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Contents
Grammar
Section 1Sentences Section 4Adjectives
Daily Maintenance 1 Daily Maintenance 51
1.1 Sentences 5 4.1 Descriptive Adjectives 55
1.2 Declarative and Interrogative Sentences 6 4.2 Proper Adjectives 56
1.3 Imperative and Exclamatory Sentences 7 4.3 Articles 57
1.4 Complete Subjects and Predicates 8 4.4 Demonstrative Adjectives 58
1.5 Simple Subjects and Predicates 9 4.5 Adjectives That Tell How Many 59
1.6 Compound Subjects 10 4.6 Adjectives as Subject Complements 60
1.7 Compound Predicates 11 4.7 Adjectives That Compare 62
1.8 Direct Objects 12 4.8 Irregular Adjectives That Compare 63
1.9 Subject Complements 13 4.9 More, Most 64
1.10 Compound Sentences 14 4.10 Fewer, Fewest and Less, Least 65
1.11 Run-on Sentences 16 4.11 Position of Adjectives 66
Section 2Nouns Section 5Verbs
Daily Maintenance 17 Daily Maintenance 67
2.1 Nouns 21 5.1 Action Verbs 73
2.2 Common and Proper Nouns 22 5.2 Being Verbs 74
2.3 Singular and Plural Nouns 23 5.3 Linking Verbs 75
2.4 Irregular Plural Nouns 24 5.4 Helping Verbs 77
2.5 Singular Possessive Nouns 26 5.5 Verb Phrases 79
2.6 Plural Possessive Nouns 27 5.6 Principal Parts of Verbs 81
2.7 Collective Nouns 28 5.7 Irregular Verbs 82
2.8 Nouns as Subjects 29 5.8 More Irregular Verbs 83
2.9 Nouns as Direct Objects 30 5.9 Simple Present Tense 84
2.10 Nouns as Subject Complements 31 5.10 Simple Past Tense 85
2.11 Words Used as Nouns and as Verbs 32 5.11 Future Tenses 86
5.12 Progressive Tenses 87
Section 3Pronouns 5.13 Present Perfect Tense 88
Daily Maintenance 33 5.14 Past Perfect Tense 89
3.1 Personal Pronouns: Part I 37 5.15 Future Perfect Tense 90
3.2 Personal Pronouns: Part II 38 5.16 Subject-Verb Agreement 91
3.3 Singular and Plural Pronouns 39 5.17 There Is and There Are 92
3.4 Subject Pronouns 40
3.5 Pronouns in Compound Subjects 42 Section 6Adverbs and Conjunctions
3.6 Object Pronouns 43 Daily Maintenance 93
3.7 Possessive Pronouns 45 6.1 Adverbs of Time and Place 95
3.8 Possessive Adjectives 46 6.2 Adverbs of Manner 96
3.9 Pronouns and Antecedents 47 6.3 Adverbs That Compare 97
3.10 I, Me, We, and Us 49 6.4 More Adverbs That Compare 98
3.11 Pronouns and Contractions 50 6.5 Good and Well; Negative Words 99
6.6 Coordinating Conjunctions 100

Contents iii

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Section 7Punctuation Chapter 3Descriptions
and Capitalization Lesson 1 What Makes a Good Description? 142
Daily Maintenance 101 Lesson 2 Sensory Language 143
7.1 End Punctuation 105 Lesson 3 Suffixes 144
7.2 Capitalization 106 Lesson 4 Similes and Metaphors 145
7.3 Titles of Works 107 Lesson 5 Graphic Organizers 146
7.4 Abbreviations 108
7.5 Personal Titles 109 Chapter 4How-to Articles
7.6 Commas: Part I 110 Lesson 1 What Makes a Good
7.7 Commas: Part II 111 How-to Article? 147
7.8 Apostrophes 113 Lesson 2 Important Details 148
7.9 Addresses 114 Lesson 3 Prefixes 149
7.10 Direct Quotations 115 Lesson 4 Dictionary 150
Lesson 5 Time Words 151
Section 8Diagramming
Daily Maintenance 117 Chapter 5Persuasive Writing
8.1 Subjects and Verbs 121 Lesson 1 What Makes Good
8.2 Direct Objects 122 Persuasive Writing? 152
8.3 Possessives and Adjectives 123 Lesson 2 Fact and Opinion 153
8.4 Subject Complements 124 Lesson 3 Synonyms 154
8.5 Adverbs 125 Lesson 4 Dictionary 155
8.6 Compound Subjects and Predicates 126 Lesson 5 Compound Subjects
8.7 Compound Direct Objects 127 and Predicates 156
8.8 Nouns as Compound Subject
Chapter 6Creative Writing: Fables
Complements 128
8.9 Adjectives as Compound Subject Lesson 1 What Makes a Good Fable? 157
Complements 129 Lesson 2 Beginning, Middle, and Ending 158
8.10 Compound Sentences 130 Lesson 3 Homophones 159
8.11 Diagramming Practice 131 Lesson 4 Expanding Sentences 160
Lesson 5 Haiku 161
Writing Chapter 7Expository Articles
Chapter 1Personal Narratives Lesson 1 What Makes a Good
Expository Article? 162
Lesson 1 What Makes a Good Personal Lesson 2 Gathering Information 163
Narrative? 132 Lesson 3 Negative Words 164
Lesson 2 Introduction, Body, Lesson 4 Rambling Sentences 165
and Conclusion 133 Lesson 5 Library Catalogs 166
Lesson 3 Time Lines 134
Lesson 4 Exact Words 135 Chapter 8Research Reports
Lesson 5 Contractions with Pronouns 136 Lesson 1 What Makes a Good
Chapter 2Formal Letters Research Report? 167
Lesson 2 Researching 168
Lesson 1 What Makes a Good Lesson 3 Reference Sources 169
Formal Letter? 137 Lesson 4 Compound Words 170
Lesson 2 Types of Formal Letters 138 Lesson 5 Outlines 171
Lesson 3 Compound Sentences 139
Lesson 4 Mailing a Formal Letter 140
Lesson 5 Antonyms 141

iv Contents

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Name Week of

SECTION 1 Daily Maintenance


1.1 4The
Grade spider
Section catches
1 Daily flies. Batch 1
maintenance
1.1
1. What is the simple subject?

2. Which noun is plural?

3. Which word is a verb?

4. Diagram the sentence here.

1.2 She bought a new backpack.


1.2
1. Is She a noun or a pronoun?

2. Is She singular or plural?

3. Is the verb past tense or present tense?

4. Diagram the sentence here.

1.3
1.3 The young children play a game.

1. Which noun is singular?

2. Is young a noun or an adjective?


Grade 4

3. Which word is a verb?


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4. Diagram the sentence here.

Section 1 1
Name Week of

1.4
1.4 Juan washes the dirty car.

1. Is Juan a common noun or a proper noun?

2. Is the verb present tense or past tense?

3. Which word is an adjective?

4. Diagram the sentence here.

1.5
1.5 We are basketball players.

1. What part of speech is We?

2. Is We singular or plural?

3. Which word is a verb?

4. Diagram the sentence here.

1.6
1.6 Miley owns two small dogs.

1. Which word is a proper noun?

2. Is the verb an action verb or a linking verb?

3. Which words are adjectives?


Grade 4

4. Diagram the sentence here.


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2 Section 1
Name Week of

1.7 The silly poem is funny.


1.7
1. What part of speech is poem?

2. Which word is a linking verb?

3. Which words does the linking verb link?

4. Diagram the sentence here.

1.8 I counted the brown boxes.

1.8 1. Is the pronoun singular or plural?

2. Which word is a verb?

3. Is the verb regular or irregular?

4. Diagram the sentence here.

1.9
1.9 Carlos won a silver medal.

1. What kind of noun is Carlos?

2. Is the verb regular or irregular?

3. Which word is an adjective?


Grade 4

4. Diagram the sentence here.


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Section 1 3
Name Week of

1.10 The woman drives a blue truck.


1.10
1. Is woman the subject or the verb?

