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MA (Journalism & Mass Communication

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OUTLINES OF TESTS, SYLLABI AND COURSES OF READING FOR
MA (JOURNALISM AND MASS COMMUNICATION)
FOR THE EXAMINATION OF 2009.

(This is applicable only to new admissions in 2008-09. The outgoing class will continue with
the annual system.)
M.A. - I YEAR

FIRST SEMESTER

Paper I Introduction to (100 Marks)
Communication & Media Theory Exam = 80
Internal Assessment = 20
UNIT - I Theories & Models of Communication – I
UNIT - II Theories & Models of Communication – II
UNIT - III History of the Press
UNIT – IV Media Management

Paper II Writing & Reporting for (100 Marks)
Media Theory Exam = 80
Internal Assessment = 20
UNIT - I Print Journalism – I
UNIT - II Print Journalism – II
UNIT - III Radio & TV Communication – I
UNIT - IV Press Laws

Paper III Editing & Presentation for (100 Marks)
Media Theory Exam = 80
Internal Assessment = 20
UNIT - I Editing for Print Media
UNIT - II Graphic Design for Print Media
UNIT - III Radio & TV Communication - II
UNIT - IV Computer Applications

Paper IV Practicals (100 Marks)
Student Reporter 35
Tele News Board 15
Broadcast Practicals 30
Media File 10
Communication Theory 10
Practicals

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SECOND SEMESTER

Paper I Communication & Media (100 Marks)
Theory Exam = 80
Internal Assessment = 20
UNIT - I Theories & Models of Communication – I
UNIT - II Theories & Models of Communication – II
UNIT - III Print Journalism – I
UNIT – IV Print Journalism – II

Paper II Current Media Issues (100 Marks)
Theory Exam = 80
Internal Assessment = 20
UNIT - I Ethical Issues in Media
UNIT - II Media Management
UNIT - III Modern History of Press
UNIT - IV Current Affairs

Paper III Media Production (100 Marks)
Theory Exam = 80
Internal Assessment = 20
UNIT - I Print Production
UNIT - II Radio and Television Production – I
UNIT - III Radio and Television Production – II
UNIT - IV Computer Applications

Paper IV Practicals (100 Marks)
Student Reporter 35
Tele News Board 15
Broadcast Practicals 30
Communication 10
Theory Practical
Internship Report 10

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COMPONENTS AND BREAKUP OF MARKS:

Paper – I, Paper – II and Paper – III of both the semesters will be of 100 marks each.
80 marks will be for theory examinations and 20 marks for continuous internal
assessment. The latter will comprise of unit tests, snap tests, assignments, attendance and
class room participation.

Paper – IV of both the semesters will comprise of:

Student Reporter: 35 Marks. These will be awarded on a weekly basis by the subject
teacher concerned and the mean will be taken at the end of each semester.

Tele News board: 15 Marks. These marks will be awarded on a daily basis by the subject
teacher concerned and the mean will be taken at the end of each semester.

Broadcast Practicals: 30 marks will be awarded by the teacher concerned at the end of
each semester.

Communication Theory Practical: 10 marks will be awarded by the teacher concerned
at the end of each semester.

Media File: 10 Marks to be awarded by the faculty member concerned at the end of the
first semester.

Internship Report: 10 Marks each to be awarded by all the faculty members and the
mean taken at the end of the second semester. The report shall comprise of the filled
attendance card signed and stamped by the organization interned at; a 1000 word report
of the work done during the internship period; and the performance grade awarded by the
concerned organization.

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M.A. – I (JOURNALISM & MASS COMMUNICATION)

FIRST SEMESTER

PAPER – I: INTRODUCTION TO COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA

(A) Course Objectives:
Unit I and II, being a bed rock course, having applications to all the other courses in this
two-year program, offers students a thorough grounding in the landmark concepts,
theories, models and other relevant contributions in communication made in the last over
five decades. The objective is to sensitize the students to the field of communication by
exposing them to its different forms; to understand the basic concepts and terminology
specific to communication and media; to sensitize them to the practical importance of
intrapersonal, interpersonal, group, and mass communication; to inculcate in them the
skills required to become effective source-encoders and to impart latest knowledge to
enable them to analyze and assess communication in the media and everyday life.

Unit III will orient the students towards the study of journalism by giving a historical
background and a context to the changes that are visible in the media.

Unit IV discusses the business aspect of mass media. The presence of transnational
organizations, media conglomerates and multimedia corporations and the changes
brought about by them in the media landscape are discussed.

(B) Pedagogy of the Course Work:
80% Lectures (including expert lectures)
20% Unit tests, snap tests, assignments, attendance and class room participation.

Instructions for papersetters and candidates:

1. There shall be 9 questions in all.
2. The first question is compulsory comprising 15 short answer type questions spread
over the whole syllabus to be answered in about 25-30 words each. The candidates
are required to attempt 10 questions. Each question shall be of 2 marks.
(10X2 = 20 marks)
3. Rest of the paper shall contain four units. Two questions shall be asked from each
unit and the candidates shall be given internal choice. The candidates shall attempt
one question from each unit. Each question will carry 15 marks. (4X15 = 60 marks)

Unit – I: Theories & Models of Communication – I

Communication: meaning, definition and forms (intra-personal, inter-personal, group &
mass); Concepts and characteristics of mass, mass society, mass media & mass
communication; Concept of theory vis-a-vis practice; basic concerns of communication
theory; functions of communication; meaning & communication, dimensions of meaning,

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Model of learning as communication. the Lasswell formula & Braddock’s extension. Civil War Journalism (1860.R. adapter categories & criticism. the Schema theory. The Times of London 19th & 20th century: Influence of WWI and WWII on the press. innovation decision process. New York Sun. concepts & significance of entropy & redundancy. Vernacular Press Act and other restrictions 5 . industrialization American Press: Colonial newspapers American Revolution (1765 –1783) Revolutionary role of press. role in communication. Osgood & Schramm’s circular model. Unit – II: Theories & Models of Communication – II Perception: definition. channels of communication. empathy as a fundamental communication ability. characteristics of innovation. Party Press (1801. History of press in Britain and USA British Press: 17th century: early restrictions. Diffusion of Innovations: definition. The Two-step flow model: major findings & criticism. Festinger’s Cognitive Dissonance Theory. Mathematical Model of Communication. Berlo’s S-M-C-R model. structure & role.1833): Dark Ages of journalism Penny Press (1833-1860). importance of group norms and group pressure in communication. Areopagitica 18th century: Stamp Act. four rings of defenses. Groups: definition & types. Krugman’s Theory of Low Involvement. Attitude: definition. Propaganda: definition.New York Journal (1890 – 1904) Indian History: Introduction The forerunners (1780 – 1818) : Hicky and Buckingham Stage I (1818 – 1868) : Early restrictions Stage II (1869 – 1919) : Rise of nationalist press. objectives & devices. Schramm’s Field of Experience model.Bullet theory and S-R model. concepts of homophily & heterophily. W. Unit – III: History of the Press Brief introduction of the evolution of early newspapers. Hearst . model of group formation. major findings of attitude-change (persuasion) research. The Tribune.1872): Age of reconstruction and financial adjustment New Journalism (1878): Joseph Pulitzer – New York World.

University of Illinois Pr. 3. Anderson : Introduction of Communication. Each group is assigned a period in history. Emergence of global media. foreign equity in Indian Media. Kenneth K. Menlo Park. 2nd ed.. Theory and Practice. Rogers : Communication and Development. Cross Media ownership. The group researches and makes a short (5 Minutes) presentation on the given period. 1969. Lee Richardson : Dimensions of Communication. Unit – IV: Media Management An overview of Mass media: Media as an industry. and Economics of print and electronic media Management of Media organizations: Basic principles Importance of H. 1976. Beverly Hills. Cummings Pub. University of Illinois Press 1953.Stage III (1919 . Everett M. Deniel Ketz et al : Public Opinion and Propaganda N. 6. THEORIES & MODELS OF COMMUNICATION ESSENTIAL READING 1 Wilbur Schramm : Mass Communication. Wilbur Schramm : Process & Effects of Mass Communication Urbana. 1972.Y.1947) : Assertive role of press Practical Exercise: Students are divided in groups of three. Co.R department and its role in recruitment and training of personnel for new media firms Practical Exercise: Class is divided into groups and gathers data on India’s various major media houses and their holdings and make class presentations. Sage Publications. 5.Y. their advantages and disadvantages. Types of ownership patterns. 1960 2. Holt 1962. Consolidation and convergence. 4. Ownership. Appleton- Century-Croft. 6 . Urbana. N.

1960 17 Blumler. 1966 16 Berlo David : The Process of Communication. New York. James et al. Kenneth : Introduction to Communication. Social Influence. Illionis. Inc. Inc. Cummings Publishing Co. California. Holt.. New York. 1977 21 Dance. Dean : Interpersonal Communication. (ed) : Mass Communication & Society.. Schoelem : Social Psychology. (ed. Dorwin & Zander. Addison. The Dorsey Press. 1973 20 Curran. Attitude Change. New York. group pressure and prejudices. Frank E. Melvin New York.) Beverly Hills.. New Yourk. Herman & Noam : Manufacturing Consent.7.) The Free Press. Rinehart & Winston. Jay G & Katz. 1968 15 Berelson. Bernard & Janowitz. New Jersey. 1975 12 Barker. Prentice Hall. Holt. Prentice Hall.. London. 1952 11 Ball-Rokeach. SAGE. New York. Elihu : The uses of Mass Communication.X. Holt.. Inc. Larry : Communication. Vintage. : Group Dynamics Tavistock. New York. 1967 7 . 1974 18 Carwright. Barry E. 1968. Longman. : Reader in Public Opinion & Communication. Warren et al.) : Mass Media and Mass Man. : Human Communication Theory. 8. Houghton-Mifflin Co. Alan (ed.) 19 Casty.Wesley 1970. E. Collins : Social Psychology. DeFleur. Rinehart & Winston. Rinehart and Winston. 1972 10 Asch. 1994. 13 Barnlund.) : Interpersonal Dynamics. 1978.S.. 14 Bennis. 1968 Alvin (ed.. Chomsky 9 Anderson. Inc. Edward- Arnold London. Morris (ed. Reading. Theory and Practice. (ed. Sandra & : Theories of Mass Communication.

Toronto. Pergamon Press. Floyd Press.) : Sociology of Mass Communication.22 Danzinger. SAGE. 1976 23 Defleur. New York. Ithiel (ed) : Handbook on Communication. 1971 8 . Penguin. Kurt : Interpersonal Communication. Evertt M. : The effects of Mass Communication. Beverly Hills. (ed) : Public Opinion & Propaganda.. 1978 26 Dexter Harry & White David : People. & Sprafkin. Lee : Dimensions of Communication: Appelton- Century-Crofts. Joseph T. Exeter Joyce 32 McQuail. 1976 34 Newcomb. Evertt & Showmaker. 1976 28 Katz. 1965 35 Richardson. 1964 27 Grunig. The Free F.. Denis : Mass Communication Theory. Theodor : Sociology Psychology. (ed) : The Decline of Global Village. Routledge & Kegan Paul. Chicago. Pergamon Press.. 1962 29 Klapper. The Dryden Press New York. Collin- Manning (ed. Daniel et at. SAGE. New York. Society & Mass Communication. New York. James E. Harper & Row. : The Communication of Innovations. 1976 31 Liebert. New York. Harper & Row. New York. Rand McNally College Publishing Co. : The Early Window. General Hall Inc. 1994 33 McQuail. 1972 25 Devito. Robert H. New York. 1960 30 Jervsm /debus (ed) : Readings in Social Psychology. Joseph : Communicology. 1969. New York. : Models of Mass Communication Denis 24 De Sola Pool. (ed) : Communication & Development.) Macmillan. London. The free press. 1982 37 Rogers. Melvin & Mc Quail. London. Denis (ed. 36 Rogers. London.

& : Communication: The Social Matrix of Reusch. Urban. W. West Publishing Co. Donald K. Jurgen Psychiatry. 1976 6 Chomsky. New York. 43 Smith. SAGE Beverly Hills. Horton & Co.) : The Communication of Ideas. 1955 42 Schramm. 1975 40 Schramm. Lawrence (ed. The MIT Press.) : Mass Communication. Wayne & Darnell. New Jersey. 1963 41 Schramm.38 Sage : Mass Communication Year Books. New York. Noam : The Manufacturing of Consent. Wilbur : Responsibility in Mass Communication. Prentice hall. 1983. 1957...) : The Process and Effects of Mass Communication University of Illinois Press. Ronald N. 45 Wrightsman. 1948 4 Bryson. Ronald : How Television sees its Audience. Holt. Pantheon Books.) : Communication & Culture. 1948 5 Cherry Colin : On Human Communication. Harper & Row. New York. Wilbur : Men. SAGE. 1951 2 Berman. Wilbur (ed. 1988 9 . New York. Wilbur (ed. Gregory W. Massachusetts. Harper & Row. Inc. Minnesota. New York. Rinehart & Winston. 1978. 44 Wood. Brooks-Cole Publishing Co. ADDITIONAL READING 1 Bateson. Alfred G (ed. Messages & Media.. 1987. Beverly Hills. Lyman (ed. 39 Schramm.. 1966. Harper & Row. W. New York. 1981 onwards. : Persons Communicating. New York. 3 Brockriede. Illinois. University of Illinois Press. : Mass Media & the Individual.) : Contemporary Issues in Social Psychology.

New York. 1953 13 Innis. 1964 10 . Bedminister Press. New Haven. Routledge & Kegan Paul. : Non-verbal Communication. Teun A.. 4 Vols. Toronto. 1976 16 Lewin. New Jersey. New York. : The Human Dialogue. Marshall : Understanding Media. Hugh Dalziel : Communication & Social Order.)) : The International Encyclopedia of Communication. Routledge & Kegan Paul. Tavistock. 1968 19 McLuhan. & Montagu. SAGE Beverly Hills. 9 Duncan. London. Oxford University Press. Cambridge University Press. 1951 14 Innis Harold : Empire and Communications. University of Toronto Press.. Marshall : The Mechanical Bride. (ed) The Free Press. London.7 Dijk. Oxford. Inc. Routledge & Kegan Paul. 1983 11 Gramsci. : An Introduction to Rhetorical Communication. International Publishers. 1972 10 Gerbner. (ed. Cambridge. & other Essays. : Discourse & Communication. 1972 12 Hovland. 1960 15 Leach. Prentice-Hall. Van. Al. London. Antonio : The Modern Prince.. Kurt : Field theory in the Social Sciences. Harold : The Bias of Communication. Carl et al. New York.. Marshall : The Gutenburg Galaxy. London. Edmund : Communication & Culture: the logic by which symbols are connected. Daniel et. 1982. 1951 20 McLuhan. Oxford University Press. 8 Druckman. New York. Yale University Press. Georage et al. 1952 17 Matson. Ashley S. James C. 1967 21 McLuhan. : Communication & Persuasion. 1967 18 McCroskey. Floyd T.

: Ideology & Mass culture. Robert T.. Warren University of Illinois Press. Gerald I. Spartan Books. Urbana. London. : Communication & Culture in Ancient India and China. Ronal Press. 1968 33 Thompson. New York. The MIT Press. 28 Poster. William G. P. Claus : The Politics of Mass Communication. 1967 36 Weiner. University of Syracuse Press. 1962 26 Oliver. 1951 24 Mueller. Cambridge. Norbert : Cybernetics. 1978. New York.et. : The Psychology of Communication. David R. Massachusetts. Norton. New York 1972 35 Watzlawick. Charles C. 1973. Mark : The Mode of Information: Post-structuralism & Social Context. Polity Press. Robert T. John B. 1972 27 Olson.22 Miller. Springfield. Lee (ed. : The World on Paper. Boston. Claude E. & Weaver. : Interpersonal Communication Michael D Houghton-Mifflin Co. 25 Oliver. New York. & Scott. : Culture & Communication. Cambridge. 1994. 1986 Dierdre 32 Thayer. McGraw Hill. : Language & Communication. 30 Shannon. 1949 31 Sperber. Thomas. 23 Miller. 1970 11 . : Human Interaction. New York. al. Basic Books Inc. 1991 29 Powers. Oxford University Press. : The Mathematical Theory of Communication. Polity Press Cambridge. : The Pragmatics of Communication.) : Communication: General Semantic Perspectives. Glenn M. 1990 34 Vernon. Cambridge University Press. Gerald I. 1964. Oxford. Dan & Wilson : Relevance Basil Blackwell. New York.

