course . GREEK GK351/GK352 – READINGS IN GREEK GK150 – FIRST YEAR GREEK L I T E R AT U R E Year course One-semester course . Herodotus.

Latin. In This course completes the coverage of Latin the second semester the focus of the reading grammar begun in LA150.Offered second semester Prerequisite: Permission of the Department L A 1 5 0 – B E G I N N I N G L AT I N This class is for students who have demonstrated Year course an outstanding facility in Latin.Offered first semester In the first semester students read selections from Prerequisite: Placement exam standard prose authors such as Livy. component turns to Latin poetry. comprehensive review of Latin grammar selections from the poetry of Ovid. L A 3 8 0 – H O N O R S T H I R D Y E A R L AT I N Students follow this course with LA252 or Year course LA282. In the second semester students apply with some experience in Latin. throughout the year students review Latin grammar and syntax. and syntax. . primarily rapid. Reading and independent study on an author or text not translation skills are emphasized. and vocabulary students will gain a common foundation for Latin study at Hotchkiss. covered by the standard department offerings. typically selections from Julius curriculum may petition the Department for an Caesar’s De Bello Gallico. This course is offered for incoming students or Pliny. the prose of Julius Caesar and are introduced to this is a comprehensive introduction to classical Latin verse. L A 2 8 2 – AC C E L E R AT E D S E C O N D Y E A R L AT I N I I LATIN One-semester course .10 CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES G K 9 5 1 / G K 9 5 2 – I N D E P E N D E N T S T U DY L A 2 5 2 – S E C O N D Y E A R L AT I N I I IN GREEK One-semester course . and students explore 1st century Roman culture through the poetry of Catullus.May be taken both semesters Prerequisite: LA231 or LA251 Prerequisite: GK451/GK452 This course introduces students to the reading Students who have exhausted the Greek of Latin prose. this class is an excellent L A 3 5 0 – T H I R D Y E A R L AT I N choice for those students interested in improving Year course their knowledge of English grammar and Prerequisite: LA252. Students read For those with little or no background in Latin. depending on performance. opportunity to strengthen their reading and translation skills and to learn some fundamentals L A 2 3 1 – I N T E R M E D I AT E L AT I N of classical rhetoric through both prose and poetry. One-semester course . grammar. Prerequisites: LA282 or placement exam and permission of the Department L A 2 5 1 – S E C O N D Y E A R L AT I N I In the first semester this class is devoted to the One-semester course . LA282. In addition. Cicero.Offered first semester study of Cicero’s Pro Caelio with a view toward Prerequisite: LA150 or placement exam appreciating Latin prose style and rhetoric. With an emphasis on vocabulary. Through a their reading skills to Latin poetry. Sallust.Offered second semester One-semester course . or placement exam enlarging their vocabulary as well as for those This year course provides students with the interested in Latin literature and Roman culture.

selections will be drawn from the literature of the early Roman Empire. This the world of the Homeric epics. and the course prepares students for AP in Latin.Offered first semester This advanced course is offered according to Prerequisite: LA350 or LA380 student demand and faculty availability. Attention is paid to both the poetic diction of Vergil and the larger themes of the epic. LA380. Authors Students will explore the strange.May be taken both semesters prepare students for AP Latin the following year. its very Roman depiction of . or LA451 may petition any member of the Classics faculty Students read selections from the Aeneid that for an independent study on an author or text not illustrate the Roman idea of the Trojan War and covered by the standard course offerings. Using material course may be taken more than once. CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES 11 with a different concept emphasized each week. For the purposes of expected to take the AP exam in the spring. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Students may petition any member of the L A 5 5 0 – A P L AT I N : V E R G I L Classics faculty for an independent study of Year course some aspect of the ancient world that is not Prerequisites: LA380 or LA452 and permission of covered by the classical language courses.Offered second semester Students who have exhausted the Latin curriculum Prerequisite: LA350. Students are expected to have a solid grasp of Latin grammar and good reading and translating skills. L A 9 5 1 / L A 9 5 2 – I N D E P E N D E N T S T U DY I N L AT I N L I T E R AT U R E L A 4 5 2 – M Y T H A N D H I S TO RY I N One-semester course .May be taken both semesters L I T E R AT U R E Prerequisite: LA550 or the equivalent One-semester course . Reading students and instructor. the Classics Diploma requirements. including the AP syllabus. Students are Latin the following year. This course helps One-semester course .May be taken both semesters L AT I N E P I C Prerequisite: Permission of the Department One-semester course . the most influential Roman epic and a seminal work in western literature. L A 6 5 1 / L A 6 5 2 – A DVA N C E D R E A D I N G S I N L AT I N L I T E R AT U R E L A 4 5 1 – RO M A N C U LT U R E I N L AT I N One-semester course . and its relation to Roman history and Students are strongly encouraged to take the the ideals of Augustan Rome. extravagant. computer. and video presentations. from slide. such as its place in the epic tradition. it counts as a fourth-year course. This class studies in depth the Aeneid of Vergil. heroism. the Department including archaeology and the classical tradition. Students read the SAT Subject Test in Latin at the end of this work in its entirety in English and several books course. students will also evaluate Vergil’s depiction of C L 9 5 1 / C L 9 5 2 – I N D E P E N D E N T S T U DY the Mycenaean world against archaeological IN CLASSICS evidence of that culture. read vary from year to year and are typically and sometimes even lurid culture and history of determined by the mutual interest of the the Roman Empire and its emperors.

and writing in a balanced and mutually supportive manner. There is also discussion of cultural events. Using the same basic training in pronunciation and intonation textbook as in CN150. speaking. France. Students will gain an increased vocabulary and a greater . reading. Generally. in order to help students comprehension.12 CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES M OD E R N L AN G UAG ES ____________________________________________________ Modern language courses are designed to provide students with as much exposure as possible to the particular language being studied. Selected students may complete one of their Hotchkiss years. or German are encouraged to begin or continue the study of another foreign language. Cultural components will be CN250 – SECOND YEAR CHINESE conjoined with language learning. or placement exam training. including articles from Chinese newspapers will be used in this course. Students will build on skills of aural equally emphasized. in Beijing. and computer programs will again be used extensively. The purpose of This course is for students who have had some this course is to lay the groundwork for the study exposure to Chinese. and differences. but covers them formation. and computer Year course programs will be used extensively in the four skills Prerequisite: CN150. or Zaragoza. values. but who have not mastered of Modern Chinese. either the Upper Middle or Senior year. Instruction aims at integrating the four at a faster pace. reading. Native speakers of Chinese. the course stresses the while introducing principles for Chinese character same patterns as the 150 level. Both appropriately in authentic contexts. A well-equipped digital media center is used in conjunction with many language classes. All students interested in a foreign language are encouraged to continue their study beyond the third-year requirement. CN160. beyond this level the emphasis is on reading and literary analysis. Both conversational and compositional This course is a continuation of CN150 or its presentation styles at the elementary level will be equivalent. CHINESE C N 1 6 0 – AC C E L E R AT E D F I R S T Y E A R CHINESE C N 1 5 0 – E L E M E N TA RY C H I N E S E Year course Year course Prerequisite: Placement exam or permission of the This course is designed for students with no Department previous knowledge of Chinese. Students work in the digital language skills of aural comprehension. Major literary works through the ages are studied and an appreciation of cultural differences is stressed. Italy. Rennes. The aim is to achieve reasonable proficiency in listening. Viterbo. The course begins with the many of the fundamentals. but grammar and composition continue to be of key importance. China. Spanish. speaking. This course is pedagogically prepared texts and authentic materials open to all students. reading and writing communicate meaningfully. and writing. French. speaking. Language classes are taught in the target language in order to develop listening and speaking skills to the highest degree possible in a limited amount of time. and developed in the first year Chinese course. Spain with the School Year Abroad program. The cultural component will be conjoined with language learning. media center five days a week. constructively.

While . and material covered. students communicate constructively. social sciences. CN160. or placement exam Year course This course is designed to help students develop Prerequisites: CN150. and current events. reading. and amount of communicate meaningfully. and describe in Chinese. narrate. Many of the grammatical Year course constructions introduced in earlier courses will Prerequisite: CN 350. Prerequisite: CN250. depth. but in literary texts on a range of topics related to more depth. or placement exam debate. appropriately in authentic contexts. newspaper. constructively. C N 4 5 0 – F O U RT H Y E A R C H I N E S E C N 2 8 0 – A DVA N C E D S E C O N D Y E A R Year course CHINESE Prerequisite: CN350. reading. reading. and appropriately at the high-intermediate level. in this course. with more written Chinese in a wide range of situations of sophisticated aspects of language and culture. Both conversational and compositional digital media center is required daily. and writing. Authentic materials from work is required five days per week. C N 3 8 0 – A DVA N C E D T H I R D Y E A R CN520 – FIFTH YEAR CHINESE CHINESE Year course Year course Prerequisite: CN450. Rigorous practice of spoken and speaking. short stories. while continuing and permission of the Department to develop the four basic language skills. This advanced second-year course continues the Students will read advanced literary and non- work begun in CN150/CN160 level. The course aims to articles from Chinese newspapers. CN280. and describe in Chinese. or placement exam be reinforced with increasing sophistication in The course is designed to be comparable to a fourth terms of style and usage. Students will be trained to discuss. multimedia. A daily life will be conducted in order to help more formal written style of Chinese is employed. Students will be trained to discuss. and essays will be employed to help students improve their CN350 – THIRD YEAR CHINESE linguistic skills with a manageable degree of Year course challenge. This is a presentation styles at the lower intermediate level significantly more sophisticated course than will be equally emphasized in order to help students CN350 in terms of pace. Media center humanities. debate. CN380. narrate. Aural-oral skills. Both pedagogically semester (or the equivalent) college or university prepared texts and authentic materials. and writing. This course is designed to consolidate and expand students’ four language skills developed C N 4 8 0 – A DVA N C E D F O U RT H Y E A R from their base in the first two years of Chinese CHINESE or its equivalent. and the writing continue to be stressed. CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES 13 understanding of more complex grammatical grammar. will be used provide students with intensive training in listening. creatively. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department or subject to enrollment and permission of the placement exam Department This course aims to enhance aural-oral skills and The course continues to develop students’ train students in more advanced study of general modern Chinese proficiency. CN480 or placement exam. or placement exam modern Chinese proficiency. Work in the structures. including courses in Mandarin Chinese. CN380.

Course related to current events. The AP exam or a final project Placement in this course for those having designed by the teacher will be required as part previously studied French is by examination. The digital media center will be used at the teacher’s discretion. the basic patterns of the language. social sciences. curriculum may petition an instructor for an and delivering formal speeches in Chinese.14 CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES continuing to develop the four language skills. independent study in an area not covered by the Chinese offerings. elaborate discussions on the reading Prerequisite: Permission of the Department materials will be conducted regularly to develop Students who have exhausted the Chinese students’ skills of abstract reasoning. of this course. humanities. and the materials will be taken from the authentic sources. and presentational) and the five learning in context. encourages the development of aural-oral skills Its aim is to provide students with ongoing and as well as reading and writing skills. no exposure to French. Regular use of the reflective of the richness of Chinese language digital media center is integral to the course. One semester course – May be taken both semesters In addition. Students in varied opportunities to further develop their this course will begin to develop their proficiencies across the full range of language knowledge of the cultures and lifestyles of the skills within a cultural frame of reference French speaking world. French 160 different topics of Chinese history. but who have not mastered This is a course of variable contents focusing on many of the fundamentals. The course connections. literature. French 150 emphasizes interpretive. and communities). religion. (topics changeable yearly). Students will write intensively. Internet—will be CN951/CN951 – INDEPENDENT chiefly employed to help students understand S T U DY I N C H I N E S E today’s China. philosophy. Authentic materials from multimedia—video. television. C N 5 5 0 – A P C H I N E S E L A N G UAG E A N D C U LT U R E Year course FRENCH Prerequisite: CN480 and/or permission of the Department FR150 – FIRST YEAR FRENCH The AP course prepares students to demonstrate Year course their level of Chinese proficiency across the This course is for students who have had little or three communicative modes (interpersonal. CN550 or placement exam. etc. the Department subject to enrollment and permission of the This course is for students who have had some Department exposure to French. but covers them at a faster pace. F R 1 6 0 – AC C E L E R AT E D F I R S T Y E A R FRENCH CN650 – TOPICS IN CHINESE CULTURE Year course Year course Prerequisites: Placement exam and/or permission of Prerequisite: CN520. and goal areas (communication. comparisons. debating. Students in this This course is designed for higher-level students course will begin to develop their knowledge of . who are interested in in-depth study of Chinese students will read rigorously both literary and cultural heritage or who wish to refine their non-literary texts on a wide range of topic areas proficiency in reading and writing skills. cultures. and culture. emphasizes the same patterns as the 150 level. language proficiency.

as is oral Prerequisites: FR350. or placement exam vocabulary development and writing skills. and writing skills. which all will be Hotchkiss diploma. Prerequisite: FR150. This course This course prepares students for the AP French completes the minimum requirement of the Language examination. expected to take. Films. and writing continue to be emphasized. FR380. reading. It Prerequisite: FR250. FR280. The course aims to Year course enhance listening. historical background of the readings. FR160. Course works. Audio exercises students will explore the culture and civilization and use of the digital media center are used to of different countries of the French-speaking strengthen the students’ grasp of vocabulary as world through the study of selected literary well as oral and written expression. FR380. This course does not prepare for grammar as well as the reading of various works the AP exam in French. Year course both free and structured. CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES 15 the cultures and lifestyles of the French speaking F R 3 8 0 – A DVA N C E D T H I R D Y E A R world. or placement exam participation. or placement exam This course is designed for students who have and permission of the Department completed the diploma requirement for In an interactive setting. oral presentations and the digital the digital media center and audio exercises are media center are used to enrich the cultural and integral to the course. Students in this course will continue to the use of a college-level anthology explore develop their knowledge of the cultures and French and francophone prose. In this course. or placement exam Prerequisites: FR150. Use of theater. Class discussions will also be based on contemporary political and social issues FR350 – THIRD YEAR FRENCH pertinent to these countries. It In an interactive setting. introduced early in the year. of francophone literature. F R 2 8 0 – AC C E L E R AT E D S E C O N D Y E A R F R 4 5 0 – F O U RT H Y E A R F R E N C H FRENCH Year course Year course Prerequisite: FR350. or placement exam FR250 – SECOND YEAR FRENCH and permission of the Department Year course This course aims to enhance aural-oral skills. Writing. FR280. aural-oral skills. or placement exam puts particular emphasis on developing oral This course includes a thorough review of proficiency. provides students with an introduction to reading. Films are used to enhance the and permission of the Department study of language and culture. Composition writing is through placement examination. this accelerated second. Students Basic composition writing is introduced in this read at least two full length works. language in French and wish to continue their year course reviews the basic elements of French study of French. or who have placed into it grammar and syntax. and through course. reading. Regular use of the digital media center is FRENCH integral to the course. Year course Prerequisites: FR250. Students also have the opportunity to discuss current political and F R 4 9 0 – A P F R E N C H L A N G UAG E social issues in the francophone world. work may be enriched by supplemental readings. poetry and lifestyles of the French speaking world. literary analysis and writing. movie productions and media resources. FR160. This course is designed for . is stressed.

and the works studied vary from Prerequisite: GM280 or placement exam year to year according to the students’ and Throughout the year students will review and instructor’s interests. reading and writing skills. this course Year course emphasizes the reading of a variety of works by This course stresses a four-skill approach to Erich Kästner and Friedrich Dürrenmatt among learning German with equal emphasis on the others. Supplemental materials such as videos klar!. Students are asked to organize ideas into G M 1 6 0 – AC C E L E R AT E D F I R S T Y E A R thoughtful prose and also to revise and rewrite GERMAN actively. a college-level textbook. Students are introduced to the main working knowledge of the mechanics of the grammatical structures of the language in French language. Students of GM380 participate in the level ability to read. literature. literary Emphasis continues to be placed on communication analysis. exclusively in the target language. write. . used. In addition to The course aims to refine aural-oral skills. Compositions. letters and short stories are included. and oral presentations are based on the in both speaking and writing. media resources. Students participate materials studied. speak. GERMAN This course is usually given on an independent Year course study basis. Alongside significant review.16 CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES students who have already acquired a strong German. or placement Prerequisite: GM160 or placement exam exam and permission of the Department This is a continuation of GM160. to the language. On- Year course line workbook and lab book work will be required Prerequisite: FR550 or placement exam during the first half of the year. contemporary advertising. deepen their understanding of the more complex grammar principles through a variety of challenging and fun activities. and understand 3 national AATG exam after the winter break. The course puts particular in the national AATG (American Association of emphasis on advanced writing and analytical skills. Teachers of German) exam after the winter break. both classical and modern. The course will conclude with the reading of the FR650 – SIXTH YEAR FRENCH standard fare play Der Besuch der alten Dame. including but not limited to selected works of Many forms of short modern prose such as posters. A thorough review of grammar situations that are relevant to their age and will accompany the study of several works of experience using the 5th edition of Deutsch: Na literature. and films. This year course is open to students who have successfully completed French 520 and who G M 3 8 0 – A DVA N C E D T H I R D Y E A R wish to continue the study of French literature. F R 5 2 0 – A DVA N C E D F R E N C H G M 2 8 0 – A DVA N C E D S E C O N D Y E A R L I T E R AT U R E GERMAN Year course Year course Prerequisites: FR380 or FR490. and mastering more complex grammatical structures. A variety of materials are students begin reading material of greater length. At the same time students are GERMAN required to begin writing longer essays on relevant topics. The digital media center will be This and all German courses are taught used at the teacher’s discretion. Workbook and and contemporary news publications may be lab book assignments are completed on-line used in order to diversify the student’s exposure using material that accompanies the textbook.

focus is German literature. Students wishing to S P 1 5 0 – F I R S T Y E A R S PA N I S H take the AP exam or similar SAT Subject Test are Year course encouraged to do so. literature. Year course The course will cover more of the same basic The course stresses a four-skill approach to material used in SP150 from Destinos. the cornerstone of the class is the short otherwise. Students are introduced to the Cyrillic school’s language requirement. Students are expected interactive oral exercises related to the plot of to read excerpts of texts ranging from early pieces to Destinos form the basis for all class work. CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES 17 Successful completion of this course meets the Russian. learning Russian with equal emphasis on the ability to read. both written and typed. and literature. alphabet. essays. Students who did not take S PA N I S H standardized exams during GM490 will be Year course encouraged to do so during their time in GM520. During the double period once a Prerequisite: GM380 or placement exam week. The context and language proficiency. Prerequisites: Placement exam and permission of the Department Students admitted to this course are those who RUSSIAN have studied Spanish before and have an incomplete background in the language and/or RU 1 6 0 – AC C E L E R AT E D F I R S T Y E A R those who have a proven bent for language RU S S I A N learning and are beginning the study of Spanish. The course uses Destinos. The course will conclude with an in-depth look at SPANISH German cinema from its beginning in the early 20th century to the present. reading and writing are also Year course included. This course is for those students who have had no or very little exposure to Spanish. the course will be taught exclusively story. and understand . speak. and will learn the main grammatical structures of the language G M 4 9 0 – A P G E R M A N L A N G UAG E in situations that are relevant to their age and Year course experience. After using a variety of pieces for a thorough in Russian and is designed for students who review of German grammar. the stories are have completed or are in their final year of examined carefully as literary works. Therefore. history. write. the course will focus (in English) on The course continues the exploration of German Russian culture. Hotchkiss will offer year. asked to keep a thoughtful journal throughout the If there is enough interest. readings of the day’s headlines. Students of GM490 take the level 4 national AATG examination after the winter break. Students are completing the School’s language requirement. It is GM520 – FIFTH YEAR GERMAN designed to develop strong speaking and L I T E R AT U R E listening skills. and classes S P 1 6 0 – AC C E L E R AT E D F I R S T Y E A R exclusively in German. The students will be asked to prepare written reports. a video- Prerequisite: GM490 or placement exam based program that emphasizes learning in This course picks up where GM490 leaves off. students studying the language. Homework and class work are designed to an optional chaperoned trip to Russia for those facilitate preparation for various standardized tests.

Year course Prerequisites: SP150. authentic broadcasts and discuss the various readings. leading to the sophistication through the study of the amply development and improvement of reading and provided and developed materials in Destinos. or placement exam Year course Students with a sufficient background in Subject to enrollment and permission of the Spanish qualify for this course. video. presentations are a significant part of the course. Additional study of culture and examination. The emphasis will be on contemporary culture is designed to produce increased linguistic through discussions and reading. students will be admitted only by the recommendation of the S P 3 5 0 – T H I R D Y E A R S PA N I S H Department or through a placement test. but in more depth. These materials are all primary source readings from literature and chosen with regard to the AP Language journalism. students will read works. the The focus of this course is on the further students read short stories and a modern novel development of the various skills in language or play in the latter part of the year. Increased learning. This course satisfies the language requirement. and grammar review exercises. depending on S PA N I S H their level. The certain grammar points through oral work and materials used in the course include short literary written exercises. and either the AP exam or . Students may take SP390. The program from Spanish-language television and radio. emphasizing listening and speaking bilingual and will take advantage of its offerings. Aural testing as well as oral including videos and Internet sites. which tests all aspects of language history is achieved through outside materials proficiency. Year course Students who do not intend to continue with Prerequisite: SP250. S P 2 8 0 – A DVA N C E D S E C O N D Y E A R or SP550 following this course. writing skills. expository materials. which will be a Department continuation of the work begun at the SP150 This course is designed for native speakers of and SP160 level in Destinos. and “Enfoques” makes use of audio. a video-based Spanish and students who are sufficiently program. Because this is a significantly more oral fluency is emphasized throughout the year. There will be a mid-term examination. SP450. skills. SP160. Class discussion. but it is not a requirement of the course. sophisticated course than SP350. Time permitting. SP160. In addition. or placement exam S P 3 9 0 – A P S PA N I S H L A N G UAG E and permission of the Department Year course This advanced second-year course also continues Prerequisite: Placement exam or permission of the the work begun in Destinos at the SP150/160 Department level. held entirely in Spanish. as may certain students who This course will offer a thorough review of have taken the normal track SP350 course. and students do considerable work in developing analytical reading skills and the writing of well- organized essays. SP280 or placement exam SP550 may enroll.18 CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES S P 2 5 0 – S E C O N D Y E A R S PA N I S H S P 3 8 0 – S PA N I S H F O R N AT I V E A N D Year course B I L I N G UA L S P E A K E R S Prerequisite: SP150. This course will enable certain students to take the AP Language exam.

CLASSIC AL & MODERN LANGUAGES 19 a final project designed by the teacher will be studied are taken from the extensive required required as part of the course. Video. and work to improve their essay writing ability in Spanish. aural comprehension. Selections are drawn from all genres and all S P 4 5 0 – F O U RT H Y E A R S PA N I S H significant literary periods from the 16th Year course century to the present. and the works studied vary from year to year according to the students’ and instructors’ S P 5 2 0 – F I F T H Y E A R S PA N I S H interests. The course also makes use of course is usually given on an independent study material available in Spanish on the Internet. music. It is a course designed as an alternative to SP550 for those students who have completed SP390 or SP450 and wish to continue their study of the language. Year course Prerequisite: SP390 or SP450 This course will be offered if there is sufficient interest. basis. Works to be . and journalism are the primary sources This year course is open to students who have for study. The basic difference between this course and SP550 is that the course will not follow the AP Spanish Literature reading list. and oral proficiency. Students may choose to take the AP in Spanish Language in the spring if they have not already done so. and work on research projects in continue the study of Spanish literature. learn the rudiments of literary analysis. This the language. The course S P 6 5 0 – S I X T H Y E A R S PA N I S H approaches the study of the language through Year course the study of culture. Students will do extensive reading in Spanish and Latin American literature. give oral successfully completed SP550 and who wish to presentations. The AP exam or a final Prerequisite: SP350 or placement exam project designed by the teacher will be required The course works to improve all skills of the as a part of this course. Multimedia materials will augment the course to achieve an increased understanding of Hispanic culture. Students write papers. reading list compiled by College Board. language with heavy emphasis on reading. S P 5 5 0 – A P S PA N I S H L I T E R AT U R E Year course Prerequisite: Permission of the Department This course will prepare students for the AP examination in Spanish Literature. Students may take SP550 upon completion of this course. literary Prerequisite: SP550 works.

Preps descriptive. Students also study the Prerequisite: Prep Humanities or permission of the fundamentals of grammar and mechanics. HUMANITIES (1500-1815) Year course EN350 – UPPER MID ENGLISH: Preps A M E R I C A N L I T E R AT U R E (AP English Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses Literature and Composition) section for a description of this course. and analysis of literature at every level. sentence and build skills from there. The Department encourages self-expression in speaking and in writing. storytelling. Thematic concentrations skills are central to the study of literature in this from a variety of literary genres and time periods course. poetry. Lower Mids which studies representative voices and visions in Perceptive reading skills and analytical thinking American literature. able students. short story. and with the teacher help develop good writing skills. and small class sections provide an ideal learning situation. Steinbeck. and emphasizes learning to use language precisely. We start work on the during the rest of the year. and expository prose. effectively. spelling. perceptive reading. and persuasively. instructors Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses HU150 (ENGLISH) – PREP section for a description of this course. Puritan grammar. and heroes’ journeys from various cultures. with particular emphasis on narrative. novel. the “Jazz . Thorough correcting. punctuation. all Upper Mids take this course. and perspectives. we focus on the universality of myth and Huxley.20 ENGLISH ENGLISH Experienced and dedicated teachers. Year course Upper Mids E N 2 5 0 – L OW E R M I D E N G L I S H Unless enrolled in American Studies Year course (EN360/HI360). pieces. In addition. Shakespeare. Using mythological tales of creation and Conrad. Twain. While regarding the readings as genre Major authors typically studied include Hurston. usage. and individual conferences is varied — myth. We teach the basics of good writing. A special seven- English in the first year stresses fundamental skills week segment of the course is devoted to daily in writing and reading. we examine different ways of looking at truth and H U 2 5 0 ( E N G L I S H ) – L OW E R M I D how truth translates into lived lives. EN150 – PREP ENGLISH vocabulary. we stress various kinds of Year course writing. Students write HUMANITIES (1815-PRESENT) frequently in response to the reading. drama. while weekly compositions are the rule upper grades and beyond. Students in the second year study may include responses to the land. The literature frequent rewriting. skills that will apply in the writing. so we stress Year course vocabulary development with words taken from Lower Mids their literary contexts. Morrison. experiences of women.

The course Culture Clash: Post-Colonial Literature explores American society and culture as they Decades: Literature of the 50s. One-semester courses – Students must take one each Thoreau. 60s. would be in their best interest. The course draws on a variety of media. Shakespeare – History. ENGLISH 21 Age. The historical Literature of the Land narrative is structured around the tension in Magical Realism American society between the dictates of the Modern Dramatic Literature majority rule and the preservation of minority Modernism rights. individual teachers whether taking the AP exam frequent writing assignments are the norm. The semester. Poems and Plays The syllabus for EN360 meets the College Short Stories: Reading and Writing Board requirements to prepare students for the AP Post-Modern and Contemporary Drama Literature and Composition exam. All E N 3 6 0 – A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S (AP students in EN452 will complete a substantial English Literature and Composition) independent essay (Teagle). to explore American culture and on Nature teachers from various disciplines to help understand Prep School Literature the particular topics. In the second author. This is an elective course in creative writing designed primarily for Upper . Effective participation in class discussions is also a key component of the students’ obligations. 70s and 80s developed in particular stages.May be taken both semesters Prerequisite: Permission of the Department This course must be taken in addition to the standard English course. genre. Courses for 2010- Year course 2011 are likely to include the following: Upper Mids Combined with HI360. Representative authors include Cather. or theme. Hawthorne. Central to the study Expository Writing of American literature is the exploration of the role Fly Fishing and Literature of the artist in America and of the ongoing quest Irish Literature for a uniquely American culture. Dickinson. and Mille. Whitman. In the second Poetry semester students should discuss with their Victorian Novels individual teachers whether taking the AP exam would be in their best interest. Hemingway. Each of these courses semester students should discuss with their emphasizes critical reading and writing skills. Emerson. this course traces the Adaptation: Fiction to Film development of American history and literature in African-American Voices: A Century of Song tandem so that each discipline can reinforce and Contemporary World Literature supplement the strengths of the other. Literature and Composition exam. Theories. and a host EN451/EN452 – SENIOR ENGLISH: of others. syllabus for EN350 meets the College Board Seniors requirements to prepare students for the AP These courses are arranged by literary period. Native American Literature including film. ELECTIVES Fitzgerald.” the African-American experience. The writing component of the Romanticism course is similar to that of EN350. E N 4 6 1 / E N 4 6 2 – C R E AT I V E W R I T I N G One-semester course .

The course includes an intensive study of poetic techniques and literary analysis with weekly themes and a substantial independent essay. This advanced course is for Seniors who are passionate about words. American. drawing directly upon structure of each genre. reading. and the aesthetics of The course requires daily written work as well as a Plato and Aristotle may also be included. Required summer EN540 – SHAKESPEARE AND THE readings include selections from Biblical. This course centers upon a close on a writing sample. attitude. and European literatures constitute the primary texts for this course. E N 9 5 1 / E N 9 5 2 – I N D E P E N D E N T S T U DY IN ENGLISH One-semester course . Unusual interest and ability in literature are required. and romances — within a Biblical and and personal essays as well as study the form and philosophical context. British. It is a final portfolio. Students will read and write poetry.May be taken both semesters Prerequisites: Permission of the Department Advanced students may arrange individual semester projects in areas of special interest with a member of the Department. tragedies. archetype. in workshops and conferences. which emphasizes literary analysis and exposition. A written proposal indicating the purpose and plan of study must be submitted to the Department Head for approval. fiction. Year course Seniors EN550 – HONORS SENIOR ENGLISH Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Year course English 540 is an advanced seminar for the Seniors accomplished student who has a serious interest in Prerequisites: Permission of the Department. and writing. . apply. effort and ability) grades and test scores. Students will work on books of the Old and New Testaments. writing-intensive course. Admission to this course is highly selective. from their writing individually in journals and essays — Genesis to Revelation. Such topics as the and in groups. teacher recommendations reading of six or seven of the better known plays (class participation. based the humanities. and historical sources. B I B L E : L I T E R A RY C R I T I C I S M theological.22 ENGLISH Mids and Seniors although Lower Mids may of Shakespeare — among the histories. epistemology.

. Students planning to pursue history at college must be able to demonstrate a solid.S. comparative government. In addition. As a result. and human geography. HUMA NITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES 23 HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES The courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences department are organized separately here by discipline. Level One courses are introductions to the study of history geared towards Preps and Lower Mids. Students who intend to pursue a thorough course of history at Hotchkiss are encouraged to include traditions other than U.S. History and American Studies. but all of them examine in some way how people across time have tried to understand and organize their worlds. The primary choice for incoming Preps in 2010 is the history component of the integrated Humanities curriculum (HU150). History. Level Two is devoted to U. research. and reading skills. The offerings at this level allow students to develop further their historical skills and to pursue particular interests in the general fields of history. Level Three courses are generally taken by Seniors. an increasing number of these courses reflect the assumption that responsible citizenship in the 21st century demands a broader perspective than was perhaps necessary in the past. The Department feels that students need to acquire basic skills before taking this required course and therefore urges them to enroll in a history course before their Upper Mid year. inter-disciplinary approaches and global themes suffuse many of our current offerings and will play an even greater role in the next few years. For Lower Mids the second year of the Humanities course (HU250) is an option. the department offers opportunities to examine many other regions of our rapidly shrinking world. they might be better placed in a 200-level course. HU M A N I TI E S ____________________________________________________ HISTORY Beyond the diploma requirement for American history. which most students take during the Upper Mid year. All of these offerings provide excellent introductions to the study of history at Hotchkiss. writing. as are other 200-level courses. All of them value critical thinking and clarity of expression—both written and oral—and expect active engagement on the part of students.S. These courses focus on note taking. continuous interest in the field. If students have had some historical background. The 350/360/390 courses are different options which all satisfy the diploma requirement for U.

Present 431 Modern East Asia 240 China and Japan 441 The Anatomy of Revolutions 250 Modern Europe since 1450 461 Tudor England and the Wider World HU250 (History) Lower Mid Humanities 471 History of the Middle East to 1917 290 AP Modern European History 472 History of the Middle East Since 1917 490 AP Geography 492 AP Comparative Government L E V E L T WO & Politics Usually Upper Mids 582 European History Since 1890 Required Course 951/2 Independent Study 350 U. History T H E C H A RT B E L OW I S A P RO P O S E D P RO G R A M F O R S T U D E N T S W I T H A PA RT I C U L A R I N T E R E S T I N H I S TO RY. S .S. I T I S M E A N T O N LY A S A N E X A M P L E .24 HU M A N I T I E S & S O C I A L S C IENC ES LEVEL ONE LEVEL THREE Preps Usually Seniors HU150 (History) Prep Humanities 422 Latin American Studies 430 The Constitution and the Usually Preps and Lower Mids Supreme Court 230 Russia from 988 . U. History or 360 American Studies (taken with EN360) or 390 AP U. WESTERN NON-WESTERN SOCIAL SCIENCE/ ECONOMICS PREP HU150 HI230 HI240 L OW E R M I D HI250 HI230 HU250 HI240 HI290 UPPER MID HI350 EC451 HI360 EC462 HI390 EC550 SENIOR HI350 HI451 HI431 HI422 HI390 HI461 HI471 HI441 HI430 HI582 HI472 SS490 HI452 SS492 EC462 EC550 .S.

HUMA NITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES 25 H U 1 5 0 ( H I S TO RY ) – P R E P The Last Emperor and the Heart of the Dragon HUMANITIES (1500-1815) series. The course traces the Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses development of European civilization by section for a description of this course. techniques of analytical This course provides a survey of Russian history prose. In addition. emergence and evolution of communism in the Emphasis is placed on classroom discussions and People’s Republic of China. The The first semester of the course introduces the course meets five times a week. The aim and Japan in the 19th and 20th centuries. of the year focuses on the development of China History from colonization to the present. Preps Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses H I 2 5 0 – M O D E R N E U RO P E S I N C E 1 4 5 0 section for a description of this course. Topics of the course is to acquaint students with ongoing include the costs and benefits of contact with the themes in U. The second half This yearlong course covers selected topics in U. and literary H I 3 5 0 – U. In addition. and on Japan also highlight themes during Year course both semesters. H I S TO RY traditions of both countries. political. S . and elementary research techniques.S. Prerequisite: One year of high school history and permission of the Department H I 2 4 0 – C H I N A A N D J A PA N This course is the Modern European curriculum Year course taught to the AP examination: it surveys the Preps. “great power” status. religious. Videos on China. including an Lower Mids examination of appropriate Russian literature. students Year course are asked to examine their own cultural values and Upper Mids. History and to help them develop West and subsequent “modernization. examining the relationship between material conditions and social forces on the one hand and H I 2 3 0 – RU S S I A F RO M 9 8 8 – P R E S E N T between social forces and individual human beings ( N OT O F F E R E D 2 0 1 0 . Seniors (Lower Mids with permission of perspectives. Lower Mids and secondary sources. from the Christianization of Kievan Rus through the 1917 Revolutions and on to contemporary H I 2 9 0 – A P E U RO P E A N H I S TO RY Russia.” the their own analytical and interpretive abilities. a student will take the AP exam.2 0 1 1 ) on the other. There will be an extensive study of the Year course Soviet Union and communism. such as . students are taught Year course principles of historical analysis: the use of primary Preps. Year course Preps. On completing history of traditional China and Japan up to the this course.S. Emphasis is placed on the social. Literary works supplement primary the Department) and secondary historical readings. 19th century. Lower Mids H U 2 5 0 ( H I S TO RY ) – L OW E R M I D This year course provides an introduction to the HUMANITIES (1815-PRESENT) history of modern Europe from 1450 to the Year course present and builds on the introductory skills Lower Mids taught at the 100 level. and Japan’s ascent to the writing of essays and short papers. Lower Mids history of Europe from 1450 to the present. philosophical.

and political perspectives. history. This will be frequent reference to cases decided by the requires a higher level of sophistication and Court with examination of the majority and application than HI350.S. cultural. from marking period. Field trips and Year course films supplement class readings and discussions. The course will examine the role of the history from colonization to the present that will Constitution in the lives of Americans today and prepare students for the U. Relations with other Far Eastern . Extensive use will be made of audiovisual. including films. examination.26 HU M A N I T I E S & S O C I A L S C IENC ES HI360 – AMERICAN STUDIES highlights the different methodologies that social Year course scientists and humanists have employed to Upper Mids understand and explore Latin America. There Prerequisites: One year of high school history and are historical elements to the course. there the AP exam and complete a research paper. The course modern period. One-semester course – Offered first semester Working with both history and economics Seniors. literature. students will study the region’s This course will focus primarily on the history of geography. historical of the English Department and a member of the texts. literary. THIS COURSE IS CROSS-LISTED WITH ECONOMICS. H I 4 2 2 – L AT I N A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S Students are encouraged to read The New York Full year course Times daily. with an emphasis on the politics. social structures. Seniors (Upper Mids with permission of the Department) H I 3 9 0 – A P U N I T E D S TAT E S H I S TO RY This course provides an examination and Year course analysis of the Constitution and the Supreme Upper Mids. and the Internet. Seniors magazine (such as The Economist). Lectures and materials are HI430 – THE CONSTITUTION AND drawn from departments other than History and T H E S U P R E M E C O U RT I N English. environmental. In Prerequisites: One year of high school history and addition. Seniors Court in contemporary American politics. students will pursue independent colonization to the present. social. Upper Mids teachers. Classroom discussion minority positions. History AP exam. students will examine how diverse Latin permission of the Department Americans represent themselves through different This yearlong course is team-taught by a member media. China and Japan. There will be a required and analytical interpretation are significant research paper that will take the place of a final components of this course. In the fourth History Department. H I 4 3 1 – M O D E R N E A S T A S I A ( N OT This full year long course introduces students to OFFERED 2010-2011) Latin American Studies. and scholarly research. economics. a multidisciplinary field. arts and foreign relations. is examined from study projects with a faculty advisor. realities. Prospective students should be C O N T E M P O R A RY A M E R I C A N comfortable with a sophisticated conceptual POLITICS approach to the course content. The American past. but the permission of the Department major emphasis is on present-day political This yearlong course is an intensive survey of U. how influential the Supreme Court is in Upon completion of the course students will take “interpreting” the Constitution.S. written sources. Naturally. together with a weekly news Upper Mids. music.

One-semester course – Offered first semester CHINA. we will from reform movements of other epochs. and economic norms in society Islam. Major questions to be considered are One-semester course . and the relations and test its validity by examining other ‘western’ perceptions that existed between the Middle East revolutions such as the American and Russian and the West from the Crusades to the present. violent change. RU S S I A . AND IRAN Seniors (Upper Mids with permission of the One-semester course . In the Korean and Vietnam conflicts? Also to be particular the course analyzes the political. HUMA NITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES 27 nations. We will study the birth and expansion of social. Why did modern This course studies the sixteenth century China adopt socialism and authoritarian transformation of England from a late medieval government. while Japan became capitalist and kingdom in 1485 to an early modern nation by democratic? What were the causes and effects of the time of Queen Elizabeth’s death in 1603. considered are what the Tiananmen Square religious. revolutions. world.Offered first semester Department) Seniors (Upper Mids with permission of the This course examines the political. War I. and economic forces – and personalities incident means for the future of democracy in the – which shaped these often revolutionary People’s Republic of China and Hong Kong’s role changes. we will minorities. . Taiwan. and Vietnam. and how its Department) legacy shapes current relations. and primary sources. this class will examine the empires that ruled in the region between the 13th various stages through which revolution develops and 20th centuries. combining a as part of the PRC. social. the Crusades and the Revolution as a model. as HI461 – TUDOR ENGLAND AND THE well as relations with the West. Using a wide variety of and identify the salient features that distinguish it literary. the rise and fall of the ‘Abbasid and through sudden. examines historical readings will be supplemented with England and its developing place in the wider literary works and films where appropriate. H I 4 7 1 – H I S TO RY O F T H E M I D D L E H I 4 4 1 – T H E A N ATO M Y O F E A S T TO 1 9 1 7 R E VO L U T I O N S : F R A N C E . the economy. Students will work in groups to study the Students should expect to be aware of current voyages of exploration and the founding of joint events in the region. the European Powers’ competition to gain control over the regions. The culminating project. Seniors (Upper Mids with permission of the how World War II affected the region. and Iran.the overturning of political. and then focus on 20th-century The course will conclude with the contraction of upheavals in Russia.Offered first semester how interaction with the West affected the region. Using the French Umayyid Caliphates. and to pursue independent stock companies. the Ottoman Empire. such as Korea. research in areas of specific interest to them. Once explore the experience of women and religious that model has been clearly articulated. artistic. Primary and secondary research paper and an oral presentation. cultural. China. and Department) cultural history of the Middle East and North At least since 1789 we have come face to face with Africa from the late sixth century through World political revolutions . will also be W I D E R WO R L D examined. and the fall of the empire after WWI.

and Middle East from 1917 to the present. set up H I 9 5 1 / H I 9 5 2 – I N D E P E N D E N T S T U DY protectorates. involvement in the about one’s own and others’ most fundamental region and the current “war on terror. with long-established traditions and One-semester course – Offered second semester their keenest critics. the emergence of radical Islamic PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION thought. As we study the history of the region between 1947 and the present. the This course explores the history of the modern collapse of Communism in Eastern Europe. the rise and fall of the Soviet Seniors (Upper Mids with permission of the Union. begins at the point when European nations. liberalism. Growth in such thinking comes through critical conversation – with H I 5 8 2 – I M P E R I A L I S M A N D WA R . the Cold War and decolonization. Al-Qaeda. and some of the most discouraging. All our at the same time that it was divided within) to a courses ask you. chapters in human history.century European history Preps with an eye toward contemporary development in Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses politics. including must approve all independent study projects. and zionism. Starting HU150 (PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION) with the scramble for Africa and concluding with – PREP HUMANITIES (1500-1815) Islamaphobia.S. economics. We will learn the Department individual semester projects in about the prominent intellectual and cultural areas of special interest. this course will survey major Year course developments of 20th. to indirectly control I N H I S TO RY the Arab world. World Department) War II. some of the most hopeful. competing for power in the regions. Europe’s history in the 20th-century contains and trying out your own ideas. The Department head movements of the 1930s and 1940s. and society. Nazi aggression and the Holocaust. The Philosophy and Religion program is We will discuss and debate issues throughout the committed to the importance of thinking hard course. or mandates. learning powers (and peacefully unifying at a rapid rate). including issues of U.28 HU M A N I T I E S & S O C I A L S C IENC ES H I 4 7 2 – H I S TO RY O F T H E M I D D L E topics studied are: Imperialism and its role as a EAST SINCE 1917 cause of World War I.” values and beliefs. with forms of life very different from E U RO P E A N H I S TO RY S I N C E 1 8 9 0 one’s own. modernism. . the impact of World War I One-semester course – Offered second semester on European society. philosophers and religious thinkers (past and D E C O L O N I Z AT I O N A N D P E AC E : present). to think for continent that is but one among many world yourself: questioning received opinion. and the path to Islamism (“fundamentalism”). from outlooks that challenge your assumptions. and the explosive changes that Advanced students may arrange with a member of occurred at the end of the war. and with classmates and Seniors teachers. Each of our courses invites students to From a continent that dominated the globe (and join actively in this conversation. the student. Among the section for a description of this course. we will focus on the themes of Israeli- Arab interaction. and the Iraq war. The course will examine the One-semester course – May be taken both semesters Second World War as experienced by the people Seniors in the region. The course European integration.