2. Is the verb present tense or past tense?

3. What part of speech is blue?

4. Diagram the sentence here.

1.11 The students visited a history museum.


1.11
1. Is visited the subject or the verb?

2. Is the verb an action verb or a linking verb?

3. Which word is a plural noun?

4. Diagram the sentence here.

Grade 4
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4 Section 1
Name Date

1.1 Sentences
A sentence is a group of words that expresses a complete thought. The
subject tells who or what the sentence is about. The predicate tells
what the subject is or does.

Circle the number of each group of words that is a sentence.


1. My mother works at the city zoo

2. A rabbit hopped across the lawn

3. Spotted a graceful bald eagle

4. An octopus has eight arms

5. Lives in forests and fields

6. Children laughed at the lively otters

7. Under the tree two giant gorillas

8. During our visit the zookeeper fed the lions

Write whether each group of words is a sentence or not a sentence. Add a


period to the end of each sentence.
9. Many people find jobs at the zoo

10. Cares for sick animals

11. Zookeepers usually


12. Volunteers might take visitors on a tour

13. In the gift shop, the salesperson

14. Workers make food for the animals

Add a subject or a predicate to each group of words to make a complete


Grade 4

sentence. Include capital letters if needed.


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15. Several large tigers .

16. swim through the water.

17. gave the polar bear fresh water.

18. The man at the information desk .

For additional help, review pages 23 in your textbook


or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com. Section 1 5
Name Date

1.2 Declarative and Interrogative Sentences

A declarative sentence makes a statement and ends with a period.


An interrogative sentence asks a question. An interrogative sentence
begins with a question word or a verb and ends with a question mark.

Write whether each sentence is declarative (D) or interrogative (I).


1. Atlanta is the capital of Georgia.

2. Is Georgia part of the United States?

3. Where is the Suwanee River located?

4. Three important rivers flow through Georgia.

5. The Atlantic Ocean borders Georgia on the east.

6. What is the name of that huge Georgia swamp?

7. Do islands protect the Georgia coast from strong storms?

Add periods to the end of declarative sentences. Add question marks to the
end of interrogative sentences. Then underline the question words.
8. Who is going to the store with me

9. We hiked up the mountain together

10. Where did your family go last weekend

11. What is your favorite school subject


12. How old will you be on your next birthday

13. Daniel wrote an excellent science report

Rewrite the declarative sentence as an interrogative sentence. Rewrite the


interrogative sentence as a declarative sentence.
Grade 4

14. Dayna has visited three different aquariums.


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15. Does this aquarium open early in the morning?

For additional help, review pages 45 in your textbook


6 Section 1 or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com.
Name Date

1.3 Imperative and Exclamatory Sentences


An imperative sentence gives a command or makes a request, and
ends with a period. An exclamatory sentence expresses strong or
sudden emotion, and ends with an exclamation point.

Add a period to the end of each imperative sentence. Add an exclamation


point to the end of each exclamatory sentence.
1. How high the water tower is

2. Please hand me that dictionary

3. Oh no, the water level is rising

4. Ask the students to be quiet

5. Wow, I cannot believe you said that

6. Dont talk with your mouth full

7. Check the doors before you leave

8. Lets sing with our friends tonight

Add a word or words to complete each sentence.


9. is so beautiful!

10. your sunglasses on bright days.

11. Please use .

12. Wow, this sunburn !

Write a sentence for each topic. Use the kind of sentence in parentheses.
13. a spider on the wall (exclamatory)
Grade 4

14. a heavy snowstorm (imperative)


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15. a sudden surprise (exclamatory)

For additional help, review pages 67 in your textbook


or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com. Section 1 7
Name Date

1.4 Complete Subjects and Predicates


Every sentence must have a subject and a predicate. A complete
subject includes the specific person, place, or thing and all related
words. A complete predicate is the verb and all related words.

Underline the complete subject once and complete predicate twice in each
sentence.
1. People selected seven new world wonders in 2007.

2. One hundred million votes were cast online.

3. The Taj Mahal in India was one of the new wonders.

4. This amazing monument was built from white marble in 1630.

5. The ancient city of Machu Picchu is also on this new list.

6. The Incas constructed these buildings over 500 years ago.

7. Another civilization carved the city of Petra 2,000 years ago.

Write whether the italicized words in each sentence are the complete subject
or the complete predicate.
8. Some students studied the Great Wall of China.

9. This wall may be the biggest humanmade monument.

10. Many short older walls were connected together.

11. Several sections are made from earth and brick.


12. Most of the work lasted more than 300 years.

13. The wall did not often protect the Chinese people.

14. Visitors are able to walk across sections of the wall.


Grade 4

Write a subject or a predicate to complete each sentence.


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15. visited the history museum.

16. have gold statues.

17. Two explorers .

18. A castle .

For additional help, review pages 89 in your textbook


8 Section 1 or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com.
Name Date

1.5 Simple Subjects and Predicates


The most important word in the subject is usually a noun. This noun is
the simple subject. The predicate describes what the subject is or does
and contains a verb. This verb is called the simple predicate.

Underline each simple subject once and each simple predicate twice.
1. Our librarian showed us the new book about presidents.

2. My sharpened pencil rolled off my desk.

3. The artists in Mrs. Parkers class painted several pictures.

4. Their school band played a lively marching song.

5. According to the menu, the milk costs more than juice.

6. Mr. Kornick pointed to the door.

7. Three students from our grade raise the flags each morning before school.

Use a simple subject from the box to complete each sentence. Then circle each
simple predicate.

class lunchroom noises rug tires

8. Our entire faces the flag.

9. A new covered the classroom floor.

10. A cars screeched at the stop sign.

11. This year our serves hot drinks during winter.

12. Strange suddenly burst from the school intercom.


Grade 4

Write a sentence using each noun and verb as the simple subject and the
simple predicate.
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13. teacher spoke

14. students practice

For additional help, review pages 1011 in your textbook


or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com. Section 1 9
Name Date

1.6 Compound Subjects


A compound subject has two or more simple subjects connected by
and or or.

Underline each compound subject. Then write the simple subjects.


1. Dad and I set up an aquarium.

2. Five fish and a snail live in this tank.

3. The red fish and the blue fish have long tails.

4. Sunlight or a lightbulb keeps the water warm.

5. Some rocks and plants give the fish hiding spots.

6. A scraper and a brush remove the green algae inside.

7. A book or a DVD teaches us about fish care.

Underline the complete subject in each sentence. Then write simple or


compound to identify the subject.
8. Spring and fall are my favorite seasons.

9. Santiago and Patrick are best friends.

10. The library is closed on Sundays.

11. A black pencil and a red pen are on the desk.

12. The boys played tennis with Carlos last night.


13. Either Jennifer or Liz fed the hungry chickens.

14. My bat and ball are both in this bag.

15. An enthusiastic audience cheered for the winning team.


Grade 4

Write a compound subject that completes each sentence.


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16. enjoy watching the fish swim.

17. are funny names for fish.

18. might injure a pet fish.

19. keep the fish healthy.

For additional help, review pages 1213 in your textbook


10 Section 1 or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com.
Name Date

1.7 Compound Predicates


A compound predicate has two or more simple predicates connected
with and, but, or or.

Underline the compound predicate in each sentence.


1. I read about Central Park and visited it with my family.

2. New Yorkers brag about its size but complain about the crowds.

3. Many people stroll or jog through Central Park every day.

4. Tourists often ride in a bike cart or relax in a horse carriage.

5. Performers sing and dance on two Central Park stages.

6. A beautiful pond welcomes visitors and offers a restful spot to sit.

7. Young people either play baseball on the field or visit the zoo in the park.

Underline the simple predicate or predicates in each sentence. Then write


simple or compound to identify each predicate.
8. The wind pounded and rattled the windows.

9. Children ran or jumped in the cool water.

10. We picked and sorted apples from the orchard.

11. My little brother plays soccer every afternoon.

12. Tom broke the table but later fixed it.


13. My cat sniffed its food and walked away.

14. Helen smiled and laughed at the circus clown.

15. The dog growled at the stranger by the door.


Grade 4

Write a compound predicate that completes each sentence.