Pressures on the Press. Hemendra Prasad : Newspapers in India. Calcutta upto 1952 7 Herd. 1973 12 Natarajan.S. 2 Barns. London. J : History of Indian Journalism. 1986. 1955. Publications Division. 1982 4 Cheney. 14 Payne. 8 IPI. 1940. Margarita : Indian Press. Henry Connecticut. Ministry of I & B. 6 Ghose. Greenwood Press. Zurich : Govt. 1970 11 Mankekar. Sharad : Indian Politics & Role of the Press. Connecticut. Prentice-Hall. J : History of Indian Press: Journalism. New Delhi. Connecticut. Indian Book Co. 1976. 13 Natarajan. Vikas Publishers. D. Deni (ed. Division. of India : Report of the Press Laws Enquiry Committee Publication Division. Durgada : The Law of the Press in India. Greenwood Press. 1955 5 Eliott. 1955. New Delhi.R. : The Press versus the Govt. Sidney : Foundations of American Journalism. 12 . Ministry of I & B. Lee & George : History of Journalism in the U. New York. Ministry of I & B. HISTORY OF THE PRESS ESSENTIAL READING 1 Govt. 1940 3 Basu.) : Responsible Journalism Sage Beverly Hills. Greenwood Press. William : Freedom of the Press. 15 PII : The Press & the Law. George Allen & Unwin. Harold : The March of Journalism. New Delhi. Harcourt-Brace. 1981 10 Kubre. 9 Karkhanis.

: Fear of the Word. Chicago.M. University of Georgia Press. Orient- Longman. 1984 13 . 2 Crawford. Judith M. Cambridge University Press. Soli J. Nelson Antrim : The Ethics of Journalism. David : Public Scandal. London 1984 6 Lichtenberg. Eli. 1947 5 Hooper. 1975.16 Sorabji. 1947 4 Drewry. New Tebbel. of India : Report of the Commission of Freedom of the Press. Connecticut. Calcutta. N. Athens.) : More Post Biographies. Odium and contempt Secker & Warburg. Asian Mass Communication Research & Information Centre (AMIC). University of Georgia Press. Athens. Bombay.) : Post Biographies. 1993 ADDITIONAL READING 1 Govt. 1974 9 Swinder.) : Mass Media Laws and Regulations in India. N. New Jersey.R. Images & Distortions. Aurobindo : Indian Press and Freedom Struggle. : Problems of Law in Journalism. USA University of Chicago Press. 17 Stewart. Tripathi. John York. M. William F. (ed. MacMillan 1955. Cambridge. Prentice Hall. Singapore. New Delhi. James E. 8 Oboler. The Scarecrow Press. Censorship & Sex. (ed. 10 Thomas. K. 1976. 1990 7 Mazumdar. Heritage Publishers. (ed) : Democracy and Mass Media.Y. James E. Greenwood Press. 1993. 3 Drewry. Kenneth & : Makers of Modern Journalism. 1969. (ed. : Laws of Press Censorship in India. 1952 18 Venkateswaran. Sunny : Truth.

of India : Report of the Press Commission Part – I (Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. New York) 6 Macdougla Curtis D.. 2 Desai. New Delhi).M. : Newspaper Sales Promotion (426 South Sixth Street. Hindi Granth Akademi) 10 Sindhwani Trilok N.P. of India. : Economic Aspects of Indian Press (Press Institute of India. 14 .P. Minneapolis 15. INC. Minnesota).. Jowa). Thomas F. of India : Report of Enquiry Committee on Small Newspapers (Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. 3 Devenport. John-Scott : Newspaper Circulation-Backbone of the Industry (W. Dubugue. 11 Govt. Brown Company. New Delhi) 12 Ojha.the Indian Press (Press Institute of India. 4 Barnhart. New Delhi) 9 Jain. Parfullachandra : Murdan Parcichay Bihar Hindi Granth Academy. Govt. New Delhi). 13 Lidbide. Burgess Publication Co. Sukamal : Bharatiya Samachar Patron Ka Sangathan aur Prabhand (M. New York). 1982 (Ministry of Information and Broadcasting. Ashok V. 7 Govt.C. AN. of India. MEDIA MANAGEMENT ESSENTIAL READING 1 Battacharjee Arun : From Profession to Industry . Hindi Granth Academy). New Delhi) 8 Govt. : Newspaper Economics & Management (Ankur Publishing House. Inc. : Weekly Newspaper Management (Appleton-Country-Corfts. Thomas F. of India. New Delhi). of India : Report of the Second Press Commission. 5 Barnhart. Govt. Govt. : Mudran Samagri Prodhogiki (M. : Newsroom Problems and Policies (The MacMillan Company.

John A (ed) : The Asian Newspapers’ Reluctant Revolution. Bloomington. Prentice-Hall New Jersey. & Merwin. 1966 5 Bird George C. Mc Graw Hill. Sydney. 1979 16 Thayer. 1980 9 Hutleng. : Media-Power-Politics. Picador. The Free Press. 1979 12 Morris. 1951 8 Fischer. London. Newbury Park. M. E. F. Simon & Louis (ed. Harper & Row. F. Ankur Publishers. Richard & Shyder. 1968 4 Sommerlad. New York. 1988 ADDITIONAL READING 1 Entman.) Schuster. 1981 2 Lent. John L. University of Georgia. Sydney University Press. Chalpathi : The Press in India.) : New Journalism. Tom : New Journalism. 1980 (ed. 1971 3 Rau.) : Dimensional Journalism. David Pearce & : Precision Journalism. Robert L.) 11 Meyer. New York. Iowa State University Press. New York . Trilok N.14 Pollard James E. 15 Sindhwani. John E (ed. : Newspaper Economic Management. Bombay.W. Appleton. London. 1973 10 Johnson. NY. Century. Frank : Newspaper Business Management. 1962 15 . : Principal of Newspaper Management. Philip : Precision Journalism. Allied. 1937. Nichols Sussanne 1987 7 Drewry. Picador. Lloyed : The Press in Developing Countries. Heinz Dietrich (ed.E : The Press & Society. : The Opinion Function. Lowa. Georgia. New David York. & Wolfe. & Paletz. New Delhi. SAGE. (ed) 1957 6 Demers. : A Treasury of Great Reporting. Indian University Press.

13 Nafziger. 1970. 1996 16 .(ed. Wilkerson. Sage Publications. London. 1968 14 Turnstall. New York.) Greenwood Press. Ralph O. Routledge & Kegan Paul. Jeremy : The West Minister Lobby Correspondents. New Delhi. & : An Introduction to Journalism Research. Marcus M. 15 Bahl Sushil : Business Communication Today.

Rest of the paper shall contain four units. types of leads. (10X2 = 20 marks) 3. Theoretical instruction would be interspersed with creative writing workshops. assignments. The candidates are required to attempt 10 questions. 17 . The news story structure. The essentials of news writing Importance of lead in a story.PAPER – II: WRITING & REPORTING FOR MEDIA (A) Course Objectives: Unit I introduces the students to basics of print journalism. 2. Definition of news News values. Each question shall be of 2 marks. Unit II is designed to train students in the art and science of writing creative non-fiction in keeping with contemporary professional demands. The candidates shall attempt one question from each unit. attendance and class room participation. 5 Ws and 1H The inverted pyramid pattern: Need and Usefulness. (4X15 = 60 marks) Unit – I: Print Journalism – I Introduction to print media. Importance of journalism in a democracy Concept of news. Instructions for papersetters and candidates: 1. Unit IV trains the students to understand the basic concepts and terminology specific to the media of radio and television. Two questions shall be asked from each unit and the candidates shall be given internal choice. provides in depth grounding in the theory on which the two media operate. The ability to think laterally and to generate ideas will be stressed. (B) Pedagogy of the Course Work: 80% Lectures (including expert lectures) 20% Unit tests. Each question will carry 15 marks. There shall be 9 questions in all. Instruction in each law shall be accompanied by case discussions. The first question is compulsory comprising 15 short answer type questions spread over the whole syllabus to be answered in about 25-30 words each. snap tests. Unit III is designed to familiarize students with various press laws in order to practice responsible journalism. provides practical knowledge to conduct research in radio and TV communication. Print media in India Basics of journalism.

education & entertainment. problem features. Role of Radio & TV in social change. Law of Defamation (Section 499-502 of IPC). books. Unit – IV: Press Laws Freedom of speech and expression: Constitutional guarantees and restraints viz. personality sketches. utility features. personal experience features. Right to Information Act. Classification and types of features: News features. Characteristics of Radio & TV. making and maintaining sources of news. commemorative features. 1977 (Article 361-A). 18 . the visual and performing arts Photo features. Contempt of Court. hobby feature. Law of Parliamentary Privileges (Article 105 (3) and 194 (3). biographical sketches. Copyright Act. 1971. Article 19(1)(a) and Article 19(2). 2005. 1957.Process of newsgathering. TRP/TAM. philosophical features. Unit – II: Print Journalism – II Definition & nature of Feature writing Role and importance of creative non-fiction in the publishing industry. Reviews: films. maintaining focus. Professional approach to writing creative non-fiction: organization and composition – structuring the story. adding detail. CPM. incorporating action. International Telecommunication Union. Practicals: Creative Writing Workshops and idea stimulation exercises.I Brief introduction to the origin and development of Broadcasting in India: Basics of world systems of broadcasting. Programme composition & programme planning strategies. career features. Qualifications and responsibilities of a reporter. obituaries. historical features. 1923. organisation of reporting staff in dailies Practical Exercises: A file on at least 12 types of leads to be prepared by the students by clipping examples of each type and identifying them. Parliamentary Proceedings (Protection of Publication) Act. Press Laws (analysis of the bare Act with case studies): Official Secrets Act. importance of lateral thinking. lifestyle features. using literary devices. Unit – III: Radio & TV Communication . Law of Obscenity (Section 292-294 of IPC). Techniques of idea generation. eliminating deadwood. Organization of news services division in All India Radio & Doordarshan.

London) 3 Waren. New York) 4 Cambell.E. John : The Professional Journalist (Holt. New Delhi). : How to Report and Write the news.) London. Walseley (Prentice-Hall. : Newsmen at Work (Houchton Mifflin. James : The Active Reporter (Press institute of India. Prentice-hall. 1964 19 .. : The Indian Reporter’s Guide (Allied Pacific. New Delhi. New Delhi) 12 Benett – England. 5 Cambell. Ramachandra : Quest for News (The Macmillan Company of India. Rondey : Inside Journalism. Laurence R. 2 Hohenmerg. R. and R. Richard P. Carl H. New Jersey. 6 Critchfield. 7 Lweis.E. and R. Peter Owen Ltd. New Delhi) 11 IIMC : A manual for News Agency Reports (Indian Institute of Mass Communication. Laurence R.. : Modern News Reporting (Harper. 10 Aivar. New York). Ltd. Walseley Bostons). Curtis D. 1967 13 Copple. Allied Publishers Pvt. 8 Charnley. Neale : Depth Reporting. (ed. : Interpretative Reporting (Macmillan New York). PRINT JOURNALISM-I ESSENTIAL READING 1 Mac Dougall. Bombay). V : Reporting (Hold Rinehart and Winston New Delhi). 9 Rajindra : Sanvad Aur Sanvaddatta (Haryana) Hindi Granth Academy. Rinehart and Winston. Mitchell.

Greenwood Press. Heinz-dietrich (ed. 5 Meyer..14 Danilov. New Jersey. Indiana University Press.). Brown Publishers. Gian Singh : Journalism: Concepts and Controversies. Sussanne Park. 21 Metzler. Prentice-Hall Inc. Berlin. John Paul : Modern Reporter’s Handbook. ADDITIONAL READING 1 Demers. Chicago. New York. 1989. David William-Heinemann. Melvin : Basic News Writing: W. Louis (ed. : Practical Newspaper Reporting. Ludhiana. Philip : Precision Journalism. 1989.. Tom : New Journalism. : Public Affairs Reporting. 1980 (ed. Victor J. 19 Metz. Gyan Publishers. Macmillan. & Wolfe.) 4 Mann. Bloomington. 1966 16 Jones. W. 1970 18 Mencher. 1996. London. Newbury Nichols.. William : News Writing.C. Nelson- Hall. 1976 17 Jones. E. Connecticut.M. 1979 20 Metzler. Geoffrey & Spark. 1980. Popular Prakashan. 2 Fisher.) : Outstanding International Press Reporting (2 Vols. 1984 3 Johnson. 1977.) : A Treasury of Great Reporting. John Paul : Gathering & Writing the News. Picador. 1964 15 Harris. Prentice-Hall Inc. Prabhake : Principles of Journalism. New Jersey. Ken : Creative Interviewing: The Writer’s Guide to gathering information by asking questions. David Pearce & : Precision Journalism. SAGE. 1991 7 Snyder. Allyn and Bacon Inc. 1973 6 Padhye. Simon & 20 . New York. London. Walter de Gruyter. Ken : News Gathering. Bombay.

1995 4 Jacobi. B The Magazine Article: How to Think it. 1998 5 Wray. Macmillian.Y 1998 4 Yudkin. New York. 1992 2 Thomas Sunny Writing for the Media. Writers’ Digest Books. Plan it. Gulf Publishing Co. Wadsworth Publishing Co. Write it. Oxford University Press. Writers’ Digest Books. Peter. Cheryl Sloan Writing for Magazines: A Beginners Guide. J Leads and Conclusions. 1981 PRINT JOURNALISM-II ESSENTIAL READING 1 Rivers.1991 2 Alexander Louis Beyond the Facts: A Guide to the Art of Feature Writing. New York. Indiana University Press.D. L Freelancer and Staff Writer: Newspaper Features and Magazine Articles. Schuster. William. 1996 21 . 1987 3 Look. 1962 8 Schulte. Vision Books Ltd. Marcia Writing Articles About the World Around You. 1997 3 Elbow Peter Writing with Power. NTC Publishing Group.N. A Beyond the Inverted Pyramid. N. Bradford Books. Henry H. : Reporting Public Affairs. 1997 ADDITIONAL READING 1 Kennedy. Marshall.

Book Reviewing. Haughton Mifflin Co. RADIO AND TV COMMUNICATION-I ESSENTIAL READING 1 G. 2 Govt. Allyn and Bacon Inc. The Writer Inc. Walt. 1972 14 Drewery John E. Vikas Publishing House N.C. Bombay Allied. Awasthy : Broadcasting in India. Rick G Magazine Feature Writing. 1991 7 Wilber. Ken Creative Interviewing: The Writer’s Guide to Gathering Information by Asking Questions. 1965. 1997 9 Metzler. 1994. MacMillan. 1978 13 Nicholls Brian Features with Flair. 12 Nelson Roy Paul Articles and Features. Harper Brothers 11 Steighelman W. Sage Publications. 1966.A Effective Feature Writing. Columbia University Press. of India : Radio and Television: Report of the Committee of Broadcasting and Information.Y. 1996 10 Sheenfeld C. 8 Harrington. Vicky The Essential Feature: Writing for Newspapers and Magazines. Writing the Feature Article. N. Ed Intimate Journalism: The Art and Craft of Reporting Everyday Life. 22 . Bedford Books.D.6 Hay.

3 P. of India : Radio and Television (Report of The Committee on Broadcasting and Information) Publications Division. 5 Govt. Sterling Publications Pvt. 1978. 1974. B. 1979.C. 1992. of India : Akash Bharti(Report of The Working Group of Autonomy for Akashvani & Doordarshan) 2 Volumes. 4 B. Min. 1984. 7 Govt. Thomas : Broadcasting The News. S.P. Oxford University Press. al.D. 1989. New Delhi. Concept Publishers. 6 Govt.P.P. of India : An Indian Personality for Television: (Report of The Working Group On Software for Doordarshan) Min I & B. New York.S. 1952. Min. 23 . Chand. : Television for Rural Development. New Delhi. Publications Division.O. New Delhi. Min. SAGE. : Indian Broadcasting. 10 Chatterji. New Delhi. 11 Chester.C. of 1 & B. Dhawan : Economics of TV in India. 1985. 1968.S. Hemkund Publishers. : Broadcasting in India.M. 1978. Pageant Press. giraud et. 8 Barnouw.. 1991. New York. Konark. 12 Franklin. H.. Ltd. 9 Chatterji. : Radio and TV Journalism. 14 Rao. 1978. Erik : The Sponsor.C. K. Publications Division. : Two Voices. 1974. of I & B. 15 Shivastava. : Television and Radio Prentice Hall. Chatterji : Adventure of Indian Broadcasting: A Philosopher’s Auto Biography Delhi. 13 Luthra. of I & B. New Jersey. New Delhi.

Kumar (ed. 17 Wolverton. Beverly Hills. London. 5 Hawkridge. Jacques & : Cinema and Television.16 Swallow. 8 Leibert. New Delhi. 9 Mitra. London. Joyce Exeter. : Broadcasting in The Third World. Richard Meran (ed. 1977. C. James W. Elihu & Weddell. A Study of the Mahabharat.. SAGE. publishing Co. 2 Barman. Ananda : Television and Popular Culture in India.. 1988. 1992. New Delhi. : Affirmation and Denial: The Prabha Construction of Feminity on Indian Television. 1966.R. Kathryn : Direct Broadcasting Satellites and the United Nations. Beverly Hills. Thomas : Broadcasting The News. 6 Katz. George MacMillan. Anita & Krishnan. Mike : And The News. : Media Myths and Narratives: Television and the Press SAGE. 7 Kerambon. Sprafkin. 1977. Pageant Press. 1988. 1988. 3 Carey. New York. Alph 11 Franklin. 1932. Gulf. Norman : Factual Television. John Croom. 4 Dighe. ADDITIONAL READING 1 Barsam. O. London. SAGE. Robert M. SAGE. The Focal Press. Ronald : How Television see Its Audience. Toronto. 1952. New Delhi. Sijthoff & Noordhoff. Houston. 1993. Orient- Shahani. 10 Queeney. 24 .) : Non-Fiction Film: Theory & Criticism. E. David & : Organising Educational Broadcasting Robinson. 1990. & : The Early Window Peragamon Press.Millan. Dutton & co.) Longman. 1976.

: Tele Service via Satellite. 1997 2 Basu. 1989. N.. Gross WCB : Tele Communication.K. Brown Publisher.M. Sita Freedom of Press – Politico-Legal Aspects of Press Legislations in India. 1992.D. Beverly Hills. Gulf Publishing Co. 19 Windelsham. Houston. 17 Smith. Ellen et al.S. 15 Carey. Concept Publishers. London. PRESS LAWS ESSENTIAL READING 1 Bhatia. 18 Tracey. Kegan Paul. Anmol Publications. Audiences & Cultural Power.An Introduction to Electronic Media.. Lord : Broadcasting in a Free Society. Sterling Publications Pvt. Sijthoff & Noordhoff. : Radio and TV Journalism. B.. Jaipur.) : Remote Control: Television. Routledge & Kegan Paul. 1978. Wm.S. London. India. Handbook of Press Laws and Ethics.(ed. James W. Alphen Aan Den Rijt. Routledge. 16 Seiter. Prentice Hall. N. R. Mike : Reality on Reels: How to Make Documentaries. 1988. New Delhi. New Delhi. Ltd. Delbert D. Michael : The Production of Political Television. Basil Blackwell. 14 Wolverton. 1977. 1977. Rawat Publications. 1977.. 1996 3 Ravindran. 13 Shivastava. Durga Das Law of the Press. C. : Television for Rural Development. London. 1989. 1999 25 . 12 Rao.D. K. 20 Lynee S. : Media Myths and Narratives: Television and the Press SAGE.

D. 1998 6 Iyer. 1997 ADDITIONAL READING 1 Fineman. K.R Freedom of Information. Vikas Publishing House. 2000 3 Grover. N.K Press in the Indian Constitution. N.D. A.N Press and the Law.D. 1993 26 . Lucknow.K. Eastern Book Co. N.S Mass Media Laws and Regulations in India. Law of Information Technology. Deep and Deep Publications. Singapore. D. Asian Mass Comm. Martha. N. 1997 2 Mittal. B. Freedom of Press: Constitution and Media Responsibility. Krishna V.Y.A ed Feminism.D. R. 1990 4 Sharma.R Freedom of Press – Under the Indian Constitution. Indian Publishers. Media and the Law. 1990 7 Ravindran. Y. 1993 5 D’Souza. Commonwealth Publishers. Taxmann. Oxford University Press. N.P.4 Venkateswaran.

2.PAPER – III: EDITING AND PRESENTATION FOR MEDIA (A) Course Objectives: Unit I will sensitize the students to the art and craft of editing. selection. copy reading symbols. editing and cropping of pictures. scripting. directing. Do’s and Don’ts of headline writing. headline schedule Significance of pictures: briefing the cameraman. Each question will carry 15 marks. style sheet. There shall be 9 questions in all. Each question shall be of 2 marks. attendance and class room participation. rewriting mofussil copy Headlines: significance and functions. (B) Pedagogy of the Course Work: 80% Lectures (including expert lectures) 20% Unit tests. (10X2 = 20 marks) 3. Rest of the paper shall contain four units. snap tests. 27 . The objective of Unit II is to train students in designing publications using computer software. Instructions for papersetters and candidates: 1. (4X15 = 60 marks) Unit – I: Editing for Print Media Organization and operations of the Newsroom of a daily newspaper Need for editing. Unit III will sensitize students to the development of concepts for documentaries and television programs. to sensitize them to frame the right headlines and cutlines. The candidates are required to attempt 10 questions. qualities and responsibilities of Sub-editor. editing different types of copy. The candidates shall attempt one question from each unit. Two questions shall be asked from each unit and the candidates shall be given internal choice. to equip them with skills to edit different kinds of copy. writing cutlines. The first question is compulsory comprising 15 short answer type questions spread over the whole syllabus to be answered in about 25-30 words each. For this they would be taught to handle the verbal and visual elements of design in keeping with design principles and the nature of publication. assignments. chief Sub-editor and News editor Sources of news copy. to train them in the selection and editing of pictures. typographical patterns of writing headlines. Unit IV will train students in various related computer software used in print and broadcast media. camera handling programming editing etc. inculcate qualities required to be a competent and responsible Sub-editor.

creating and using master pages. Unit – IV: Computer Applications Importance of Computer Software in Editing & Design. Creating text and graphic elements. New York). EDITING FOR PRINT MEDIA ESSENTIAL READING 1 Tayler. boxes. Illustrations. London). line. Typographic presentation: legibility and appropriateness. Vocabulary of design: Point. Opening and Saving Documents. Howard B. using colors. mass. Unit – II: Graphic Design for Print Media Graphic design and the communication process. space. structure and classification of type.. and Jacab Scher : Copy Reading and News Editing (Prentice Hall. Unit – III: Radio & TV Communication . harmony and unity. focus. movement and rhythm. T. pictures. 3 Evans. scale and proportion. formatting text and using style sheets. importing and editing graphics.J. Quark XPress Basics. text-breakers – sub-headings. importance in design. : Sub-editing Sir Issac Pitman & Sons. shape. London. contrast. Principles of design: Balance and proportion. Elements of Design (verbal. 2 Mansfiled. Harold : Editing and Design (Five Volumes) (William Heinamann. visual and white space): text as a visual element: Design. 28 . Basics of TV script-writing. criteria for selection. info graphics etc as visual elements: types. Ltd. Creating. importing and editing text. Pre-production considerations: above and below the line functions. Do’s & don’ts for conducting interviews & discussions for TV/Radio.II Basic principles of writing news for Radio & TV. bold-faced paragraphs. motion. colour. drop letters or initial letters. texture. tone.

: Editing the Day’s News. 1953 13 Hoy. 4 Westley. George et al. 1937 17 Prince. 1980) 10 Baskette.. New York. House. New Delhi.S. Chilton Book Co. New Delhi).S. Hastings. New York. & Sissors. Cambridge. Michael : The Sub-editor companion (Press Institute of India. Robert C. 8 Narayanan K. Dineh : Computers in Newspaper Publishing. 29 . Mifflin Co. Frank P. Massachusetts. 1995 11 Bastian. New York. Harper & Bros.J. Garth : Editing the Company Publication.P. Harry : Proofreading & Copy-editing. New York. 1973 15 Maghdam. Lee : Getting started in Photo Journalism (Chilton Book company. Prentice-hall. 7 Payne.. : Photo Journalism: the Visual Approach. Marcel-Dekker Inc. New York. Bruce : News Editing Houghton.P. 1978 16 McGriffert. New York). : News Editing ( Indian Institute of Mass Communication.. Jack : The Art of Editing. 5 IPI Manual : The Active Newsroom (International Press Institute of Zurich). Macmillan. Floyd D. : The Art of Editing the News. New Jersey. 1956 12 Bentley . 9 George. Macmillan. : Sampadam Kala (M. Book One: Newman’s English Book Two: Handling Newspaper Text Book Three: News Headlines Book Four: Picture Editing Book Five: Newspaper Design. T.A. U. New York.. Jack : News Photography. Hindi Granth Academy). 6 Hides. 1986 14 MacNaughton.

1937 18 Prince. London. Routledge. London. Ron & Teel. New York) 2 Hutt. Foresman & Co. Allen : An Outline of Newspaper Typography Odhams for the National Union of Journalists. 1985 ADDITIONAL READING 1 Bills. 1978 6 Worlock. Ltd. 1956 5 Tochman Gaye : Making News: A Study in the construction of Reality Free Press. Lewis : The New York Times style book for Writers and Editors McGraw Hill. Sidney : The Lens in Action. Prentice Hall. 1976. Heinemann. Lawrence : GEM Desk Publishing. Ronald Table Press. 1988. The Focal Press. Albert A. 1989 2 Fyfe. Ronald Table Press. 1988 3 IPI Manual : The Active Newsroom. London 30 . New York. 20 Taylor. New York. Scott. 3 Roger Bernard : Elementary Typography Sir Issac Pitman & Sons. Gordon & Law : Visual Power. : Design and make-up of the Newspaper (Prentice-Hall. London... 1937 19 Ray. Jack : News Picture. New Jersey. 4 Jordan. London. Peter : The desktop Publishing Book. New York. GRAPHIC DESIGN FOR PRINT MEDIA ESSENTIAL READING 1 Sutton. Leonard Ray : Into the Newsroom. New York.

1989. 1977 9 Johnson. Robin The Non Designers Design Book. Northern Book Center.F. : Type Design. 1972. Van Norstand-Reinhold Co. 6 Williams. : Ink On Paper. Routledge & Kegan Paul. Peter Collin Publishing Ltd. Harper & Row.. University of California Press. Allen : Publications Design. D. 1971 2 Goudy. Harper & Row. Barrie & Jenikins. Harold : Newspaper Design. Marshall : The Gutenberg Galaxy. Grafton & Co.. ADDITIONAL READING 1 Banks.H. London. New York. Edmund C.) : Recent Developments in Graphic Arts Research Pergmom. 1978. Oxford. London. Toronto... H. Peachpitt 31 . 1951 10 Krishnamoorti. 1977 3 Ivins Jr.. 1981. New York. 1967 5 Hoy. New Delhi. Fredric W. Berkeley. Frank : Photo Journalism: The Visual approach. : Typologia.4 Amold. Routledge & Kegan Paul. Middlesex. 1956.Hall. New Jersey. (ed. Patricia Barnes : A Dictionary of Graphic Arts Terms. 6 Collin. New York. 12 Mintz. Rinehart & Winston. 1953 4 McLuhan.H. W. 7 Evans. Prentice. 5 Amold Edmund C. R. 1986. New York. New York. Holt. : Dictionary of Printing & Publishing. 1986 11 Lewis John : Typography. : Copy Preparation & Proof Reading. Van Norstrand- Reinhold Co. 1974 8 Hurlburt. William : Print & Visual Culture. Peachpitt Press1994 The Non Designers Type Book. : Functional Newspaper Design. London.

et.1998 7 Meggs. John Wiley and Sons. 3 Cowgill Rome : Fundamentals of Writing for Radio Rinehart & Co. 32 . 2000 11 Bringhurst. Anne Faces on the Edge: Type Design in the Digital Age. New York. 1987.. Visual Literacy – A Conceptual Approach to Richard Graphic Problem Solving Watson Guptill Publishers. Jeremy Issues – New Magazine Design. 1998 8 Wilde. Robert The Elements of Typographic Style. 1998 13 Leslie. al. N. : The Television News Interview. Laurence R. Ginko Press. 2 Cohen. 2000 RADIO AND TV COMMUNICATION-II ESSENTIAL READING 1 Campbell. Philip. N. 2000 9 Krause. 1997 12 Fink.Y.Akiba N. North Light Books. Judith and Wilde. Jim Ideas Index: Graphic Effects and Typographic Treatment. 1949. 2000 10 Fishal. SAGE. Press.Y. Catherine Redesigning Identity: Graphic Design Strategies for Success. B A History of Graphic Design. Peachpitt Press. 1950. Iowa. Iowa state University Press. Rockport Publishers. Hartley and Marks. : A Guide to Radio-TV Writing. Beverly Hills.

8 Willis. 1998. 5 Health. 1980. New York. Wm. 9 Mylie. Kate : Teach yourself Quark XPress. 1967. Max : Radio & Television Writing. 2 Busch. Edgar : Writing Television & Radio Programmes. The Focal Press. 1998. London.An Introduction to Electronic Media. 33 . Hasting House. New York. Martin J. New Delhi. 1962. Brown Publisher. Eric : Television Writer. I. Gross WCB : Tele Communication. & : Writing for the Media. David D. Tech Media.E. BPB Publications. Teach yourself Pagemaker. New York. Prentice Hall. ADDITIONAL READING 1 Ken Fielding : Introduction to Television Production (Arizone State University) Longman New York & London. Rinehart & Winston. Editing Filming. Los Angeles. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1 Binder. Hayden Books. Paul Max New Jersey. Rinehart. C. Brewster Publishers. Bront Teach yourself Photoshop. 1965. : Television News: Writing. S Handbook. Maurice : How to Write Commentaries. Rubenstein. 1997 3 Davis. Holt. 1978. 1950. 2 Lynee S. Broadcasting. 6 Kirsch. 4 Fang. 7 Maloney.

headline writing. It will be a group presentation. editing. It would be a group assignment. The work profile would include selection. placement as per news values and layout. features and articles. The work profile would include camera handling. writing and condensing news reports. sensitization to studio work. The work profile would include coverage of beat area. Tele News Board (15 Marks): A daily wall newspaper derived from teleprinter copy. design and circulation. Broadcast practicals (30 marks): these would cover the entire spectrum of radio & TV communication. Components: Student Reporter (35 Marks): A weekly laboratory journal would be published by the students covering the entire spectrum of instruction in Print Media.PAPER – IV: PRACTICALS Course Objectives: To provide practical training to the students as a continuum to the theory paper taught during the semester. editing. composition. 34 . Feedback to be collected by the presenter from every classmate to identify strength and weaknesses as source-encoder Media file (10 Marks): Presentation of a clippings file pertaining to media. Communication Theory Practicals (10 Marks): Individual presentation to the class on a topic to be chosen in consultation with the teacher. broadcasting assignments. newsgathering.

attendance and class room participation. Each question will carry 15 marks. models and concepts in communication. Uses & Gratifications perspective: basic model. Free-press. Totalitarian. Cultivation. Dependency Model of communication. Display-Attention model: the market-driven dimension. snap tests. Agenda Setting Model: basic model. Instructions for papersetters and candidates: 1. Unit IV will train the students to execute multiple features by slanting to different markets. 2. The first question is compulsory comprising 15 short answer type questions spread over the whole syllabus to be answered in about 25-30 words each.SECOND SEMESTER PAPER – I: COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA (A) Course Objectives: Unit I and Unit II will broaden and deepen the students understanding of the field of communication by introducing them to important theories. There shall be 9 questions in all. assignments. criticism. The candidates are required to attempt 10 questions. Social Responsibility. Media violence theories: Catharsis. McLuhan’s Media Determinism. Observational-Learning. 35 . The candidates shall attempt one question from each unit. Rosengren’s model. (4X15 = 60 marks) Unit – I: Theories & Models of Communication – I Media performance theories: Authoritarian. model of differential agenda-setting. (B) Pedagogy of the Course Work: 80% Lectures (including expert lectures) 20% Unit tests. Two questions shall be asked from each unit and the candidates shall be given internal choice. criticism Unit – II: Theories & Models of Communication – II Neuman’s Spiral of Silence model. It will also acquaint them with the magnitude of the market. Unit III will train the students in various aspects of news writing styles. Rest of the paper shall contain four units. to train them in market research and other techniques required to sell their features. Each question shall be of 2 marks. concepts of Global Village and hot & cool media. Reinforcement. (10X2 = 20 marks) 3.

Practicals: Exercises in market research. Scope for freelance writing in Print and online. Weather 2. Sports 7. multiple feature generation from a single idea. human interest. Education 6. Government. slant. humour and illustrations Preparation of manuscript. elections and politics 4. Accidents and crime 3. importance of market research. meetings. Society and culture 5. Practical Exercises: News writing assignments given regularly in the classroom to hone news writing skills. speeches. Unit – IV: Print Journalism – II Feature Writing: an art or a craft? Science of consistent selling: inculcating a professional writer’s mindset. news features Covering press conferences Reporting for magazines and news agencies. THEORIES & MODELS OF COMMUNICATION Courses of reading same as semester-I PRINT JOURNALISM-I Courses of reading same as semester-I 36 . Courts Writing obituaries.Unit – III: Print Journalism – I Various areas in reporting 1. news interviews.

Prentice Hall PAPER – II: CURRENT MEDIA ISSUES 37 . 1996 ADDITIONAL READING 1 Scott. 1999 7 Patterson Helen M. 1997 5 Hennessey. Allison and Burby Inc. Marshall Ideas and Research. 1997 6 Friedlander. Brendan Writing Feature Articles: A Practical Guide to Methods and Markets. Erik Writing for Publication. Applebaum. Addison-Wesley Publishing Co. Writing and Selling Feature Articles. Rodgers and Nelson Publishing Co. Gordon The Craft of Writing Articles. Bruce Professional Feature Writing. Eva The Successful Writer’s Guide to publishing Magazine Articles. Focal Press. 1978 3 Shaw. Deadline Communications 1999 4 Krantz. Harper and Row. 1998 3 Bean. 1998 4 Wells. Laurence Eribaum Assoc. Plume Inc. J Feature Writing for Newspapers and Magazines: The Pursuit of Excellence. Judith. Writers’ Digest Books.1998 2 Garrison. 1974 2 Evans.. Meredith (ed ) Writing to Sell. Nancy and How to get Happily Published. Harper and Row. PRINT JOURNALISM-II ESSENTIAL READING 1 Blundell. William. Edward. E The Art and Craft of Feature Writing.

government. editor. the Press Council of India guidelines under the Press Council Act. Instructions for papersetters and candidates: 1. In Unit IV current affairs pertaining to social. 1978. politicians and market forces as a factor affecting professionalism. Ethical codes. Each question shall be of 2 marks. snap tests. attendance and class room participation. Rest of the paper shall contain four units. responsibility and accountability: Supportive and adversarial role of a journalist as a commentator. invasion of privacy. Each question will carry 15 marks. role play. Unit II deals with the business aspect of mass media. Responsibility and accountability of the press viz. (4X15 = 60 marks) Unit – I: Ethical issues in Media Defining ethics: Work ethic and professional integrity. citizen. Unit – II: Media Management 38 . plagiarism. (B) Pedagogy of the Course Work: 80% Lectures (including expert lectures) 20% Unit tests. debates on ethical issues. educator.(A) Course Objectives: Unit I will sensitize the students to the importance of press freedom and the related issues of responsibility and accountability. (10X2 = 20 marks) 3. There shall be 9 questions in all. Code of conduct for journalists: self regulation. In continuation with the first semester. political issues etc would be taken up for discussion and analysis. The candidates are required to attempt 10 questions. bias. Two questions shall be asked from each unit and the candidates shall be given internal choice. The candidates shall attempt one question from each unit. Role. cultural. Unit III sensitizes the students to the history of the press in post-Independence India. employer and self. their violation as well as factors necessitating the violation would be discussed. Practicals: Class Presentations on Ethical violations. Ethical problems including yellow journalism. 2. economical. infotainment. organizational regulation. Practicals would involve role play and case discussions. Role of proprietor. reflector and communicator. assignments. The first question is compulsory comprising 15 short answer type questions spread over the whole syllabus to be answered in about 25-30 words each.

39 . TV. Each group is assigned a period in history. political issues etc would be taken up for discussion and analysis. The success of the project depends on how well the team functions. strengths and problems of the department visited by them. Online. Newspaper as an industrial product. Electronic media management: Radio.Organisational structures and functions Practical Exercise: Class is divided into groups. Each group leader prepares and presents a report on the functioning.Media industry: Significant aspects of newspaper industry in India and its constraints including problems of small and medium newspapers in India. The group researches and makes a short (5 Minutes) presentation on the given period or entity Unit – IV: Current Affairs Current affairs pertaining to social. Role of Publisher and GM Newspaper Business Management: Definition and Classification of newspapers. economical. Problems of newspapers in present scenario. Organizational structure of different Departments of Newspapers. Unit – III: Modern History of Press Indian Press: Post Independence history of press Stage I (1947 – 1975) From Independence to Emergency 1st and 2nd Press Commissions Press Council of India Stage V (1975 till date) Growth of media industry post liberalization Media organizations such as PIB. PTI Practical Exercise: Students are divided in groups of three. DAVP. cultural. Each group visits a different department of a local newspaper office or television or radio channel.

ETHICAL ISSUES IN MEDIA ESSENTIAL READING 1 Prabhakar. Rajeshwar Media and Market Forces: Challenges and (ed) Opportunities. Jaipur. Compendium of Codes of Conduct for Media Sanjeev Professionals. Kanishka Publishers. Anmol Publications. N. Clifford and Traber.D. V. 1984 6 Padhy. Sage Publications. P. K. Manohar and Bhanawat. 1998 40 .S. N.K and Arora. N. John. Jeffrey Ethics in Journalism.D.S Indian Press: Role and Responsibility.D. D. N.R Democracy and the Press.K Kuldip. Radha Publications. Communication Ethics and Universal Values.D. Somaiya Publications. New Jersey. M. S Publishers.D. 1986 3 Gupta. N. Ashish Publishing House. S.D. N.K Freedom of the Press. 1997 9 Sharma. K. N. K. 1991 11 Joseph. H Market Driven Journalism. Concept Publishing Co. 1997 12 Bandyopadhyay. Prentice Hall. N. University Book House. 1998 4 Olen. 1996 10 Padhy. Battle for Freedom of Press in India.K The Press Council – A Self Regulatory Mechanism for the Press. Practitioners’ Guide to Journalistic Ethics.S.D. Academic Foundation. Sage Michael Publications. N. 1988 5 Padhy. 1984 The Muzzled Press.D. 1994 8 Christians. and Dayal. N. 1999 2 Trikha.D.S 7 McManus.

1999 MEDIA MANAGEMENT Courses of reading same as semester-I MODERN HISTORY OF THE PRESS Courses of reading same as semester-I 41 .D. 1981 ADDITIONAL READING 1 Mehta.D. N. Mumbai. 1991 17 Karkhanis. Prabhakar Principles of Journalism. 1971 14 Linz. Swati and Chandra. Sipra Publications.D. Popular Prakashan. S. N.D. Navin Journalism Today: Principles. Practices and Challenges. Konark Publishers. Kanishka Publishers. Gautam Press Councils – the Indian Experience. N. Daniel and Malamuth. Bad News. Sharad Indian Politics and Role of the Press. Neil Pornography.D. Press Institute of India. N. Vinod Mr. Sage Publications.13 Adhikari.D. Sage Publications. N. P. Patrice Dynamics of Modern Communication.K Media and Ethics. N.D. 1993 3 Chauhan. 1994 15 Flichy. N. 1999 2 Aggarwal. Editor. Punnoose Tharyam. 1995 16 Padhye.D. N. 1997 4 Tharyam. Good News. Vikas Publishers. How Close are you to the PM.

planographic printing process and rotary offset printing press. Unit IV will train them in the use of relevant computer software.. Radio Production team. Unit II and III will provide the students with requisite knowledge and understanding that will enable them to produce television programmes (pre-production. Video production team. There shall be 9 questions in all. Unit – II: Radio & Television Production – I Production and post-production considerations. Visits to printing presses and newspaper production departments would be organized for demonstration purposes. floor manager. The candidates shall attempt one question from each unit. The students would also be made conversant with contemporary printing processes used in the print industry. (10X2 = 20 marks) 3. snap tests. Rest of the paper shall contain four units. Types of layout and page makeup. Print Production using computerized phototypesetting. Two questions shall be asked from each unit and the candidates shall be given internal choice. editor etc. Mechanics of page makeup. assignments. cameraman. attendance and class room participation. Types of front page makeup.PAPER – III: MEDIA PRODUCTION (A) Course Objectives: Unit I will involve practical exercises ranging from designing front pages to templates. The candidates are required to attempt 10 questions. director. The first question is compulsory comprising 15 short answer type questions spread over the whole syllabus to be answered in about 25-30 words each. Instructions for papersetters and candidates: 1. (B) Pedagogy of the Course Work: 80% Lectures (including expert lectures) 20% Unit tests. Each question will carry 15 marks (4X15 = 60 marks) Unit – I: Print Production Application of design principles in print layout. Practicals: Page mock ups and cover designs. 42 . production and post production stages). 2. Role of producer. Each question shall be of 2 marks.

: Functional Newspaper Design. language of camera movements. London. 1973. New York.. New York. 43 . Raymond : Layout.. titles. Edmund C. New York) 2 Craig. Faber & Faber. Reinhold Publishing Corpn. language of vision mixing (transitions). Harper & Row. New York.II Basic Radio Production equipment and process. 1956. components of video editing systems. Harper & Bros . Alec : Graphics: Design into Production. Video editing with Windows Movie Maker and Adobe Premiere: effects. Basic camera shots. Join : News Paper Design. 6 Craigd. 1956. 5 Ballinger. transitions. N. James Production for the Graphic Designer. Basics of editing. Albert A.Y 1979 3 Allen. 7 Davis. switching. Unit – III: Radio & Television Production . editing tools. Basics of sound perspective-microphones and their pick-up patterns. using the editing system. Editing applications and features using Non – linear editing software: the basic interface. composition. Watson- Gutpill Publications. New York. 1947 4 Amold. Basics of lighting for video production Unit – IV: Computer Applications The Language of Film. PRINT PRODUCTION ESSENTIAL READING 1 Sutton. James : Production for the Graphics Designer Waston- Gutpill Publications. camera perspective. 1979. : Design and make-up of the newspaper (Prentice-Hall. motion and transparency .

Prentice-Hall. Houston. : Design & Make-up of the Newspaper. The North-Western Press. ADDITIONAL READING 1 Bill..) : The Television Workshop. 2 Tooly. Lawrence : GEM Desktop Publishing. Dineh : Computers in Newspaper Publishing. Marcel- Dekker Inc. 1948 12 Warlock. Bernard : The Techniques of Special Effects in Television. Peter : The Desk Top publishing Book. Minneapolis. Foreman Co. Scott. Hugh : The Techniques of Documentary film Production.8 Hurlburt.. Albert A. 2 Strelho. Faber and Faber. Bront Teach yourself Photoshop Hayden Books. London. New York1978. New York. 1988 3 Davis. Heineman. 3 Wilkie. Kevin : Pagemaker: Desk top publishing on the Machine. New York. Howard (ed. 4 Wolverton. 1953.. Van Norstrand-Reinhold Co. 1988. 1977.. Allen : Publications Design. Mike : Reality on Reels: How to Make Documentaries. London. 1977 9 Maghdam. Alec Graphics: Design into Production. 44 . London. The Focal Press. 1971. Gulf Publishing Co. 10 Davis. 1989. 1973 11 Sutton. Foresman & CO. Scott. New York.. 1998 : RADIO AND TELEVISION PRODUCTION ESSENTIAL READING 1 Baddelloy.

Routledge & Kegan Paul. : The Producer’s Medium. Gress & Larry W. Kathryn : Direct Broadcasting Satellites and the United Nations. Thomas : Broadcasting the News. Brewster Publishers. (Pepperdine Ward University) (California State University Fullesion) Wodsmorth Publishing Co. Collins. 9 Ken Fielding : Introduction to Television Production (Arizone State University) Longman New York & London. John : Grierson on Documentary. 1985. 11 Gerald Millerson : The Techniques of Television Production. Roberts & Newcomb. Oxford Horace (ed. Betmount. 5 Allen.An Introduction to Electronic Media. 1946. 10 Lynee S.(The Centre for Media in the Public Interest). 12 Brain Philips : BBC Television Training Manuals ‘STAND BY STUDIO” – An 45 . Michael : The Production of Political Television. Eric : Television Writer’s Handbook. 7 Lynnes S. New York. 8 Carl Houseman : Modern Video Production. C. 6 Tracey. Techniques & Applications. Sijthoff & Noordhoff. O.Tools. 1952. London. 1977. : Electronic Movies Making.) University Press. Wm. London. California. 4 Health. New York. Los Angeles.ADDITIONAL READING 1 Grieson. Alph 3 Franklin. Pageant Press. Gross WCB : Tele Communication. 1962. 2 Queeney. Hasting Home. A Division of Wodsworth Inc. Brown Publisher.

. Instructor BBC Television. 4 Adobe Creative Team : Adobe Premiere Class room in a book. CA. Introduction to Studio Television. Triad Publishing company. Jarn : BBC Television Training Manuals- Shooting On Location. 2 Doucette. Martin : Digital video for dummies. 2001 46 . IDG Books World Wide Inc. 13 Peter. :Machael : Non-linear: A field guide to digital video and film editing. Charles River Media. 2001. Sonja : Digital non-linear desktop editing. 3 Schenk. Sr. 2001. COMPUTER APPLICATIONS ESSENTIAL READING 1 Rubin. 2000.

Communication Theory Practicals (10 Marks): Individual presentation to the class on a topic to be chosen in consultation with the teacher. writing and condensing news reports. placement as per news values and layout. newsgathering. video production processes. The work profile would include selection. editing. Scripting. Further. Each student shall demonstrate that he/she has based the presentation on the strengths identified in the first semester practicals. video and audio production. 47 . Broadcast practicals (30 marks): Introduction to equipment. design and circulation. Components: Student Reporter (35 Marks): A weekly laboratory journal would be published by the students covering the entire spectrum of instruction in Print Media. composition. It would be a group assignment. headline writing. Feedback to be collected by the presenter from every classmate to identify the strengths and weaknesses as a source- encoder.PAPER – IV: PRACTICALS Course Objectives: To provide practical training to the students as a continuum to the theory papers taught during the semester. Internship Report (10 Marks): The report shall comprise of the filled attendance card signed and stamped by the organization interned at. filming and producing of a documentary as a group assignment. Tele News Board (15 Marks): A daily wall newspaper derived from teleprinter copy. and the performance grade awarded by the concerned organization. features and articles. each student shall demonstrate that the weaknesses identified in the first semester practicals have also been taken care of. The work profile would include coverage of beat area. a 1000 word report of the work done during the internship period. editing.

48 .