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ProfessionalInformation

PersonalArtwork

TeachingforArtisticBehavior

StudentArtworkandLessonPlans

Assessments

WritingCurriculum
Professional
Information

Resume
Certification
Cover Letter
IllinoisStateBoardofEducation EducatorLicensureInformationSystem
JamesT.Meeks,Chairman
TonySmith,Ph.D.,StateSuperintendentofEducation
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PrimaryInformation ContactInformation Profile


FullName: MorganL.Bomkamp Address: 833WBuenaAve
IEIN: 972864 Address2: #2101
City,StateZip: Chicago,IL60613 PDStatus: Active
DOB: 5/14/1991
Email: mlbomkamp@cps.edu
Gender: Female
PrimaryPhone: (815)9143012

SecondaryPhone:
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Licenses
Select License License Status Status Entitlement Application Orig Issued Expires ROE Registered Register Apply
ID Code Desc Date Issued Thru
Select 2271973 ProfessionalEducatorLicense I Issued ILISU(10/29/2013) 02/14/2014 02/14/2014 02/14/2014 06/30/2019 15 2019 RegisterinanAdditionalRegion ApplyforEndorsement

IllinoisApprovedProgram/EndorsementsForSelectedLicense
Description Grade StatusDescription Issued Entitlement ApplicationDate
VisualArts KindergartenthroughGrade12 Issued 02/14/2014 ILISU(10/29/2013) 02/14/2014

Approvals
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Designations
Source Status Endorsement Grade CandidateNumber IssueYear Expires

Registration
FiscalYear SchoolYear RegionCode Region LicenseCode License CertificateNumber
2019 20182019 15 CITYOFCHICAGO PEL ProfessionalEducatorLicense
2018 20172018 15 CITYOFCHICAGO PEL ProfessionalEducatorLicense
2017 20162017 15 CITYOFCHICAGO PEL ProfessionalEducatorLicense
2016 20152016 15 CITYOFCHICAGO PEL ProfessionalEducatorLicense
2015 20142015 15 CITYOFCHICAGO PEL ProfessionalEducatorLicense
2014 20132014 15 CITYOFCHICAGO PEL ProfessionalEducatorLicense

PreviousQualifications
EndorsementCode Endorsement Grade StatusCode Status RegionCode Region Issued
Personal
Artwork
Ceramics
Illustration / Drawing
Painting
Teaching for
Artistic
Behaviors
Students in Action
Student Work
Student
Work

Artwork
Lesson Plans
TEACHER NAME Morgan Swenson GRADE K-1
VISUAL ART WEEK PLAN UNIT TITLE Patterned Geishas 2014 DATES

National Visual Arts Standard(s) VA:Cr2.2.K, VA:Re7.2.K, VA:Re8.1.K Materials


Illinois State Standard(s) 25.A.1d, 26.B.1d., 27.B.1 Crayons
Focus/Assignment/Theme Culture Pencils
1. Students will be able to analyze the clothing of traditional Geishas Paint
Learning Objective(s) 2. Students will be able to fill their Geishas with different lines and patterns Paper
3. Students will be able to correctly fold their Geisha's kimono using an origami technique. Glue
Assessment Formative: Checklist Summative: Rubric Scissors
Modifications/Accommodations One-on-One direction, Small group instruction, work buddies. Permanent markers
Book baskets/ creation station Computer
Early Finisher Activities Projector

WEEK ART MAKING VOCAB ARTIST/ART HISTORY ACTIVITIES CRITICAL QUESTIONS


Patterns and lines Patterns Set Induction: Sketchbooks Where in nature do we see different patterns?
lines 1. Students will start by learning about different types of patterns and
lines.
2. Students will create a painting painting by breaking the paper into at
1 least 8 different sections using different lines.
3. Students will then draw different patterns in the sections and outline
them using a permanent marker
4. Students will paint the sections in using different colors of paint
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Geishas Geisha Set Induction: Sketchbooks How has clothing changed through time?
Trace 1. Students will look at different Kimonos from traditional to modern
2 2. Students will then a human silhouette, a long rectangle, and a large
square from stencils and fill them in with line and patterns
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Drawing Colored Pencils Set Induction: Sketchbooks What are different examples of landscapes?
1. Students will begin coloring their Geisha
3 2. Students will use crayons to draw a landscape based on their dream
location.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson Says
Assembly Set Induction: Sketchbooks Why is it important to look at everyone's work?
Museum walk 1. Students will finish their drawings and cut out their dolls
2. Students will carefully fold their kimono and belt, and glue their dolls
4
on to their background paper
3. Students will do a museum walk of each others artwork.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson Says
TEACHER NAME Morgan Swenson GRADE Kindergarten-1st
VISUAL ART WEEK PLAN UNIT TITLE Kandinsky Circle Paintings 2014 DATES

National Visual Arts Standard(s) VA:Cr2.1.K, VA:Cr2.1.K, VA:Re7.2.K Materials


Illinois State Standard(s) 25.A.1d, 25.B.1, 26.A.1e Paper
Focus/Assignment/Theme Kandinsky/Bauhaus Movement/Painting Crayons
1. Students will be able to identify at least 3 elements of art in Kandinsky's artwork. Tempera cakes
Learning Objective(s) 2. Students will be able to listen to jazz music and identify the mood that they are feeling with a drawing. Brushes
3. Students will create at least 6 pieces of artwork based on Kandinsky's concentric circles using tempera cakes. Cups
Assessment Rubric/Checklist for participation Pencils
Modifications/Accommodations Written instruction, one on one instruction, group instruction. Erasers
Book baskets or free draw. Sharpeners
Early Finisher Activities Computer
Projector

WEEK ART MAKING VOCAB ARTIST/ART HISTORY ACTIVITIES CRITICAL QUESTIONS


Color/Feeling Emotion Wassily Kandinsky Set Induction: Who has ever heard of Wassily Kandinsky before? Can feelings be represented by different
drawings Jazz 1. Learn about Wassily Kandinsky and his inspiration to create art. colors?
2. Analyze his artwork for elements and principles.
1 3. Learn about how colors can be associated with music
4. Students will listen to Jazz music and choose what color the song
makes them feel on paper.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Kandinskys Line and Line Wassily Kandinsky/Bauhaus Set Induction: What different kinds of lines are there? What different kinds What, besides art, can be abstract?
Shape drawings Shape of shapes are there?
Color 1. Students will again look at an image of Kandinskys artwork and talk
Overlap about what kinds of lines and shapes they see and how they overlap
2 Abstract each other.
2. Students will use crayons to create their own drawings using lines
and shapes
3. Students will listen to Jazz music while creating artwork.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Kandinskys Paint Wassily Kandinsky Set Induction: Who has ever used Tempera paint before? What other things have concentric circles?
Concentric circle Brush 1. Students will look at Kandinskys concentric circle paintings and
paintings Concentric circle discuss the colors he used
2. Students will learn how to use tempera cakes and paint brushes in a
3
correct and safe manner.
3. Students will be given 6 3.5x3.5 squares of paper to create their
painted concentric circles.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Kandinsky concentric Art Critique Wassily Kandinsky Set Induction: How do we talk about art? Why is it important to talk about our own
circle paintings art 1. Students will take their drawings and assemble them together with artwork?
assembly and critique. tape to create one final painting.
4
2. Paintings will be set on the table and discussed as we walk around
the room.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
TEACHER NAME Morgan Swenson GRADE 2-3
VISUAL ART WEEK PLAN UNIT TITLE Patterned Matryoshkas 2014 DATES

National Visual Arts Standard(s) VA:Cr2.2.K, VA:Re7.2.K, VA:Re8.1.K Materials


Illinois State Standard(s) 25.A.1d, 26.B.1d., 27.B.1 Colored Pencils
Focus/Assignment/Theme Culture Pencils
1. Students will be able to analyze the clothing of traditional Matryoshka dolls. Paint
Learning Objective(s) 2. Students will be able to fill their Matryoshkas with different lines and patterns Paper
3. Students will be able to correctly use at least 2 different colored pencil techniques. Glue
Assessment Formative: Checklist Summative: Rubric Scissors
Modifications/Accommodations One-on-One direction, Small group instruction, work buddies. Permanent markers
Book baskets/ creation station Computer
Early Finisher Activities Projector

WEEK ART MAKING VOCAB ARTIST/ART HISTORY ACTIVITIES CRITICAL QUESTIONS


Patterns and lines Patterns Set Induction: Sketchbooks Where in nature do we see different patterns?
lines 1. Students will start by learning about different types of patterns and
lines.
2. Students will create a painting painting by breaking the paper into at
1 least 8 different sections using different lines.
3. Students will then draw different patterns in the sections and outline
them using a permanent marker
4. Students will paint the sections in using different colors of paint
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Matryoshka dolls Matryoshka Set Induction: Sketchbooks How has clothing changed through time?
Trace 1. Students will be introduced to the book The Littlest Matryoshka, and
will participate in a close reading exercise.
2. Students will look at different Matryoshkas from across the world,
including the teachers.
2
3. Students will then trace 3 different sized dolls from stencils and fill
them in with line and patterns
4. Students will outline their drawings and details with permanent
marker.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Drawing Colored Pencils Set Induction: Sketchbooks What are different examples of landscapes?
1. Students will learn how to correctly fill in shapes and spaces using
colored pencils
3 2. Students will then begin coloring their matyroshkas
3. Students will use color pencils to draw a landscape based on their
dream location.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson Says
Assembly Set Induction: Sketchbooks Why is it important to include an artist
Artist Statement 1. Students will finish their drawings and cut out their dolls statement with your artwork?
2. Students will carefully glue their dolls on to their background paper
4
3. Students will write an artist statement that explains their process and
the meaning behind their artwork.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson Says
TEACHER NAME Morgan Swenson GRADE 4th-5th
VISUAL ART WEEK PLAN UNIT TITLE Abstract Mondrian Maps 2014 DATES

National Visual Arts Standard(s) VA:Cr2.2.4, VA:Pr4.1.4 Materials


Illinois State Standard(s) 25.A.3d, 26.A.3e Paper
Focus/Assignment/Theme Piet Mondrian/ Abstract Art/ Oil Pastels sharpie markers
1. Students will be able to analyze Mondrian's painting using a graphic organizer oil pastels
Learning Objective(s)
2. Students will be able to create an abstract map drawing using at least 3 different maps as inspiration pencils
Formative: Checklist eraser
Assessment computer
Summative: Rubric
Modifications/Accommodations One-on one instruction, small group instruction, visual steps written on board. projector
Early Finisher Activities Book Baskets and sketcbook free draw
WEEK ART MAKING VOCAB ARTIST/ART HISTORY ACTIVITIES CRITICAL QUESTIONS
Analyze Piet Mondrian Set Induction: Sketchbook Drawiangs Why do we look at artwork more closely? Why
Describe 1. Students will start by analyzing a piece of artwork by Mondrian and should we analyze artwork?
1
Interpret will fill out their graphic organizer.
Judge Closure: Mrs. Swenson Says
Topography Set Induction: Sketchbook Drawings Why are maps important? Now that we have
Map 1. Students will learn about different types of maps such as a technology, are paper maps needed?
boundary map topography map, boundary map, county map, ect.
county map 2. Students will be given printed maps to look at and must use at least 3
2
Road Map to copy the lines on their drawing paper.
Underground Closure: Mrs. Swenson Says
Utility map

Abstract Piet Mondrian Set Induction: Sketchbook drawings. Is abstract art a valid art form?
Primary colors 1. Students will use sharpie markers to outline their drawing lines
3
Organic 2. Students will then choose shapes to color in on their maps.
Geometric Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Reflection Set Induction: Sketchbook Drawings. Why do we reflect on our artwork?
Artist Statement 1. Students will write an artist statement about their artwork, using the
vocabulary words from the unit.
2. Students will critique tanother classmates artwork with a 3-2-1
4 method.
3 Things you like
2 Things that you think should be improved
1 Question for the artist.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson Says
TEACHER NAME Morgan Swenson GRADE 4-5th
VISUAL ART WEEK PLAN UNIT TITLE Henna hands 2014 DATES

National Visual Arts Standard(s) VA:Cr1.2.2, VA:Cr2.1.2, VA:Re9.1.2 Materials


Illinois State Standard(s) 25.A.1d, 27.B.1, 26.A.1e Paper
Focus/Assignment/Theme Painting/Culture Permanent marker
1. Students will be able to draw henna designs on to their hands Pencils
Learning Objective(s) 2. Students will be able to correctly use warm and cool color schemes. Erasers
3. Students will be able to use painting materials in a safe and effective manner. Oil Pastels
Assessment Formative: Checklist Summative: Rubric Scissors
Modifications/Accommodations One-on-one instruction, small group instruction, peer buddies Glue
Book baskets/ creation station. Computer
Early Finisher Activities Projector

WEEK ART MAKING VOCAB ARTIST/ART HISTORY ACTIVITIES CRITICAL QUESTIONS


Henna patterns Henna Set Induction: Sketchbooks Why is it important to learn about other
Trace 1. Students will start by getting a worksheet with different henna culture's art?
Pattern designs.
2. Students will trace their hands and arms 4 times on 2 pieces of
1
paper.
3. Students will fill the hands and arms with the henna designs using
pencil.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Finish henna making Details Set Induction: Sketchbooks Why is art necessary?
2 1. Students will continue to add designs and details to their hands being
sure to cover the entire hand and arm
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Painting Overlap Set Induction: Sketchbooks Why is art important?
1. Students will take an additional paper and create concentric circles
using oil pastels.
2. Once the paper is covered entirely, students will take an eraser and
3
create zigzags going from the center of the paper going outward.
3. Students will cut out their hands and glue them in an overlapping
manner on their painted paper
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Details Set Induction: Sketchbooks What makes a good artist?
1. Students will add any last details on their hands and backgrounds
4
2. Students will write an artist statement on their artwork.
Closure: Mrs. Swenson says
Student
Assessment

Rubric
Analysis
Checklist
Writing
Curriculum

Narrative
Argumentative
Informational
Narrative

Writing Belief Examples of Classroom Characteristics of Student Writing


(proposed) Practice/Instruction
(based on analysis of standards and student
(based on reading/article/standards) samples)

Writing should be a means Narrative


by which students express Narrative
their thought and ideas. K-2 K:
Drawing, dictating, writing
*Partner shares/think aloud Telling events in order (first, next, then)
Writing is relevant and an *Lots of modeling - mentor texts
essential tool in all *Dictating (writing is an extension of thinking *Differentiation: Drawing and labeling for all
disciplines and should be and speaking)
practiced daily. *Drawing/labeling 1st:
*Response journals Writing using event order (2 or more sequenced
*Common anchor charts events)
Writing should be build *Using texts examples to show conventions Use: Yesterday, today, first, next, last
upon throughout each *Students are invited to share personal Provide a sense of closure
grade level, using common experiences
writing language. *Differentiation: Drawing and labeling for all

2nd:
Writing is a process Write using well elaborated sequenced events
purposeful writing (actions, thoughts, feelings)
scope and sequence Use temporal words: A long time ago, today, later,
3-4 first, next, then, last)
Main event
*Build language beginning in primary from Use sensory words (taste, touch, smell, sound, and
grade to grade, with interactive word walls sight)
*The key to teaching students to write well
with voice is to ensure they are writing *Differentiation: Drawing and labeling for all
something.
*Success hinges on having great word
choice.
*The key to using words in narrative writing is 3rd:
capturing the readers imagination by using
words to bring the topic to life. Understand the purpose to their writing
*Common anchor charts Include an introduction with a hook
*Using texts examples to show conventions Use temporal words
*Students are invited to share personal Remain on topic
experiences Refer back to the text to use text evidence
Provide a sense of closure
Creating developed setting
5-6 Use sensory words and details

*Mentor texts - novels, conferring, peer- 4th:


sharing Events are arranged into authentic sequences that
*Journaling - POV (point of view) reflection unfold naturally
*Common anchor charts dialogue and description is added to bring the story
*Using texts examples to show convention and its characters alive
* Questions to consider: history; building transitional words and phrases are inserted to orient
background knowledge readers to the sequence of events
story has an ending that makes sense and provides
a satisfying conclusion

5th:
Conferring with peers for feedback and editing
Seeing the narrative as a whole piece, whole event,
whole picture in mind

6th:

Build on claim/argument
narrative techniques - adding dialogue and details in
experiences or events.
Using more advanced transitional phrases.
Writing Belief Examples of Classroom Characteristics of Student Writing
(proposed) Practice/Instruction
(based on analysis of standards and student
(based on reading/article/standards) samples)

Writing should be a means Argumentative Argumentative


by which students express
their thought and ideas. K-2 K: - Use a combination of drawing, dictating and
- Provide real-world examples writing to tell the reader about an opinion about a
- Use a variety of mentor texts (humorous, topic or book (e.g., My favorite book is)
Writing is relevant and an serious, real-life)
essential tool in all - Model how to use logical thinking (not a
disciplines and should be script) 1st: - introduce the topic of name the book that is
practiced daily. - Teach students how to write a good hook being written about.
to grab the readers attention - State an opinion, supply a reason and a sense
- Model using linking words (because, and of closure
Writing should be built upon also, later, then, meanwhile)
throughout each grade - Model ending the piece with a sense of
level, using common writing resolution (thoughtful and convincing) 2nd: - introduce the topic of book that is being
language. - Make a list of tones to show how a writer written about.
can feel about a topic - State an opinion, supply a reason, use linking
words (because, and, also) and provide a
Writing is a process concluding statement
purposeful writing
scope and sequence

3rd:
Introduce the topic with clear purpose
State their opinion
Write using an organizational structure which lists
reasons.
Provide reasons that support the opinion.
Use of linking words and phrases (e.g., because,
Writing should be a means therefore, since, for example)
by which students express 3-4 Provide a sense of closure with a concluding
their thought and ideas. statement or section.
Mentor texts- Examples of real-world Debates
persuasion
Writing is relevant and an Find shorter opinion passages so students
essential tool in all can see how writers have one purpose in
disciplines and should be mind.
practiced daily. The right choice of words or phrases has an 4th:
impact on the quality of the opinion piece.
Introduce the topic with clear purpose
Writing should be built upon State their opinion
throughout each grade Write using an organizational structure which lists
level, using common writing reasons.
language. 5-6 Provide reasons that support the opinion.
Students begin with an opinion, using Use of linking words and phrases (e.g., for instance,
supporting evidence. supported by reasons, in order to, in addition).
Writing is a process facts, and details. Provide a sense of closure with a concluding
purposeful writing As students become more proficient with statement or section.
scope and sequence opinion, in 6th, the opinion becomes a claim
supported by evidence and text support
Link opinion and reasons using words,
phrases, and clauses (e.g., 5th: Opinion based with reasons and details.
consequently,specifically).
In 6th students will clarify the relationships
among claim(s) and reasons. 6th: Claim based using evidence as suppoort
Concluding statement needed

Additional Notes:

*Where do we teach grammar? Use the CCSS


Language Standards to inform grade-level
expectations.
Writing Belief Examples of Classroom Characteristics of Student Writing
(proposed) Practice/Instruction
(based on analysis of standards and student
(based on reading/article/standards) samples)

Writing should be a means Informational Informational


by which students express
their thought and ideas. K-2 K:
Important to build background knowledge -Drawing,dictating,writing
Use students personal experiences to link -Informing the reader of two or three pieces of
Writing is relevant and an back to their writing information they should know
essential tool in all Use culturally relevant practices-for example, -adding details
disciplines and should be encourage students to write about a country
practiced daily. they are familiar with and include
drawings/pictures 1st:
Review different examples of how tone is -Drawing,dictating,writing
Writing should be built upon used in real life- ex: signs. Then have -Student supply topic,facts and illustrations that
throughout each grade students revise a sign and compare/contrast provide extra information
level, using common writing to highlight the importance of tone. -Provide a sense of closure
language. Provide examples of different types of
informational texts for students to interact with
(ex. letters, biographies). 2nd:
Writing is a process Scaffold students with sentence -Student explain their topic and provide enough
purposeful writing starters/frames but know when to transition details and facts to inform the reader
scope and sequence students to allow for more freedom and -Determining sequence 1st, 2nd and 3rd to provide
creativity. a clear point about the topic
Inventory and use students interests as -Defining important words for the reader
writing topics/themes (ex. interest survey). -Adapting ideas from books ex. pictures with
captions,labeled drawings to help illustrate piece
-Provide a concluding statement

Writing should be a means


by which students express
their thought and ideas. 3rd:

-Informative/explanatory writing should include well


Writing is relevant and an developed topic with clear ideas and information.
essential tool in all -Students use illustrations as an informational aid.
disciplines and should be -Students link ideas with words and phrases: (also,
practiced daily. 3-4 another, and, more, but)
-Students provide a concluding statement
Character Traits- Identify traits with textual
Writing should be built upon evidence
throughout each grade -Focus on flow of the sentence 4th:
level, using common writing -How does it sound? -Informative/explanatory writing should include
language. -Anticipate questions from student proper formatting including paragraphs and
-Use of powerful words sections.
-Word Choice (interactive) across disciplines -Students link ideas with more complex words and
Writing is a process -Give students options of topic when possible phrases: (another, for example, also, because)
purposeful writing to build their understand of tone -Students provide a concluding statement
scope and sequence

5th:
-Students writing is based on general observations,
is more broad.
-Ideas are developed with facts, concrete details,
and examples related to the topic.
-Writing uses precise language and discipline-
specific/content language.

5-6

6th:
-Students writing is based on more specific
observations/evidence.
-Addition of more stylistic/sophisticated writing (ex.
advanced transitions, illustrations, graphs, charts,
less formulaic, more complex sentence structure,
advanced language and vocabulary)
-Cause/Effect writing
-more advanced formatting
-adding charts/tables (graphics)
-use of technology/multimedia to gain and convey
new information

Additional Notes: