You are on page 1of 128

CONSUMER BUYING BEHAVIOR

CHAPTER I

INTRODUCTION

TEXTILE INDUSTRY AND CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR

In an environment of competitive market, the success of every


industry largely depends on how precisely it can understand the target
consumers. Because, such an understanding is the sole means to
translate the needs and wants of the prospective consumers into
products or services. Regarding textiles, understanding consumer is
the nucleus of its production and marketing, as clothing is the
manifestation of the behavioural aspects of the wearer in its totality.
To make it more clear, the decision regarding buying and using
textiles is the reflection of the rational behaviour of consumers.

The amazing and amusing aspect of the rational behaviour is its


'dynamism' - which is conspicuous because of its magnitude. It is
worth noting here the opinion of Michael De Montaigne 'There never
were in the world two opinions alike, no more than two hairs or two
grains: the most universal quality is diversityl(Montaigne, Michael
De, 1915). The dynamism of rational behaviour postulates
the,formulation and the reformulation of approach, outlook or
perception in resdLct of every sphere of human activity including
consumption. A sagacious marketer, therefore, has to convince
himself that his products / services and sti,ategies are in line with the
dynamic marketingenvironment .
'Marketing is the 'whole business' from the viewpoint of its final
result, that is,from the consumer - point- of- view' (Drucker, P.F.
1973). Unlessa deliberate attempt is madebythe marketers
toanalyzeand understandthebehavioural aspects of the target
consumers, there will hardly be any parity between production and
consumption. 'The study of consumer behaviour began when
marketers realized that consumers did not always act or react as
marketing theory suggested they would' ( Schiffman ,G.L and Kanuk,
L.L ,2002).
Consumer

It is expedient to examine the concept of consumer before


discerning the behaviour of the consumer. Who can be a consumer?
Can children be considered consumers? Shouldit be an individual?
These probing questions call for a more realistic aswell as .pragmatic
interpretation of the term consumer. Children are generally regarded
to be incapable of making independent decisions and in that sense they
cannot be labelled as consumers or a consumer unit. However, from
the perspective of'user status', they are the end users of articles like
toys, story books; hence they can be considered consumers at par.
When an individual purchases food or clothing for his family, he may
be more concerned about the welfare of hi s family than a b o u t his
personal welfare or interest.

As the available resources have been utilized for consuming goods 1


services for the family, scan be designated as a consumer unit.
Aconsumer unit is one or more persons who collectively generate
income and allocate it for consumption among the members of the
unit' (Eastwood, D.B,1985). To make it more clear, the terminology
consumer unit connotes households, which include individuals,
families and those who are living together.

Peripherally, consumer behaviour denotes the response of


individuals1 household to different situations1 conditions in respect of
marketing of goodand services. Nothing can 'be substantially evolved
for strategic decision in marketing management, if the concept of
consumer behaviour remains as a mere response in the corpus of
knowledge. Recalling a handful of widely used definitions seem to be
indispensable to get a bird's- eye view of the concept of consumer
behaviour.

Definitions of Consumer Behaviour

'Consumer behaviour is the study and the marketing of products and


of human response to products or services (Kardes, ER, 2002).

'Consumer behaviour is the behaviour that consumers display in


searching for, purchasing, using, evaluating products or services and
ideas that they expect will satisfy their needs' (Schiffman, G.L and
Kanuk, L.L, 2002).

'Consumer behaviour refers to the buying behaviour of final


consumers - individuals and households'(Kotler, Philip and
Armstrong, Gany, 1985).

'Consumer behaviour is the behaviour of the ultimate consumers,


those who purchase products for personal or household use, not for
business purpose' (Ferrell, 0.C and Pride, W.M, 1989).

'The act of individuals households in obtaining and using goods


andservices including the decision processes that pervade and
determine those acts' (Rathor, B .S, 1998).
The cited definitions lay emphasis on the clause that the applicability of
the termconsumer behaviour is completely confined to
theultimate'consumers'.

Overwhelmingly, it is associated with the decision - making process


with regardto buying and using products or services.

Consumer Decision - Making Process

The words of 'Napoleon I' - 'nothing is more difficult, and therefore


more precious, than to be able to decide'(Schiffman, G.L and Kanuk,
L.L 2002) tell us that the decision-making process stands as a colossus
among the routine phenomena in everyday life of people. Consumers
make decisions for deriving the expected level of satisfaction by
purchasing products or consuming services. Manufactures as well as
marketers are found to be inquisitive to understand and analyze the
consumer decision-making process, as it portends the fate of a product
or service in the prevailing market environment. 'Cost' and 'utility' of
the target product or service are the 'dyadic conditions' which
pervade every consumer decision-making process.
Obviously, it varies from context to context and household to
household. However, a typological approach may be made in the
categorization of the consumer decision-making process.
Although the consumer decision-making process varies considerably,
they can be included in one of the three categories: 'routine response
behaviour, limited decision- making' and 'extensive decision making'
(Howard, J. A and Shethu, J.N, 1969). The routine response behaviour
is associated with frequently purchased articles and the consumers
intake the decisions spontaneously. The limited decision making is
applicable in the context of occasional buying. And the consumers are
increasingly interested in gathering the needful information so as to
make the appropriate decision. When unfamiliar and infrequently
bought products have become the target, the consumers adopt the
policy of "think-twice before you leap" and hence very keen in
information - search and processing in order to avoid the post
purchase dissonance.
'Joint decisions' and 'individual decisions' are the later additions to the
classification of consumer decision - making process. The former
represents group involvement while the latter denotes involvement of
a single individual in the decision- making process. 'Joint decision -
making is different from individual decision - making not only in
terms of the unit but also in terms of the processitself' (Park, W.C,
1982).

'Many major consumer decisions are arrived at by consultation or


give-and take among group members' (Katonah,G, 1980). And there
are several stages in the consumer decision-making process for
deriving the expected level ofsatisfaction.

Stages in Consumer Decision -Making Process

Every consumer decision-making process is the meridian of several


phasic stages.

These stages are 'problem or need - recognition, information search,


evaluation of alterative, purchase and post - purchase- evaluation'
(Ferrell, 0.C and Pride,W.M,1989). Both the personal and the non-
personal aspects of consumersmay influence each stage in the
decision- making process.

Where there is a discrepancy between the desired condition and the


actual condition, the consumers locate a problem to be solved or a
need to be satisfied.

Economic advancement, change in the stages of lifecycle,


technological development and socio-cultural environment are the
major contributory factorsthat may arouse the urge for solving a
problem or satisfying a need. Besides, factors like market
environment and promotion campaigns of marketers are instrumental
to accelerating the process of problem- solving or need - satisfaction.
Awareness of a problem induces the consumers to search for
information. Product features, brand, seller and price are the major
subjects, which are to be analysed with the help of the information
obtained from the various sources. Now-a-days, consumers have been
hugged by information explosion; particularly by the coverage given
by the mass media. 'Consumers use decision rules to cope with
exposure to too much information or information overload'

(Owen, R.S and Hargtved, P.C,1993). If consumers are provided with


too much information at a given point of time, it exceeds their
processing limits.

Exposure to information takes the consumers to the world of different


product alternatives. Consumers are usually pre-conditioned by
setting a plethora of characteristic features of the target product in
their mind. In order to get a multi-dimensionpicture of the target
product, they may even consider the opinions and viewpoints of
others. 'Consumers are especially like to note information and to
avoid product or brand that receives negative evaluations'

(Ami, A.S and Schiffman, G, L, 1986). 'When making a purchase -


decision, consumers must judge the relative values of various
alternatives' (Puto,C.P,1987). If the known products or brands are not
corresponding to the rating, the consumers may go in for further
search.
After profiling the characteristic features of the target product1 brand
andevaluating the alternatives, the consumer proceeds to the actual
buying process, by which prospective consumers will become actual
consumers. Perhaps consumers may go for a compromise, if the
products/ brands, which have secured the highest ratings are not
available in the immediate vicinity. Purchase is characterized by
factors like store loyalty, brand affinity, timing and even group-
involvement. 'Consumers may also use a preference formation
strategy that is other-based-in which they allow another person to
make the selection or purchase for them'(Olskavsky, R.W, 1985).
Post-purchase evaluation is the last phasic stage in the decision-
making process. If the product is an expensive one, the consumer will
be keen in evaluating the product. If the evaluation evokes a
dissonance, it causes mental fatigue to the consumers. The
discontented consumers will give word - of-mouth that may
discourage the other prospective buyers. Unless precautionary
measures are taken by the marketers against the injurious word - of -
mouth of the consumers, their existence will be at stake. 'Perhaps the
most important thing for marketers to understand about word -of -
mouth is its huge pckential economic impact' (Walker, C, L995).
Understanding the factors that can exert an influence on the behaviour
of prospective consumersis the short-cut to reach atthis destination.

