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Republic of the Philippines

BATANGAS STATE UNIVERSITY


JPLPC Campus, Malvar, Batangas

COLLEGE OF TEACHER EDUCATION

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION PROGRAM


COURSE SPECIFICATION

First Semester, AY 2016-2017

VISION
A globally recognized institution of higher learning that develops competent and morally
upright citizens who are active participants in nation building and responsive to the challenges of
21st century

MISSION
Batangas State University is committed to the holistic development of productive citizens
by providing a conducive learning environment for the generation, dissemination and utilization of
knowledge through innovative education, multidisciplinary research collaborations, and
community partnership that would nurture the spirit of nationhood and help fuel national economy
for sustainable development.

CORE VALUES
Faith Integrity
Patriotism Mutual respect
Human dignity Excellence

COURSE TITLE: DEVELOPMENTAL READING I


COURSE CODE: EDUC 310 INSTRUCTOR: Richard M. Baez, MAT
PREREQUISITE: ENG 102 CONTACT NUMBER: (043)778-2170
CREDIT UNIT: 3 EMAIL ADDRESS: chadbanez25@gmail.com
REVISION NUMBER: 00 SCHEDULE: Mon and Fri 9:00 11:00
ISSUED DATE: August 7, 2016 ROOM: CTE 203

PROGRAM EDUCATIONAL OBJECTIVES


The graduates have the ability to:
1. Demonstrate in-depth understanding of the development of elementary learners.
2. Exhibit comprehensive knowledge of various learning areas in the elementary curriculum.
3. Create and utilize teaching methodologies and materials appropriate to the elementary
level to enhance teaching and learning.
4. Design and implement assessment tools and procedures to measure learning outcomes
in the elementary level.
5. Communicate effectively in oral and in writing using both English and Filipino.
6. Act in recognition of professional, social, and ethical responsibility.
7. Pursue lifelong learning for personal and professional growth

1. PHILOSOPHY
Developmental Reading is a good foundation and its completion is a prerequisite to
perform well in English subjects. This subject includes background knowledge on the nature of
psychology of reading process and various topics related to the acquisition and refinement of
reading skills. It includes multi-level exercises in developing vocabulary, comprehension and
literary appreciation, speed and study skills.

2. AUDIENCE
The course is intended for third year Bachelor in Elementary Education students.

3. STUDENT OUTCOMES
The following are the skills that teacher education graduates are expected to acquire upon
the completion of their program. These skills are essential in performing their various tasks as
educators.
a. Identify and design lessons according to the stages of learners growth and
development.
b. Utilize the potentials and uniqueness of individual learners in teaching.
c. Discuss and share insights on the subject areas learning goals, instructional
procedures and content in the elementary/secondary curriculum.
d. Use appropriate teaching-learning strategies to sustain interest in learning.
e. Select, develop or adapt updated technology in support of instruction.
f. Use traditional and non-traditional assessment techniques and use assessment data
to improve teaching and learning.
g. Behave in accordance with the Code of Ethics for Professional Teachers.
h. Plan and carry out personal and professional advancement.

4. INTENDED LEARNING OUTCOMES


By the end of the course, the students must be able to:
ILO 1. characterize the nature of reading to acquire improved reading skills;
ILO 2. analyze the varied processes and facets of reading;
ILO 3. apply the different reading skills and techniques in analyzing prose and poetry; and
ILO 4. design appropriate techniques, strategies, and devices used in teaching reading
with literature to support students literacy development.

The following table maps the intended learning outcomes with the student outcomes. This
also illustrates the relationship of the intended learning outcomes (ILOs) with the student
outcomes (SOs).

Intended Learning Outcome Applicable Student Outcomes


ILO 1 a b c
ILO 2 a b c
ILO 3 a b c
ILO 4 d e f

5. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES
Upon completing the course, students should be able to exhibit the following objectives
congruent with each topic outlined in the course.

Intended Learning Outcomes


Topics and Objectives
ILO 1 ILO 2 ILO 3 ILO 4
A. THE NATURE OF READING
a. Compare and contrast the various models of
+ +
reading process.
b. Identify factors that affect the reading process. + +
c. Determine the different stages in the
+ +
development of reading.
d. Describe the different developmental reading
+ +
programs.
e. Characterize the comprehension levels. + +
B. READING AND COMPREHENSION SKILLS
a. Analyze meanings of unfamiliar words using
+
context clues and structural analysis.
b. Distinguish main ideas from supporting details. +
c. Predict outcomes based on the given
+
circumstances.
d. Determine information which is not directly
+
stated in the text.
e. Identify the main thought and rephrase it using
+
ones own words.
f. Form opinions or judgment from the literary
+
articles or selection.
g. Determine the author's purpose and tone. +
C. STRATEGIES FOR READING LITERATURE
a. Evaluate the effectiveness of the literary
elements in conveying theme or message in +
short story, poem and drama.
D. TEACHING READING WITH LITERATURE
a. Identify appropriate strategies in teaching
+
reading with literature to grade school pupils.
b. Develop a literature unit in elementary English
+
class.
c. Assess pupils reading performance using
+
appropriate tools.