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16. The children .

17. I .

18. Several bicyclists .

19. That family from Houston .

For additional help, review pages 1415 in your textbook


or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com. Section 1 11
Name Date

1.8 Direct Objects


A direct object is the noun or pronoun that receives the action of the
verb. The direct object tells whom or what after the verb. A compound
direct object is two simple direct objects joined by and.

Underline the direct object in each sentence.


1. She found our route on a map.

2. Ana and I each ate an apple.

3. Duncan and his brother raise pigeons.

4. The artist painted a mural yesterday.

5. My father bought groceries for the week.

6. Emma watered the vegetables in the garden.

7. The explorer discovered an island across the bay.

8. Our team easily won the championship.

Circle the direct object or compound direct object in each sentence.


9. Families can catch fish along the Mississippi River.

10. They rent fishing rods and bait at the visitor center.

11. Adults must also purchase a fishing license.

12. Minnesota allows residents to fish without a license.


13. Many people ride their bikes along the shores of the Mississippi.

14. The park rangers lead groups on river paths.

15. The cyclists see amazing views of the Mississippi River.


Grade 4

16. They discover exciting, new trails and interesting history about the river.
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Write a compound direct object that completes each sentence.


17. My sister explored .

18. Yesterday I saw .

19. Many people buy .

For additional help, review pages 1617 in your textbook


12 Section 1 or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com.
Name Date

1.9 Subject Complements


A subject complement is a noun or an adjective that follows a
linking verb and tells more about the subject. A compound subject
complement is two simple subject complements joined together.

Circle the simple subject in each sentence. Then underline the subject
complement or compound subject complement.
1. Most weather reporters on TV are meteorologists.

2. A meteorologist is usually a college graduate.

3. The study of mathematics and physics is important.

4. A college degree in meteorology is useful in other jobs.

5. Many meteorologists are science teachers or researchers.

6. These researchers are curious and concerned about global warming.

7. Some weather forecasters are partners with oceanographers.

Use a subject complement from the box that completes each sentence. Write
whether the subject complement is a noun (N) or an adjective (A).

fascinating model musical scientist student topic

8. I might be a when I grow up.

9. Storms and weather are to me.

10. Earthquakes are also an interesting .

11. I was the top in my science class.

12. My science project was a of a tsunami.


Grade 4

13. My parents are rather than scientific.


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Write a subject complement that completes each sentence.


14. A great white shark is .

15. Yesterdays weather was .

16. Good activities for rainy days are .

For additional help, review pages 1819 in your textbook


or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com. Section 1 13
Name Date

1.10 Compound Sentences


A compound sentence combines two short related sentences by
adding a comma between the sentences followed by and, but, or or.

Circle whether each sentence is compound (C) or not a compound (NC).


1. Our computer is old, but it still works. C NC

2. The holiday fireworks were loud and colorful. C NC

3. We need to apply sunscreen, or we will get sunburned. C NC

4. Please do not watch TV and do homework at the same time. C NC

5. Maddies puppy was tired but happy after their walk. C NC

6. We found quarters under the bed, but Patrick spent them. C NC

7. The diver spotted the octopus, and he photographed it. C NC

Write yes or no to identify whether each compound sentence is written


correctly.
8. I got a banana for lunch, Ursula got a sandwich.

9. Mom wants a new car, but Dad likes the old one.

10. Three people were flying kites and one person had a balloon.

11. Bethany will paint her room or she will put wallpaper on the walls.

12. We swam in the ocean, and they made a sand castle on the beach.

Combine each pair of sentences into a compound sentence. Use a comma and
and, but, or or.
13. I play softball. My brother plays baseball.
Grade 4

14. Dad may have a baked potato. Maybe he will have mashed potatoes.
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15. Florida can be very hot in August. It is extremely humid.

For additional help, review pages 2021 in your textbook


14 Section 1 or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com.
Name Date

1.10 Compound Sentences


A compound sentence combines two short related sentences by
adding a comma between the sentences followed by and, but, or or.