Factors Affecting Consumer Behaviour

'Consumer behaviour (B) is the result of the interaction of the


consumer's personal influence (P) and the pressure exerted upon him
by the outside factors

in the environment'(E):B='# (P,E)- (Rathor, B .S,1998).


This conveys that the behaviour of consumers is influenced by
cultural, social, personal and psychological factors. It is not imperative
that on all occasions, all the factors have to be at work to mould the
behavioural pattern of consumers. It is interesting to note that the
factors, which are responsible for the behaviour of consumers are
complimentary in character.

Cultural Factors

'The cultural setting of consumers is conspicuously integrated with


their behavioural aspects, because culture envisages distinctive modal
patterns of behaviour, and the underlying regulatory beliefs, norms
and premises'

(Krech,Dand Crutch Field,R.S, 1962).Ingeneral,thecultural


backgroundof consumers acts as the 'control surface' with regard to
their consumption process. Choice of products1 brand, mode of
buying, type of vendor selected may be pointed out as the examples
for the interplay between the culture and behaviour of consumers. In
the textile market, culture is a vital factor that influences the fashion
adoption. Now-a-days, cultural trends have tended to redefine the
usage pattern of many a product, ranging from consumerproducts to
spots- symbol products. In a country like India, cultural
normsexceedingly influenced by re1igious doc trines, have
considerable implications on the behavioural aspects of consumers.
Social Factors

The social characteristics of consumers may be identified as a factor,


which has an enduring impact on consumer behaviour. 'There are
three types of social character; tradition - directed, inner - directed,
and other - directed'

(Riesman, D, 1950). Nevertheless, the interaction between social


factors and consumer behaviour varies from social class to social
class. 'The basic distinction between the middle -class and the
working class is that the latter advanced as a result of group activity
whereas those above them moved forward by individual initiative'
(Shanks and Michael, 1972). In the social set up, consumers get
ample opportunities to interact with others, and to be influenced by
them. The group that exercises influence on consumers is termed
'reference group' in consumer behaviour science. 'Reference group is
any person or group of people that significantly influences an
individual's behaviour '(Enger, J.F, Blackwell, R.D and Minard, P.W,
1999). Over the years, the social set up of every country, including
India, has undergone many transformations. This has evoked changes
in behaviour among consumers regarding volume or frequency of
consumption, product pattern, information search and exposure.
Personal Factors

'There can be free interplay between the personal facts of consumers


such as age or lifecycle stage, occupation, economic situation,
lifestyle, personality and self-concept' (Kotler, Philip and Armstrong,
Garry, 1985) and their behaviour.

The personal factors may influence many aspects of consumers like


thinking, searching, and processing of information, decision- making
and judgement of products or services. For instance, an educated
consumer having a lucrative occupation will be more competent to
take a wise decision with regard to con-summing and using products
or services.

Life Cycle Stage

The behaviour of consumers is subject to radical changes during the


entire life span, because they require different types of products at
different stages of thelife cycle. To quote an example, the
requirements of the elderly are diametrically opposite to those of the
youngsters. 'Over the years, the elderly segment of consumers has
.been widened, as people are enjoying longer and healthier lives'
(Urban and Star, 1991). Similarly, age or life cycle- stage causes
drastic changes in the formation of attitude a perception. 'Now-a-days,
psychological life cycle - stages have also been identified' (Lepisto,
S.L, 1985) by the marketers as an input while designing products as
well as strategies for different market segments.
Occupation

The trenchant changes that have taken place in the market


environment on the global level are due to the changes in the
occupational scene of the consumers.

A sizeable number of consumers have given up agriculture as their


source of income, and have occupationally migrated to other avenues,
particularly 'white-collar jobs'. This has considerably improved the
economic status of consumers; thereby spectacular changes have been
witnessed in the consumption process and pattern. Exposure to
information, preference for brand, store and media habit are some of
the important facets of changes that have been brought about by the
occupational mobility of consumers. Change in media habit true to the
new horizons of occupation is apparent from the enhancement in the
number of readers of dailies and magazines. 'Readership is the
strongest among college graduates and among those in executive-
managerial professions' (Rebacca, P, 1995).

Economic Situation

'During the 1960's, economists began to focus attention on the


economic

Decision-making within the household' (B ecker, G.S, 1965).


Evidently, they had become ready to acknowledge the degree of
influence exerted by the economic situation of consumers on their
behaviour. In the macro sense, it is apt to state that the economic
situation affects the nature of products bought by the consumers. In
the micro sense, it is more apt to spell out that brand choice,
particularly of the 'premium brands', is the net result of the
improvement in the economic conditions of the consumers. Hence,
there are economic reasons for setting 'product standards' for
consumer goods.
Life Style

The major elements of life style are identified by "Plummer", as


'activities, interests, opinions and demographics' (Plummer, J.T,
1974). 'Life style embodies the pattern that develop from the
dynamics of living in society'

(Lazer and William, 1963). As it sketches one's attitude or outlook


and capability for adjustment and being adjusted, it affects
consumption too. The pains taken for information search, interaction
with others, especially with opinion leaders, extent of search for
(product) alternatives, perception about brand, mode of consumption,
and usage pattern often reflect the life-style maintained by the
consumers. Acknowledging the role of life style on the be-havioural
aspects of consumers, marketers have begun using life sty1e as a
criterion or input for market segmentation of many consumer
products.

Personality

According to Tholess, personality is 'covering all the ways in which


one individual can differ from another' (Thouless, R.H, 1967).
'Personality is usually described in terms of traits such as self-
confidence, dominance,sociability, autonomy, defensiveness,
adaptability and aggressiveness' (Kassarjian, S .Nand Scheffet M.J,
1984). Consumers especially those who belong to the upper stratum in
the society, are exceedingly interested in creating a 'perceived image'
in the environment in which they live. And it is always adherent to
their personality. Accordingly, they may select and use only those
products and services, which are compatible with their image and
personality. The trend of consumers to analyses the 'brand personality'
or 'brand image' may be spelt out as an example of the relationship
between personality factors and the behavioural aspects of consumers.

Self - Concept

'Self-concept' has been defined as 'the sum total of all that a man
can callhis body, traits, and abilities; his material possessions; his
family, friendsand enemies; his vocations and avocations and much
else' (Hall, Calvin, S and Lindzey, 1957). The contributions of an
individual to the society and his social identity are the indicators ofhis/
her self -concept. A rational individual always tries to safeguard his or
her self- concept while he/she is engaged in any kind of activity,
including consumption. This makes it explicit that the behavioural
aspect of consumers is largely affected by their self-concept. A prudent
marketer has to understand the self-concept of his prospective buyers
andthereby their position in the society, before developing products and
designingmarketing strategies.
Psychological Factors

The four identifiable psychological factors that modulate the behaviour


of consumers are 'motivation', 'perception', learning' and 'attitude'.

Motivation

Human needs and motives are 'Siamese twins'. Hence, striking a


precise difference between the two concepts seems to be a hair-
splitting task. 'As Bayton has observed, some psychologists claim that
words such as motives,needs, urges, wishes and drives should not be
used as synonyms; others are content to use them' (Bayton, J.A,
1958). In the absence of acomprehensive conceptual framework,
motivation can be regarded as a desire that springs from the
"unsatisfied needs" of human beings, which leads to a goal-setting.
Motivation activates the behaviour of an individual in adirection
towards a typical activity. 'A motivated organism willengagein an
activity more vigorously and more effectively than an unmotivated
one'

(Hugard, E.R, Atkinson, R.C and Atkinson, R.L, 1978). A forceful


motivationmay instigate individuals to avoid certain things and to
accept certain other things. Regarding consumption of consumer goods,
motivation of individuals increasingly influences decisions on product,
brand, store, information search and size of expenditure. With this
temperament, certain people are seen to be 'risk-averse' and hence
marketers must so carefully design products and services as to tap the
demand potential of such consumers.
Perception

Markin hasdefinedperceptionas'oneofthe elements of cognition- the


processinvolved in knowing' (Markin, R.J, 1969). It is a process by
which an individual gathers, selects, organizes and interprets
information or stimuli into a meaningful and coherent picture of the
world. As perception is more instrumental to developing 'viewpoints'
than in gathering and processing information, it is characterized by a
high degree of diversity. Hence,different consumers who are exposed to
the same market environment may behave differently. In practical
marketing, studying consumer behaviour from the angle of the
perceptual background of consumers generates valuable inputs for
strategic decisions. It is worth mentioning that understanding and
analyzing the perception of consumers has become the decisive factor in
organizing promotion campaigns, since the present promotion imparts
heavy information load to the consumers. It is not likely that consumers
always perceive it positively. In order to overcome this handicap,
information and products as well should be brought to the target
consumers in such a way as to synchronize with their perception. 'In
short, while perception has sensory data at its core, it in turn has a
central role in the cognitive and thinking process' (Bliss, P, 1970).
Learning

From the marketing perspective, 'consumer learning' can be thought of


as 'the process by which an individual acquires, the purchase and
consumptionknowledge and experience that he/she is applying to
future relatedbehaviour '(Schiffman, G . L & ~Kanuk, L.L2002).