6. TEACHING-LEARNING STRATEGIES AND ASSESSMENT METHODS

Teaching and Learning Strategies


A. Active Learning. This is includes question-posing, inquiry, and self-directed
learning.
B. Cooperative Learning. This allows students to work in groups and be responsible
for each others learning, and each accountable for their own learning.
C. Critical Thinking. This approach to thinking emphasizes stating original claims or
opinions and supporting them with reasons. Critical thinking is used expressively
when students make interpretations and support them verbally or in writing. Critical
thinking is used receptively when students critique other peoples arguments.
D. Directed Reading Activity. This is a building-knowledge strategy for guiding the
silent reading of students with comprehension-level questions; often associated
with reading with stops or chunking.
E. Explicit Teaching of Text Structure. Teaching the parts of different types of text
and making sure students understand the text structure before reading is the
primary goal of this strategy. This would include basics such as text in English is
read from left to right, and also more sophisticated structures such as the structure
of a narrative.
F. Hands-On. This encourages the students to design activities that they are actively
involved. Hands-on participation is as important as verbal participation in the
activity.
G. Literature Circles. Students discuss portions of books in a small group.
Sometimes roles are assigned for group interaction. Students at varying levels are
able to share different points about the book.
H. RAFT. A writing activity usually used in the consolidation phase of a lesson in
which students consider four elements: role, audience, format and topic.
I. Reading and Questioning. A cooperative learning and study activity in which
pairs of students read a text and write questions about the text and answers to
those questions. Later they may use the questions and answers as study aids.

Assessment and Evaluation Methods


A. Formative and Summative Assessments. Formative assessment covers
activities that generate information on how well students are engaged in classroom
interactions such as recitations and discussions. On the other hand, summative
assessment includes major examinations that describe and measure students
learning outcomes.
B. Performance-Based Assessment. Instructor observes and make judgements
about students demonstration of skills and competencies in creating a product,
constructing a response and the like in line with the criteria communicated by the
instructor through rubrics and other assessment organizers.
C. Affective Assessment. Students affective traits and dispositions are recorded
through instructors observation, student self-report, and peer ratings.

7. COURSE REQUIREMENTS
A. Dramatic Presentation. This is a major requirement in the course. The students
will conduct a dramatic presentation by applying the elements of drama.
Performance of the students will be assessed through rubrics.
B. Book Review. Students will analyze an entire book to evaluate its usefulness in
the field of education by writing a comprehensive review. Performance of the
students will be assessed through rubrics.
C. Examinations. There will be four major examinations to be administered on the
date set by the department otherwise specified. These will evaluate students
knowledge on the topics covered in the class. Make-up tests will only be given to
a student having a valid reason for not taking the examination on the prescribed
date. The instructor has the right to disapprove any explanations for absences
presented without prior notice and to void opportunity for a make-up test.
D. Homework and Seatwork. Homework and seatwork are integral part of the
course. This may come in various task such as group work, individual activity,
research work, extended reading and the like. This will provide opportunities for
the students to transfer the concepts they have learned in class to a more concrete
situation and to equally participate in class discussion
E. Class Engagement. Students are expected to actively participate in the various
activities prepared by the instructor. To be part of the learning community, students
are required to accomplish various tasks required in the course while adhering to
the set standards prescribed by the instructors.

8. COURSE POLICIES
A. Refer to the University Student Handbook for the policies on Attendance,
Dropping of Subject, Grading System and on Scholastic Delinquency.
B. Academic Misconduct. Academic misconduct will be subject to disciplinary
action. Any act of dishonesty in academic work constitutes academic misconduct.
This includes plagiarism, changing or falsifying any academic documents or
materials, cheating, and giving or receiving unauthorized aid in tests,
examinations, or other assigned school works. Punishment for academic
misconduct will vary according to the seriousness of the offense. Punishment for
such offenses includes expulsion, suspension, non-credit of examination and the
like.
C. Regulations and Restrictions in the Classroom
The students should be completely aware of their behaviour and attitude inside
the class. They must avoid interrupting or distracting the class on any level. The
following must be strictly observed during the class.
a. The orderliness and cleanliness of the classroom must be maintained
before, during and after the class.
b. Any material or gadget irrelevant to the subject must be turned off and kept.
c. Chatting or talking with the seatmates is prohibited unless required in the
classroom activity.
d. Going in and out of the room without permission from the instructor.
e. Being excused by friends or peers from the class for any reason is not
allowed except for emergency cases concerning family problems or
administrative reasons.

