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DANIEL DIAZ VIDAL

CONTACT INFORMATION Email: ddiazvidal@ut.edu


Dept. of Economics Phone: (813) 361-1911
Sykes School of business Website: http://www.danieldiazvidal.com/
University of Tampa Nationality: Spanish
401 W Kennedy Blvd
Tampa, Fl 33606

CURRENT POSITION
Assistant Professor of Economics at The University of Tampa
Councilor for the Social Sciences, Council On Undergraduate Research
Honorary Assistant at the Department of Economic History, University of Seville

EDUCATION
University of California Davis, Ph.D. Economics, September 2014
San Diego State University, M.A. Applied Economics, 2003
University of Michigan, B.A. Economics, With Honors, 2000

RESEARCH INTERESTS
Economic History, Social Mobility, Assortative Mating, International Trade, Returns to
Migration, Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

TEACHING INTERESTS
Economic History, International Trade, Industrial Organization, Macroeconomics,
Microeconomics, Mathematical Economics, Applied Statistics, Economics through film,
Labor Economics, Environmental Economics

Ph.D. DISSERTATION
Surnames, Social Mobility, and Assortative Mating in Chile and Costa Rica, 1850-2010

PUBLICATIONS
Chile: Mobility among the Oligarchs, in Gregory Clark, Daniel Diaz Vidal, et al. The Son
Also Rises: Surnames and the History of Social Mobility, Princeton University Press, 2014
This book won the Gyorgy Ranki Biennial Award.

Surnames: A new source for the history of social mobility with Gregory Clark, Neil
Cummins and Yu Hao Ma, Explorations in Economic History, 2015

WORKING PAPERS
Analyzing the impact of college life on academic and post academic outcomes Presented
at ISSOTL 2015

This research represents a response to the necessity to identify and study the dimensions of
college life at Wabash College that have an influence in the academic and post academic
outcomes of our students, including fraternity affiliation, participation in clubs, student
leadership, community service, participation in collegiate sports and other measures of
engagement, in order to efficiently allocate resources, to promote a changing college
DANIEL DIAZ VIDAL
experience that adapts to the global environment and to assure prospective students, and
their parents, that coming to Wabash will have a positive influence in their long term
success. This project has integrated, expanded and analyzed currently available data in order
to produce historical results from information pertaining to current alumni.

Social Mobility Rates in Chile, 1940-2004: A surname Analysis of Social Mobility,


Daniel Diaz Vidal and Gregory Clark, Wabash College and UC Davis

Using rare and ethnic surnames we track the economic status of a set of historically pre-
selected socioeconomic groups in Chile with idiosyncratic wealth and social characteristics
through the 20th century. The pre identification of individuals as belonging to specific
socioeconomic groups provides results that are not biased by traditional measurement error.
We find that Social Mobility rates in Chile are not significantly lower than those of Sweden
or the UK and relatively high in the Latin American context.

Social Mobility in Costa Rica, 1850-2000: A Surname Analysis Daniel Diaz Vidal and
Gregory Clark, Wabash College and UC Davis
Using rare and ethnic surnames we track the economic status of a set of historically pre-
selected socioeconomic groups in Costa Rica with idiosyncratic wealth and social
characteristics through the 19th and 20th centuries. The pre identification of individuals as
belonging to specific socioeconomic groups provides results that are not biased by
traditional measurement error. I find that Social Mobility rates in Costa Rica are not
significantly lower than those calculated, using surname analysis, for Chile, Sweden or the
UK. The results also indicate relatively high persistence of status for Costa Ricans in the
Central American context.

The Nature of Assortative Mating: A Surname Analysis Daniel Diaz Vidal and
Gregory Clark, Wabash College, UC Davis

How closely matched are spouses in terms of social status? Studies that look at the spousal
correlation in characteristics like education, intelligence, health, income and occupation find
correlations in the range 0.2-0.6. If the matching is based on these characteristics the
correlation of underlying genotypes will be much lower. Thus genetic correlations between
a parent and subsequent generations will decline by nearly a half each generation.
However, here we present evidence that the correlation of spouses on underlying
characteristics is actually stronger than on individual elements of the phenotype. Thus the
genetic correlation between spouses may indeed be high enough to make the genetic
correlation between a parents and descendants high even across multiple generations.

Estimating Social Mobility Rates from Surnames: Social Group or Dynastic Transmission
versus Family Effects
Grouping individuals by surnames, whether or not these surnames correspond to ethnic
subgroups, results in high intergenerational correlations of status: in the range 0.7-0.8. The
Son Also Rises (Clark et al., 2014) argues this corresponds to a pattern of individual family
mobility, where whatever measured short term mobility is, there is strong underlying status
correlation within families. Torche and Corvalan, 2016, argue that surname status
DANIEL DIAZ VIDAL
persistence instead just captures group level persistence. Within social groups there will be
the conventionally measured social fluidity. Adermon, Lindahl and Palme, 2016, claim
instead that the observed persistence stems from social network effects within family
dynasties, not again the individual families. In this paper I show that the individual
persistence model of The Son Also Rises has different empirical implications to group or
dynastic persistence models. I show also that data from an extensive English lineage born
1790-1929 supports the individual persistence model better than these alternatives.

WORK IN PROGRESS
An evaluation of spaced learning in economics, accepted poster at ISSOTL 2015

Four groups of 30 students taking introduction to economics are taught the same material by
the same instructor. Two of the groups have already completed their coursework, which was
designed and implemented using the traditional teaching and evaluation strategies. The two
remaining groups will take 6 quizzes throughout the semester and a comprehensive final
instead of two midterms and a comprehensive final. 40% of the credit obtainable in each
quiz will pertain material covered since the previous quiz and the remaining 60% will be
comprehensive. Furthermore, in the two later courses, the students will be assigned
homework that is also partly comprehensive and podcasts regarding the contents of the
course will be assigned two weeks after the relevant topics were covered. All four groups
will be asked to retake an economics exam pertaining to their 101 material one year and 5
years after they completed the coursework to test how assessment and learning spacing
during the course has affected their long term retention of the material.

Economics through film, a qualitative study of student immersion and engagement

PROFESIONAL SERVICE
Referee: European Review of Economic History
Secretary: Social Science Division, Council on Undergraduate Research
Committee Member: Southern Social Science Association Membership Committee

PRESENTATIONS
"How strong is Assortative Mating? A Surname Analysis" 7-27-2017, Economic History
Clio Lab 2017, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile.

Social Mobility and Assortative Mating in Chile and Costa Rica 3-31-2017, Food and
Resource Economics departmental seminar series. University of Florida, Gainesville, Fl.

Teaching economics through film: a qualitative analysis. at ISSOTL 2016

Analyzing the impact of college life on academic and post academic outcomes at
ISSOTL 2015

An evaluation of spaced learning in economics, poster presentation at ISSOTL 2015


Four centuries of surnames and social immobility in Chile All UC Economic History
Group meeting, Davis, CA. 2013
DANIEL DIAZ VIDAL
Class Persistence in Chilean History: A Surname Analysis of Social Mobility in Chile.
Economics Lecture Series at Sonoma State University, 2012.

PROFESSIONAL AFFILIATIONS
Member: American Economic Association, Economic History Association, International
Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning

TEACHING EXPERIENCE
University of Tampa: Introduction to Macroeconomics, Foundational Economics for
Managers, Economics Through Film

Wabash College: Introduction to Economics, Spanish Economic History, The Economics of


Migrations, Chilean Economic History (taught in Spanish), Enduring Questions (Writing
and Critical Thinking Course)

Sonoma State University: Introduction to Macroeconomics (Fall and Spring 2013) and
Introduction to Microeconomics, Fall 2013

University of Seville, ISA, ICS and other study abroad programs: Comparative
Economic Systems, Spanish Economic History, European Economic Integration, European
Marketing and International business, 2003-2008

San Diego State University: 7 sections of Introduction to Economics (Macro/Micro), 2001-


2003, Remedial tutoring

Etudes Online Teaching Certificate (30 hours)

TEACHING EXPERIENCE (TA)


University of California, Davis: T.A. for Math 15A, 17A,17B and 17C (Calculus for
Biology and Science), American Economic History, World Economic History, Industrial
Organization, Intermediate Microeconomics, Introduction to Microeconomics and
Macroeconomics and Native American Studies 1A among other courses

SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS


Gyorgy Ranki Biennial Award (Co-authorship of The Son Also Rises by Gregory Clark)
Talentia Scholarship 2008-2014, for outstanding potential
Economic History Association Travel Grant 2010-11
Non Resident Tuition Fellowship at UC Davis (2007/2008)
Council for Public Economics Scholarship for contributions to the field 2003
Terhune Scholarship for outstanding academic achievement 2002
Erasmus Scholarship for outstanding academic achievement 2001

OTHER PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE


Business Group Wiesbaden 2002-2003 (Marketing Consultant)
Santander Central Hispano Bank 2003-2004 (Financial Management and Risk Analysis)
CEO and founder at World Educational Destinations, SL
Co-owner at Garba Wine Company, Ltd