It is worthwhile to note the opinion of Winston Churchill 'I am always


ready toI do not always like being taught'. Consumer learning is
anongoing process and every consumer happens to learn something in
his everyday life. Learned consumers possess distinctiveness in many
aspects and are found to be efficient at the market place, because, he/she
has been gathering knowledge about product, brand, media message,
price and economic aspects.

This gives the message that the marketers should equip themselves to
deal with those consumers who are active in learning

Attitude

Attitude influences everyone's life and it affects the way in which


everyone adjusts with, and reacts to, other people, objects or events.
Allport gives the definition of attitude as 'a mental and neural state of
readiness organized through experiences exercising a distinctive or
dynamic influence upon the individuals' (Allport, G, 1935). An
analysis of consumer behaviour from the perspective of consumers'
attitude helps marketers to understand what consumers will do in a
specified condition at a point of time. Attitudinal influence on usage
pattern, frequency of consumption, preference for hyper market,
multiple shopping and predicts/brand insistence has become
conspicuous over the years. In advertising research, for instance, 'the
changing of consumers' attitude towards specific products and services
is considered to be a very useful method of assessing the effect
ofadvertising' (Adler, Allan,G and Donald, L.B, 1965).

Viewing from this perspective, textile industry has to focus on four


thrust areas of the behavioural aspects of the consumers; such as what
the consumers like to buy (product), from where they like to buy
(source of buying) how they keep themselves informed about products
(media exposure) and how they adapt with their environment in the
decision- making process (socio - economic factors).

The Indian textile industry has been producing cotton cloth of quality
made from long staple cotton fibre, since the inception of the
handloom sector. Inorder to cater with the requirements of the
changing environment, the mill sector has started producing a number
of blended and synthetic fabrics. A variety of 'new generation textiles'
which are eco-friendly have been inducted in the market. And the
research endeavours with institutional support spell out that the Indian
mill sector is potential enough to develop improved varieties of fabric
and clothing. However, the marketability of the textile product
depends on how it is perceived by the consumers. This calls for the
analysis of perception of consumers about specifications of their target
product.

The consumers in the textile market have been exposed to different


modes of selling outlets in different market segments. Textile retailers
are competing with one another in occupying a legitimate space in the
perceptual map of the prospective consumers. Often such competition
seems to be a sheer waste.
The consumers may take into account several parameters to perceive a
source of buying as ideal. When a source of buying-is mismatching
with the perception of consumers, it is characterized with a weak sales
potential. This has a special relevance in the case of those textile
manufacturing units, which are active in marketing also.
Information exposure is the salient feature of the modern marketing
environment. This enables the consumers to acquire deep magnitude of
knowledge, which in turn makes them "smart consumers" at the market place. It
is desirable to have a foolproof picture of the information search process of
consumers, to understand their attitudinal aspects. The important outcome of
such an approach is that both the textile manufactures and marketerscan
communicate the meaningful facts and figures to their target consumers very
cffectively. Besides, the modem strategy of two-way communication through
the mass media provides feedback to the producers and marketers; which can
be used a s precious inputs for product planning as well as marketing.

Thc consumers are subject to the influence of their environment. Social,


economic and occupational facets of environment are seen to be highly
dynamic. Its impact ranges from the change in the propensity to consume to the
outlook and approach towards buying and using textiles. The evaluation of the
influence of changes on the behavioural aspects of consumers would equip the
manufac-tures and marketers of textiles to design strategies corresponding to
the pre-vailing socio- economic environment of the target consumers.

In a nutshell, the textile industry must be viewed from the angle of consumers
so as to crop up production and sales. It is worth mentioning here a quote
attributable to Mahatma Gandhi, in which he stresses 'a consumer is the sole
reason for a business or an industry to exist'(The Hindu, July 2003). Since
Mahatma was born in the trading community of Gujarat, he might have sensed
what ought to be the right philosophical mooring for a business or an industry.

Thus, a comprehensive analysis of the behavioural aspects of the consumers


isthe fulcrum, which enables the Indian textile industry to march ahead. In
tunewith this requirement, several vital factors with regard to textile
consumption such as 'product specification', 'preference for source of buying',
influence of advertisement and sales promotion and socio - economic factors of
buyers have been analysed in the following chapters.
INTRODUCTION:

Marketing is the moving and exciting activity in everybody activities.


The sellers, distributors, advertising agencies, consultants, transporters,
financers, store agencies and every one as a counter are part of the marketing
system. Any exchange process be it consumer, goods, intermediary goods,
services of ideas, comes under the preview of marketing. It is very often
regarded that the development of markets and marketing is synonymous with
the economic development of account. Through marketing is an action
discipline. In the ever-growing corporate world, marketing is being regarded as
a crucial element for the success of an Enterprise

The marketing discipline is undergoing fresh re appraisal in the light of the vast
global, technological, economic and social challenges facing todays companies
and countries. Marketing at its best is about value creation and raising the
worlds living standards. Today, spinning companies are those who succeed
most in satisfying, indeed delighting their target customers. As quoted by
P.P.Drucker Marketing is so basic that it cannot be considered a separate
function. It is whole business seen from the point of view of its final result, that
is, from the customers point of view. Business success is not determined by the
producer but by the customer".

Philip Kotler has therefore defined marketing as it is a social and managerial


process by which individuals and groups obtain what they need and want
through creating, offering and exchanging products of values with others.
Many Indian companies espouse a satisfied customer philosophy and describe
marketing as customer-satisfaction engineering. Since the economy in this
country has changed from a primary condition of scarcity to gradual and steady
stage of affluence, largely giving consumers the opportunity to choose among
manyvaried alternatives, satisfaction has become a major concern of business.
Subculture:

social classes are relatively homogeneous and enduring divisions in a society


which are hierarchically ordered and whose members shares similar Values,
interest and behaviour and social classes includes upper class, middleclass and
lower class.

SOCIAL FACTORS:

A persons reference groups consist of all the groups thathave a direct (face to
face) are indirect influence on the persons altitude or behavior. This group to
which the person, belongs and interacts.

Personal Factors:

A consumer decision also influenced by personalcharacteristics notably the


buyers age & life cycle stage, occupation, economiccircumstances, life style and
personality and self concept.

PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS:

Motivation:

A person has many needs at any given time. Some needs are biogenic. They
arise from psychological states of tension such as hunger, trystand discomfort.

Perception:

Perception is defined ass the process by which an individualselects, organizes,


intercepts, information, inputs to create a meaningful pictureof the world.
NEED FOR THE STUDY:

Consumer behaviour plays a major role for the growth of the company in the
modern market scenario. The basic idea of this study is to find the consumer
behaviour towards Textiles. The needs have to be recognized and necessary
steps have to be taken to make the changes. India is growing rapidly and
changes are dynamic. People are changing, the preference and the demand is
changing. The market also has to change accordingly. The purpose of consumer
behaviour is not only for retaining the customers but also attracting new
customers and increasing the sales also creating and maintenance of brand
awareness. In this competitive market the level of consumer satisfaction decides
the success of any product and any company. The night consumers have to be
targeted and the right strategy should be implemented at the right time. This will
give the desired results.
OBJECTIVES OF THE STUDY:

The main objective is to determine the current consumer behaviour levels of the
customers with regards to Textiles.

To study and analyze consumer shopping behaviour towards Textiles.


To assess the behaviour level of different type of customers shopping at
Textiles.
To identify what type of strategies are suitable for the company to
reachthe targeted customers.
To find out the factors which influence the consumption of the products
inTextiles.
To identify effective a advertising sources which are influencing
customer purchasingbehaviour at Textiles.
To find out how the consumers spent their incomes, time on the
purchasing of the products.
SCOPE OF THE STUDY

Textiles as six branches in Karur. My scope is limitation to one Branch


(KACHIGUDA). The scope of the study is to identify the consumer behavior
towards Textiles. It is aimed at enlightening the company about different steps
to be taken up to increase the share of Textiles with regard other competitors
and also to make the company to provide better customer services. The scope of
the study is only confined to the area covered under Karur and only confined in
studying about the consumer behaviortowads Textiles.
LIMITATIONS:

Time has been a major constraint throughout the study as it has been only
for duration of 2 months.
As this survey was restricted to Karur this cannot be stated as an in depth
research on this subject.
Enough care is taken in formulating the questionnaire, still some errors
may creep in. The consumer behaviour varies according to different
products.
Quality verses price was not taken into the consideration.
The project is based on the interview methodology by a stored
questionnaire and the personal skills of the person undertaking the project
affect the results.
CHAPTER-II

REVIEW OF LITARATURE/CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR:

What is consumer behavior?