9. ACADEMIC INFRASTRUCTURE
A. Textbooks:
Cox, C. (2012). Teaching language arts: A student-and response-centered
classroom. Boston: Allyn and Bacon.
Henry, D.J. (2014). The effective reader. United States of America: Pearson
Education.
Villanueva, A. S. & Delos Santos, R. L. (2008). Developmental reading 1. Quezon
City: Lorimar Publishing.

B. References:
Barnet, S. (2012). A short guide to writing about literature. Boston Toronto, USA:
Little, Brown and Company.
Clandfield, L. (2016). Teaching materials: using literature in the EFL/ ESL
classroom. Retrieved August 8, 2016, from:
http://www.onestopenglish.com/methodology/methodology/teaching-
materials/teaching-materials-using-literature-in-the-efl/-esl-
classroom/146508.article
Griffith, K. (2012). Writing essay about literature: a guide and style sheet. United
States of America: Heinle & Heinle Thomson Learning.
Heffernan, W. A., Johnston, M. & Hodgins, F. (2012). Literature: art and artifact.
Orlando, Florida: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc.,
Perrine, L. & Arp, T. R. (2014). Sound and sense: an introduction to poetry. 9th ed.
Orlando, Florida: Harcourt Brace Jovanovich Publisher.
Perrine, L. (2012). Story and structure. 7th ed. Orlando, Florida: Harcourt Brace
Jovanovich Publisher.
Roberts, E. V. & Jacobs, H. E. (2012). Literature: an introduction to reading and
writing. 6th ed. New Jersey, USA: Pearson Prentice Hall.
Roberts, E. V. (2011) Writing themes about literature. Englewood Cliffs, New
Jersey: Prentice-Hall Incorporated.
Wood, J. (2008). How fiction works. New York, United States of America: Picador.

10. COURSE CALENDAR


The following is the list of topics and required readings for the course. However, the
instructor has the right to alter the outline any time due to inevitable circumstances or presence
of other resources which he deems essential for the class.
Week Topics Required Readings
I. THE NATURE OF READING
a. Models of the Reading Process Villanueva & Delos
1
b. Language Domains Essential for Proficient Santos: pp. 1 - 45
Reading
c. Developmental Reading Stages Villanueva & Delos
2
Santos: pp. 1 - 45
d. Developmental Reading Programs Villanueva & Delos
3
Santos: pp. 1 - 45
e. Comprehension Levels Villanueva & Delos
4
PRELIMINARY EXAMINATION Santos: pp. 1 - 45
II. READING AND COMPREHENSION SKILLS
5 a. Enriching Vocabulary Skills Henry: pp. 1 - 127
b. Identifying Main Ideas
c. Noting Supporting Details Henry: pp. 1 - 127
6
d. Making Inferences
e. Determining Implied Main Ideas and Implied Henry: pp. 1 - 127
7 Central Ideas
f. Analyzing Transitions and Thought Patterns
g. Distinguishing Fact and Opinion Henry: pp. 1 - 127
8 h. Determining Author's Purpose and Tone
MIDTERM EXAMINATION
III. STRATEGIES FOR READING LITERATURE
9 Barnet: pp. 267 - 456
a. Understanding Short Story
10 b. Understanding Poetry Barnet: pp. 267 - 456
11 c. Understanding Drama Barnet: pp. 267 - 456
12 SEMI-FINAL EXAMINATION
IV. TEACHING READING WITH LITERATURE
13 Cox: pp. 348 - 425
a. Reader Response to Literature
14 b. Response-Centered, Integrated with Literature Cox: pp. 348 - 425
15 c. Literature Units Cox: pp. 348 - 425
16 d. Assessing Teaching with Literature Cox: pp. 348 - 425
FINAL EXAMINATION
17 - 18
Submission of all requirements

Prepared by:

Mr. RICHARD M. BAEZ


Instructor III

Checked and Verified by: Recommending Approval:

Miss RACHELLE M. QUINCO Dr. RUBILYN M. LATIDO


Department Chair, CTE Associate Dean, CTE

Approved:

Dr. AMADO C. GEQUINTO


Dean of Colleges