for example. As a background to examination of ancestors or progeny. in rationing of health moral importance to animals and ecosystems. pay to the Declaration of Independence. This course uses a seminar discussion format and draws P L 4 6 2 – L I B E RT Y. Increasingly. The aim is to help One-semester course – Offered second semester students acquire clear knowledge of the science Upper Mids. and the use of animals for various human human beings ourselves . in medical research. hazardous waste control and that transform not only nature around us. is Applied biological science and technology are utterly blind. and to deepen their “Liberty” and “equality” are routinely saluted in critical understanding of the ethical choices that many societies. environment. difference. social. ethical thinking about the THE SCIENCE DEPARTMENT. Yet if science without THIS COURSE IS CROSS-LISTED WITH ethics is silent. Prerequisite: Prep Humanities or permission of the Science by itself can’t answer key ethical questions instructors raised by the expanded power it has given us to Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses affect the environment. and even political historical development of moral thinking with problems: in reproductive decision-making. What ought we do with section for a description of this course. the biological atmospheric pollution and climate change. (Think of the homage Americans face us as individuals and as a society. and cross-species the interwoven scientific and ethical issues that organ transplantation are just some of the arise in connection with today’s controversial emotionally charged topics that have claimed environmental topics such as endangered species.) Yet the meaning and weight of these values are contested. probabilities of spurring controversies that grab news headlines on various outcomes can make an enormous a daily basis: genetic engineering. E Q UA L I T Y. A N D on the best recent work at the intersections of JUSTICE applied biology and ethics. fetal tissue transplants.Offered second semester questions of moral value. media attention. HUMA NITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES 29 HU250 (PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION) E S 4 2 1 – E N V I RO N M E N TA L E T H I C S – L OW E R M I D H U M A N I T I E S ( 1 8 1 5 . This interdisciplinary course explores cloning. Seniors (Lower Mids with permission) behind these complex issues. With these new powers specific policy topics we will also study the come new ethical. river sciences are providing the basis for technologies systems management. but also siting. respect to various environmental problems? How should we weigh conflicting values and interests in BI422 – BIOMEDICAL/ determining policies for our relations with the B I OT E C H N O L O G I C A L E T H I C S non-human world? With a method that sets aside One-semester course . science on its own is Upper Mids. Others argue these values .as individuals and endeavors. The facts matter. in the arguments over the assignment of independent workplace and insurance. care resources. Seniors Year course THIS COURSE IS CROSS-LISTED WITH Lower Mids THE SCIENCE DEPARTMENT. without the aid of the sciences. gene therapy. and contemporary treatment of diseases. in the regard to nature in general. One-semester course . Seniors (Lower Mids with permission) silent before such questions. in food production and more.Offered first semester PRESENT) Upper Mids. Some philosophers have argued that liberty and equality are the matching pillars of a just society.

Offered second semester restrictions on liberty. psychological. either in Washington.Offered first semester make use of first-person accounts and documents Upper Mids. theologians. immigration policy. and vice versa. and the rights also examine how a regime and program such as of ethnic minorities and religious groups that Hitler’s could come into being and gain public deviate from prevailing norms. real possibility for us? Is reason the essential human or in New York City. and spiritual implications GOOD LIFE of the Holocaust for people today. “hate speech” and “hate crimes. Seniors (Lower Mids with permission) from the Holocaust. or should government actively try to nature – and the alternative ethical ideals and social secure the material well-being of its citizens? What practices they support. exploring issues that. are humans the course. A N D O U R lead to reduced equality. This interdisciplinary course takes as its organizing we will closely examine how these contested topic the Nazi extermination of European Jews in concepts play a role in disputes — in various the 1940s. what limits The political realm has been the subject of some of should a good society place on their liberty? the deepest questioning in the history of philosophy. this course will critically of government? Is that government best which examine various provocative models of human governs least. P L 4 8 1 – H U M A N N AT U R E A N D T H E political. Beginning with seminal Upper Mids. common “nature” – are there common or even and social psychologists. G O O D. philosophers. But the course will to health care. trait. Seniors about human beings and their behavior. or do we often exaggerate the extent to which we are moved by rational considerations?) Can we PL571 – MODERN POLITICAL meaningfully talk in general terms of a “good life” P H I L O S O P H Y (Not offered 2010-2011) for human beings. needs. those who were victims. in one way or another. D. or is the good life whatever you One-semester course think is good? Given what you have observed Upper Mids. The course will One-semester course . acceptance or acquiescence in the first place. desires. Guest speakers will be universal capacities.” access protect the intended victims. Drawing on resources including philosophy. the role of money in electoral politics. and religion society must address. class members will take a field trip to a deep down always self-interested. our social arrangements.30 HU M A N I T I E S & S O C I A L S C IENC ES are often incompatible: an increase in liberty will P L 4 8 2 – E V I L . studying the events from multiple societies — over issues such as affirmative action perspectives: the perspectives of those who killed in college admission. Students will be invited to consider the ethical. gay those who stood by. Near the end of biggest problems for us? (For example. number of films that try to document or which are most important. biology. (Lower Mids with permission) works of Western and Non-Western philosophers. or supported the killing. or laws? government ought to recognize? If so. Seniors. and which pose the artistically engage the Holocaust. as well as the work of What makes human beings tick? Do people share a historians. Which of the models seem entitles any person or people to govern others? Are most illuminating? What changes do they suggest there any natural or human rights that any in our values. novelists. or is altruism a Holocaust museum. or behavioral invited to visit the class. every psychology. What are the legitimate aims (Western and Eastern). justice H I S TO RY: T H E H O L O C AU S T sometimes requires unequal treatment or One-semester course ..C. anthropology. what are those What emerges as your conception of the good life? rights and how far do they extend? If one turns to . Students will see a tendencies that are distinctively human? If so. the legal status of drug use. and those who tried to marriage.

history. if any. Could a machine — the job done? These and other questions will be a computer — be “conscious” as you are? As you explored through a seminar-style course. Upper Mids. and law. think. or just an ever-changing affairs? Self-styled “realists” argue that adherence to series of experience-states? In view of what science morality in international relations leads to disaster. dangerous notion. however. We will pursue such PHILOSOPHY questions as the following: What moral limits One-semester course . ponder this. Seniors for a willingness to get one’s own hands dirty to get You can. tells us about causes of human behavior. either guide foreign policy decisions? What authority individually or in small-group seminar fashion. drawing on classic texts from the history of international political institutions. let’s suppose. the issues have philosophy and the work of philosophers today. as some critics argue. or necessary for significance of the Muslim Hajj? What am I to progress? make of the fantastic. and the development of these. take on extra academic responsibility may arrange should the promotion of human rights help to semester projects to pursue them in depth. politics. should be vested in international institutions like normally meeting once a week. well as literature and films. as taken a new shape. Bringing together philosophy. can you really know emphasizing discussion and debate. Who’s people can be held responsible for what they do? correct? In a world made smaller by economic This course will explore challenging questions like globalization. Do ethical concerns have any role to play in global enduring through time. or an R E 4 7 2 – I N T RO D U C T I O N TO WO R L D outdated. Students will what other people think or feel? That they think read some of the classic texts of modern political or feel at all? In fact. technology.May be taken both semesters should we recognize in the use of violence and war Students with special interests and willingness to in international affairs? To what extent. can you know anything philosophy as well as very recent work by beyond how-things-seem-to-you? Does any contemporary thinkers. Seniors (Lower Mids with permission) poor ones? Are current trends in globalization Why is the Zen Master laughing? What is the unjust. particular “version” of reality have a better claim to truth than others? Is there any rational basis for P L 5 8 1 – I N T E R N AT I O N A L A F FA I R S morality or is it just a matter of non-rational AND ETHICS preferences? Is belief in God rationally defensible One-semester course . is there Others.Offered first semester or logically incoherent? Do even the natural Upper Mids and Seniors sciences rest on groundless beliefs? Are you a self. to be replaced by RELIGIONS loyalties as “a citizen of the world?” Do rich One-semester course .Offered second semester countries (or their citizens) owe any assistance to Upper Mids. HUMA NITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES 31 the practice of politics and leadership: should ethical P L 5 9 1 – F U N DA M E N TA L Q U E S T I O N S considerations enter into the decision-making of OF PHILOSOPHY those who hold political office? Or does the practice One-semester course – Offered first semester of political leadership call for setting morality aside. multiple-armed images of . this course will examine ethics and international affairs from an P L 9 5 1 / 9 5 2 – I N D E P E N D E N T S T U DY I N interdisciplinary perspective. the UN or the International Criminal Court? Is national patriotism a positive virtue. argue that ethical principles and any room for what some people call “free will”? human rights should guide policy choices Should we abandon the common belief that alongside calculations of national interest. ask yourself.

Taking an interdisciplinary approach. as well as explore areas of comparison. individually or in small-group seminar fashion. films. Despite apparent differences. we will try normally meeting once a week.May be taken both semesters Christianity and Islam – as well as the study of Prerequisite: Permission of the Department religion as an academic discipline. to understand sympathetically what these religions mean “from the inside” for the individuals and communities that practice them. supplemented by guest speakers and field trips to several religious communities. are they all really “saying the same thing” in different cultural accents? Or do these world views and spiritual paths differ even at their depths? Students will pursue such questions through readings.32 HU M A N I T I E S & S O C I A L S C IENC ES Gods in the Hindu tradition? This semester R E 9 5 1 / R E 9 5 2 – I N D E P E N D E N T S T U DY course will introduce you to five major religions of IN RELIGION the world – Hinduism. Judaism. . and practices of each semester projects to pursue them in depth. either tradition. doctrines. and discussions. We will look at Students with special interests may arrange central symbols. Buddhism. One-semester course .

and Russia. in the E C 5 5 0 – A P M AC RO E C O N O M I C S A N D political behavior of their citizens and elite. political This yearlong course is an introduction to micro- change. They do not require previous coursework world. secondary school economics. This semester course explores why countries vary in their domestic political institutions. population control.Offered second semester will evaluate the extent to which there are social and Seniors (Upper Mids with permission of the economic costs associated with gender inequality. Mexico. They are gender in modern societies. say that it stunts it. and on completing this agreements. in economics. Seniors Geographical Information Systems during the Is equality between the sexes linked to economic year. The course is designed to prepare students growth? Economists argue about the importance of for the AP Human Geography exam. Upper Mids. The course emphasizes certain themes. During the first semester. and in their political Year course economy. China. and cultural geography of the context. and the role of the government in . religious and cultural for those students who have completed a year of diffusion. and macroeconomic theory. This course to) tax and environmental protection policies as prepares students for the AP Government and well as debates about immigration and free trade Politics examination. and the S S 4 9 2 – A P C O M PA R AT I V E reasons why women work more but earn less and G OV E R N M E N T A N D P O L I T I C S own less than men in many parts of the world. wide range of topics. democratization. culture. We One-semester course . social. individual and firm decision-making. Upper Mids The 550 offering is focused on quantitative Prerequisites: One year of high school history and analysis and prepares students for the AP exams in permission of the Department micro-and macroeconomics. Additional course This course is designed to examine elements of the offerings locate economic processes in historical economic. Independent study is encouraged migration. languages. and territorial organization. is on international trade. Seniors including globalization. and citizen-state relations. Nigeria. including (but not restricted Iran. We will also Prerequisites: One year of high school history and consider how government policy can encourage permission of the Department more equitable economic growth. Department) and the benefits of greater equality. and One-semester course – Offered second semester resources. others research paper. public policy. Some contend that expected to take that exam and complete a gender equality promotes economic growth. and how these concepts affect human activity. the emphasis course. We will explore demographic trends. This course will help students understand what gender inequality is. HUMA NITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES 33 SOC I AL S C I E NCES ____________________________________________________ SS490 – AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY ECONOMICS Year course Senior. Students will be introduced to Upper Mids. Emphasis is placed EC462 – GENDER AND upon examining development as it relates to I N T E R N AT I O N A L D E V E L O P M E N T economics. urbanization. in A P M I C RO E C O N O M I C S their public politics. patterns of agriculture. students will take the AP exam. It offers insight on a The six core countries studied are Britain.

government Department) spending. social structures. .May be taken both semesters understand and explore Latin America. current events is an integral part of the course. the problems of Seniors (Upper Mids with permission of the unemployment and inflation. a particular media. and This semester long course introduces students to students will also learn about new developments in Latin American Studies. Reading about and discussing HISTORY. The H I 4 2 2 – L AT I N A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S second semester is devoted to understanding One-semester course – Offered second semester national income accounting. students produce a research project in the particular area of their interest. economics. economic theory. students will study the region’s and AP Macroeconomics exams. literature. project-oriented course Americans represent themselves through different in which students pursue. arts and foreign relations. seminar format. in detail. and scholarly research. music. politics. students will examine how diverse Latin This is an interdisciplinary. In addition to the required readings. The course E C 9 5 1 / E C 9 5 2 – I N D E P E N D E N T S T U DY highlights the different methodologies that social I N A DVA N C E D E C O N O M I C S scientists and humanists have employed to One-semester course .34 HU M A N I T I E S & S O C I A L S C IENC ES regulating individual and business behavior. In Upper Mids. including film. geography. Seniors addition. This course prepares students for Working with both history and economics and expects them to take the AP Microeconomics teachers. In the fourth is relevant to their understanding of contemporary marking period. and the role of the Federal Reserve THIS COURSE IS CROSS-LISTED WITH banking system. a multidisciplinary field. Class meetings are held in study projects with a faculty advisor. historical field of economics that is of interest to them and texts. history. students will pursue independent economic issues.

valuable experience that can be challenging and gratifying to all students. digital media. . to understand the basic structure of mathematics and its relationship to other disciplines. and performance on our placement examination. beyond that. and to equip students with a language and a set of skills that may be applied to other areas of inquiry. including programming. and advanced algebra and trigonometry in the third year completes the mathematics requirement. and web design. In a world of constantly changing technology and ever-increasing amounts of information. geometry in the second year. students must be comfortable with computer technology. our students must own the CAS version. For each returning student. We provide opportunities for motivated and interested students to study more focused applications of computers. Although there is a non- CAS version available. Students who graduate from Hotchkiss should be able to use computers to communicate effectively. level of achievement in his or her previous school. NOTE: Students are required to own the Texas Instruments TI-Nspire CAS calculator. We hope that our program will help students to gain confidence in their mathematical ability. course placement is made by the Department based on the degree of success experienced in math courses at Hotchkiss and the student’s level of interest and commitment. MATHEMATICS & COMPUTER 35 M AT H E M AT I C S & COMPUTER We view the study of mathematics and computer as an exciting. to enter a world increasingly reliant on quantitative information. Students pursuing elective and accelerated courses should discuss choices with their current teacher and advisor. Through its program the Department seeks to foster an appreciation of the inherent beauty and logic of mathematics. A three-year sequence of algebra in the first year. Placement in our mathematics program for each new student depends on mathematical background. Students are then prepared to enter a variety of elective courses. and to experience the satisfaction of rigorous intellectual pursuit. Our required sequence of mathematics courses builds a foundation of mathematical skills and understanding that will allow students to pursue elective courses and.

Honors Precalculus I 550* AP Calculus (AB syllabus) Satisfactory completion of 310. . Mathematical Modeling 220 Intermediate Algebra.36 M ATHE M AT I C S & C O M P U TER DIPLOMA REQUIREMENT COURSES: ELECTIVE COURSES 150 Intermediate Algebra 431* 1st semester. 350. solid. Elementary Number 350 Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry Theory 370* Advanced Algebra. or a course that requires Departmental permission. Precalculus I geometry requirement 442* 2nd semester. Mathematical Modeling 250 Plane Geometry: area. 451* 1st semester. for new students and Applications I with geometry credit 432* 2nd semester. and and Applications II analytic geometry: satisfies diploma 441* 1st semester. Linear Algebra 355 Introduction to Programming 662* 2nd semester. Further Math: Statistics and Group Theory 652* 2nd semester. Further Math: Analysis ELECTIVE COMPUTER COURSES and Discrete Mathematics 335 Digital Media and Web Design 661* 1st semester. see course description 462* 2nd semester. Precalculus II AB 310* Similar to 350. 651* 1st semester. Trigonometry. AP Computer Science AB 951/952* Independent Study in Advanced 951/952* Independent Study in Computers Mathematics Courses denoted with (*) require Departmental permission. the Mathematics and Computer Department reserves the right to remove students who do not meet the expectations of the course. 370. In an honors course. Precalculus I AB satisfies diploma geometry requirement 452* 2nd semester. Honors Precalculus II Precalculus for Upper Mids wishing to 510* Calculus take AB Calculus as Seniors 540* AP Statistics 383* 1st semester. Precalculus II 280* Honors section of Plane Geometry. Programming in Java 671/672* Topics in Advanced Mathematics 552* 2nd semester. Multivariable Algebra 451 1st semester. and 482* 2nd semester. or 383 580* AP Calculus (BC syllabus) fulfills the mathematics diploma requirement.

as well as how to make Preps. This course has no prerequisites. study the material in AP Computer Science. graphics. and event One-semester course – May be taken both semesters handling. Students learn through a combination the computer to create polished. Students will learn the fundamentals of constructing effective . interactive movies. Students who complete fundamentals of object-oriented programming the course are prepared to take the AP exam. professional of written work and computer-based documents and web pages. Upper Mids. Flash and Dreamweaver) to create a variety of Students with no programming experience are printed documents. Lower Mids. websites. and This course allows students to learn how to use simple I/O. One-semester course – Offered first semester Preps. MATHEMATICS & COMPUTER 37 C OM PU T E R ____________________________________________________ The computer curriculum includes a variety of courses in the areas of programming and computer applications. but Prerequisite: CO452 or permission of the students should be comfortable using a computer. Preps. Photoshop. Students learn the programming language. and strongly urged to take CO355 first. Lower Mids. Seniors conditional programming. which allows students to create animated scenes and interactive CO951/CO952 – INDEPENDENT programs. This course prepares students to Adobe Creative Suite (Illustrator. In addition to learning hands-on techniques. Lower Mids. Topics covered include classes. Students learn how to create more One-semester course – Offered both semesters sophisticated programs. looping. Department This course extends the study of computer C O 3 5 5 – I N T RO D U C T I O N TO programming into the areas of algorithms and P RO G R A M M I N G data structures. events. This course prepares students to take Prerequisite: Permission of the Department CO451 the following year. classes. objects. Advanced students may arrange individual semester projects in areas of special interest with a C O 4 5 1 – P RO G R A M M I N G I N J AVA member of the Department. Upper Mids. using a network of 20 dual-boot iMac workstations in the Watson Computer Center. S T U DY I N C O M P U T E R S conditional statements. Topics covered include One-semester course – Offered both semesters basic program structure. Students use the programming. Upper Mids. looping. Seniors effective design decisions in large-scale This course provides an introduction to computer programming. Seniors This course teaches object-oriented programming to students who have prior programming experience in another language. using the Alice environment. students also learn fundamental CO552 – AP COMPUTER SCIENCE A principles of effective graphic design and web page One-semester course – Offered second semester design. C O 3 3 5 – D I G I TA L M E D I A A N D W E B programs through the study of the Java DESIGN programming language. The course also extends and programming for students who have no prior expands the students’ knowledge of the Java programming experience.

and is appropriate this course satisfies the mathematics diploma for new students with a geometry credit who are requirement. which covers many of the same M A 2 2 0 – I N T E R M E D I AT E A L G E B R A topics as MA350. quadrilaterals. Topics studied include introduction to sequences and matrices. including work with fractions. In addition. the pace is Year course quicker. Students completing this course not ready for our third-level program. is for returning students who Year course need additional time for review. Successful completion of this M A 3 7 0 – A DVA N C E D A L G E B R A . In studying these topics. using the same text. modeling. A N D P R E C A L C U L U S Year course M A 2 8 0 – H O N O R S G E O M E T RY Upper Mids Year course Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Prerequisite: Permission of the Department This course is designed for able and motivated This course parallels MA250. radicals and studying advanced algebra and trigonometry. exponential functions. and in basic algebra skills. including polynomial. and they polygons and polyhedra. basic statistics and elementary data analysis. students will receive an Geometer’s Sketchpad. T R I G O N O M E T RY Year course M A 2 5 0 – G E O M E T RY This course provides a thorough examination of Year course functions. circles. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department This course. although it may and individual attention. T R I G O N O M E T RY. Upper Mid students who wish to complete AB . rational and trigonometric functions.38 M ATHE M AT I C S & C O M P U TER M AT H E M AT I C S ____________________________________________________ M A 1 5 0 – I N T E R M E D I AT E A L G E B R A but topics are covered in greater depth. Successful completion of cover topics in greater depth. course satisfies the geometry diploma requirement. This course parallels Math 150. This course should not expect to take MA451. volumes and surface completion of this course satisfies the mathematics areas of solids. Successful figures. including regression. This course M A 3 1 0 – A DVA N C E D A L G E B R A A N D assumes students are proficient in basic numeric T R I G O N O M E T RY operations. solution of linear Successful completion of this course satisfies the equations and inequalities. Algebra concepts are reviewed and previewed in an integrated fashion. students will explore using formal proofs and rigorous deductive complex numbers. absolute value. decimal M A 3 5 0 – A DVA N C E D A L G E B R A A N D numbers. similar and congruent modeling. quadratic and geometry diploma requirement. transformations and inverse reasoning. hands-on approach to the study of geometry. parallel lines and planes. regression. exponential. transformations and trigonometry. diploma requirement. and the problem sets are more This algebra course covers operations with challenging. will become familiar with various methods of coordinate geometry. This course emphasizes a problem-solving and logarithmic. In the fourth quarter students begin integers. rational numbers. more examples. including work with fractions and Year course decimal numbers. assumes students are proficient in basic numeric operations. polynomials. Students work extensively with relations.

topics outside the traditional high school The course includes a thorough examination of all curriculum. followed by MA482. matrices. an completion of this course satisfies the mathematics introduction to probability and statistics. a student who is successful in the This course offers the opportunity to investigate two-semester sequence of MA441 and MA442 mathematics beyond our third level and to study may enroll in MA510. This to prepare students to take AP Calculus or an course is calculator-intensive. topics outside the traditional high school curriculum. Prerequisites: MA441 or MA383 or permission of the Department M A 4 3 1 – M AT H E M AT I C A L M O D E L I N G This course continues the work begun in Math A N D A P P L I C AT I O N S I 451. with an emphasis some or all of the following: game theory. on graphing and applications. matrix algebra and Prerequisite: Permission of the Department applications. MATHEMATICS & COMPUTER 39 Calculus (MA550) by the end of the fourth year. MA383 – HONORS PRECALCULUS I MA441 – PRECALCULUS I One-semester course – Offered first semester One-semester course – Offered first semester Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Prerequisite: Permission of the Department This course. Successful optimization theory. and mathematics beyond our third level and to study exponential and logarithmic properties. voting theory. Most students who have completed MA280 will enroll in this course. Much of this course will be devoted to the completion of the M A 4 3 2 – M AT H E M AT I C A L M O D E L I N G study of trigonometry begun in Advanced A N D A P P L I C AT I O N S I I Algebra and Trigonometry. With permission of Prerequisite: Permission of the Department the Department. is an accelerated Students enrolled in this course will study various one-year sequence that prepares motivated topics in precalculus. The course is not designed to prepare One-semester course – Offered first semester students to take AP Calculus. Other topics may One-semester course – Offered second semester include vectors. and an introduction to difference This is the first of two semester courses designed equations and the mathematics of finance. conic sections. This . With selected topics from advanced algebra and permission of the Department. equivalent college calculus course. and topics are covered in great depth. matrices. Successful MA442 – PRECALCULUS II completion of MA383 satisfies the mathematics One-semester course – Offered second semester diploma requirement. This course MA451 in the second marking period. Topics covered in this course include a MA451 – PRECALCULUS I AB review of linear functions with related One-semester course – Offered first semester applications. This is a may be taken for credit without taking MA442. students who are trigonometry (see MA350) during the first successful in the two-semester sequence of MA441 marking period and the same precalculus topics as and MA442 may enroll in MA510. probability. Topics covered in this course include MA 350 and MA 451/2 topics. fast-paced course. complex numbers in polar and Prerequisite: Permission of the Department trigonometric forms. projects in geometric probability. This course offers the opportunity to investigate sequences and series. The course is not designed students for AP Calculus BC. and diploma requirement. MA383 covers to prepare students to take AP Calculus.

This course continues the work begun in MA 383 to prepare students for AP Calculus BC. such M A 4 6 2 – E L E M E N TA RY N U M B E R as limits. analyzing. but is not to enrollment designed to prepare students for the AP exam. related rates. In the spring. equivalent college calculus course. This course parallels MA452. Students inference. and Prerequisite: MA383 or MA451 and permission of includes additional topics from the BC syllabus. Year course Prerequisite: Permission of the Department MA482 – HONORS PRECALCULUS II This course covers differential and integral calculus. Prerequisites: MA451 or MA383 and permission of and the problem sets are more challenging. T H E O RY maximization. the pace is quicker. Although number theory has its roots in This non-calculus-based statistics course ancient mathematics. preparing students to take AP Calculus or an time is spent on competition math. area and volume. matrices. advanced graphing. In covering the AP syllabus. the course a thread of topics in number theory that lead up emphasizes topics in data exploration. to the RSA algorithm. This course covers most of the topics included in the AB calculus course. This course is calculator-intensive. One-semester course – Offered second semester satisfies the AB syllabus of the AP program. Topics may include vectors. probability. Some . methods of differentiation. will learn the basics of programming in the Java Students are expected to take the AP exam. probability. No MA550 – AP CALCULUS AB prior programming experience is required. subject methods of integration. MA451 in the first semester may be given permission to take this course in the second MA452 – PRECALCULUS II AB semester. focusing on provide a clear understanding of the ideas and limits and the derivative. and it will also give an experimental design. applications of calculus. but topics One-semester course – Offered second semester are covered in greater depth. Prerequisites: MA350 and permission of the Department M A 5 4 0 – A P S TAT I S T I C S Number theory is a branch of mathematics that Year course examines relationship and patterns among Prerequisite: Permission of the Department integers. it continues to have modern introduces students to methods and tools for applications in fields such as computer science and collecting. The the Department course emphasizes proofs and problem solving at a This course continues the work begun in MA higher level than on the regular track. One-semester course – Offered second semester. language and use that knowledge to implement several of the algorithms they have learned. the The goal of this applied calculus course is to course introduces differential calculus. and exponential Prerequisite: Permission of the Department and logarithmic properties. Riemann sums.40 M ATHE M AT I C S & C O M P U TER course may be taken for credit without taking very able and motivated students who completed MA452. the Department Students are expected to take the AP exam. and statistical overview of the history of cryptography. This course will focus on developing from data. Year course sequences and series. and drawing conclusions cryptography. and some 451. conic sections. complex numbers in polar and MA510 – CALCULUS trigonometric forms.

Discrete Mathematics exposes students Year course to graph theory and number theory. Multivariable Integral Calculus that are not part of the AB Calculus curriculum. but it also provides important Fundamental Theorem of Calculus (Stokes’s prerequisite material for Multivariable Calculus Theorem) in n dimensions. and distributions. Its content has similarities to the IB Further Algebra studies the geometry of linear structures Math topics. We are thus led to concepts such as higher- Analysis component thus offers to AB Calculus dimensional volumes. college-level course is for who have successfully completed AP Calculus BC students with a strong interest in mathematics who or MA652. . and hypothesis testing. studies processes of accumulation on k-dimensional though some of the Differential Equations material objects (manifolds) embedded in n-dimensional may be new to BC Calculus students as well. The vector spaces and vector space homomorphisms. MATHEMATICS & COMPUTER 41 MA580 – AP CALCULUS BC (MA662). discrete and continuous and eigenvectors. may be taken for credit without taking MA651. The Analysis the classification of critical points of functions in component largely covers the BC Calculus topics higher dimensions. Analysis and Discrete Mathematics Inverse and Implicit Function theorem. topics that are Prerequisite: Permission of the Department fundamental to modern applications from This course covers differential and integral calculus operations research to cryptography. quadratic forms. flux of a vector field through students the opportunity to take the AP Calculus the boundary of a region in space. Statistics portion of the course covers the concepts the geometry of n-dimensional space.This course may be taken for credit M A 6 6 2 – M U LT I VA R I A B L E C A L C U L U S without taking MA652. an excellent preparation for Linear Algebra (MA661). and finally to the BC examination. This course may be taken for credit is a topic in modern abstract algebra that provides without taking MA662. Statistics (calculus-based) and Group in n-dimensional spaces. have successfully completed AP Calculus (AB or thus applying the linear algebra studied in MA661. Topics covered include: Theory will be offered in the fall semester. college-level course is for functions in n dimensions by generalizing the students with a strong interest in mathematics who concept of local linear approximation (derivative). The space. Students are expected to take the AP exam. though a mastery of group theory have successfully completed AP Calculus (AB or (covered in MA651) is very helpful. as well as will be offered in the spring semester. BC). Group Theory determinants. One-semester course – Offered second semester Prerequisite: MA661 M A 6 5 2 – F U RT H E R M AT H : A N A LYS I S This one-semester. eigenvalues of random variables. Linear BC). M A 6 6 1 – L I N E A R A LG E B R A M A 6 5 1 – F U RT H E R M AT H : S TAT I S T I C S One-semester course – Offered first semester A N D G RO U P T H E O RY Prerequisite: MA580 or MA652 One-semester course – Offered first semester This one-semester. college level course is for A N D D I S C R E T E M AT H E M AT I C S students with a strong interest in mathematics who One-semester course – Offered second semester have successfully completed MA661. This course and satisfies the BC syllabus of the AP program. Its content is modeled on the IB Further Important applications of the derivative include the Math topics. Multivariable Prerequisite: MA550 or MA580 Differential Calculus studies local properties of This one-semester. college-level course is for Prerequisite: MA550 or MA580 students with a strong interest in mathematics This one-semester.

. on topics in higher mathematics. curriculum may petition a member of the This is an advanced course for motivated and Department for an independent study in an area disciplined students capable of independent work not covered by the Department’s offerings. The choice of topics to be studied is made by the instructor in collaboration with the students taking the course.42 M ATHE M AT I C S & C O M P U TER M A 6 7 1 / M A 6 7 2 – TO P I C S I N MA951/MA952 – INDEPENDENT A DVA N C E D M AT H E M AT I C S S T U DY I N M AT H One-semester course – May be taken both semesters One-semester course – May be taken both semesters Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Prerequisite: Permission of the Department The format of this course varies depending on Students who have exhausted the math enrollment and teacher’s and students’ interests.

are offered for the 2010-2011 academic year: PREPS UPPER MIDS AND SENIORS: SC250 – Foundations of Physical Science BI350 – Biology BI550 – AP Biology L OW E R M I D S : CH350 – Chemistry SC250 – Foundations of Physical Science CH550 – AP Chemistry SC260 – Foundations of Biology and Chemistry ES540 – AP Environmental Science PY350 – Physics PY540 – AP Physics B PY581/PY582 – AP Physics C Incoming Preps should take. Please note: Students who have elected a semester course of study off-campus need department permission to join a full-year Hotchkiss course upon return to campus. sequentially. oral and written communication. All 300. SC250 and SC260. Incoming Lower Mids should take either SC250 or SC260. the Department recommends selecting one physical and one life science in the course of study. In order to fulfill the two-year diploma requirement. The development of basic skills is the core of our program – observation and analysis. use of the scientific method. and creative problem solving are just a few of the skill areas we emphasize. These electives are available to Upper Mids and Seniors. innovative and dynamic. Fundamental to our program is the belief that science is creative. The Department’s elective program and offerings of advanced placement courses provide students an opportunity to explore a variety of interests. Laboratory experimentation and hands-on activities are the basis for nearly all of the courses offered by the Department. The following full-year courses. which meet the current diploma requirements. Students should seek prior consultation with Department Chairs in order to ensure appropriate course selection in approved off-campus programs. 400. . Most Hotchkiss students complete three or four years of science. and 500-level courses have a prerequisite of two years of lab science and/or permission of the Department. The Department also offers independent study and independent research opportunities for students who have a strong interest in and are motivated to study a particular area of science on their own. depending on their ninth-grade science study. Exceptional science students are encouraged to speak directly to the co-chairs of the Science Department for a recommendation regarding appropriate course placement. SCIENCE 43 SCIENCE The Science Department believes that science provides a way to understand our universe and sustain our world. The semester elective program offered by the Department is extensive.

students will million people are living with HIV/AIDS. however. What is new. now current to flow? What causes the differences in the claims one million lives annually. in the context of areas. mysterious. new and heightened vulnerability is not much more. S C 2 6 0 – F O U N DAT I O N S O F B I O L O G Y S C 4 4 2 – I N T RO D U C T I O N TO A N D C H E M I S T RY F O R E N S I C S C I E N C E (Not offered 2010- Year course 2011) Lower Mids One-semester course – Offered second semester This course continues to build upon the Using criminal case studies. the ability to work in teams. independent laboratory investigation. and experience in epidemics. This course movement of people. and ideas are the covers many topics in physics and chemistry and driving force behind the globalization of disease. with public health. is the develop cooperative problem-solving skills. students will get the opportunity to and cholera. This seek the answers to these questions and much. . The methods and instrumentation used in forensic overarching ecological themes presented in the science laboratories to analyze the physical final term will allow for students to draw from evidence. goods. instrumentation. epidemiology and its interaction further study in science. leprosy. and the use of modern of diseases such as smallpox. characterization. Through hands-on activities. Through laboratory laboratory analysis. critical increased potential that at least some of these thinking skills. Malaria leads to state of matter? Why is the periodic table arranged more than one million deaths a year. individualization of the physical evidence collected the course will integrate biological and chemical in criminal investigation and the scientific concepts by way of meaningful application. and investigations and detailed classroom discussion. The course provides a strong foundation for globalization.44 SCI E N C E TOPICS IN SCIENCE SC432 – INFECTIOUS DISEASES: DISEASES IN A GLOBAL COMMUNITY S C 2 5 0 – F O U N DAT I O N S O F P H YS I C A L One-semester course – Offered second semester SCIENCE One only has to look at the statistics regarding Year course public health issues to appreciate the idea that the Preps. new Lower Mids (See department instructions) world has rapidly become very vulnerable to the Why does a seat belt grab you when the car stops eruption and global spread of both new and old suddenly? How does an oil refinery work? Why infectious disease. Today 42 as it is? In this introductory course. their knowledge and skill base in order to successfully complete an ecologically-based. Tuberculosis. provide an overview of the most commonly used laboratory and communication skills in science scientific laboratory methods. this course will development of a student’s problem-solving. History documents the societal effects laboratory investigations. through the study of basic biological and chemical and strategies used by forensic scientists in their concepts and principles. even worldwide and written presentation skills. tuberculosis. oral diseases will generate large-scale. technology. The dramatic increase in worldwide the use of the scientific method. weaves an environmental theme into specific topic The course will examine. nearly eradicated does a rocket follow a projectile path? What causes from the industrial world by the 1970s.

SCIENCE 45

S C 4 5 2 – E N G I N E E R I N G (Not offered SC650 – APPLIED SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH
2010-2011) Year Course
One-semester course – Offered second semester Upper Mids and Seniors and permission of the
This course provides the opportunity for Department required
students to gain firsthand exposure to the broad Prerequisite: One year of AP Science recommended
field of engineering. The following engineering Applied Scientific Research is a student-directed
disciplines are available for investigation by the research course and will require a great deal of
student: chemical, civil, environmental, independent work, both in and out of the
mechanical, and materials science. In this laboratory. Students will design, in conjunction
interdisciplinary, project-based course, students with the instructor, an independent research
will be required to integrate their knowledge of project in an area of science related to molecular
chemistry, physics, and mathematics. Through biology or biochemistry. Projects outside these
the applied nature of engineering, the course disciplines are possible, but will require
teaches critical thinking skills by bridging the considerable initiative on the part of the student.
gap between practice and theory. Through The beginning of the course will focus on
projects such as building an electric car and experimental design, data collection and analysis,
racing in the Electrathon America competition basic statistics, laboratory notebook preparation
at Lime Rock race track, students have the and presentation skills. Reading and critiquing
opportunity to explore alternative energy sources primary research literature relating to the students’
and materials. In addition, through exposure to areas of research and dissecting the “science”
computer software, field trips and guest behind student projects will also be a focus of the
speakers, students will learn to appreciate the course. Once the students have finalized their
intricacies of engineering and gain a greater projects, the majority of their efforts will be
understanding of the fields driving the current dedicated to running their project and gathering
advancements in technology. their data. Failure is a big part of the research
process and it is likely that students will need to
SC462 – INTRODUCTION TO ROBOTICS restart or alter their project at least once. The first
One-semester course – Offered second semester semester will culminate in a research poster and
This first course in robotics will introduce the presentation of the students’ work to a larger
students to the building, calibration and audience of their peers and teachers for evaluation.
programming of small autonomous vehicles. Revisions and extensions of the students’ research
Using various robotics platforms, students will projects will continue in the second semester, and
build a series of robotic vehicles, each more a second, final presentation will be made in the
complex in the way they sense the environment fourth marking period. A final research paper and
and react to it. The Vex Robotics System will be poster are also required. Any student wishing to
used extensively with the Arduino microcontroller enhance his or her research experience by way of
and a variety of sensors such as; ultrasonic motion engaging in summer work with a college or
detectors, infrared distance sensors, sound sensors, university laboratory will work with the instructor
photodiodes, touch sensors, etc. The class will in order to identify an appropriate venue.
culminate with participation in a robotics
competition such as the Trinity College Fire-
Fighting Robot Contest.

46 SCI E N C E

S C 9 2 1 / S C 9 2 2 – D I R E C T E D S T U DY I N “health”), in medical research, in the workplace
SCIENCE and criminal justice, in the allocation of health
One-semester course – May be taken either semester care resources, in food production for a hungry
Seniors only and permission of the Department world facing climate disruptions. Drawing on
Students who have exhausted the course offerings recent work at the intersections of applied biology
in a particular discipline may arrange for advanced and ethics, students will learn the science behind
study, either individually or in small groups. these complex issues and deepen their critical
understanding of the ethical choices facing
individuals and societies.
BIOLOGY
B I 4 3 1 – H U M A N N E U ROA N ATO M Y
BI350 – BIOLOGY A N D B E H AV I O R
Year course One-semester course – Offered first semester
This survey course covers the practical applications Human Neuroanatomy and Behavior is focused
of biology and connections with disciplines such on the structure and corresponding function of
as the other natural sciences, humanities and social the human brain, and this theme will be examined
sciences. Open-ended investigations and enhanced on many different levels – behavioral, systemic,
experimental design build upon a student’s prior tissue-specific, cellular, and molecular.
science experiences. This course prepares students Laboratories will include dissections to examine
(with some independent revision) for the SAT anatomical structure. Case studies will be used to
Subject Test in Biology. develop a working knowledge of the nervous
system. Utilizing an understanding of the
BI422 – BIOMEDICAL/ components of the brain and its supporting
B I OT E C H N O L O G I C A L E T H I C S systems, students can then begin to examine
One-semester course – Offered second semester human behavior, and carefully and critically
THIS COURSE IS CROSS-LISTED WITH investigate the rapidly expanding field of
THE HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES biopsychology. Previous study of biology is
DEPARTMENT. helpful, but not required.
Increasingly, the sciences promise to shape not
only nature around us but also human beings B I 4 3 2 – H U M A N A N ATO M Y A N D
themselves. New uses of biotechnology loom P H YS I O L O G Y
before us. People can — or will be able to — One-semester course – Offered second semester
exercise much broader “quality control” in Human Anatomy and Physiology is a course
reproduction, prevent much more disease and designed to examine systems of the human body
disability, identify those with genetic liabilities or in terms of structure and corresponding function
advantages, and (some predict) distinguish reliably at many different levels – molecular, cellular,
between someone lying and someone telling the tissue, system and organism. Much of the material
truth. We will be able to enhance the range of leads directly into discussions of health and
human abilities — even, some urge, to transcend disease, fitness, behavior, and development. The
the limits of “humanity” itself. Yet these new laboratory sessions are designed to explore some of
powers bring urgent ethical, social, and political these areas in greater detail and allow the student
questions: in reproductive decision-making, in the to apply concepts introduced during lectures. The
treatment of diseases (and the redefining of aim is to help students develop a deeper and more

SCIENCE 47

personalized understanding of the biological and students will also be prepared for the SAT Subject
chemical processes going on within. Test in Biology at this time.

B I 5 4 2 – B I OT E C H N O L O G Y A N D
G E N E T I C S (Not offered 2010-2011) CHEMISTRY
One-semester course – Offered second semester
Prerequisite: Permission of the Department C H 3 5 0 – C H E M I S T RY
This course offers an in-depth study of molecular Year course
genetics and the technology used to manipulate CH350 is a yearlong course focusing on a
and analyze DNA in the laboratory. The first part quantitative approach to introduce the concepts
of the course focuses on an understanding of and principles of general chemistry. Laboratory
DNA structure, replication, and its organization experimentation will include the use of probes,
into chromosomes. The second part of the course micro-scale and large-scale equipment. This
will focus on the molecular workings of gene course prepares students (with some independent
regulation and protein synthesis as well as the revision) for the SAT Subject Test in Chemistry.
human genome and the inheritance of genetic
material from generation to generation. Primary C H 5 4 1 – I N T RO D U C TO RY TO
literature from peer-reviewed scientific journals O R G A N I C C H E M I S T RY
will be discussed in order to expose students to One-semester course – Offered first semester
different areas of biotechnology and the scientific Prerequisite: Permission of the Department
method that is the basis for current research. Introductory Organic Chemistry is a course
Students will have the opportunity to work with focusing on the fundamental chemistry of
the techniques of PCR, genetic transformation, carbon and its compounds. The course will
gel electrophoresis, DNA fingerprinting and begin with a look at the chemistry of carbon,
mapping, and Southern and Western blotting. and then these principles will be applied to the
The lab work concentrates on the deductive study of hydrocarbons. The chemistry of alkyl
reasoning and problem-solving skills involved in halides, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amines,
genetic analysis using humans, bacteria, and esters and carboxylic acids will complete the
drosophila as model systems. study of carbon compounds. Laboratory
activities will form a major component of the
BI550 – AP BIOLOGY course requirement with the possibility of some
Year course independent research topics incorporated into
Prerequisite: Permission of the Department the material. Where possible, emphasis will be
Using evolutionary thinking as a unifying concept, placed on the importance of organic molecules
this first year college-level biology course covers to our present-day society and will address
the following major themes: chemical basis of life, environmental issues where appropriate.
metabolism of cells, genetic continuity,
homeostasis in animals and plants, and how C H 5 5 0 – A P C H E M I S T RY
populations evolve and are part of ecosystems. Year course
Development of laboratory, analytical, and writing Prerequisites: Completion of, or concurrent
skills commensurate with college-level enrollment in, MA350, and permission of the
expectations is emphasized. On completing this Department
course, a student is expected to take the AP exam; This is an AP course that introduces those

48 SCI E N C E

scientific principles that form the foundation of significance of non-human beings and ecosystems.
chemistry. In addition, the facts of descriptive
chemistry and the observed properties of ES451 – LIMNOLOGY
substances will be interwoven with theoretical One-semester course – Offered first semester
principles to as great an extent as is possible. The This program emphasizes the use of the watershed
materials used will be ones common to a first-year approach to the study of freshwater ecosystems.
college chemistry course for science majors. It is Students in this course engage in intensive field
expected that students enrolling in this course will research aimed at developing their understanding
take the AP exam at the end of the year. Students of a variety of freshwater systems (lakes,
are also prepared for the SAT Subject Test in impoundments, rivers and streams, wetlands, and
Chemistry. groundwater). The focus is on the importance of
water as the biosphere’s circulatory system.
Flowing water transports energy and materials,
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE linking distant and varied systems (biological as
well as cultural) into a coherent whole that
E S 4 2 1 – E N V I RO N M E N TA L E T H I C S demands our attention and thoughtful
One-semester course – Offered first semester stewardship. The goal of the course is to give
THIS COURSE IS CROSS-LISTED WITH students a solid background in the fundamentals
THE HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL of aquatic ecology. Toward that end, students learn
SCIENCES DEPARTMENT. basic principles of aquatic ecology, a variety of
How should we weigh conflicting values and sampling and measurement techniques, and the
interests in determining policies that affect human use of computer software for data compilation,
beings and the natural world? Is the very habit of analysis, and presentation. Those skills are applied
distinguishing “humans” and “nature” an ethical toward the completion of an individual research
mistake? Science on its own is silent before such project intended to be of practical value to the
questions. Yet if science without ethics is silent, student, the School, and the community. Students
ethical thinking about environmental are expected to participate in frequent early-
responsibilities, without the aid of the sciences, is morning field study and sampling trips to nearby
blind. The facts matter; probabilities of various aquatic systems (with an emphasis on Lake
outcomes can make an enormous difference. This Wononscopomuc) and one extended field trip
interdisciplinary course draws on ethics, law, each semester.
politics, and science to examine controversial
environmental topics such as climate change ES452 – STREAM ECOLOGY
mitigation and adjustment, allocation and use of One-semester course – Offered second semester
resources, endangered species protection, and the “...bounded on the East by?...The Housatonic
use of animals for human endeavors. We will pay River!” The Housatonic River is the central artery
special attention to charges that policies and of our home place here in the northwest corner of
consumption patterns in developed countries Connecticut. This course uses the river, its
unfairly burden poorer nations. Before examining tributaries, its watershed, and its history to provide
specific policy topics, we will study the historical students with a strong foundation in the science of
development, among diverse cultures and ecology and to develop a more nuanced sense of
philosophers, of attitudes towards nature, as well place. During the winter term we will use George
of contemporary arguments over the ethical Black’s excellent Trout Pool Paradox as a guide to

Newton’s laws of motion). the nature of gravity. Students learn that local and optics. to flowing water ecosystems. formation. . The goal of this course is to provide and light are studied. In the spring.Offered first semester wetlands. and bodies of water. assume stewardship of local environments. and research methods to questions that are central to an understanding of astronomy: concerning the impact of human intervention and forces and motions.quasars. The course covers classical E S 5 4 0 – A P E N V I RO N M E N TA L mechanics including kinematics (the description SCIENCE of motion in one and two dimensions). This course prepares students with the scientific principles. political. data overview of the fundamental physics principles collection. Housatonic. waves. Emphasis is placed Emphasis is placed equally on laboratory on aquatic insects as indicators of ecosystem experience and theoretical concept development. and supernova including early morning fieldwork and several all. using a hands-on approach. and economic history of the student is expected to take the AP exam. In addition. On completing this course. vegetation. Next we explore a wide variety of Students taking AP Environmental Science should exotic astronomical phenomena that the heavens be aware that there is a major field component. The various ecosystems G U I D E TO T H E U N I V E R S E in Hotchkiss’s natural areas (fields. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department and the conservation laws (energy and This course. pulsars. Readings in the course explore independent projects of their own design. We continue with an examination of environmental issues often have global our sun and solar system and move on to a more implications and that human beings can. students (with some independent review of prior and methodologies required to understand the material) for the SAT Subject Test in Physics. Emphasis is placed on the past impacts of the iron industry on the watershed and on modern cases like PCB contamination and PHYSICS dam re-licensing. topics selected from on the science underlying environmental problems electrostatics. and general study of stellar evolution and galaxy must. and the lakes) provide This course is an introduction to the mysteries of the laboratory for hands-on learning. and light disturbance. hold . the course shifts to practicing field-based science. or as modern theories of cosmology and the efforts of part of the School’s ongoing research of local 20th-Century astronomers to explore and explain mammals. Weekly trips to P Y 3 5 0 – P H YS I C S various sites will allow students to make Year course observations and collect data aimed at testing This course in physics develops the student’s general ecological principles and their application observational and problem-solving skills. concepts. ponds. a cultural. focuses momentum). forests. sound and issues. dynamics Year course (the causes of motion. black holes. brooks. One-semester course . simple electric circuits. assumed. the universe. This course begins with a brief students apply basic ecological principles.as fascinating as they are bizarre. function and health and on “reading a stream” A background in algebra and geometry is with an eye toward trout habitat preference. trigonometric concepts are developed in class as required. The study of . Working on the heavens. interrelationships of the natural world and to analyze both natural and human-made P Y 4 4 1 – A S T RO N O M Y: A U S E R ’ S environmental problems. SCIENCE 49 the fundamental ecology of rivers and the specific day field trips.

observation. and students are One-semester course – Offered first semester expected to take the AP exam. The semester component of this course consists of both is devoted to the study of vectors. and atomic and nuclear physics. with Year course an emphasis on rotational systems. Although helpful. They’ll Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in. with an emphasis on topics prepared for the SAT Subject Test in Physics. The laboratory This course is a continuation of PY581. The course includes a sophisticated exam at the end of the year. electricity and P Y 5 8 2 – A P P H YS I C S C : E L E C T R I C I T Y magnetism. Ampere’s Law. and the principles and in solving problems. and students are expected to take the AP exam. the course. The material covered previous study of physics. gravitation. thermodynamics. examination in mechanics. course and enhance the student’s skills of electric potential. although experiments and hands-on activities will help the PY581 is not a prerequisite. related to electric circuits. The emphasis Prerequisites: Completion of MA350 and permission throughout the course is on theory development of the Department and mathematical problem solving. or completion of. waves and optics. we consider The course provides students with an opportunity the possibility of extraterrestrial life and ponder to study at a level commensurate with that of a the question: “Are we alone?” The laboratory college engineering physics course. The material covered qualifies students for the AP Physics C P Y 5 8 1 – A P P H YS I C S C : M E C H A N I C S examination in E and M. Students are also laboratory program. planetary regular evening sessions. capacitors and dielectrics. topics include: Newtonian mechanics. calculus and permission of the Departmen. rotation. The observation program requires momentum. college-level physics course. experimental work during class and observations particle dynamics. This rigorous second-year physics course is designed for students who have already acquired a . of laboratory equipment. astronomy. A N D M AG N E T I S M Students will delve deeply into everyday problems One-semester course – Offered second semester that confront scientists and engineers.50 SCI E N C E these objects leads into a discussion of Einstein’s strong foundation in physics and pre-calculus. kinematics. and the use electric current. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in. Gauss’ Law. Finally. General Theory of Relativity. prior study of physics is strongly motor turn. and electrical students enrolling in this course will take the AP resonance. no motion. chemistry. calculus and permission of the weighing it. and oscillations. calculus is used freely in formulating non-calculus. This course P Y 5 4 0 – A P P H YS I C S B includes a sophisticated laboratory program. and learn how opticians know how to recommended shape the lenses for glasses. It is expected that electromagnetic induction. The course focuses student understand the concepts covered in the on the study of electric charge. qualifies students for the AP Physics C or earth science is required. experimentation. find out how electricity makes a Department. work and energy. magnetic fields. or learn how to measure the mass of a planet without completion of. analysis. Throughout This course is comparable to an introductory. impulse and of the night sky. prior study of physics is strongly recommended.

To learn more about the five arts disciplines and the specific courses offerings thereof. students are taught new skills. our program offers opportunities for success at every level. but you are interested in new challenges and new media. diverse. VISUA L & PERFORMING A RTS 51 VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS The Department of Visual & Performing Arts at Hotchkiss thrives on the collaborative energy of five distinct disciplines – Dance. All five arts disciplines are fully integrated into the interdisciplinary Humanities Program as well. Over the course of any given school year. In addition to this fully credited curricular program. Art at Hotchkiss is lively. A RT ____________________________________________________ Art at Hotchkiss offers a place for every student. We are committed to teaching students how to see. but hesitate because you have never studied art before. Perhaps you are well versed in drawing or ceramics. Music. and ultimately. Whatever your degree of confidence or expertise. The arts program at Hotchkiss is substantive. You may be curious about your artistic abilities. . the experience is profoundly rewarding. participate in trips to museums and galleries. We regularly host visiting artists. Students also learn how to critique objectively their own work and that of their peers. as well as courses designed to challenge and refine the skills of students well versed in the discipline of serious arts study and commitment. We offer courses designed to engage and support the curious beginner. The studio emphasis of each course is complemented by the study of art history and art vocabulary. and always pushed to learn from both their successes and their failures. and integrate classes with the Tremaine Gallery exhibitions here on campus. For more information about the arts offerings in the Humanities Program. and demanding. please review the individual program listings that follow. Theatre and Visual Art. encouraged to take risks. regardless of experience or talent. how to manipulate various media in a compelling and meaningful manner. rigorous and inspiring. In a challenging and supportive studio setting. how to compose/design. how to work through visual problems. Photography. And for those students who embrace the challenge and strive to connect with the work on a personal level. we also offer a breadth of co-curricular programming outside the class day that fosters greater student ownership and independent direction. please refer to that section of the course catalogue. the arts programs at Hotchkiss thoughtfully instruct well over three-quarters of the student body and creatively engage the entire school community and the community at large. At the heart of the Arts Department is a curricular program that is both broad and deep.

sculpture and architecture Prerequisite: Permission of instructor . Also involved are the use of colored clays. In the winter and spring. Preps. political. fall. salt firing. and This yearlong. students examine Western art from Paleolithic cave paintings of France and Spain.52 VI SUA L & P E R F O R M I N G ARTS ART HISTORY range of approaches to surface decoration. In a personal. Upper Mids. (1500-1815) glazing. learning to “read” them with a particular discipline. raku firing. Rodin. Upper Mids. Prentice Hall. social. survey course is designed to prepare traditional oxidation and reduction firing. Upper Mids. Rubens and semester course. The Craft of Art and Clay. Text: students for the AP exam in Art History. Lower Mids. The class takes two field trips Peterson. Preps Students mix all glazes from raw materials and learn Please refer to the Humanities section for a about glaze chemistry while experimenting with a description of this course. and carving on pots. Lower Mids. Seniors students study painting. . including Upper Mids. The Craft of Art and Clay. and sculptural techniques. One-semester course – May be taken both semesters Lower Mids. inventive and flexible studio environment. Formal instruction in Year course hand building and wheel throwing is presented. Seniors sawdust firing. Realism. The Craft of Art and Clay. the first known AR242 – CERAMICS II artwork produced by man. Seniors Prerequisites: AR341 and AR342 CERAMICS This course pursues advanced hand building.students must from the Early Renaissance through the 20th have ceramic experience to qualify for the second century. One-semester course — Offered second semester Renaissance in Italy. Seniors religious and economic context of each artwork. Michelangelo and Monet. Seniors No clay experience is necessary for the exploration STUDIO ART of the multifaceted world of ceramics. Text: AR240 – CERAMICS I Peterson. Palladio and Picasso are examples of This course is a continuation of AR240. Lower Mids. In the Peterson. Year course Various firing techniques are explored. slip A R 5 2 0 – A P A RT H I S TO RY decoration. in addition. underglazes. Prerequisite: AR240 or AR242 Assignments emphasize analyzing works of art by This course pursues intermediate hand building. and the Baroque. wheel throwing. and firing techniques. will be A R 3 4 1 / A R 3 4 2 – I N T E R M E D I AT E examined. and sculptural techniques. Prentice Hall Year course Preps. Slide lectures and discussions are the core CERAMICS of the learning experience. to New York City museums. Text: specific vocabulary. to the Proto. students H U 1 5 0 ( A RT ) – P R E P H U M A N I T I E S learn about ceramics through a variety of forming. which stresses an One-semester course – May be taken both semesters understanding of the geographical. wheel throwing. Prentice Hall. styles of major periods such as Impressionism. Students are also required to study one non-Western artistic tradition A R 4 4 1 / A R 4 4 2 – A DVA N C E D C E R A M I C S throughout the year. discussed. with the individual artists whose accomplishments will be addition of throwing on the wheel. Upper Mids.

and light color. Lower Mids. visual structure. VISUA L & PERFORMING A RTS 53 H U 2 5 0 ( A RT ) – L OW E R M I D first place. limitations. This course also provides Prerequisites. 6th Ed. and intensity through a sequence of exciting color A R 2 5 0 – F O U N DAT I O N D E S I G N : 2 . Design Basics. students will learn the Please refer to the Humanities section for a interactive dynamics of color and come to description of this course. concentration on learning to “see” (perceptual skill) and translating (technical skill) this information AR252 – FOUNDATION DESIGN: COLOR into thoughtful compositions. Preps pastel. Students are encouraged and taught to develop unique solutions which solve the visual A R 2 6 0 – I N T RO D U C TO RY A RT: problem. of traditional drawing. Simply come with an open mind seeing. value. and foam-core construction projects. Please see AR252 for the skills. Seniors techniques and media. engaging design sequences. The first half of include art history. complex objects.. follow specific criteria. Rinehart. Holt. and involve B L AC K A N D W H I T E D R AW I N G dynamic. Seniors Focusing primarily on the concepts of form. vocabulary. and a critical process this course focuses on the study of color theory in their making of successful images. Simply guidelines or criteria to direct one’s efforts — just come with an open mind and the will to learn. first semester students will This course is an excellent starting point for gain confidence and new skills as they learn to students who wish to learn the fundamental skills design and define visual space in black and white. drawing. form. Seniors and linear perspective. and how do designers and painters HUMANITIES (1815-PRESENT) select the right colors when there are so many Year course from which to choose? Using Color-Aid paper. and acrylic paint. Holt. understand the relationship of hue. and Winston. Again. self-portraiture. The student and color interaction. In a studio . sequencing and visual rhythm. Upper Mids. expressive image. Text: Lauer. 6th Ed. drawing. value. This form. but how do we really perceive color in the to create a thoughtful. Preps. and incorporate sound course is about visual problem solving. Essential to skill development is Basics. previous experience and “talent” are experienced students with a rigorous grounding in not necessary. and Winston. Upper Mids. the illusion of depth. We live in a world full of learns to control line. value. Design learn to draw. prerequisites. This is an ideal course for students who are repetition. as any professional designer or architect is given a Text: Lauer. Upper Mids. Each design principles. and composition development and the will to learn. previous project deals with a specific challenge and a set of experience and “talent” are not necessary. projects. students uncertain of their ability or experience in visual art will conceive and construct wall reliefs and large- but wish to learn and develop design. Preps. The Art Department believes that anyone can second semester description. shape. Year course board. specific problem to solve within a set of Rinehart.Offered second semester life are studied through a variety of drawing Preps. Through the Year course study of line. Lower Mids. and still One-semester course . scale models which display an understanding of color. Lower Mids. The second half of this course introduces DIMENSIONAL DESIGN basic sculptural concepts through a series of paper. Students are encouraged to This course is designed to allow students to enter be inventive with newly acquired knowledge and to our design program mid-year. and three dimensional design skills.. Subject matter such THEORY AND 3-DIMENSIONAL DESIGN as hands. space.

are explored at this level as well. Students at this level are Following an AP portfolio track.. still life. landscape. learn more and benefit most from a yearlong Readings in historical texts. and a critical developed in AR260. and regular slide course allows motivated students to enter our and video lectures supplement studio study. space. or 3D portfolios. Students will also learn focus on more complex skill development and how to mix and manipulate acrylic pigment. and abstract Basics. this drawing and painting publications. Within Prerequisite: AR260 or AR262 or portfolio review the framework of regular assignments. Text: Lauer. Design explore the figure. encouragement and techniques. Work is One-semester course – Offered first semester pursued with an emphasis on the expansion of Lower Mids. evaluating second semester description. and relief. AR361 pursues encouraged to begin preparing work on one of the intermediate and advanced drawing and painting AP Drawing. Upper Mids. Upper Mids. students learn the disciplines of how to matter. PA I N T I N G A N D color theory and painting. Seniors expression of this newly acquired knowledge and to This course is a continuation of the work include art history. There is a strong emphasis on self- two-dimensional images. This course first introduces students to the portrait and the self-portrait A R 3 6 2 – I N T E R M E D I AT E A RT: through the drawing medium and then pursues P R I N T M A K I N G . drypoint.54 VI SUA L & P E R F O R M I N G ARTS atmosphere of challenge. Holt. Also included is an introduction to new painting and drawing A R 3 6 1 – I N T E R M E D I AT E A RT: mediums and techniques. Please see AR262 for expression. problem solving in the use of color. including 6th Ed. Various printmaking techniques and the work of others. Upper Mids. a broader range of media. Internet research. form. program mid-year. This course (or an art. contemporary studio experience. Holt. Rinehart. Students students at the appropriate level. and more intense D R AW I N G A N D PA I N T I N G involvement with art historical references. including work with Lower Mids..Offered second semester encouraged to be inventive and passionate in the Preps. Art faculty . The resulting images often lead to A R 2 6 2 – I N T RO D U C TO RY A RT: C O L O R extended series or further development according to AND COMPOSITION each student’s individual ideas. students are This course is for students with an interest in given greater responsibility and independence with exploring the expressive potential of visual art. While we feel that students process in their making of successful images. as well as three-dimensional subject support. conceptual problem-solving. and Winston monotypes. Seniors individual ideas within particular themes. Design Basics. 6th Ed. and composition other art courses. Seniors major color harmonies and using color to create Prerequisite: AR260 or AR262 or portfolio review the illusion of space in still life. Lower Mids. 2D. and Winston subjects in sophisticated compositions and combinations. and critique their work and composition. landscape and This course continues the work of AR361 with a abstract compositions. art vocabulary. Students are One-semester course . Rinehart. compose a color image. This portion of the MIXED MEDIA course involves the study of both basic and One-semester course – Offered second semester complex color interaction. color theory. The art faculty will review student fundamentals are further expanded with the portfolios for those with experience and place introduction of new painting techniques. investigated through a substantial range of develop and critique successful and meaningful media. Text: Lauer. and the development of individual themes. equivalent portfolio) is a prerequisite for several Drawing.

three-dimensional. internet research. Enrollment in Prerequisites: AR361 and AR362 or portfolio review the course assumes genuine interest and immersion This course requires substantial commitment and a in an inventive curriculum stressing scale. Art faculty will also assist Upper Mids. Working note that the 3rd marking period curriculum closely with the Art faculty. Baker. contemporary publications. Texts: Ching. and a series of practical architectural Upper Mids.Offered second semester studio experience. independent and residential construction sites and New York City passionate in the expression of newly acquired architectural sites. The course offers the investigation Students also receive a basic grounding in the of advanced drawing techniques. Wiley. art college slide portfolios and may subsequently have vocabulary. Please see the description for AR530 and This course is a continuation of AR561. and painting beyond color videos. Upper Mids. There is an opportunity for the study of conceptual projects such as designing a space with sculpture in a variety of media. students will be . problem-solving exercises. Norton the instructor Prerequisite: AR250 or AR260 or portfolio review A R 5 6 1 – A DVA N C E D A RT: This yearlong course combines inventive three. willingness to explore new directions and express a proportion. printmaking processes. and sculptural assignments before pursuing a series of practical AR530 – ARCHITECTURE architectural drawing and model-making projects. DVDs. Seniors drawing and model-making projects. Assignments range from pure or acrylic. It is expected that students at this level will AR532 – ARCHITECTURE begin preparing work for either the AP Drawing. While we feel that students I N D E P E N D E N T P O RT F O L I O I I learn more and benefit most from a yearlong One-semester course . Wiley. Lower Mids with permission of American House Styles. and a critical process in their making of the opportunity to pursue an AP Portfolio in 2D or successful images. Readings in historical texts. Prerequisite: AR250 or AR260 or portfolio review This course is a continuation of the work A R 5 6 2 – A DVA N C E D A RT: developed in AR 530. problem-solving exercises. sculptural One-semester course . Lower Mids with permission of students in assembling slide portfolios for college the instructor applications. Seniors. Architectural Graphics. or 3D portfolios. Many students will assemble knowledge and to include art history. allowing for concentration in oil studio projects. Seniors. Prerequisite: AR561 or portfolio review year.Offered first semester assignments. this design course allows Upper Mids. AP portfolio study eight columns and a continuous plane to the is stressed to those interested and qualified. Seniors motivated students to enter our program mid. weekly slide and video lectures supplement studio study. elevations and will receive support in the creation of slide presentation models for real-world residential portfolios for college application. personal vision. Seniors creation of floor plans. Year course Texts: Ching. advanced history of architecture through assigned readings. VISUA L & PERFORMING A RTS 55 will also assist students in assembling slide includes several inventive. I N D E P E N D E N T P O RT F O L I O I dimensional. and form in the built environment. 3D. portfolios for college applications. Norton. and Baker. One semester course – Offered second semester 2D. Architectural Graphics. Students have the opportunity to visit local encouraged to be inventive. American House Styles. slide lectures and design research for and composition. sections. Students are projects.

students have studied 20th Century Art.May be taken both semesters Students are encouraged to prepare an AP Prerequisite: AR440. Placement of students in the various courses will be made at the discretion of the instructor. Art. Independence and commitment Portfolio Art students are able to pursue individual to the development of a personal body of work interests and self-defined directions in subject are essential. The course typically culminates Study Course application indicating the purpose with a research paper. H U 1 5 0 ( DA N C E ) – P R E P H U M A N I T I E S H U 2 5 0 ( DA N C E ) – L OW E R M I D (1500-1815) HUMANITIES (1815-PRESENT) Year Course Year Course Preps Lower Mids Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses section for a description of this course. AP concentration. Department Head. A written proposal and Independent and the instructor. course where daily output is their primary obligation. Weekly writing The course is designed by the student and the assignments will be critiqued by both the student instructor. Eligibility is reading and research in a particular art movement. A mid-term performance examination is given in certain classes during each semester. and plan of study must be submitted to the instructor. . course offerings. For Art History students AP Art History or the Independent Art is a specific course beyond equivalent is a prerequisite. 2D. and Dean of Studies for approval. section for a description of this course. Some research and writing are required. or 3D portfolios. Upon request. a winter special project in dance can be arranged in place of athletics only after a student has completed one semester of study in either medium. AR561or AR562 Studio Art Portfolio if they haven’t already done Eligibility: Students must receive permission from the so. AR520. Students must be willing and able matter. and technique through the creation to take on the responsibility of an independent of the concentration section of the AP portfolio. In the completed our program through the 500 course past. Double-period studio classes and a A R 9 5 1 / A R 9 5 2 – I N D E P E N D E N T S T U DY single-period critique period will be scheduled I N A RT weekly. One-semester course . This course is offered only DAN C E ____________________________________________________ Dance at Hotchkiss offers students the opportunity to learn the discipline and craft of Ballet and Modern Dance and to explore the creative challenges of this art form. Picasso and Lichtenstein. Art faculty will also assist students in Department and must have exhausted all regular art assembling slide portfolios for colleges.56 VI SUA L & P E R F O R M I N G ARTS expected to assemble and submit work for either to highly motivated students in a chosen area of the AP Drawing. The course will involve Architecture or Advanced Art. Pop level or the 400 course level course in Ceramics. media. strictly limited to those students who have on a particular artist or school of artists.

Lower Mids. Lower Mids. One-semester course . Students in Classical Ballet and permission of the Department enrolled in this class will be expected to be This course offers students the opportunity to involved in performance.May be taken both semesters running. proper DA 3 4 1 – F U N DA M E N TA L S O F placement. leotard and tights. Upper Mids. The focus of the One-semester course . floor barre. The class moves at a faster M O D E R N DA N C E pace.May be taken both semesters course will be on personal development. Upper Mids. Students enrolled in this class will movement. Upper Mids. Students will be exposed to a wide be expected to be involved in performance. Students are Preps. center and A DVA N C E D B A L L E T learning dance combinations. Class structure DA 4 2 1 / DA 4 2 2 – I N T E R M E D I AT E / consists of floor barre. Seniors expected to be involved in performance.May be taken both semesters developed. control of INTEGRATED DANCE movement. years ballet training and/or the equivalent to Graham. half-toe to full point articulation as well Preps. Jazz. endurance and articulation in the ankles expression. the Department This course furthers the student’s development and training with the addition of more complex MODERN exercises both at the barre and center. and Cunningham technique. Mechanics of partnering are introduced and One-semester course . and range of movement. Seniors taught vocabulary and terminology relevant to the This course teaches basic foundation principles in course of study. Hip-Hop and Latin. DA421/DA422. center floor M OV E M E N T F O R T H E AT H L E T E adagio and allegro combinations. Limon. some improvisation and dance history. Seniors as turns and pirouettes. range of dance styles and techniques: Modern. Students enrolled in this class will be Preps.May be taken both semesters elementary exercises and gains exposure to Prerequisite: Must have had a minimum of three modern dance principles encompassing Horton. and basic technical control are goals and . Lower Mids. Class format will include concepts of isometric plie. Class work will consist of a series of studies. and the One-semester course – Offered first semester only mechanics of turns and jumps. or permission of the Department Other important aspects of class study include This class emphasizes building strength. Classes are designed to help develop and strengthen center alignment. Students will need proper Prerequisite for DA322: DA321 or formal training fitting pointe shoes. Clarity of balance. A thorough understanding of the course syllabus with DA 3 3 1 / DA 3 3 2 – I N T RO D U C TO RY proficiency is required. Ballet. aesthetic Prerequisite for DA422: DA421 or permission of appreciation and enjoyment of movement. barre work. thoughtful construction of dance and feet. VISUA L & PERFORMING A RTS 57 BALLET exercises done at the barre which then prepares the student to take on more challenging work at DA 3 2 1 / DA 3 2 2 – B E G I N N I N G / center floor. learn the discipline and technique of ballet. Students will learn both sequenced I N T E R M E D I AT E B A L L E T and comprehensive movement such as walking. barre work. Prerequisite for DA332: DA331 or permission of the Department DA 5 2 1 / DA 5 2 2 – P O I N T E In these semester courses the student learns One-semester course . control.

and five large rehearsal/classrooms. and performance reflect the Department’s commitment to serve all students. The Department is equipped with 12 Grand Pianos (ten Steinways).May be taken both semesters vary in this course. The Hotchkiss Recording Studio and WKIS. and a comprehensive collection of percussion instruments. and solo recitals. it is responsible for recording every event sponsored by the Music Department. general music courses.58 VI SUA L & P E R F O R M I N G ARTS challenges. theory. Although the range of talent may One-semester course . Performance goals are given more I N DA N C E emphasis in this course than in the 330 level. 12 practice rooms. A One-semester course . talent or music experience. independent study in some aspect of dance. seven upright pianos. of a high level of commitment and achievement. Qualified students may take the Music Technology course and use the studio facilities. . Students enrolled in this class will be when the instructor feels that a student is capable expected to be involved in performance. Hotchkiss’s radio station. The state-of-the-art recording studio with MIDI lab offers an extensive inventory of professional audio equipment and is capable of recording 96 channels of high-definition audio. Courses in music literature. Elfers Hall in the Esther Eastman Music Center offers world-class facilities for orchestral.May be taken both semesters Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Permission for 530-level work is granted only MUSIC ____________________________________________________ The Music Program offers Hotchkiss’s active and diverse student body excellent facilities and a range of course selections that accommodates all levels of interest and involvement. the H. There are three distinct ways a student can be involved in music at Hotchkiss: performance courses. Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Students enrolled in this class will be expected to Students may petition the Department for an be involved in performance. faculty. The 615-seat Katherine M. Choreographic and technical efforts are expected DA 4 3 1 / DA 4 3 2 – I N T E R M E D I AT E to be sufficiently sophisticated to merit a school M O D E R N DA N C E performance. The music wing boasts eight private teaching rooms. and non-credit music lessons. Introductory Modern Dance and a willingness to attempt increasingly more complex technique and DA 9 5 1 / DA 9 5 2 – I N D E P E N D E N T S T U DY choreography. Besides providing the capability for courses in music technology. a Fazioli 308 Concert Grand Piano.May be taken both semesters certain degree of technical proficiency is required. are also housed in the new Esther Eastman Music Center. and guest artists. Denison Fish Harpsichord. Students enrolled in this class will be These semester courses presuppose knowledge of expected to be involved in performance. each student will be expected Prerequisite: DA331/DA332 or permission of the to sustain an attitude of dedication and Department motivation. chamber. a Schantz Pipe Organ (installed in 1968). DA 5 3 1 / DA 5 3 2 – A DVA N C E D M O D E R N DA N C E One-semester course . regardless of knowledge. for students.

All students taking music for credit are Year course required to attend at least three music concerts Lower Mids each semester. intervals. VISUA L & PERFORMING A RTS 59 Performance Courses HU150 (MUSIC) – PREP HUMANITIES Students who wish to have private instrumental or (1500-1815) voice instruction for credit should choose this Year course option. between each private lesson. which is designed to enhance the musicianship of students through the use of M G 1 5 1 / 1 5 2 – F I R S T Y E A R G U I TA R modern technology. will publicly at least once per semester. Once students have fulfilled their music history and theory requirements. composers. and a class will also be working constantly with all the in introductory music history once a week. courses in music technology as part of their music credit. students will concentrate on Students playing guitar at Hotchkiss for the first basic notions of acoustics. Students are expected to perform proficiency. and simple during the spring semester must have had prior chords. and computer operation specific to audio of taking private lessons twice a week. follow the yearlong curriculum. M G 2 5 1 / 2 5 2 – S E C O N D Y E A R G U I TA R PERFORMANCE One-semester course – May be taken both semesters Prerequisite: MG151/152 or permission of Department Students take private lessons twice a week. As a performance course. music theory class reinforces music notation. and depending on the result. in order to discusses the origins of the Western music tradition. performing tasks such as Students sign up for and schedule private lessons at recording. which consists process. arranging. all students are expected to participate in H U 2 5 0 ( M U S I C ) – L OW E R M I D some sort of public performance at least once per HUMANITIES (1815-PRESENT) semester. Students who take performance courses Preps for academic credit are expected to practice Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses regularly in order to develop constant progress section for a description of this course. editing. mixing. The introductory music history class briefly theory and history instruction. digital conversion time should begin with this course. equipment available. Students will then explores all major musical periods. a class . be given permission by the Department to register for the course. scoring and the beginning of each semester. Please note that students starting music rhythm. they can opt to GUITAR take this course. The introductory composing. key signatures. A list of eligible concerts is Prerequisite: Prep Humanities or permission of the distributed by the Department Head at the instructors beginning of the semester. a class in applications as well as musical concepts. Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses Upper-level performance students can also take section for a description of this course. Taking advantage of the PERFORMANCE School’s new state-of-the-art recording and music One-semester course – May be taken both semesters production facilities. scales. Students introductory music theory once a week. be subjected to a test to demonstrate and styles.

and on such styles as swing. the beginning of each semester. and simple semester. guitar literature. One-semester course – May be taken both semesters All scale modes as well as all kinds of intervals and Students playing keyboard at Hotchkiss for the first triads are discussed in great detail. Prerequisite: MG251/252. The music theory class further develops PERFORMANCE students’ knowledge of scales. are expected to perform publicly at least once per rhythm. M G 3 5 1 / 3 5 2 – T H I R D Y E A R G U I TA R then explores all major musical periods. jazz history. or permission of Department MK251/252 – SECOND YEAR Students take private lessons twice a week. and music technology. and a class in music KEYBOARD history once a week. . Students may expected to perform publicly at least once per take either a jazz history class (see MU469 course semester. Students sign up for and Students who elect to take music theory and schedule private lessons at the beginning of each music history may choose between various semester. as well as Mozart and Performance. Students sign up for and schedule private lessons at the beginning of each M K 1 5 1 / 1 5 2 – F I R S T Y E A R K E Y B OA R D semester. intervals. The guitar literature class focuses on in introductory music history once a week.60 VI SUA L & P E R F O R M I N G ARTS in music theory once a week. After briefly describing the M G 4 5 1 / 4 5 2 – F O U RT H Y E A R G U I TA R development of the piano as an instrument. or. and triads. a class in description below for details) or a class in guitar introductory music theory once a week. HU250. the One-semester course – May be taken both semesters piano literature class examines the most important Prerequisite: MG351/352 or permission of periods. piano works by Schumann. and jazz fusion. and compositions written for Department the piano. Bach collections currently performed See description for Third Year Guitar on the piano are discussed. Students are triads are discussed in great detail. Beethoven sonatas. jazz composition and All scale modes as well as all kinds of intervals and improvisation. scales. and K E Y B OA R D P E R F O R M A N C E either they take a class in music theory once a One-semester course – May be taken both semesters week and a class in music history once a week. a class week. Students may time should begin with this course which consists take either a jazz history class (see MU469 course of taking private lessons twice a week. history once a week. and a class literature. and a class in music lessons at the beginning of each semester. chords. cool. the evolution of the guitar. Students sign up for and schedule private in music theory once a week. key signatures. intervals. they Department participate in a Hotchkiss Music Ensemble twice a Students take private lessons twice a week. which include students’ knowledge of scales. starting in 1895 with Students sign up for and schedule private lessons at delta blues. Prerequisite: MK151/152 or permission of with permission of the Department. composers. The introductory modern west coast. Students music theory class reinforces music notation. The music theory class further develops electives (enrollment permitting). and triads. description below for details) or a class in piano literature. intervals. from PERFORMANCE Cristofori’s prototype to the modern piano. bebop. composers. Students are expected to perform One-semester course – May be taken both semesters publicly at least once per semester. PERFORMANCE and styles. The introductory music history class briefly discusses the origins of the western music tradition.

and simple M K 3 5 1 / 3 5 2 – T H I R D Y E A R K E Y B OA R D chords. twice Prerequisite: MP151/152 or permission of a week. Liszt. HU 250. One-semester course – May be taken both semesters then explores all major musical periods. composers. Students sign up for and schedule private Department lessons at the beginning of each semester. Students sign up for and electives (enrollment permitting). they PERFORMANCE participate in a Hotchkiss Music Ensemble. One-semester course – May be taken both semesters Prerequisite: MK351/352 or permission of MP351/352 – THIRD YEAR Department PERCUSSION PERFORMANCE See description for Third Year Keyboard One-semester course – May be taken both semesters Performance. or. and electives (enrollment permitting) which include a class in introductory music history once a week. scales. Prerequisite: MK251/252. triads are discussed in great detail. Students take private lessons twice a week. VISUA L & PERFORMING A RTS 61 Brahms. Debussy. Prerequisite: MP251/252. The introductory perform publicly at least once per semester. and music technology. or permission of Department Students take private lessons twice a week. jazz history. which Students who elect to take music theory and consists of taking private lessons twice a week. Rachmaninov. or permission and styles. . a class in Students who elect to take music theory and music theory once a week. and PERCUSSION either they take a class in music theory once a week and a class in music history once a week. intervals. key signatures. HU 250. twice One-semester course – May be taken both semesters a week. music theory class reinforces music notation. jazz composition and semester. jazz composition and improvisation. a music history may choose between various class in introductory music theory once a week. piano literature. Students sign up for and schedule private Students playing percussion at Hotchkiss for the lessons at the beginning of each semester. or. Students are expected to perform of Department publicly at least once per semester. Students also take a jazz history class (see MU469 course M K 4 5 1 / 4 5 2 – F O U RT H Y E A R description below for details). first time should begin with this course. Students are expected K E Y B OA R D P E R F O R M A N C E to perform publicly at least once per semester. which include schedule private lessons at the beginning of each jazz history. Students are expected to the beginning of each semester. among others. The introductory music history class briefly PERFORMANCE discusses the origins of the Western music tradition. and a class in music music history may choose between various history once a week. Ravel. Students take private lessons twice a week. The music theory class further develops improvisation. and either they take a class in music theory once a MP251/252 – SECOND YEAR week and a class in music history once a week. they One-semester course – May be taken both semesters participate in a Hotchkiss Music Ensemble. and triads. Students are students’ knowledge of scales. MP151/152 – FIRST YEAR PERCUSSION with permission of the Department. expected to perform publicly at least once per All scale modes as well as all kinds of intervals and semester. intervals. rhythm. and Students sign up for and schedule private lessons at Prokofiev. PERCUSSION PERFORMANCE with permission of the Department.

scales. a class in Prerequisite: MS251/252. musical styles. composers. at the beginning of each semester. The placement in each ensemble will be based on talent compatibility with the ensemble’s goals. VOICE The Department head oversees the enrollment of each ensemble. then STRINGS explores all major musical periods. Students are expected to MS251/252 – SECOND YEAR STRING perform publicly at least once per semester. The introductory music history class briefly discusses the origins of the Western music tradition. key signatures. Students singing at Hotchkiss for the first time should begin with this course. and to perform a diverse array of perform in a Hotchkiss Ensemble. PERFORMANCE and simple chords. which consists of taking private lessons twice a week. and Department participate in a Hotchkiss Ensemble twice a week. The introductory music theory class reinforces music M S 4 5 1 / 4 5 2 – F O U RT H Y E A R S T R I N G notation. Students are PERFORMANCE expected to perform publicly at least once per One-semester course – May be taken both semesters semester. PERFORMANCE One-semester course – May be taken both semesters MS351/352 – THIRD YEAR STRING Students playing strings at Hotchkiss for the first PERFORMANCE time should begin with this course. students also have an Prerequisite: MS351/352 or permission of opportunity to explore a variety of musical Department settings. and participating in the Hotchkiss Chorus twice a . PERFORMANCE One-semester course – May be taken both semesters M P 4 5 1 / 4 5 2 – F O U RT H Y E A R Prerequisite: MS151/152 or permission of PERCUSSION PERFORMANCE Department One-semester course – May be taken both semesters Students take private lessons twice a week. which consists One-semester course – May be taken both semesters of taking private lessons twice a week. a class in introductory music theory once a week. intervals. HU 250. and repertoire requirements. Various public performances are M V 1 5 1 / 1 5 2 – F I R S T Y E A R VO I C E expected throughout the year. See description for Third Year Percussion Students sign up for and schedule private lessons Performance.62 VI SUA L & P E R F O R M I N G ARTS and music technology. from large orchestral ensembles to smaller Students take private lessons twice a week and chamber groups. Students are expected to perform publicly at MS151/152 – FIRST YEAR STRING least once per semester. or permission introductory music theory once a week. a class Prerequisite: MP351/352 or permission of in introductory music history once a week. lessons at the beginning of each semester. By participating in a One-semester course – May be taken both semesters Hotchkiss Ensemble. rhythm. and styles. Students sign up for and schedule private perform in a Hotchkiss Ensemble. and of Department participating in a Hotchkiss Ensemble twice a Students take private lessons twice a week and week.

a class in at least once per semester. The One-semester course – May be taken both semesters introductory music theory class reinforces music Prerequisite: MV151/152 or permission of notation. week. a Ensemble. students also have an opportunity to class in introductory music history once a week. explore a variety of musical settings. key signatures. Students sign up for and schedule private perform in a Hotchkiss Ensemble. The introductory music theory class reinforces music notation. The Prerequisite: MV351/352 or permission of introductory music history class briefly discusses Department the origins of the Western music tradition. Students are expected to perform publicly of taking private lessons twice a week. lessons at the beginning of each semester. intervals. Students sign up for and schedule private PERFORMANCE lessons the beginning of each semester. Chorus exposes students to a wide body of choral literature through the MW151/152 – FIRST YEAR WIND rehearsal and performance of representative pieces PERFORMANCE of great choral literature. intervals. and the origins of the Western music tradition. Students are expected to perform public performances are expected throughout the publicly at least once per semester. which consists concert. then repertoire requirements. WINDS and simple chords. key signatures. introductory music theory once a week. Department and simple chords. year. scales. Students sign up for and schedule private and to perform a diverse array of musical styles. and . Various and styles. from large and participate in the Hotchkiss Chorus twice a orchestral ensembles to smaller chamber groups. scales. or permission One-semester course – May be taken both semesters of Department Prerequisite: MW151/152 or permission of Students take private lessons twice a week and Department perform in a Hotchkiss Ensemble. and participating in a Hotchkiss Ensemble twice a M V 2 5 1 / 2 5 2 – S E C O N D Y E A R VO I C E week. a class in introductory music history once a week. composers. and M V 4 5 1 / 4 5 2 – F O U RT H Y E A R VO I C E participate in a Hotchkiss Ensemble twice a week. rhythm. rhythm. VISUA L & PERFORMING A RTS 63 week. The chorus performs One-semester course – May be taken both semesters three times during the year: the annual Festival of Students playing winds at Hotchkiss for the first Lessons and Carols. a winter concert and a spring time should begin with this course. PERFORMANCE Students sign up for and schedule private lessons One-semester course – May be taken both semesters at the beginning of each semester. The department head explores all major musical periods. Students are expected to perform publicly at least once per semester. composers. The The placement in each ensemble will be based on introductory music history class briefly discusses talent compatibility with the ensemble’s goals. By participating in a Hotchkiss Students take private lessons twice a week. M V 3 5 1 / 3 5 2 – T H I R D Y E A R VO I C E PERFORMANCE MW251/252 – SECOND YEAR WIND One-semester course – May be taken both semesters PERFORMANCE Prerequisite: MV251/252. then Students take private lessons twice a week and explores all major musical periods. HU 250. Students take private lessons twice a week. lessons at the beginning of each semester. oversees the enrollment of each ensemble.

Seniors MW 351/352 – THIRD YEAR WIND Music students registered in this course will have PERFORMANCE an opportunity to participate in a variety of One-semester course – May be taken both semesters musical settings. requirement. Lower Mids. Upper Mids. which meets for two hours each week. a winter concert and a spring to sing or play an instrument and students with concert. and repertoire requirements. Lower Mids. is charged for these lessons. Please note that his yearlong course. Seniors to take courses in music for credit without taking This course explores the history of jazz and private voice or instrumental lessons. Students are expected to perform publicly at M U 3 5 9 – H OT C H K I S S E N S E M B L E S least once per semester. HU 250. As such. The purpose of the course is to expose students to a wide body of choral literature through the Non-credit music lessons rehearsal and performance of representative pieces This option. Students will also this option. The department head oversees the M W 4 5 1 / 4 5 2 – F O U RT H Y E A R W I N D enrollment of each ensemble. A fee. Lower Mids. is Students take private lessons twice a week and worth a half credit and fulfills half of the arts perform in a Hotchkiss Ensemble.64 VI SUA L & P E R F O R M I N G ARTS styles. during two class periods. Please note that this yearlong Department course. Courses in modern music styles from ragtime to the present music history. Year course (one-half credit) Preps. is Year course (one-half credit) worth a half credit and fulfills half of the arts Preps. All ensembles PERFORMANCE rehearse twice a week. performing a diverse of Department array of musical styles. One-semester course – May be taken both semesters Various public performances are expected Prerequisite: MW351/352 or permission of throughout the year. with the ensemble’s goals. which are not part of the student’s regular academic program. these lessons do not . The placement in each Students take private lessons twice a week and ensemble will be based on talent compatibility perform in a Hotchkiss Ensemble. of the regular tuition expenses. previous experience who do not wish to take which meets for two hours each week. Seniors requirement. Chorus meets for two class periods each week. and participation in any of day. performers. is recommended for two kinds of students: three times during the year: the annual Festival of those novices who are interested in learning how Lessons and Carols. Upper Mids. Please note that this yearlong M U 3 4 9 – H OT C H K I S S C H O RU S course. which is not part half credit and fulfills half of the arts requirement. and recordings Hotchkiss music ensembles are available through will be analyzed and discussed. or permission to smaller chamber groups. Upper Mids. The chorus will perform week. is worth a music for academic credit. from large orchestral ensembles Prerequisite: MW251/252. All major styles. study the social aspects that helped shape this American art. which meets for two hours each week. which provides one private lesson a of great choral literature. M U 4 6 9 – H I S TO RY O F J A Z Z General Music Courses Year course (one-half credit) This option is geared towards students who wish Preps.

advanced. or a portfolio review Through readings and critiques students will Following a review of black and white develop a vocabulary for discussing photographs. In addition to regular classroom instruction. Prerequisite: PO350. It must be signed and returned to the School before the extracurricular lessons can begin. there are field trips off campus and visits to galleries and museums. printing and proper Lower Mids. Music lessons fees will be posted on the student’s term bill. Preps. but members of advanced classes should have their own 35mm cameras or SLR digital cameras. A music lesson contract is mailed to parents before each semester begins. Third MID HUMANITIES (1815-PRESENT) Edition. Upper Mids. Lower Mids. and digital videography. Revised by Henry Horenstein. Seniors This course is an abbreviated version of Photo 350. Upper Mids. and independent courses are offered in traditional photography. photography and the fundamentals of exposure. Students make use of the lab as members of photography and video classes and as members of various School clubs and publications. A Basic Manual. As we move into the second Preps semester. Lower Mids. PHOTOGRAPHY & FILM ____________________________________________________ The Photography & Film Program at Hotchkiss is nearing 40 years old and is housed in one of the finest facilities of its kind in the country. studio lighting. and landscape photography. digital photography. Seniors P H OTO G R A P H Y This course covers the basics including Year course development of film. Contact us directly for suggestions on types of cameras. Upper Mids. PO350 – BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY I AND II Year course P O 4 4 0 – C R E AT I V E D I G I TA L Preps. Owning a camera is not required for beginning classes. VISUA L & PERFORMING A RTS 65 count towards the Hotchkiss art requirement. PO352. Text: Black and H U 2 5 0 ( P H OTO G R A P H Y ) – L OW E R White Photography. Year Course Lower Mids P O 3 5 2 – B A S I C P H OTO G R A P H Y I Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses One-semester course – Offered second semester section for a description of this course. portraiture section for a description of this course. H U 1 5 0 ( P H OTO G R A P H Y ) – P R E P Throughout the year there will be brief reading HUMANITIES (1500-1815) assignments and discussions about the history of Year Course photography. Basic. there is no refund should the student decide to discontinue the lessons. Once a student begins taking lessons. . Guest artists and photographers exhibit their work in the Tremaine Gallery and hold workshops for students. as well as an introduction to Adobe Photoshop. students will explore experimental Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses printing techniques. Seniors preparation of photographs for exhibition.

One-semester course – Offered both semesters if needed. Lower Mids. Students are introduced to the new photographic technologies encouraged to enter their work in student including methods of capture. The initial photograph will be thought of as P H OTO G R A P H Y I a point of departure for taking the image to many One semester course – Offered both semesters different creative levels. film/video festivals. Students will be students may enter the 2nd semester of PO440 expected to attend lectures. A plan of study . Seniors shoot and edit their own productions using Prerequisite: PO471 or PO472 professional cameras and Final Cut Pro. Students This course is for students who have shown will have the opportunity to meet professional exceptional ability. involved in Tremaine Gallery events. Students will attend Upper Mids. Students must provide written proposals for projects at the P O 4 5 5 – I N T RO D U C T I O N TO F I L M beginning of each semester. Students are given greater Prerequisite: PO350. blending. PO455. and various Lower Mids.66 VI SUA L & P E R F O R M I N G ARTS focus. Upper Mids. video. PO352. A few qualified and execution of their work. Seniors alternative processes. The members of the class will write. Semester course – Offered second semester large format photography. and viewing films. Greater consideration will be made for their direction in photography or related media. This course provides an opportunity for a limited number of dedicated students to explore P O 4 4 2 – C R E AT I V E D I G I TA L techniques from a wide variety of possible choices P H OTO G R A P H Y such as advanced black and white photography. masking. original music and lighting Students must be willing to make a substantial design. take class trips and be Prerequisites: PO440. P O 9 5 2 – A DVA N C E D P H OTO G A P H Y A N D R E L AT E D M E D I A P O 4 6 2 – A DVA N C E D F I L M A K I N G One semester course – Offered second semester One semester course – Offered second semester Seniors Prerequisite: PO 455 or portfolio review Prerequisites: PO471/472. video to tell a narrative in a short format. raw files. Preps. will be provided by the school. however. Upper Mids. Refer to course description for filmmakers as well as take field trips for lectures PO471/PO472. take class trips. and multiple image composites in both black and white and P O 4 7 1 / 4 7 2 – A DVA N C E D color. or a portfolio review responsibility and independence in the planning See description for PO440. enhancement. PO481. and be depending upon size of enrollment. PO462 Students will continue to hone their shooting and This course is offered to highly motivated students editing skills by working on more complicated of exceptional ability who wish to pursue a specific films. Seniors lectures by photographers. Seniors students must supply their own SLR digital or This course introduces the students to the use of film cameras. Through the study of classic features and short films. the PO482 – ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY II students will learn film language and the art of One semester course — Offered second semester storytelling. Large format cameras. Final projects will be screened before an commitment on a daily basis. or PO462 involved with Tremaine Gallery events. toning. and composition students will be audience at the end of the semester. Final projects will be screened before an audience at the end of the semester. work with sound.

In addition to Humanities (Theatre). literature. Upper Mids. and evocative collage. must learn science. directors’ approaches. Throughout the year students will discover numerous connection points to ideas from other H U 2 5 0 ( T H E AT R E ) – L OW E R M I D disciplines. All courses offered in the Theatre curriculum fulfill the art diploma requirement. Musical Theatre. Beginning as early Year Course the Greeks and continuing to the present day. The actor. It involves many creators and assumes a knowledge that spans all the disciplines one encounters in formal education. Qualified students may also be permitted to direct or design productions sponsored by the Hotchkiss Dramatic Association in Walker Auditorium or in the Black Box Theater. all of which work together to invite HUMANITIES (1815-PRESENT) responses to these fundamental questions. “What does it mean to be alive? Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses How should we act? What must I do?” section for a description of this course. history. . sorrows. designers’ visions. designer. Preps Theatre asks. to represent or challenge a given culture’s religious beliefs. Students will attend lectures by photographers and be involved with Tremaine Gallery events. All of the courses encourage students to experiment with creative problem solving through practical. one should study HUMANITIES (1500-1815) its history and practice its skills. social values. the curriculum includes courses in Acting. language. Public Speaking. political views. actors’ styles. and joys. Stanislavsky techniques. T H E AT R E ____________________________________________________ Theatre is a complex art. Students must own their own cameras. themes. VISUA L & PERFORMING A RTS 67 must be submitted to the department head for approval. Directing. Independence and a commitment to the development of a personal body of work are essential. H U 1 5 0 ( T H E AT R E ) – P R E P nature of theatre as an art form. Seniors movement exercises. Design. Lower Mids. choreographer. The Theatre Program offers students the opportunity to learn about theatre both as a cultural value and as a performance art. Every student will discover the T H 3 2 0 – F O U N DAT I O N S I N T H E AT R E richness of this art through an introduction to Year course commedia dell arte mask work. mathematics. as well as all of the other arts in order to achieve that which is Theatre’s primary purpose: namely. playwright. Before one can fully appreciate the multi-faceted improvisation. and Theatre Technology. hands-on experience. director. voice and Preps. The Year Course year begins with the vocabulary associated with Lower Mids early Greek theatre and explores the traditions that Please refer to the Interdisciplinary Courses directly or indirectly influenced playwrights’ section for a description of this course. All courses offered in the Theatre curriculum fulfill the arts diploma requirement.

Goldoni. photometrics. scoring. thereby encountering multiple instructor interpretations of that text. students hone principles of composition. they also develop their their ability to create and articulate intelligent and vocal and physical skills by learning techniques well thought out concepts in reference to designed by leaders in the development of actor theatrical direction and design. frames of analysis.Offered second semester One-semester course. Theatre for a description of the second semester. students review their a particular focus of the course. script analysis of the text The year culminates in a theatre piece that draws selected for final projects necessitates research into on the acting techniques and design elements the cultural and historical circumstances of the introduced throughout the year. Chekhov manuscript speeches of appreciable length to an and others. Ibsen. By semester’s . Students are encouraged to translate historical and cultural information TH425 – PUBLIC SPEAKING: into design terms relevant to a contemporary P E R S UA S I O N A N D I N S P I R AT I O N audience. Research is a significant component of the work. the importance of unique points of view. TH431 has a specific focus on Maslow Pyramid and continues with the study of past and current technological advances that formal rhetorical devices as evinced in great impact the entertainment industry. and techniques committed students with some previous involved in lighting and sound design. end. play’s setting and period. this course allows organizational structure. TH431 – LIGHTING & SOUND DESIGN T H 3 2 2 – F O U N DAT I O N S I N T H E AT R E F O R T H E AT R E One-semester course. paperwork organization. As the semester training. varying cultural backgrounds influence artistic This course begins with an understanding of the representations. Please see TH322 — Foundations in audience of their teachers and peers. cueing. others by permission of the another. Meisner repetition and projects — color theory. The experience to join the TH320 course midyear. Anne lighting and sound designer using practical Bogart’s Viewpoints.68 VI SUA L & P E R F O R M I N G ARTS Representative playwrights include Sophocles. students are expected to deliver full Shakespeare. Experiments continue with movement progresses. This course speeches from Shakespeare to Angelou. ETC develop monologues and montages based on programming. Using may be repeated in subsequent semesters with a these speeches as models. sound mixing. Using both understanding of the elements of design and creative and critical thinking skills. readings in this course and in their other courses. sound editing. students explore the process of a for the actor. As relationship to and function of the director is also the year progresses. students develop their Special Studies designation. Laban methods of behavior. awareness of ethos. pathos and logos and then work to create their own arguments. This multiplicity of Despite the increased use of computer technology interpretations offers opportunity to observe how as a means of communication. processes. and the articulate and knowledgeable speaker remains. Students create designs around the One-semester course-Offered each semester same text and share those designs with one Upper Mids. generating combine with the students’ own writing to light plots. In addition. Seniors.Offered each semester Prerequisite: Permission of the Department Prerequisite: TH320 or HU250 (Theatre) Although we believe that the full year program is This course is a focused study of the basic the best for our students. Moliere.

If and technicians in a typical production process. and this particular form of theatre. TH320 or Prerequisite: HU250 (Theatre).Offered each semester basic play analysis students equip themselves to Prerequisite: TH320 or HU250 (Theatre) tackle any piece of dramatic literature. objective. When possible. this course focuses the play’s setting and period. paint One-semester course. By building skills in One-semester course. Students are primarily on the development of the musical encouraged to translate historical and cultural theatre of the 20th and 21st centuries both as information into design terms relevant to a historical event and as a performing art. Students and many more elements are integral to a director examine the work of scenic and costume designers being able to stage a successful production. involved in scenic and costume design. Using both by students in this course and presented at the end creative and critical thinking skills. the advanced acting students serve as the The relationship to and function of the director is cast of short plays/Shakespearean scenes directed also a particular focus of the course. students explore the process of a scenic T H 4 6 1 / 4 6 2 – M U S I C A L T H E AT R E : and costume designer by developing practical skills H I S TO RY A N D P R AC T I C E — technical drawing. This course may be repeated in Studies designation. This multiplicity visiting artists will offer their experiences as of interpretations offers opportunity to observe performers to help students learn the intricacies of how unique points of view. Additionally. model building. Plot This course is a focused study of the basic structure. This course may be repeated in their ability to create and articulate intelligent and subsequent semesters with a Special Studies well thought out concepts in reference to designation. Students create designs will study librettos. listen to recordings. As the semester unfolds. The kind of intensive analysis and rehearsal required in . vocal dialect. available. organizational structure. students hone of the semester. and techniques elements of behavior. watch around the same text and share those designs with videos and learn the techniques necessary to give one another. TH320 or costume rendering. interpretations of that same text. frames of analysis. TH320 or permission of the Department Interview/Audition Directing for the stage is far more than holding a Students at this level are prepared to engage in the megaphone while sitting in a very tall chair. thereby encountering multiple songs their physical and vocal life.Offered each semester One-semester course. basic AutoCAD. offered either semester Prerequisite: HU250 (Theatre). script analysis of the With some attention given initially to the text selected for final projects necessitates research melodrama and musical theatre of the 19th into the cultural and historical circumstances of century as background. T H 4 7 1 / 4 7 2 – A DVA N C E D AC T I N G : C O N T E M P O R A RY T H E AT R E TH455 – DIRECTING PERFORMANCE One-semester course. Prerequisite: HU250 (Theatre). theatrical direction and design. tactics. rudimentary costume permission of the Department construction. model building. character analysis. offered each semester elevations. VISUA L & PERFORMING A RTS 69 TH442 – SCENIC & COSTUME DESIGN theatre director must have a working knowledge F O R T H E AT R E of both acting and design. processes. This course may be varying cultural backgrounds influence artistic repeated in subsequent semesters with a Special representations. stage picture. subsequent semesters with a Special Studies designation. Students contemporary audience.

This course contemporary play. we’ll take our actors outside and perform multiple characters which appear. . Beth Henley. As the weather Wright’s I Am My Own Wife. Various techniques developed may be repeated in subsequent semesters with a in Humanities—Theatre or Theatre 320 now Special Studies designation. Lynn Siefert. There are no other actors to support Voice. but ends with a different public AutoCAD 2008. the works of the Bard on and around the Bronze reappear during the course of the full length Bulls. Actors will work with sonnets. What gets in the way of T H 5 7 5 – AU TO C A D F O R D E S I G N truthful acting? How does an actor make A P P L I C AT I O N S connections to other actors? How does the actor One-semester course. As You Like It. David project planning and design is executed using Henry Hwang and others provide rich material for CAD (Computer Aided Drafting) software. a space quite evocative for Signs of Intelligent Life in the Universe or Doug of the Elizabethan Globe Theater. but the work must ultimately generate for Shakespearean actors. It is a tour de force for the actor.Offered both semesters use improvisation as a means to discover self and Prerequisite: TH435 or permission of the character? Playwrights such as David Mamet. The Sonnets the performer. We decided in collaboration with a director and are fortunate to have some exciting playing spaces designers. solve design problems using sketching. TH320 or to assemble CAD drawings in industry-standard Interview/Audition plan form and produce plotted hardcopies ready There’s nothing like the Bard to challenge an for distribution. visiting artists will give master contemporary actor. popular and challenging experience for the When possible. Tony Kushner. Winter’s Tale will be the focus text for first performance. Often. Students master usage of these performance. Virtually every aspect of engineering. drafting. This this work. Students emerge able Prerequisite: HU250 (Theatre). The Riverside Shakespeare. we will discover Shakespeare’s Prerequisite: TH471/472 or TH481/482 or clues regarding how a scene might be played. architecture. It requires hours of rehearsal classes in the techniques the course introduces. This course may be repeated in commands by completing simplistic practical subsequent semesters with a Special Studies drawing projects and gain the skills necessary to designation. monologues and scenes from a TH585 – SOLO PERFORMANCE wide range of Shakespeare’s plays. Department Caryl Churchill. Tom Stoppard. for the second. and demands considerable physical stamina and Resource texts include Freeing the Shakespearean discipline. offered either semester view. the actor creates warms. Focus is placed T H 4 8 1 / 4 8 2 – A DVA N C E D AC T I N G : on the ability to create 2-dimensional P L AY I N G S H A K E S P E A R E representations of 3-dimensional objects in plan One-semester course. all of the production values are (Signet Classics Edition) and The First Folio. Through study One-Semester Course-Offered both semesters of the First Folio.70 VI SUA L & P E R F O R M I N G ARTS mounting a long one-act or full length semester. We permission of the Department. Each semester begins with similar semester course covers the basic commands in technique work. elevation and section. disappear. as in Jane Wagner’s Search hope to play in Elfers Hall. In the first semester we from the actor. actor’s linguistic and physical skills. form the foundation for character development in this advanced work. Kia Korthron. will also spend considerable time developing the Solo performance has become an extremely vocal freedom necessary for animating the text. and 3 dimensional construction.

traveling theatre. and light design. playwriting. directing. directing. playwriting. scene specific fields. VISUA L & PERFORMING A RTS 71 TH955 – SPECIAL STUDIES IN T H 9 7 5 / 9 8 5 – A DVA N C E D S T U D I E S I N T H E AT R E T H E AT R E Offered both semesters by special arrangement with Offered both semesters by special arrangement with the Department the Department Students must have completed two years in Prerequisite: TH955 theatre course offerings or have documented Students may elect a tutorial program to extend significant contributions to the HDA or their studies beyond the areas introduced in the elsewhere.g. score and libretto for a full- theatre history. and theatre history.g. directing of a full-scale musical. e. e. composition of text. . They may specialize in one of several departmental offerings. acting. length musical. Examples of recent tutorials include the lighting design. stage craft. stage management. scene design. and the creation and performance of a one- woman full-length drama. costume design. acting.

develop class plans course as a Senior elective are required to and lead class discussions. group discussion. There will be two participate in a weekend training program during seminars during the course of the year that all the spring of their Upper Mid year. physical wellness. and the dynamics of areas through readings. and Human understanding of their own personal growth and Development faculty approval development. sexuality.72 HU M A N D E V E L O P M E N T HUMAN DEVELOPMENT HD250 – HUMAN DEVELOPMENT H D 5 5 0 – A S S I S TA N T T E AC H I N G O F Year course HUMAN DEVELOPMENT All Lower Mids Year course This course is a requirement for all Lower Mids. Students in the Lower Mid class meet two periods each week. reaction. group process. and current research. and to foster an section of HD250 will be taught by one faculty understanding of adolescents in this community member and two Senior TA (HD550) students. interview. and emotional health. and sexuality. The taught by Senior Teaching Assistants enrolled in selection process for this course begins in the HD550. Seniors The goal of HD250 is to increase our students’ Prerequisites: Application. families. Students planning on taking the of human development faculty. learning styles. Students will learn to identify Through lecture. Students will be graded on a pass/fail basis. readings. relationships. and and interpret reliable information and resources research students will study theories of adolescent that support their health needs and the needs of development and the subject areas that will be their friends and families. Subject matter includes included in HD250: relationships. videos. Teaching Assistants. Class time will should have an interest in developing both focus on discussion. families. community adolescent development. presentations. to help our students recognize and Students accepted into this course will be prepare for the challenges of becoming healthy. There will be no academic credit points given for this course. Each autonomous young adults. and other cultures. HD250 is unique in that it is their own personal growth and development. Lower Mids are required to attend. emotional health. physical wellness and life. . and clarification of teaching and leadership skills. as well as examining the information. Teaching Assistants (TAs) for HD250. community living. All Lower Mid students will take this course in addition to the normal five-course load. Students applying for this course literature. drug use. under the direction Upper Mid year. Students will be provided information in these teaching and leadership skills. content will also include peer counseling skills. Course drugs/alcohol issues.

Seniors distinct seeker of knowledge. such as Science. H U 2 5 0 – L OW E R M I D H U M A N I T I E S (1815-PRESENT) Please see description below. how we gain knowledge in and from . knowledge. We shall examine the differences in available to Upper Mids and Seniors and will carry scope and method between these types of a Pass /Fail grade. I C 3 5 9 – WAYS O F U N D E R S TA N D I N G The first semester will examine the nature of Year course (one-half credit) knowledge. Human Sciences. technology and understand their world. enduring learning. periods each week and carries a half credit. INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES 73 INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES Interdisciplinary courses challenge students to make connections across disciplines and to develop sophisticated understanding of complex topics not possible from the perspective of a single discipline. and Social Sciences sections for a description of this course. different lenses by which humans come to know imagination and emotion (the heart). will be placed at the Ways of Understanding is an interdisciplinary. and faith (the allow the directed reflection that makes the spirit). this course. This course is cross-listed in the Science and the Humanities and Social Sciences Departments. HU150 – PREP HUMANITIES (1500-1815) Please refer to those sections for a description of Please see description below. Hotchkiss offers the following interdisciplinary courses: BI422 – BIOMEDICAL/ I C 3 5 9 – WAYS O F U N D E R S TA N D I N G B I OT E C H N O L O G I C A L E T H I C S Please see description below. The objective is to (the hand). Interdisciplinary courses also promote deep. EN360/HI360 – AMERICAN STUDIES Please refer to those sections for a description of Please refer to the English and the Humanities this course. center of this enterprise. the wise. History. We shall consider the critical thinking course focusing on issues of following ways or means of knowing: sense knowledge and understanding through the perception (the body). Each individual in the class. It is a full year course that meets two Mathematics. It is and Ethics. This course is cross-listed in the Science and the Humanities and Social Sciences Departments. H I 4 2 2 – L AT I N A M E R I C A N S T U D I E S Please refer to the Humanities and Social Sciences E S 4 2 1 – E N V I RO N M E N TA L E T H I C S section for a description of this course. and the knowing into the disciplines of knowledge. we shall consider informed into the seeker. language (the tongue). the Arts. reason (the mind). In the second semester. as a Upper Mids.

Groups and governments use force to promote values they believe right for all human beings. art forms and literature. although there will habit of mind that will foster a directed habit of be a philosophical dimension to many class heart and allow the knower to navigate a discussions. one’s ethnic group. The power of science. How do we know and what do we count as “knowledge”? What makes a “good” society? What are the most important elements of a “good” life? What is the place of human beings in the natural world? You could begin making sense of today’s world by examining the different ways its inhabitants ask and answer these questions. Skeptics about global citizenship reassert more particular loyalties — to one’s country.* . “a global village. have been asked — and variously answered — in all societies. The course aims to Ways of Understanding is not a course where train an informed. some say. manage disagreement. circulate across borders no less than trade. the benefits and burdens of economic globalization seem unfairly distributed. English. exceeds our wisdom in its application. Many people delight in the freedom to assemble their own individual identities from an ever-richer storehouse of possibilities. nor a psychology nor creative writing course. Still-developing global institutions foster dialogue. the course of study has been fashioned by an interdisciplinary team. in some form. independent and interrogative great philosophers are studied. read on. what the connections are Ways of Understanding adopts the power of the between them. and people. Some opponents of the “global village” view go beyond critical argument to violence in order to defend identities and ways of life threatened by change and pluralism. The ideal of “global citizenship” is celebrated. knowledge-based world. what the limitation of each might interrogative as its method. technology. critically examining others’ ways of asking and answering these basic questions and constructing your own. Humanities at Hotchkiss deliberately breaks from such a practice. and philosophy and religion (each with a teacher from the respective discipline). universal human rights are widely asserted. How can anyone comprehend such a seemingly contradictory world and prepare to contribute positively to it? The Humanities program rests on the belief that you are best equipped for this task by developing a broad understanding of how people in diverse times and places have made sense of themselves and the world around them. Detractors see international institutions as a threat to national sovereignty. the class is the starting point. because the be and how they might offer knowledge and assumptions and knowledge of the members of understanding in particular and illuminating ways. You and your classmates will play active roles in your learning. some fear. HU M A N I TI E S ____________________________________________________ The world has become. The movement of people across borders provokes alarm. it is designed for students who enjoy discovering the connections among disciplines that deepen learning. But they are in fact fundamental questions that.” Ideas and values.74 I N TE RDI S C I P L I N A RY C O U RS ES different disciplines. Yet this view of the world is challenged from many quarters. another two or three in English. and respond to worldwide challenges like climate change. history. Secondary school students have usually encountered such questions piecemeal: a few questions sometimes turn up in a history course. If you might be such a student. and so on. to help you develop a richer understanding of how people in different times and cultures create meaningful worlds and make their place within them. It is not a course in current events. Though students will study the arts. one’s religious community. Science promises ever- increasing understanding and control of nature.

examining how this “Enlightenment project” has been eagerly promoted by some people. China and Japan. Your teachers will help you learn the freedom and discipline combine to transform skills of historical study. the art. they will help you prepare to join the ranks of those responding with creative solutions. the United States. read and analyze primary and secondary rigor of the course rests. Students should read skillfully and authentically to conflicting individual the overall Humanities statement above before and social values. only that it has powerfully influenced our world. The course will include a engagement with alternative media. the Americas. The successive Humanities courses are designed for the student who enjoys learning in collaborative conversation with peers and teachers. But the historical period known as the Enlightenment will only be a springboard — for study that continues to the 21st century and reaches around the globe. and philosophy and religion. writing. If you are willing to seize the opportunities it offers. English. in part. The program does not rest on the assumption that the Enlightenment project is good or bad. The notes. on encounters with sources. how to organize and write essays. We will be exploring and discussing the time period English. traditions. you will come out of the two-year program with important skills of critical thinking. Understanding grammatical Islamic world. one credit will count towards the Humanities will study universal themes in diploma requirement in English. and the arts. partially accepted by more. These skills will do more than just equip you to pursue your own passions in upper-level electives in the arts. of rhetoric as a skill. Through Prep Humanities has components in English. research. and criticized and even fiercely rejected by others. and other parts rules and expanding vocabulary become necessary as of the world. We begin in the fall with the develop their reading. and challenging literary texts of various genres and on undertake research. including how to take enthusiastic practice into polished performance. philosophy and religion. each analytical and sensory — students learn to respond of which is explained below. Humanities English invites students to 1500-1815. HU150 – PREP HUMANITIES (1500-1815) examination and reading provide for comprehension Year course and application of the critical questions connecting Preps the various Humanities disciplines. and the arts. philosophy and religion. This course builds verbal ability through United States. and institutions would be critically reexamined and then reformed. reading the discipline-specific descriptions below. The readings for HU150 (History) the creative process in which finished work results will be primary and secondary sources from from a commitment to the phases of writing as an Europe. the program allows for a concentration within the arts component of Humanities. They will enable you to think more creatively about issues we face in our contemporary world. Students completing this course will earn a total of History. Close sequence of research projects and papers. according to scientific reason and empirical understanding of human nature. and speaking skills in background to the European Enlightenment and a collaborative environment as they respond to the end in the spring with the defeat of Napoleon in stories that shape contemporary and canonical Europe and the end of the War of 1812 in the literature. and one will Western and global history and will be linked to satisfy the diploma requirement in the Arts. interdisciplinary study and experience — both history. INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES 75 The program will pay special attention to ideas and aspirations of the 18th-century Enlightenment — a time when thinkers viewed themselves as the vanguard of a revolutionary era in which inherited beliefs. history. You will . English. *Recognizing that developing proficiency in a specific art form takes cumulative practice. The history component of Prep three credits. and creative expression.

Students are encouraged to be inventive and expressive with Beginning with study of inherited religious newly acquired knowledge. Art. as we unpack its most closely linked to those in English. offering a Reformation. The 18th-century Enlightenment will marking period a major assignment in Art will be receive special attention. understand sympathetically world-views other than your own. contradictions. Dance took Students must select one of the following arts to take on a new importance for social grace and manner. color theory. observation. In addition to historical study. drawing from the works of philosophers and religious authors. students will learn how to of how we know and how society should be confidently create and critique artwork. On the course sign-up Court and Ritual dance. The religion helped shape the revolutions that brought historical study of dance from the 16th century the 18th century to a close. (Dance). as part of Prep Humanities. HU150 (Photo). and framing constructive instruction. space. HU150 thinking. you will wide range of media in the creation of meaningful find yourself increasingly called to practice visual images. This course is an exciting and accessible however. HU150 (Theatre). course provides students with a rigorous engaging the thinkers you study as conversation.76 I N TE RDI S C I P L I N A RY C O U RS ES be expected and encouraged to participate fully sheet designate your choice in parentheses after the throughout the course by careful reading. and painting. philosophy and powerfully influential ideas and its internal religion. and discussion. which connected to . a range of media and subject matter. we move to intellectual ideas from humanities disciplines and art history developments in the Renaissance and in the making of imaginative images. almost all your reading will come from problem-solving design. The Art development of your skills in critical reading. You won’t be able to rely on a fundamental skills and expressive potential of textbook. This course will It’s a great way to stretch yourself as an combine pertinent design and fine art topics with independent thinker. grounding in seeing. Department believes that anyone. course number as such: HU150 (Arts). and light. trying to regarding appropriate course placement. and history. shape. and the partners. in which you turn over a understand and manipulate line. we will examine critical reactions to the Dance. They will combine traditions of Europe. encouragement. portion of your essay to the strongest possible form. value. Emphasis will be arguments against your ideas — and then show placed on how best to edit and arrange one’s why those counter-arguments are not persuasive. color. can learn to manipulate successfully a arguments. composition. Close attention will be given to expression of ideas through images. Exceptional arts students are Philosophy and Religion. you will work on another level: as a starting point for students who wish to learn the philosopher. Dance has been part of the human Enlightenment and explore how philosophy and experience as far back as ancient times. You will examine how encouraged to speak directly to the chair of the religion and philosophy have shaped the past and respective department for a recommendation the world in which we live today. This You will have the chance to do philosophy. covers the Renaissance period with members of the aristocracy and the middle classes. with proper analytical writing. Over the course of two years. In a emergence of a new world-view in the Scientific studio atmosphere of challenge. HU150 (Music). image creation and subject matter. Each governed. From there we explore the personal response to their learning experience. As the year moves to a close. Every student will be taught to dialectical writing. Revolution and the unfolding of new conceptions and support.

develop personal concepts of self while making Since the core of the performance component is statements about society’s morals and values. violin. Students will opportunity to insert their individual musical work individually and collaboratively in a experiences in a broad context of historical and supportive environment where creativity and contemporary learning. and large group dances were created. ‘Rainbow Round My Shoulder. “What does it mean to civil rights movement will offer seamless be alive? How should we act? What must I do?” connection points between music and the other Throughout the year. this course Fokine’s ‘L’Apres-midi d’un Faun’ to Isadora welcomes musicians of all levels and experiences. students will be expected to analyze critically music.’ dance makers studio lighting. either as a soloist or as a member of a prominence. Students taking music as part of the of photographs for exhibition. and proper preparation Music. Students relate to the other arts. romanticism. oboe. and specific to trombone. darkroom printing. As performers. art. and the present day. Included is a brief Humanities program will have a unique introduction to digital printing. and history. design. Why is music such an experimentation are encouraged. popular as both women and men staged and double-bass. take class society? Is music capable of affecting the behavior of trips to museums and galleries. religion. guitar choreographed performances for royalty. clarinet. Wherever possible. have an opportunity to take private lessons in one Intermedio. spatial use. and to contemporary will attend lectures by photographers. drums. time independently authentic musical interpretations. jazz this period. flute. and Donald Photography. developing an appreciation for Theatre. be explored. landscape have always made evocative statements about photography and experimental printing processes. Students learn how to process shoot and process film. pattern formation. all students are expected to perform patterns. and attend exhibits people? How is the ipod changing music? Students in the Tremaine Gallery. one historical and geographical backgrounds will also should study its history and practice its skills. The main goal of this course is The Humanities dance curriculum covers study in to develop performers who are able to construct shape. and trumpet. portraiture. Duets also appeared. The Prep Humanities McKayle’s masterful choreography about slavery. refined. The relevance of diverse multifaceted nature of theatre as an art form. saxophone. students will discover Humanities courses. became of the following instruments: bass. INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES 77 English Masque. musical ensemble. Periods and topics such as the Beginning with the Greeks and continuing to the Enlightenment. became more elaborate. percussion. Martha Graham’s creation of a new technique. Besides constant regular group formation through organized steps and practice. change. philosophy and listeners and performers. viola. students will numerous connection points to ideas from other . Dancers discover and information provided by the Humanities program. Before one can fully appreciate the musical theory and form. voice. As listeners. nationalism. Through reading important form of human expression? What factors assignments and critiques students develop a influence and inspire composers? How does music vocabulary for discussing photographs. based on multi-discipline and curvilinear forms. solos were given publicly. perspective. French horn. will be encouraged to think about these and other assignments will be linked in an interdisciplinary relevant questions from two distinct angles: as way to Humanities English. The Italian Mascherata. piano. From taught through individual lessons. society and culture. During (electric and classical). Duncan’s free-spirit dance. cello. Theatre asks. harp. and directions in linear in various styles. photography course covers straight photography. and The Ballet Comique. dance took on classic forms and piano.

history 1815 to 2009.S. Humanities program. Humanities program. English. satisfy the diploma requirement in the Arts for thinking. actors’ styles. short scenes. The literature traditions that directly or indirectly influenced will consist of both American and more global playwrights’ themes. This and physical skills through an introduction to course is meant to build on HU150. and integrating arts. known as “art History. Students will build upon the Lower Mids skills developed in the prep year and focus on: Prerequisite: Prep Humanities writing analytical essays. we dig more deeply and broaden requirement). all of which work together English. those who did not satisfy the art requirement by taking Prep Humanities. Exploring and Lower Mid Humanities satisfy the diploma philosophical and religious developments from requirement in history (i. like all other lower-mid English sections. costume study and both planned and unexpected ways. You will total of three credits. interpretation/transformation. Students statistics. In keeping with the philosophy of the mask work. directors’ works chosen either to complement the approaches. and philosophy classes will continue to mesh in design conceptualization.” give the students the opportunity to share Humanities will study themes in Western and what they are learning with the other artists in the global history and will be linked to English. generally stretch their imaginations and develop their vocal involving at least two of the subject areas. Every student will chronology of Humanities History or to reflect. charts. designers’ visions. a theme of central experimentation with monologues. including evocative collage. H U 2 5 0 – L OW E R M I D H U M A N I T I E S beginning with the age of the Industrial (1815-PRESENT) Revolution in Europe and the Early Republic in Year course the United States. history. and one will throughout the course by careful reading. students various interdisciplinary assessments. the the skills of language through grammar and a first year in Humanities-Theatre explores the seven-week Daily Theme period. 1815-present. Themes to be examined include: challenges to older world-views and images of human nature from new developments . the arts. We will examine the time period c. the U. Students completing this course will earn a culminate with a major research project. As the year progresses. techniques designed by leaders in the development of actor training. our focus further beyond the West.e. The course will before reading the discipline-specific descriptions include particular emphasis on research skills and below.78 I N TE RDI S C I P L I N A RY C O U RS ES Humanities disciplines. one credit will count towards be expected and encouraged to participate fully the diploma requirement in English. will stress Beginning with a brief look at Greek theatre. reading interpretive Lower Mid Humanities has components in accounts of events. Gatherings. philosophy and religion. philosophy and religion. rooting historical arguments English.. Those who complete Prep Philosophy and Religion. and non-verbal evidence in should read the overall Humanities statement above constructing historical arguments. each of which is explained below. The lower-mid course in Humanities. and discussion. importance. to invite responses to these fundamental questions. and the into the context of scholarship. in discover the richness of this art through a work outside that chronology. history. taking in a globalizing world. voice and movement exercises. and the arts. The history component of Lower Mid salons. improvisation.

improvisation. Two private weekly lessons manipulating line. HU250 (Theatre). drawing from observation. saxophone. will be closely linked to those in English. The Lower Mid Humanities dance took Prep Humanities may continue with or switch curriculum continues the study of shape. explore self-evaluation. color provide students with in-depth instruction in the and light. step for those enrolled in the Prep Humanities Art Students will be expected to refine their work and curriculum as well as those wishing to join a 10th. violin. Students are expected to be trombone. choreographic tools of ABA. pattern course sign-up sheet designate your choice in formation and directions in linear and curvilinear parentheses after the course number as such: HU250 forms. time change. based on multi-discipline instruction. and support. Students will continue to learn lessons. tensions between traditional ways of with newly acquired skills and knowledge. to a different art in Lower Mid Humanities. introductory level. value. palindrome. Department believes that anyone. The music increasingly independent. best to edit and arrange one’s image. percussion. and painting. color theory. They life and new cultural norms. counterpoint. The Art independently authentic musical interpretations. and the expression of ideas performers who are able to construct through the process of image making. spatial use. flute. canon. shape. voice. on both national and thoughtful response to their humanities learning global levels. Lower Mid Humanities dance students will (Arts). composition. viola. drums. HU250 (dance). and tuba. design. can learn to manipulate successfully a information provided by the Humanities program. There will be emphasis grade course focusing on building fundamental placed on dance history and the cross connection visual skills and exploring the expressive potential to American and European History. music history and theory classes. conflicting ideas of will combine ideas from humanities disciplines the role and proper liberty of the individual in and art history with visual content in the creation changing societies. harp. oboe. growing awareness of cultural encouragement. rights against the backdrop of world war and Each marking period a major assignment in Art genocide. The music component of the Lower Mid course provides students with a second year of Humanities program follows the same guiding continued focus on the discipline of discerning principles of the prep year curriculum: develop seeing. inventive and expressive appreciation component will focus on late 19th- . Students must select one of the following arts to take as part of Lower Mid Humanities. sonata. On the perspective. In a studio atmosphere of challenge. This Music. and history. INTERDISCIPLINARY COURSES 79 in science. of problem-solving design. philosophy and religion. Students who Dance. Art. rondo. form. This course is a natural and welcoming next fugue and movement for narrative/theme. wide range of media in the creation of meaningful Consequently. Students will continue to focus on how following instruments: bass (acoustic and electric). new critiques of how power of imaginative images that offer a studied and and wealth are distributed. guitar will combine pertinent design and fine art topics (electric and acoustic). clarinet. with proper in various styles. HU250 explore in more depth concepts of space and time. it offers a similar weekly routine of visual images. the emergence of international human confidently learn to create and critique artwork. trumpet. and about the process and practice of organizing and ensemble rehearsals. piano. This course cello. (Photo). conversations among religions in a experience. space. students will relativism. jazz with media and subject matter beyond the piano. HU250 (Music). shrinking world. French horn.

Practical research and design impact of photography and related media projects. whenever possible linking these assignments to the other Humanities disciplines. Tennessee Williams. 19th-century photographic techniques coincide with the world that is covered within the other Humanities disciplines. Comedy of manners. Serialism. scheduled student recitals. Jazz. and and vocal techniques and elements of design Popular music. These kinds of actors in those plays. The impact of the first and second introduced during the first year. Susan Glaspell. Students pursuing the Lower Mid music influenced by the philosophical and political Humanities program will be expected to engage in attitudes of the day. and the with the design team influence a production Hotchkiss Chorus. in turn. Theatre. Students will be theme and other elements involved in moving from required to utilize their musical performance skills the plays to stage. Lorraine views himself and the world. contact printing and proceed to direct short one-act plays with their peers as the using lenses and view cameras. Students build on these experiences as we move into the study of digital photography and related media. After some shared review of the physical Impressionism. and others. and the Humanities program. Minimal musical proficiency is process? Beginning with the end of the 19th- required. objective. in order to perform these ideas in their works. field trips and attendance at Tremaine Gallery exhibits round out the experience. Playwrights. of the actor and director evolved significantly. and the ’60s their attention to some of the common questions around the world will offer natural and used by actors. the Russian Revolution. humanities seminars. At year’s end. and regular.and 20th-centuries we see the invention such playwrights as Maxim Gorky. Arthur Miller. the art to join an ensemble. of photography and its explosion onto the stage in Henrik Ibsen. directors and designers: What gets meaningful conversation points with the other in the way of truthful acting? How does an actor Humanities disciplines. so beginner students may not be allowed century and continuing to the present day. the Hotchkiss Jazz Ensemble. Students will be assigned make connections to other actors? What rhetorical to appropriate musical ensembles. the plot structure. the late 1830s and 1840s changing they way man Samuel Beckett. We begin the year with early answer how the role of the director and designer photographic processes including pinhole develops over time. Anton Chekhov. character analysis. students will turn world wars.80 I N TE RDI S C I P L I N A RY C O U RS ES century Romanticism and Nationalism. Atonal music. expressed regular and rigorous practice. the students photography. such as a Vision Book for The Tempest. . throughout the year. movement and design Photo As the Humanities program moves into to the creation of characters and scenes in works by the 19th. Lectures by photographers. Our study will explore in class. in order to illustrate and support topics studied in absurdist drama and the like give the actors. We will look at the Hansberry. directors/designers an opportunity to apply what they’ve learned about voice. depending on devices lend themselves to effective speeches? How their choice of instrument: the Hotchkiss does the role of the director and her relationship Orchestra. realism.

Tuesday Classes resume March 4. Friday Proctors return by noon August 30. Thursday Classes resume April 25. Wednesday Students return by check-in January 6. Monday Students return by check-in February 8. Second Semester Last day of classes. all students home by noon (or after last exam) June 4. Wednesday Students return by check-in March 24. Tuesday Classes resume December 14. May 31 – June 3 Exams for underclass students June 3. Friday Last exam./Sat. Thursday All returning students on campus by 4 pm September 3. Thursday Classes resume February 3. Monday Varsity Athletes (by invitation) arrive by noon International Orientation Leaders arrive August 31. Saturday Thanksgiving Recess begins at 12 noon November 29. Saturday Closed Weekend* October 16. Friday Graduation (all seniors leave campus by 4:00 p. Friday End of Marking Period #3 Spring Recess begins at 12 noon March 23. Announced Holidays November 20. Monday Students return by check-in November 30. Sunday Reading Day May 30. Parents Weekend October 25 & 26. Senior Prize Awards May 27. Fri. Friday Classes begin September 4.m. Thursday Long Winter Weekend begins at 12 noon February 7. Saturday End of Marking Period #1 October 22 & 23. Tuesday End of First Semester All students home by noon 2011 January 5. Tuesday All Seniors & Orientation Leaders return by noon New and Returning International Students arrive September 1. Monday Memorial Day. Saturday Project Day for all underclass students May 29. Saturday SATs – Hotchkiss is a test site *Other Closed Weekends and Days with no classes will be announced in June . Thursday End of Marking Period #4.) May 28.m. Mon./Tues. First Exam @ 3p. Monday Announced Holiday May 26. Wednesday All New Students (except seniors) arrive by noon September 2. 2010-2011 C ALENDAR 2010 August 27.

THE HOTCHKISS SCHOOL P. Connecticut 06039 Phone: 860-435-2591 Fax: 860-435-8056 http: //www. Box 800 Lakeville.hotchkiss.org . O.