Activities people involved in when selecting, purchasing, and using products so


as to satisfy needs and desires. Consumer behavior involves the psychological
process that consumers go through in recognizing needs, findingways to solve
these needs, making purchase decision (e.g., whether or not to purchase a
product and, if so, which brand and where), interpret information,make plans,
and implement these plans (e.g., by engaging in comparison-shopping or
actually purchasing a products).

SOURCES OF INFLUENNCE OF THE CONSUMER:

The consumer faces numerous of influence. Often, we take cultural influences


for granted, but they are significant. An American will usually not bargain with
a storeowner. This, however, is common practice in much of the world. Physical
factors also influence our behaviour. We are more likely to buy a soft drink
when we are thirsty. For example, and food manufacturers have found that it is
more effective to advertise their products on radio in the late afternoon when
people are getting hungry. A persons self image will also tend to influence.
what he/she will buy. An upwardly mobile manager may buy a flashy car to
project an image of success. Social factors also influence what the consumers
buy-often, consumers seek to imitate others whom they Admire, and may buy
the same brands, the social environment can include both the mainstream
culture (e.g., Americans are more likely to have corn flakes/ham and eggs for
brake past than to have rice, which is preferred in many Asian countries) and a
sub culture (e.g., rap music often Appeals to a segment with in the population
that seeks to distinguish itself from the main stream population).Thus sneaker
manufacturers are eager to have there products worn by admired athletes.
Finally, consumer behaviour is influences by learning you try hamburger and
learn that it satisfies your hunger and tastes good, and the next time you are
hungry, you may consider another hamburger.

Personality and self concept

A persons distinguishing psychological characteristics that lead to relatively


consisting and lasting responses to his or her own environment.

PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS

A persons buying choices are further influenced by four major psychological


factors: motivation, perception, learning, and attitudes.

Motivation

A need that is sufficiently pressing to direct the person to seek satisfaction of


the need.

Perception

The process by which people select, organize, and interpret information to form
a meaningful picture of the world.

Learning

Changes in an individuals behaviour arise from experience.

Beliefs and attitudes

A descriptive thought that a person holds about something is his/her belief. A


persons consistently favourable or in favourable evaluations, feeling, and
tendencies toward and object or idea is attitude. The common tools used to
conduct data analysis range from simple cross tabulations and segmentation
analysis to more sophisticated statistical methods
such as multivariate and logistic regression discriminates analysis and cluster
analysis. In the last few years, optimization tools and machine learning
algorithms such as neural networks and genetic algorithms have also been used
to perform advanced data analysis. The study of consumers helps firms and
organizations improve their marketing strategies by understanding issues such
as The psychology of how consumers think, feel, rason, and select between
different alternatives (e.g., brands, products);

The psychology of how the consumer is influenced by his or her environment


(e.g., culture, family, signs, media);

The behaviour of consumers while shopping or making other marketing


decisions; Limitations in consumer knowledge or information processing
abilities influence decisions and marketing outcome; How consumer motivation
and decision strategies differ between products that differ in their level of
importance or interest that they entail for the consumer; and How marketers can
adapt and improve their marketing campaigns and marketing strategies to more
effectively reach the consumer. Understanding these issues helps us adapt our
strategies by taking the consumer into consideration. For example, by
understanding that a number of different messages compete for our potential
customers attention, we learn that to be effective, advertisements must usually
be repeated extensively. We also learn that consumers will sometimes be
persuaded more by logical arguments, but at other times will be persuaded more
by emotional or symbolic appeals. By understanding the consumer, we will be
able to make a more informed decision as to which strategy to employ.

Behavior occurs either for the individual, or in the context of a


group(e.g.,friends influence what kinds of cloothes a person wears) or an
organization (people on the job make decisions as to which products the firm
should use).

Consumer behavior involves the use and disposal of products as well as the
study of how they are purchased. Product use is often of great interest to the
marketer, because this may influence how a product is best positioned or how
we can encourage increased consumption. Since many environmental problems
result from product disposal (e.g., motor oil being sent into sewage systems to
save the recycling fee, or garbage piling up at landfills) this is also an area of
interest.

Consumer behavior involves services and ideas as well as tangible products.

The impact of consumer behavior on society is also of relevance.


RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

The survey technique is intended to secure one or more items of information


from a sample of respondents who are representatives of a larger group. The
information is recorded on a form known as questionnaire. As dataare gathered
by asking questions from persons who are believed to have desired information,
the method is known as questionnaire technique.

REASONS FOR WIDE USE OF THIS METHOD:

It can secure both quantitative and qualitative information directly from


the respondents.
It is the only method of directly measuring attitudes and motivations.
It is quite flexible in terms of the types of data to be assembled, the
method of collection or the timing of research.

Meaning of Research

According to D. Slessinger and M. Stephenson in the Encyclopaedia of social


sciences define research as the manipulation of things, concepts or symbols for
the purpose of generalizing to extend, correct or verify knowledge,whether that
knowledge aids in construction of theory or in the practice of anart.
TYPES OF RESEARCH

1. Exploratory Research,

2. Descriptive Research

Descriptive Research:

Diagnostic Research studies determine the frequency with somethingoccurs or


its association with something else.In this project, information pertaining to
customer needs satisfaction andtheir demographic profile was collected; hence
it is a descriptive research.

Exploratory Research:

Exploratory research studies are also termed as formulate research studies.The


main purpose of such studies in that of formulating a problem for more precise
investigation or of developing the working hypothesis forms anoperational point
of view.

1) Primary data:

Meaning: Primary sources of data are the data which needs the personal efforts
of collect it and which are not readily available. Primary source of data are the
other type of source through which the data was collected.

Following are few ways in the data was collected:

1. Questionnaires:

It is the set of questions on a sheet of paper was being given to the of fill it,
bases on which the data was interpreted.
2. Direct interviewing:

Direct interviewing involved the process where I asked the questions


directly to the customers and I got the feedback.

2) Secondary data:

Secondary sources are the other important sources through which the data was
collected. These are the readily available sources of the data where one had
need not put much effort to collected, because it is already been collected and
part in an elderly manner by some researcher, experts and special.

The secondary sources helpful for the study were

1) Text books like marketing management research methodology Advertisement


and sales promotion etc.

2) Internet was made use for the collection of the data.

3) News papers were also referred.

4)Business magazines were referred.

3)Sample size:

By using judgment random sampling technique 100 respondents areselected for


the purpose of the study.

4)Period of study:

The study is undertaken in the duration of 34 days.

5)Research approach:

The survey method was adopted for collected the primary data. Survey research
is systematic gathering of data from respondent through questionnaire.
6)Research instrument:

The data for this research study was collected by survey technique using
interview method guided by questionnaire.

7)Collection of Data:

Questionnaire and personal interviews are the methods that I have used for
collecting the data.
CHAPTER-III

INDUSTRY PROFILE

INTRODUCTION TO THE TEXRLES

Sivasakthi Textiles the Cotton Development Organization monitors the


production, processing, and marketing of cotton in Uganda. The organization
promotes the distribution of high quality cotton seed and generally facilitates
the development of the cotton industry.

Established in 1994 by an Act of Parliament, it has the responsibility to


monitor the production, processing, and marketing of cotton so as to enhance
the quality of lint exported and locally sold, to promote the distribution of
high quality cotton seed and generally to facilitate the development of the
cotton industry.

Cotton is Ugandas third largest export crop after coffee and tea. It is the
main source of income for some 250,000 households, who cultivate cotton
under rain-fed conditions and with minimal use of inputs, such as fertilisers
and chemicals. Since the climate and the soil are very suitable for cotton
cultivation, it is a very popular commodity among smallholders with an
average farm size of 0.5 hectares.

Cotton has been growing from many decades ago. Its more important crop
and it has its own important. Cotton seed is removing from raw cotton after
ginning process. Cotton seed has its own kingdom in globe for usefulness for
various purposes. Cotton seed is occupied around 65% in raw cotton so it is
widely available in much cotton growing country.
It manufactures Cotton yarn, Polyester and Blended yarn with well and
updated machines. Most of the yarn goes for export and includes USA,
Europe and Asia countries.

Two manufacturing units have latest machinery in every section. It has been
maintaining a Quality control lab to check the quality of sliver and yarn
produced at different levels.

