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Geothermal Power Session Introduction

Roland N. Horne
Stanford University, USA
1. Purpose of Concurrent Session
The concurrent sessions will be held in the middle of the whole agenda. In the
concurrent sessions, experts from each area will engage in discussions on necessary
actions to promote innovation in order to address climate change, while introducing
examples of innovation and future outlooks.
tentative

Session title Contents


Opening Session Opening addresses and keynote speeches
Plenary Session Short speeches and panel discussion on Principal Issues in the Future GHG
(Part 1) Reduction
Oct.
7th Plenary Session Short speeches and panel discussion on Future Perspectives from Innovators,
(Part 2) Visionaries and Global Leaders
Concurrent Sessions on innovation in specific areas
Cement, Energy Systems, Geothermal Power, Hydrogen Energy, Iron and Steel, Nuclear Energy,
Sessions (Part 1) Technology Transfer to Developing Countries and Investment Promotion
Concurrent Sessions on innovation in specific areas
Artificial Photosynthesis, Electricity Storage, Zero Energy Building, Low-Carbon Mobility, Role of Public
Sessions (Part 2) Funding for Research, Development and Demonstration, Smart Grid, Wind Power

Oct.
Concurrent Sessions on innovation in specific areas
Sessions (Part 3) Advanced Liquid Biofuels, CCS, International Framework for Complementing UN, Solar Energy
8th
Plenary Session
Short speeches and panel discussion on Future Strategy for Climate Change
(Part 3)
Closing Session Briefing of respective concurrent sessions and others.

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Not All Renewables are Alike

Source: Emerging Energy Research (2009)


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Life Cycle Emissions

Comparison of Life Cycle Emissions in Metric Tonnes of CO 2e per GW-hour for various modes of Electricity
Production; P.J. Meier, Life-Cycle Assessment of electricity Generation Systems with Applications for Climate
Change Policy Analysis,
Ph.D. dissertation, University of Wisconsin (2002); S. White, Emissions form Helium-3, Fission and Wind
Electrical Power plants, Ph.D. Dissertation, University of Wisconsin (1998); M. K. Mann and P. L. Spath, Life
Cycle Assessment of a Biomass Gasification Combined-Cycle System,
(1997), www.nrel.gov/docs/legosti/fy98/23076.pdf (ref 33). 4
Source: Richter(2012) 4
World Geothermal Electricity (2015)

World Geothermal Electricity 21,443 MWe in 2020


25.000 80.000
12,635 MWe in 2015
70.000
20.000 Installed Capacity
60.000
Produced Energy

50.000
15.000

GWh
MW

40.000

10.000
30.000

20.000
5.000
10.000

0 0
1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020
Years
Bertani, 2015, WGC

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Operating Capacity (1)

(GEA, February 2015)

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Operating Capacity (2)

(GEA, February 2015)

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World Geothermal Electricity (2015)

4000

3500

3000

2500
1995
MW

2000
2000
1500 2005

1000 2010
2015
500

Bertani, 2015, WGC


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World Geothermal Electricity (2015)
Top 5 countries installed capacity
COUNTRY 2010 2010 2015 2015
MWe GWh MWe GWh
USA 3,098 16,603 3,450 16,600
PHILIPPINES 1,904 10,311 1,870 9,646
INDONESIA 1,197 9,600 1,340 9,600
MEXICO 958 7,047 1,017 6,071
NEW ZEALAND 762 4,055 1,005 7,000

Top 5 countries increase in absolute capacity since 2010


COUNTRY MWe GWh %MWe %GWh
KENYA 392 1.418 194% 99%
USA 352 11%
TURKEY 306 2.637 336% 539%
NEW ZEALAND 243 2.945 32% 73%
INDONESIA 143 12%

Bertani, 2015, WGC

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Future Development

(GEA, February 2015)

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The Guardian, October 2, 2015

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2. Scope and Presentation Topics
In the Geothermal Power Session of ICEF2014, it was agreed upon the panellists that
geothermal energy is one of the most reliable sources of renewables with significant
potential for further development.
At this years session, we would like to focus on policies and technological development
with a long term outlook for drastic expansion of geothermal energy utilization.

1.Long-term Vision and Policies 2.Technology Development


Long term vision on geothermal energy Feasibility of development of extreme high
development in Kenya temperature geothermal resource
2050 Energy Strategy Plan and R&D Roadmap in Technology Development on supercritical fluids
Switzerland utilization

3. Panel Discussion
Prospects for technology development
Effective policy measures
Importance of international Cooperation

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3. Session Time Table
Suggested Time Table for Geothermal Power Session
The session take the following order: opening address, presentations, panel discussion, and closing address. We
will also ask the audience to take part in the discussion.
Time Speaker
1. Opening
Session Chair: Roland N. Horne (Thomas Davies Barrow Professor of Earth Sciences, Stanford
16:15 ~ 16:30
University)
2. Presentations
Paul Ngugi (General Manager, Business Development, Geothermal Development Company,
16:30 ~ 16:50
Kenya)
16:50 ~ 17:10 Keith Evans (Senior Scientist, Department of Earth Sciences, ETH Zrich)
Hiroshi Asanuma (Leader, Geothermal Energy Team, National Institute of Advanced Industrial
17:10 ~ 17:30
Science and Technology)
17:30 ~ 17:50 Gumundur mar Frileifsson (Chief geologist, HS Orka hf)
Intermediate Break (10 min)
3. Discussion
18:00 ~ 18:35 Chair and Presenters, Questions to be accepted from the audience
4. Closing
18:35 ~ 18:45 Roland N. Horne (Thomas Davies Barrow Professor of Earth Sciences, Stanford University)

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4. Presentation Story Line
Suggested order of presentations as below. The topics below are suggestions, and the
speakers may change topics if they wish.

Topics Speakers

Long term Paul Ngugi (General Manager, Business Development, Geothermal


Speaker
country vision Development Company, Kenya)
on geothermal Theme Idea Long tern vision of geothermal energy in Kenya
energy
development Speaker Keith Evans

Theme Idea Motivation of geothermal energy development in Switzerland

Technology Speaker Hiroshi Asanuma


developments
Theme Idea Development of supercritical geothermal resources in Japan
with a very long
term outlook
Speaker Gumundur mar Frileifsson
Theme Idea Iceland Deep Drilling Project (IDDP)

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5. Panel Discussion Topics
The Chair will decide the topics for the panel discussion, based on the presentations given by the speakers and
questions posed to them.
The followings are reference topics for the Chair.

1 Prospects for technology development


Technological forefront of supercritical fluids utilization
Achievements so far and challenges faced
Mid- to Long- term prospects on technology development

2 Effective policy measures

Mid- to Long- term strategies on geothermal energy development in each country


Effective policy measures to promote geothermal energy development
Role of the government, academia and private sector to realize potential of geothermal energy

3 Importance of international cooperation

Current frameworks on international cooperation


International cooperation for mid- and long-term revolutionary technology development

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Contact Information

Innovation for Cool Earth Forum


Secretariat for Geothermal Power Session

Mari Iwata
Climate Change Group

miwata@mri.co.jp

10-3, Nagatacho 2-Chome, Chiyoda-Ku,


Tokyo, Japan 100-8141
Tel.(Direct) +81 (0)3 6705 5499 Mobile +81 (0) 80-2281-6123

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