Circle the letter of the sentence in each pair that is a compound sentence.
1. a. Teresas favorite season is spring, but Hallie likes summer weather.
b. Teresa and Hallie like the weather in the summer.

2. a. I might play field hockey, or I might try golf.


b. I might play field hockey or golf.

3. a. After hearing thunder Eddie felt a raindrop on his head.


b. Eddie heard thunder, and he felt a raindrop on his head.

4. a. Today is my first soccer game, and my family is watching.


b. My family is watching my first soccer game today.

Add a comma and and, but, or or to each compound sentence.


5. Cyclists may race on the road races may be held on a track.

6. Winter Olympics are interesting I like the ones in the summer.

7. We may watch the Olympics on TV we may play baseball.

8. Children are learning how to swim they are learning to dive.

9. Someday Tom could swim in the Olympics he might win a medal.

10. Volleyball is played in a gym beach volleyball is played outside.

11. Gymnastics is an exciting sport soccer is thrilling to watch.

12. Weightlifters have strong arms their legs are very powerful.
Grade 4

Write words that complete each compound sentence.


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13. Jake pinned up hockey posters, and .

14. , but she reads about tennis.

15. Cara will go to judo class, or .

16. , and he swims across the pool.

For additional help, review pages 2021 in your textbook


or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com. Section 1 15
Name Date

1.11 Run-on Sentences


A run-on sentence results when two sentences are combined but not
connected properly. A run-on sentence occurs when two sentences are
separated by only a comma or by no connectors at all.

Circle the number of each sentence that is a run-on.


1. Some farmers raise animals, but other farmers grow crops.

2. We picked raspberries at the farm, we ate all of them.

3. Cold weather damages crops, and too much rain ruins farmland.

4. Corn is the most common crop in this area, soybeans are also popular.

5. My family visited a pumpkin farm, we bought a giant pumpkin.

Write correct if a sentence is written correctly. If a sentence is not correct,


write the connector that should be added.
6. Maria walks to school, her sister rides a bike.

7. Tonight is a new moon, and the stars will be very bright.

8. I can rake the leaves, and you can help me.

9. The weather is cold today, the wind is icy.

10. I thought I was late, but the bus was early.

11. Sue wants a new book, she does not have enough money.
12. The children can play outside, they can watch a movie.

Rewrite each run-on sentence as a compound sentence.


13. Peggy eats fresh strawberries, Peggy likes blackberries.
Grade 4

14. I watered the plants in the garden, I forgot to water the roses.
Loyola Press. Voyages in English

15. Mother picked flowers from our yard, I helped carry them inside.

For additional help, review pages 2223 in your textbook


16 Section 1 or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com.
Name Date

1
LESSON
What Makes a Good
Personal Narrative?
A personal narrative is a true story about something that happened to
the writer. Personal narratives have interesting topics, are told from the
first-person point of view, and are arranged in time order.

Circle the letter of the ending that best completes each sentence.
1. A personal narrative is a true story that tells
a. about an event that really happened to the writer.
b. about a person who lived more than a hundred years ago.

2. Words such as I, me, we, and our show that the writing is written in
a. the third-person point of view.
b. the first-person point of view.

3. The events in a personal narrative are


a. made up so that they are more interesting.
b. told in the order in which they happened, using time words.

4. When you choose a topic for a personal narrative,


a. write about an event that will be interesting to your audience.
b. write about sports because everyone finds this topic interesting.

5. A good topic for a personal narrative is


a. a list of facts and dates that tell about a day in your life.
b. a funny, exciting, or unusual event that really happened.

Write 15 to place the sentences in the correct time order.


Grade 4

6. Finally, I smiled as I watched it fly away across the yard.


Loyola Press. Voyages in English

7. First, a butterfly gently floated into my room.

8. When I opened my window this morning, an amazing thing happened.

9. Then the butterfly seemed to wave to me as it flew back out the window.

10. Next, it circled around me three times.

For additional help, review pages 212215 in your textbook


132 Chapter 1 or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com.
Name Date

2
LESSON
Introduction, Body, and Conclusion
The personal narrative has three main parts: the introduction, the
body, and the conclusion. These parts form the beginning, the middle,
and the ending of a story.

Circle T (true) or F (false) for each statement about personal narratives.


1. The introduction should make the reader want to know more. T F

2. An introduction can be a question or an interesting statement. T F

3. Details that are not related to the topic belong in the body. T F

4. Interesting details that really happened should be placed in the body. T F

5. The body describes events in order of importance. T F

6. Details are important to a personal narrative. T F

7. The conclusion tells how the story began. T F

8. Sometimes the conclusion tells something the writer learned or felt. T F

For each set of sentences, write introduction, body, or conclusion to identify


the best placement of each sentence in a personal narrative.
9. a. Little did I know what this day would hold.
b. This party was the best surprise of my life.
c. I went to soccer practice as usual.

10. a. I found the second clue a minute later.


b. This Saturday my family hosted their annual
treasure hunt.
c. Perhaps my prize proves I am the best
detective around.
Grade 4

11. a. As I splashed into the pool, I was relieved


Loyola Press. Voyages in English

the ride was over.


b. From the top of the waterslide, I was on top
of the world.
c. My legs flew up as the first turn sent me
sideways.

For additional help, review pages 216219 in your textbook


or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com. Chapter 1 133
Name Date

3
LESSON
Time Lines
A time line is a tool used by writers to organize their ideas. A time line
is divided into equal periods of time. Events are listed in time order
along the line.

Circle T (true) or F (false) for each statement about time lines.


1. A time line helps a writer put ideas in time order. T F

2. A time line can be divided into periods of time that are not equal. T F

3. All time lines should be drawn diagonally across the paper. T F

4. The periods of time are on one side, and the events are on the other side. T F

5. Once you finish a time line, look it over and add or change details as needed. T F

Write details from the box to complete the time line.

hear sound from closet Shadow eats dinner


find Shadow in clothes hamper give Shadow big hug
Shadow does not come to eat

6.

set out Shadows dinner


4:00

search for Shadow in house

hear sound from closet


4:30
Grade 4
Loyola Press. Voyages in English

give Shadow big hug

Shadow eats dinner


5:00

For additional help, review pages 220223 in your textbook


134 Chapter 1 or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com.
Name Date

4
LESSON
Exact Words
A writer uses exact words to create a clearer picture for the reader.
Strong verbs and colorful adjectives tell the story in a more exact
way.

Write a verb or an adjective from the box to replace the italicized word in
each sentence.

fantastic exclaimed gorgeous strenuous


kindhearted sprawled darted stroll

1. After dinner we decided to walk along the river.

2. My friend Teri is a very nice person.

3. I think Dad found a nugget of gold! I said.

4. When the deer saw us, it went into the forest.

5. Our hike into the bat caves was a good trip.

6. I noticed a pretty dress in the store window.

7. My kitten lay on the sunny windowsill.

8. Running is hard exercise. Pedro explained.

Write more exact words for big that complete the word web. Answers will vary.
Grade 4

big
Loyola Press. Voyages in English

For additional help, review pages 224227 in your textbook


or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com. Chapter 1 135
Name Date

5
LESSON
Contractions with Pronouns
A contraction is formed when two words are combined, using
an apostrophe to take the place of the missing letter or letters.
Contractions with pronouns join a pronoun and a verb.

Write the contraction for each pair of words.


1. I will 5. you have

2. she is 6. I would

3. they will 7. we are

4. he would 8. she has

Circle the words or the contraction that would be appropriate to use in a


business letter.
9. (I would Id) like to ask for the discount coupon.

10. I bought the toy in December, and (its it is) already broken.

11. I hope you can attend our ceremony if (you are youre) not busy.

12. (We will well) return the cracked CD to the store.

13. Please have Mr. Smith call me when (hes he is) available.

Rewrite each sentence using contractions to make it less formal.


14. It has been a long time since I last wrote you.

15. Toby told me that you would like a photograph from the party. Grade 4

16. My mom said she will drive us to the movie.


Loyola Press. Voyages in English

17. I think we have finished all our homework.

For additional help, review pages 228231 in your textbook


136 Chapter 1 or visit www.voyagesinenglish.com.