The Company enjoys a high promoters holding of 64.22% and is listed on


the Bombay and National Stock Exchanges with a market capitalisation of
INR 87.13 Cr as on March 31 2013.

Industrial revolution

Main article: Textile manufacture during the Industrial Revolution

The woven fabric portion of the textile industry grew out of the industrial
revolution in the 18th Century as mass production of yarn and cloth became a
mainstream industry.

In 1734 in Bury, Lancashire, John Kay invented the flying shuttle one of
the first of a series of inventions associated with the cotton woven
fabric industry. The flying shuttle increased the width of cotton cloth and speed
of production of a single weaver at a loom.

Resistance by workers to the perceived threat to jobs delayed the


widespread introduction of this technology, even though the higher rate of
production generated an increased demand for spun cotton.
TEXTILES INDUSTRY HISTORY

The study of the history of clothing and textiles traces the availability
and use of textiles and other materials and the development of technology for
the making of clothing over human history. The wearing of clothing is
exclusively a human characteristic and is a feature of most human societies

Clothing and textiles have been important in human history and reflects
the materials available to a civilization as well as the technologies that had been
mastered. The social significance of the finished product reflects Textiles can
be felt or spun fibers made into yarn and subsequently netted,
looped, knit or woven to make fabrics, which appeared in the Middle East
during the late stone age. From the ancient times to the present day, methods of
textile production have continually evolved, and the choices of textiles available
have influenced how people carried their possessions, clothed themselves, and
decorated their surroundings.

Sources available for the study of clothing and textiles include material
remains discovered via archaeology; representation of textiles and their
manufacture in art; and documents concerning the manufacture, acquisition,
use, and trade of fabrics, tools, and finished garments. Scholarship of textile
history, especially its earlier stages, is part of material culture studies.

Prehistoric development

The development of textile and clothing manufacture in prehistory has been


the subject of a number of scholarly studies since the late 20th century. These
sources have helped to provide a coherent history of these prehistoric
developments. Evidence suggests that humans may have begun wearing
clothing as far back as 100,000 to 500,000 years ago.

Early adoption of fibrous apparel

Genetic analysis suggests that the human body louse, which lives in clothing,
may only have diverged from the head louse some 107 millennia ago, which
supports evidence that humans began wearing clothing at around this
time. These estimates predate the first known human exodus from Africa,
although other hominid species who may have worn clothes - and shared these
louse infestations - appear to have migrated earlier.

Initial manufacture of clothes

Possible sewing needles have been dated to around 40,000 years ago. The
earliest definite examples of needles originate from the Solutrean culture, which
existed in France from 19,000 BC to 15,000 BC. The earliest dyed flax fibers
have been found in a prehistoric cave in the Republic of Georgia and date back
to 36,000 BP.

Ancient textiles and clothing

The first actual textile, as opposed to skins sewn together, was probably felt.
Surviving examples of Nlebinding, another early textile method, date from
6500 BC. Our knowledge of ancient textiles and clothing has expanded in the
recent past thanks to modern technological
developments.https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_clothing_and_textiles -
cite_note-12 Our knowledge of cultures varies greatly with the climatic
conditions to which archeological deposits are exposed; the Middle East and the
arid fringes of China have provided many very early samples in good condition,
but the early development of textiles in the Indian subcontinent, sub-Saharan
Africa and other moist parts of the world remains unclear.

Renaissance and early modern period

Bold floral patterned silks, 15th century.

Main article: 14001500 in fashion

Wool remained the most popular fabric for all classes, followed by linen and
hemp. Wool fabrics were available in a wide range of qualities, from rough
undyed cloth to fine, dense broadcloth with a velvety nap; high-value
broadcloth was a backbone of the English economy and was exported
throughout Europe. Wool fabrics were dyed in rich colours, notably reds,
greens, golds, and blues.

Industrial revolution

During the industrial revolution, fabric production was mechanised with


machines powered by waterwheels and steam-engines. Production shifted from
small cottage based production to mass production based on assembly line
organization. Clothing production, on the other hand, continued to be made by
hand.

Sewing machines emerged in the 19th century streamlining clothing production.


In the early 20th century, workers in the clothing and textile industries
became unionised. Later in the 20th century, the industry had expanded to such
a degree that such educational institutions as UC Davis established a Division of
Textiles and Clothing. The University of Nebraska-Lincoln also created a
Department of Textiles, Clothing and Design that offers a Masters of Arts in
Textile History, and Iowa State University established a Department of Textiles
and Clothing that features a History of costume collection, 18651948. Even
high school libraries have collections on the history of clothing and textiles.

Textiles were not only made in factories. Before this, they were made in local
and national markets. Dramatic change in transportation throughout the nation
is one source that encouraged the use of factories. New advances such as
steamboats, canals, and railroads lowered shipping costs which caused people to
buy cheap goods that were produced in other places instead of more expensive
goods that were produced locally. Between 1810 and 1840, the development of
a national market prompted manufacturing which tripled the outputs worth.
This increase in production created a change in industrial methods, such as the
use of factories instead of hand made woven materials that families usually
made.

The vast majority of the people who worked in the factories were women.
Women went to work in textile factories for a number of reasons. Some women
left home to live on their own because of crowding at home; or to save for
future marriage portions.

The work enabled them to see more of the world, to earn something in
anticipation of marriage, and to ease the crowding within the home. They also
did it to make money for family back home. The money they sent home was to
help out with the trouble some of the farmers were having. They also worked in
the millhouses because they could gain a sense of independence and growth as a
personal goal.

19th century developments

With the Cartwright Loom, the Spinning Mule and the Boulton & Watt steam
engine, the pieces were in place to build a mechanised woven fabric textile
industry. From this point there were no new inventions, but a continuous
improvement in technology as the mill-owner strove to reduce cost and improve
quality. Developments in the transport infrastructure; that is the canals and after
1831 the railways facilitated the import of raw materials and export of finished
cloth.

Secondly, in 1830, using an 1822 patent, Richard Roberts manufactured the


first loom with a cast iron frame, the Roberts Loom.[8] In 1842 James Bullough
and William Kenworthy, made the Lancashire Loom. It is a
semiautomatic power loom. Although it is self-acting, it has to be stopped to
recharge empty shuttles. It was the mainstay of the Lancashire cotton industry
for a century, when the [ Originally, power looms were shuttle-operated but in
the early part of the 20th century the faster and more efficient shuttleless loom
came into use. Today, advances in technology have produced a variety of looms
designed to maximize production for specific types of material. The most
common of these are air-jet looms and water-jet looms. Industrial looms can
weave at speeds of six rows per second and faster.

Thirdly, also in 1830, Richard Roberts patented the first self-acting mule.
Stalybridge mule spinners strike was in 1824, this stimulated research into the
problem of applying power to the winding stroke of the mule. The draw while
spinning had been assisted by power, but the push of the wind had been done
manually by the spinner, the mule could be operated by semiskilled labor.
Before 1830, the spinner would operate a partially powered mule with a
maximum of 400 spindles after, self-acting mules with up to 1300 spindles
could be built.
Textile production in England peaked in 1926, and as mills were
decommissioned, many of the scrapped mules and looms were bought up and
reinstated in India.

20th century

Major changes came to the textile industry during the 20th century, with
continuing technological innovations in machinery, synthetic fibre, logistics,
and globalization of the business. The business model that had dominated the
industry for centuries was to change radically. Cotton and wool.

1. Clothing factory in Montreal, Quebec in 1941

2. Nylon stocking inspection in Malm, Sweden 1954.

3. Modern ring spinning frame.


The late 1980s, the apparel segment was no longer the largest market for
fibre products, with industrial and home furnishings together representing a
larger proportion of the fibre market. Industry integration and global
manufacturing led to many small firms closing for good during the 1970s and
1980s in the United States; during those decades, 95 percent of the looms in
North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia shut down, and Alabama and
Virginia also saw many factories close.

Producers were not the only source for fibres, as chemical companies
created new synthetic fibres that had superior qualities for many uses, such as
rayon, invented in 1910, and DuPont's nylon, invented in 1935 as in inexpensive
silk substitute, and used for products ranging from women's stockings to tooth
brushes and military parachutes.

Industry integration and global manufacturing led to many small firms


closing for good during the 1970s and 1980s in the United States; during those
decades, 95 percent of the looms in North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia
shut down, and Alabama and Virginia also saw many factories close.
21st century

In 2002, textiles and apparel manufacturing accounted for $400 billion in


global exports, representing 6% of world trade and 8% of world trade in
manufactured goods. In the early years of the 21st century, the largest importing
and exporting countries were developed countries, including the European
Union, the United States, Canada and Japan. The countries with the largest
share of their exports being textiles and apparel were as follows (2002):
SIVASAKTHI TEXTILES OVERVIEW

Textile classes can complement many areas of study, including fashion


design, merchandising and apparel technology. Read on to discover some
typical coursework for students who want to learn more about textiles.

Apparel Production

This course focuses on current trends in apparel construction. Students learn


how companies size clothing and set standards for fabric quality. Additional
clothing accessories, such as lace, buttons, zippers and pockets are discussed,
with emphasis placed on current trends. Students learn how these additional
items and quality influence price.

Nonwoven Fabrics

In this course, students learn the advantages and disadvantages of producing


fabrics from natural fibers. Students and professors discuss why some textiles
are produced in this fashion and how they can be used. They also discuss the
economic rationale behind the use of nonwoven fabrics. In the lab portion of the
course, students have the opportunity to work with the same tools used in the
production of nonwoven textiles.

Survey of Fashion Textiles

Students in this course examine the fabrics and materials used in clothing. They
study trends in the industry, as well as the popular colors and fabrics used in the
past. Students also explore fabric patterns, including animal prints, dyes and
polka dots. Current use of popular fabrics is also covered.

The Fashion Consumer

This textile course examines what consumers look for when buying clothing
and fabrics. By observing popular trends in advertising, on television and in
stores, students learn what's selling and why. They also learn how the media
influences fashion. Through an examination of fashion theories and research,
students stay on top of developing trends and learn how to predict future trends.

Color Science

In this hands-on textile course, students dye fabrics and find out which ones
hold color, which ones don't, and how to achieve desired colors. They also
prepare fabrics for production and experiment with patterns, colors and prints
on multiple fabrics.
COMPANY PROFILE

Contact Information

Company Name: SIVASAKTHI TEXTILE PROCESSORS

Address : # N.NO:8/7-B, Gandhipuram road, Sengunthapuram(po),

Karur- 639 002.

Tamil Nadu

India

Contact Person: Mr. SIVAGNANA MOORTHY (PROPRIETOR)

1. 2002 year : Textiles

2. Founder : S. Siva Kumar

3. CEO : S. Shakthi Subramanian

Company Profile

Products are out-and-out 100% cotton, zero finished fabric with Procaine &
Azo free pigment printing which will take care of your delicate skin. For the
first time we are introducing eco-friendly packing for our high quality products.

We are manufacturer & traders of 100% cotton handkerchiefs. We have some


interesting brands in a variety of colors and designs to cater needs of our
customers. Our products are highly appreciated amongst our customers for the
eco-friendly raw materials and printing that imparts a refreshing feel for our
customers.
FUNCTIONAL DEPARTMENT

Production department

HR department

Finance department

Marketing department

Sales department

Purchasing department
ORGANIZATIONAL CHART

Org charts and more

Whether you work for a large organization or own a small business, Lucid
chart has the tools you need to think and communicate visually. Make
flowcharts, wireframes, BPMN diagrams, and more.
CHAPTER-IV

DATA ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION

Table 1

Age

Frequenc Percent Valid Cumulative


y Percent Percent
Below 30 26 21.5 26.0 26.0
years
31-40 years 24 19.8 24.0 50.0
Valid 41-50 years 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Above 50 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
years
Total 100 82.6 100.0
21 17.4
Missing System

Total 121 100.0


CHART

INTERPRETATION:

From the table-126% of the Employee age are Below 30 years, 24% of the
Employee age are 31-40 years, 25% of the Employee age are 41-50 years, and
25% of the Employee age are Above 50.
Table 2:

Distribution of respondents by gender

Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative


Percent
Male 51 42.1 51.0 51.0
49 40.5 49.0 100.0
Valid Female

Total 100 82.6 100.0

Missing System 21 17.4

Total 121 100.0


INTERPRETATION:

From the table-251% of the Distribution of respondents by genderare male, 49%


of the Distribution of respondents by genderFemale.
Table 3:

How long you have been working here

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Less than 5 34 28.1 34.0 34.0
years
5years 10 33 27.3 33.0 67.0
Valid years
More than 10 33 27.3 33.0 100.0
years
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-334% of the How long you have been working hereare Less than
5 years, 33% of the How long you have been working hereare 5years 10
years, 33% of the How long you have been working hereare More than 10
years.
Table 4:

How did you come to know about Sivasakthi textiles

Frequency Percent Valid Cumulative


Percent Percent
Advertisement 26 21.5 26.0 26.0
25 20.7 25.0 51.0
Colleagues references

Valid Friends/relatives 25 20.7 25.0 76.0


references
Any other specify 24 19.8 24.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0

Missing System 21 17.4

Total 121 100.0


INTERPRETATION:

From the table-426% of the How did you come to know about Sivasakthi
textilesare Advertisement, 25% of the How did you come to know about
Sivasakthi textiles are Colleagues references, 25% of the How did you come to
know about Sivasakthi textilesare Friends/relatives references, and 24% of the
How did you come to know about Sivasakthi textiles are Any other specify.
Table 5:

How frequently do you visit Sivasakthi textiles

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Once in a week 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Twice in a week 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Once in every 15 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
days
Once in a month 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-525% of the How frequently do you visit Sivasakthi textilesare
Once in a week, 25% of the How frequently do you visit Sivasakthi textiles are
Twice in a week, 25% of the How frequently do you visit Sivasakthi textilesare
Once in every 15 days, and 25% of the How frequently do you visit Sivasakthi
textiles are Once in a month.
Table 6:

What is the main purpose of purchase

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Personal Usage / 34 28.1 34.0 34.0
consumption
Valid To Gift 33 27.3 33.0 67.0
Any other 33 27.3 33.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-634% of what is the main purpose of purchaseare Personal


Usage / consumption, 33% of what is the main purpose of purchase are To Gift,
33% of what is the main purpose of purchaseare any other.
Table 7:

You prefer to go in Sivasakthi textiles with

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Family 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
members
Spouse 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Valid
Friends 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Others 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-725% of the You prefer to go in Sivasakthi textiles withare


Family members, 25% of the You prefer to go in Sivasakthi textiles with are
Spouse, 25% of the You prefer to go in Sivasakthi textiles withare Friends, and
25% of the You prefer to go in Sivasakthi textiles with are Others.
Table 8:

Which mall you like the most in the city

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Textiles 26 21.5 26.0 26.0
Spencer 24 19.8 24.0 50.0
City 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid central
Hyd 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
central
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-826% of the Which mall you like the most in the cityare
Textiles, 24% of the Which mall you like the most in the cityare Spencer, 25%
of the Which mall you like the most in the cityare City central, and 25% of the
Which mall you like the most in the cityare Hyd central.
Table 9:

What is the reason behind purchasing in Sivasakthi textiles

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Good satisfaction 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
over products
Reasonable prices 26 21.5 26.0 51.0
Valid
More offers 25 20.7 25.0 76.0
Any others 24 19.8 24.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-925% of the What is the reason behind purchasing in Sivasakthi
textilesare Good satisfaction over products, 26% of the What is the reason
behind purchasing in Sivasakthi textilesare Reasonable prices, 25% of the What
is the reason behind purchasing in Sivasakthi textilesare More offers, and 24%
of the What is the reason behind purchasing in Sivasakthi textilesare Any
others.
Table 10:

How do you rate the pricing of products at Big Bazaar

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Expensive 26 21.5 26.0 26.0
Competiti 25 20.7 25.0 51.0
ve
Affordabl 25 20.7 25.0 76.0
Valid
e
Reasonabl 24 19.8 24.0 100.0
e
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-1026% of the How do you rate the pricing of products at Big
Bazaarare Expensive, 25% of the How do you rate the pricing of products at
Big Bazaarare Competitive, 25% of the How do you rate the pricing of products
at Big Bazaarare Affordable, and 24% of the How do you rate the pricing of
products at Big Bazaarare Reasonable.
Table 11:

Why do you prefer to shop in Sivasakthi textiles

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Availability of 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
adequate stock
Convenience of 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
location and timing
Valid
Offers and 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
discounts
Variety of products 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-1125% of the Why do you prefer to shop in Sivasakthi


textilesare Availability of adequate stock, 25% of the Why do you prefer to
shop in Sivasakthi textilesare Convenience of location and timing, 25% of the
Why do you prefer to shop in Sivasakthi textilesare Offers and discounts, and
25% of the Why do you prefer to shop in Sivasakthi textilesare Variety of
products.
Table 12:

What more facility would you like to get at Sivasakthi textiles

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Membership 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Card
Discount Card 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Free packing 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
Offers
Lucky draw 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Offer
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-1225% of the What more facility would you like to get at
Sivasakthi textilesare Membership Card, 25% of the What more facility would
you like to get at Sivasakthi textilesare Discount Card, 25% of the What more
facility would you like to get at Sivasakthi textilesare Free packing Offers, and
25% of the What more facility would you like to get at Sivasakthi textilesare
Lucky draw Offer.
Table 13:

Assistance from store staff in selecting your Purchase

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Almost 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Always
Frequently 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Valid
Sometimes 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Never 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-1325% of the Assistance from store staff in selecting your
Purchaseare Almost, 25% of the Assistance from store staff in selecting your
Purchaseare Always Frequently, 25% of the Assistance from store staff in
selecting your Purchaseare Sometimes, and 25% of the Assistance from store
staff in selecting your Purchaseare Never.
Table 14:

How is your overall experience in Sivasakthi textiles

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Excelle 34 28.1 34.0 34.0
nt
Valid Good 33 27.3 33.0 67.0
Poor 33 27.3 33.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-1434% of the How is your overall experience in Sivasakthi


textilesare Excellent, 33% of the How is your overall experience in Sivasakthi
textilesare Good, 33% of the How is your overall experience in Sivasakthi
textilesare Poor.
Table 15:

Would you visit Sivasakthi textiles again

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Sure 34 28.1 34.0 34.0
May 33 27.3 33.0 67.0
Valid be
Never 33 27.3 33.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin Syste 21 17.4
g m
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-1534% of the would you visit Sivasakthi textiles againare Sure,
33% of the would you visit Sivasakthi textiles againare May be, 33% of the
would you visit Sivasakthi textiles againare Never.
Table 16:

Do you suggest any one to shop at Sivasakthi textiles

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Yes 50 41.3 50.0 50.0
Valid No 50 41.3 50.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin Syste 21 17.4
g m
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-1650% of the Do you suggest any one to shop at Sivasakthi
textilesare Yes, 50% of the Do you suggest any one to shop at Sivasakthi
textilesare No.
Table 17:

Suggest to Big Bazaar management to making present

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
To maintain quality 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
products
Reasonable prices 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Valid Giving more offers 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
and discounts
Convenience 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-1725% of the Suggest to Big Bazaar management to making


presentare To maintain quality products, 25% of the Suggest to Big Bazaar
management to making presentare Reasonable prices, 25% of the Suggest to
Big Bazaar management to making presentare Giving more offers and
discounts, 25% of the Suggest to Big Bazaar management to making presentare
Convenience.
Table 18:

Mention your satisfaction level for following elements

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-1825% of the Mention your satisfaction level for following
elementsare Highly satisfied, 25% of the Mention your satisfaction level for
following elementsare Satisfied, 25% of the Mention your satisfaction level for
following elementsare Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Mention
your satisfaction level for following elementsare Dissatisfied.
Table 19:

Location

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-1925% of the Locationare Highly satisfied, 25% of the


Locationare Satisfied, 25% of the Locationare Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied,
25% of the Locationare Dissatisfied.
Table 20:

Operating time

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-2025% of the Operating time are highly satisfied, 25% of the
Operating time are satisfied, 25% of the Operating time are neither satisfied nor
dissatisfied, 25% of the Operating time are dissatisfied.
Table 21:

Parking facility

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-2125% of the Parking facility are highly satisfied, 25% of the
Parking facility are satisfied, 25% of the Parking facility are neither satisfied
nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Parking facility are dissatisfied.
Table 22:

Cleanness of store

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-2225% of the Cleanness of storeare highly satisfied, 25% of the
Cleanness of storeare satisfied, 25% of the Cleanness of storeare neither
satisfied nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Cleanness of storeare dissatisfied.
Table 23:

Spacious shop floor

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-2325% of the spacious shop floorare highly satisfied, 25% of the
spacious shop floorare satisfied, 25% of the spacious shop floorare neither
satisfied nor dissatisfied, 25% of the spacious shop floorare dissatisfied.
Table 24:

Easy to locate product

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-2425% of the Easy to locate productare highly satisfied, 25% of
the Easy to locate productare satisfied, 25% of the Easy to locate productare
neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Easy to locate productfloorare
dissatisfied.
Table 25:

Quality product

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-2525% of the Quality productare highly satisfied, 25% of the
Quality productare satisfied, 25% of the Quality productare neither satisfied nor
dissatisfied, 25% of the Quality productfloorare dissatisfied.
Table 26:

Promotion offers

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-2625% of the Promotion offersare highly satisfied, 25% of the
Promotion offersare satisfied, 25% of the Promotion offersare neither satisfied
nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Promotion offersfloorare dissatisfied.
Table 27:

Price of the product

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-2725% of the Price of the productare highly satisfied, 25% of the
Price of the productare satisfied, 25% of the Price of the productare neither
satisfied nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Price of the productare dissatisfied.
Table 28:

Staff helpfulness

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-2825% of the Staff helpfulnessare highly satisfied, 25% of the
Staff helpfulnessare satisfied, 25% of the Staff helpfulnessare neither satisfied
nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Staff helpfulnessare dissatisfied.
Table 29:

Flexibility in payment mode

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-2925% of the Flexibility in payment modeare highly satisfied,


25% of the Flexibility in payment modeare satisfied, 25% of the Flexibility in
payment modeare neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Flexibility in
payment modeare dissatisfied.
Table 30:

Return of value for money

Frequen Percent Valid Cumulative


cy Percent Percent
Highly satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 25.0
Satisfied 25 20.7 25.0 50.0
Neither satisfied nor 25 20.7 25.0 75.0
Valid
dissatisfied
Dissatisfied 25 20.7 25.0 100.0
Total 100 82.6 100.0
Missin 21 17.4
System
g
Total 121 100.0
INTERPRETATION:

From the table-3025% of the Return of value for moneyare highly satisfied,
25% of the Return of value for moneyare satisfied, 25% of the Return of value
for moneyare neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, and 25% of the Return of value
for moneyare dissatisfied.
CHAPTER-V

FINDINGS, SUGGESTIONS, CONCLUSION

FINDINGS

It can be 26% of the Employee age are Below 30 years, 24% of the Employee
age are 31-40 years, 25% of the Employee age are 41-50 years, and 25% of the
Employee age are Above 50.

It can be 51% of the Distribution of respondents by gender are male, 49% of the
Distribution of respondents by gender Female.

It can be 34% of the How long you have been working here are Less than 5
years, 33% of the How long you have been working here are 5years 10 years,
33% of the How long you have been working here are More than 10 years.
It can be 26% of the How did you come to know about Sivasakthi textiles are
Advertisement, 25% of the How did you come to know about Sivasakthi textiles
are Colleagues references, 25% of the How did you come to know about
Sivasakthi textiles are Friends/relatives references, and 24% of the How did you
come to know about Sivasakthi textiles are Any other specify.
It can be 25% of the How frequently do you visit Sivasakthi textiles are Once in
a week, 25% of the How frequently do you visit Sivasakthi textiles are Twice in
a week, 25% of the How frequently do you visit Sivasakthi textiles are Once in
every 15 days, and 25% of the How frequently do you visit Sivasakthi textiles
are Once in a month.

It is referred to be 34% of what is the main purpose of purchase are Personal


Usage / consumption, 33% of what is the main purpose of purchase are To Gift,
33% of what is the main purpose of purchase are any other.

It can be 25% of the You prefer to go in Sivasakthi textiles with are Family
members, 25% of the You prefer to go in Sivasakthi textiles with are Spouse,
25% of the You prefer to go in Sivasakthi textiles with are Friends, and 25% of
the You prefer to go in Sivasakthi textiles with are Others.

It can be 26% of the Which mall you like the most in the city are Textiles, 24%
of the Which mall you like the most in the city are Spencer, 25% of the Which
mall you like the most in the city are City central, and 25% of the Which mall
you like the most in the city are Hyd central.
Its Referred as 25% of the What is the reason behind purchasing in Sivasakthi
textiles are Good satisfaction over products, 26% of the What is the reason
behind purchasing in Sivasakthi textiles are Reasonable prices, 25% of the What
is the reason behind purchasing in Sivasakthi textiles are More offers, and 24%
of the What is the reason behind purchasing in Sivasakthi textiles are Any
others.
It can be 26% of the How do you rate the pricing of products at Big Bazaar are
Expensive, 25% of the How do you rate the pricing of products at Big Bazaar
are Competitive, 25% of the How do you rate the pricing of products at Big
Bazaar are Affordable, and 24% of the How do you rate the pricing of products
at Big Bazaar are Reasonable.
It can be 25% of the Why do you prefer to shop in Sivasakthi textiles are
Availability of adequate stock, 25% of the Why do you prefer to shop in
Sivasakthi textiles are Convenience of location and timing, 25% of the Why do
you prefer to shop in Sivasakthi textiles are Offers and discounts, and 25% of
the Why do you prefer to shop in Sivasakthi textiles are Variety of products.

Its Referred as 25% of the What more facility would you like to get at
Sivasakthi textiles are Membership Card, 25% of the What more facility would
you like to get at Sivasakthi textiles are Discount Card, 25% of the What more
facility would you like to get at Sivasakthi textiles are Free packing Offers, and
25% of the What more facility would you like to get at Sivasakthi textiles are
Lucky draw Offer.
It can be 25% of the Assistance from store staff in selecting your Purchase are
Almost, 25% of the Assistance from store staff in selecting your Purchase are
Always Frequently, 25% of the Assistance from store staff in selecting your
Purchase are Sometimes, and 25% of the Assistance from store staff in selecting
your Purchase are Never.
It 34% of the How is your overall experience in Sivasakthi textiles are
Excellent, 33% of the How is your overall experience in Sivasakthi textiles are
Good, 33% of the How is your overall experience in Sivasakthi textiles are
Poor.
It can be 34% of the would you visit Sivasakthi textiles again are Sure, 33% of
the would you visit Sivasakthi textiles again are May be, 33% of the would you
visit Sivasakthi textiles again are Never.

It can be 50% of the Do you suggest any one to shop at Sivasakthi textiles are
Yes, 50% of the Do you suggest any one to shop at Sivasakthi textiles are No.
It can be 25% of the Suggest to Big Bazaar management to making present are
To maintain quality products, 25% of the Suggest to Big Bazaar management to
making present are Reasonable prices, 25% of the Suggest to Big Bazaar
management to making present are Giving more offers and discounts, 25% of
the Suggest to Big Bazaar management to making present are Convenience.
It can be 25% of the Mention your satisfaction level for following elements are
Highly satisfied, 25% of the Mention your satisfaction level for following
elements are Satisfied, 25% of the Mention your satisfaction level for following
elements are Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Mention your
satisfaction level for following elements are Dissatisfied.

It 25% of the Location are Highly satisfied, 25% of the Location are Satisfied,
25% of the Location are Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Location
are Dissatisfied.
It is referred to be 25% of the Operating time are highly satisfied, 25% of the
Operating time are satisfied, 25% of the Operating time are neither satisfied nor
dissatisfied, 25% of the Operating time are dissatisfied.

It can be 25% of the Parking facility are highly satisfied, 25% of the Parking
facility are satisfied, 25% of the Parking facility are neither satisfied nor
dissatisfied, 25% of the Parking facility are dissatisfied.
It can be 25% of the spacious shop floor are highly satisfied, 25% of the
spacious shop floor are satisfied, 25% of the spacious shop floor are neither
satisfied nor dissatisfied, 25% of the spacious shop floor are dissatisfied.
It can be 25% of the Easy to locate product are highly satisfied, 25% of the Easy
to locate product are satisfied, 25% of the Easy to locate product are neither
satisfied nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Easy to locate product floor are
dissatisfied.
It can be 25% of the Quality product are highly satisfied, 25% of the Quality
product are satisfied, 25% of the Quality product are neither satisfied nor
dissatisfied, 25% of the Quality product floor are dissatisfied.

It can be 25% of the Promotion offers are highly satisfied, 25% of the
Promotion offers are satisfied, 25% of the Promotion offers are neither satisfied
nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Promotion offers floor are dissatisfied.

It can be 25% of the Price of the product are highly satisfied, 25% of the Price
of the product are satisfied, 25% of the Price of the product are neither satisfied
nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Price of the product are dissatisfied.

It can be 25% of the Staff helpfulness are highly satisfied, 25% of the Staff
helpfulness are satisfied, 25% of the Staff helpfulness are neither satisfied nor
dissatisfied, 25% of the Staff helpfulness are dissatisfied.
It can be 25% of the Flexibility in payment mode are highly satisfied, 25% of
the Flexibility in payment mode are satisfied, 25% of the Flexibility in payment
mode are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, 25% of the Flexibility in payment
mode are dissatisfied.
It can be 25% of the Return of value for money are highly satisfied, 25% of the
Return of value for money are satisfied, 25% of the Return of value for money
are neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, and 25% of the Return of value for money
are dissatisfied.
CONCLUSIONS

Considering the importance of the classic variables such as age, sex,


education and social place, becomes easily understanding that from the present
research comes out a question. How much the traditional consuming behavior
is opposed to the current consuming behavior of young persons? It was
realized that there are consumers who mainly buy goods aiming to the
satisfaction that they will have for some of their basic needs and some other
the young persons that they come from a safety socio-economic environment
who breaks the traditional consuming habits through selecting expensive brand-
name products for reasons such as prestige and social projection. In a lot of
cases the last ones, byes goods that probably will never use because for them,
the process of purchase is a way of entertainment, characterizing thus their
consuming behavior as total absurd.

In our opinion, this behavior is an outcome of a particular social growth and,


even if behavior of young persons could change from certain social
circumstances in a given moment, in long run will return in the same situation
when these circumstances change again.

In the next years, when the current parents will become older and the youth
replace them, will be possible to be examined in which point this behavior is
based in the age factor of youth, or if their behavior it is actually a result of a
social process.
REFERENCES:

1. Survey: Kroeber Riel / Weinberger, Konsumententenverhalen


TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITT MNCHEN (TUM)

2. Survey: Systematically varying consumer satisfaction and its implications


for product choice - Shaun McQuitty New Mexico State University, Adam Finn
University of Alberta, James B. Wiley Victoria University

3. http://www.ama.org (American Marketing Association )

4. G. Siomkos (Ph.D) / Consumer Behavior and Strategic Marketing,


Stamoulis publications, 1999.

5. Philip Kotler, Marketing Management, Interbooks publications, 2000.

6. Defining customer satisfaction / Joan L. Giese Washington State


University Joseph A. Cote Washington State University / Academy of
Marketing Science Review Volume 2000 No. 1 Available:
http://www.amsreview.org/articles/giese01-2000.pdf Copyright 2002
Academy of Marketing Science.

7. www.statistics.gr / National statistical service


Questionnaire for consumer buying Behaviour

1. Name
2. Age
a. Below 30 years
b. 31-40 years
c. 41-50 years
d. Above 50 years
3.Distribution of respondents by gender?

a) Male
b) Female

4. How long you have been working here?

a) Less than 5 years [ ] b) 5years 10 years [ ] c) More than 10


years [ ]

5. How did you come to know about Sivashakthi textiles?

a)Advertisement

b)Colleagues references

c)Friends/relatives references

d)Any other specify

6)How frequently do you visit Sivashakthi textiles?

a)Once in a week

b)Twice in a week

c)Once in every 15 days

d)Once in a month
7) what is the main purpose of purchase?

a)Personal Usage / consumption

b)To Gift

c)Any other

8) You prefer to go in Sivashakthi textiles with

a)Family members

b)Spouse

c)Friends

d)Others

9) Which mall you like the most in the city

a) Textiles

b)Spencer

c)City central

d)Hyd central

10) What is the reason behind purchasing in Sivashakthi textiles?

a)Good satisfaction over products

b)Reasonable prices

c)More offers

d)Any others

11) How do you rate the pricing of products at Big Bazaar?

a)Expensive

b)Competitive

c)Affordable

d)Reasonable
12) Why do you prefer to shop in Sivashakthi textiles?

a)Availability of adequate stock

b)Convenience of location and timing

c)Offers and discounts

d)Variety of products

13) What more facility would you like to get at Sivashakthi textiles?

a)Membership Card

b)Discount Card

c)Free packing Offers

d)Lucky draw Offer

14) How often do you ask for Assistance from store staff in selecting your
Purchase?

a)Almost Always

b)Frequently

c)Sometimes

d)Never

15) How is your overall experience in Sivashakthi textiles?

a)Excellent

b)Good

c)Poor

16) Would you visit Sivashakthi textiles again?

a)Sure

b)May be

c) Never
17) Do you suggest any one to shop at Sivashakthi textiles?

a)Yes

b) No

18) How, do you suggest to Textile management to making present Sivashakthi


textiles to more attractive?

a)To maintain quality products

b)Reasonable prices

c)Giving more offers and discounts

d)Convenience

19. Mention your satisfaction level for following elements

1)Highly satisfied

2)Satisfied

3)Neither satisfied nor dissatisfied

4)Dissatisfied

1.Location ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )

2.Operating time ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )

3.Parking facility ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )

4.Cleanness of store ( ) ( ) ( )

5.Spacious shop floor ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )

6.Easy to locate product ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )

7.Quality product ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )

8.Promotion offers ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )

9.Pricefo the product ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )

10.staff helpfulness ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )
11.flexibility in paymentmode ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )

12.return of value for money ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )