Running head: PROFESSIONAL REFLECTION

Professional Reflection

Katrina Maccalous

OTL502 – Learning Theories and Modules of Instruction

Colorado State University – Global Campus

Dr. Brenda Bagwell

July 30, 2017
PROFESSIONAL REFLECTION 2

Goodwin and Hubbell (2013) designed a set of twelve touchstones of good teaching, in

order to help teachers “understand the deep whys that underlie what they should be doing in the

classroom” (xx). These touchstones served as a guide in the development and implementation of

a first grade problem-based learning activity.

The Results

Personal learning goals can greatly impact student success. For this reason, I wanted to

look more closely at touchstone two and its impact on student growth.

I used mid-lesson conferences and a final conference to monitor student progress during

the lesson. During Student A’s mid-lesson conference, we reread her goals and looked at her

current work to assess progress. She was able to determine that she had met her first goal on the

rubric: “I can create an original insect with appropriate body parts (7) labeled.” Additionally, by

using the rubric, she was able to see that her life cycle section was incorrectly labeled. We

discussed what she could do to move to the level three box. By putting the responsibility back on

the student, I was able to ensure that student learning was happening and not simply being

handed to her. This process was repeated for both Student B and Student C.

After the lesson was completed, each student met with me for a final time to complete the

self-assessment portion on the rubric. I then provided my score addressing their strengths and

next steps. During this portion of the final conference, we also compared our scores and talked

about why they did or did not match. Their scores, based off of the rubric are shown in the graph

below, as well as a comparison of both the pre-assessment and project scores. Student A scored a

12 out of 16 on the final project compared to a 10 on the pre-assessment. This is a gain of 2

points, and an overall score of proficient. Student B’s overall score improved from a 7 to a 10,
PROFESSIONAL REFLECTION 3

which moved her from partially-proficient to proficient. Her highest scores were in insect

appearance and environmental interactions. Student C’s scored moved from a 4 to a 7, which

moved her from developing to partially-proficient.

Final Scores

4.5
4
3.5
3
2.5 Student A
Student B
2
Student C
1.5
1
0.5
0
Name & Needs Life Cycle Interaction with
Appearance Environment

Growth Data

14

12

10

8 Student A
Student B
6
Student C
4

2

0
Pre-Assessment Final Scores
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Successes, Next Steps, and Future Considerations

Based off of this data, I was able to determine that overall, students scored higher in the

name and appearance category and lowest in the life cycle of insects. The data indicates that

more instruction will be needed when learning about the life cycle of an insect.

When implementing this lesson in the future, I will ensure that each student has been

shown how to effectively use the rubric attached to their packet. Based on the ages of my

learners, this skill will be practiced in a whole group setting, in addition to teacher-student

conferences. Another consideration to ensure effective implementation of the touchstones will be

how I have students “teach” the class about their insect. In order to encourage the development

of deep knowledge, I plan to have students collaborate to compare and contrast their “findings”

with one another, guided by questions that “force students to think:” “Why will your insect be

able to thrive in this environment? How do you know? Would your insect be able to survive in

your partner’s habitat? Why or why not?” (Goodwin & Hubbell, 2013, p. 151).

Overall, the lesson was a success because of the thoughtful planning and implementation

of the twelve touchstones. I am excited to see how successful my students will be in the years to

come based off of these touchstones.
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References

Goodwin, B & Hubbell, E. (2013). The twelve touchstones of good teaching. Alexandria, VA:

ASCD