U.S.

Department of Justice FY 2008 PERFORMANCE BUDGET

CONGRESSIONAL SUBMISSION

COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE

Table of Contents Page No. I. Overview .............................................................................................................. II. Summary of Program Changes....................................................................... III. Appropriations Language and Analysis of Appropriations Language……. IV. Decision Unit Justification............................................................................... A. Community Relations Service 1. Program Description.................................................................................. 2. Performance Tables.................................................................................... 3. Performance, Resources, and Strategies.................................................... V. Program Increases by Item................................................................................. N/A VI. Program Offsets by Item.................................................................................. N/A VII. Exhibits............................................................................................................ A. Organizational Chart...................................................................................... B. Summary of Requirements ........................................................................... C. Program Increases by Decision Unit.............................................................. E. Resources by DOJ Strategic Goal/Objective................................................. F. Justification for Base Adjustments................................................................. G. Crosswalk of 2006 Availability...................................................................... H. Crosswalk of 2007 Availability...................................................................... I. Summary of Reimbursable Resources........................................................... J. Detail of Permanent Positions by Category................................................... K. Financial Analysis of Program Increases/Offsets.......................................... L. Summary of Requirements by Grade............................................................. M. Summary of Requirements by Object Class.................................................. N. Status of Congressionally Requested Studies, Reports, and Evaluations...... 3 5 6 7 7 10 11

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I. Overview for Community Relations Service In FY 2008, the Community Relations Service (CRS) requests 56 permanent positions, (which includes 1 attorney) 56 FTE, and $9,794,000. No additional programs or enhancements are requested for FY 2008. CRS’ information technology (IT) program will continue operating with one (1) FTP/FTE, with no anticipated IT enhancements in FY 2008. “Beginning in FY 2007, electronic copies of the Department of Justice’s congressional budget justifications and Capitol Asset Plan and Business Case exhibits can be viewed or downloaded from the Internet using the Internet address: http://www.usdoj.gov/jmd/2008justification/.” CRS was created under Title X of the historic Civil Rights Act of 1964 (42 U.S.C. §2000g et seq.) signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson on July 2, 1964. Title X of the 1964 law mandated CRS’ creation and its duties and responsibilities. CRS, an office within the U.S. Department of Justice, is headquartered in Washington, D.C., and is a single decision unit that plays a significant role in DOJ’s Strategic Goal #3, Conflict Resolution and Violence Prevention Activities. Serving as the Department’s “peacemaker” for community conflicts and tensions arising from discriminatory practices, CRS is a specialized mediation service available to state, local and federal officials and communities in resolving and preventing racial and ethnic conflict, violence, and civil disorder. CRS has 10 Regional offices and 4 field offices at the following locations: Boston; New York; Philadelphia; Chicago (field office at Detroit); Kansas City; Denver; Los Angeles (field office at San Francisco); Dallas (field office at Houston); Atlanta (field office at Miami); and, Seattle. CRS possesses a remarkably unique attribute in being the only federal component dedicated to assisting state and local units of government, both private and public organizations, and community groups with preventing/resolving racial and ethnic tensions, incidents, and civil disorders, and in restoring racial stability and accord. CRS is able to address perception of racism, which sometimes may prove to be as upsetting to communities as actual racism. However, CRS does not have law enforcement authority and does not investigate or prosecute cases or assign blame or fault. In contrast, CRS enables communities to develop, as well as, implement their own solutions to reducing racial/ethnic tensions. CRS facilitates the development of viable, mutual understandings and agreements as alternatives to coercion or litigation. The CRS budget consists of operating expenses which includes but is not limited to, payroll for its 56 permanent positions; travel expenses to enable the CRS conciliation professionals to be physically available to the nation’s tate and local units of government, private and public organizations, and community groups; as well as funding for normal operations, i.e., communications, equipment, supplies, etc. By applying common inflation rate methodologies, and the evaluation of historical trend analysis methodologies, the FY 08 budget cost of $9,794,000 is required for CRS to support the Department in maintaining conflict resolution and violence prevention activities. Under recent budget constraints, the CRS program has not requested any increase in FTE or program enhancements. No programs within CRS have been subject to the Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) review.

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Performance Challenges Although CRS’ mission and strategic objectives will not change drastically in FY 08, complex and forever changing challenges still remain; thus impacting CRS’ progress toward achievement of its goals. CRS must continue to enhance its daily operations based on Departmental dynamics, technological developments, national security, and recruitment of quality applicants. These factors pose challenges that demand attention, and impact the practices of CRS. Outside of CRS’ operational intricacies, the challenges we face on a national level will continue to change and develop. CRS will continue to emphasize racial tensions involving ethnic communities who are suffering as a result of the war on terrorism. Fear related to terrorism often turns into prejudicial hate against persons of a different heritage, national origin, or race. CRS will continue to focus on possible racial conflicts in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. In addition, CRS is confronted with the constant impact of stringent economic times, which limits local and federal resources and increases pressure and tension among diverse racial and ethnic groups. In effect, CRS has pioneered highly successful conflict resolution and violence prevention strategies to deal with the constantly changing demographic shifts that create cultural, language, and historical clashes throughout the U.S. cities and increasingly in border states. CRS External Challenges External challenges to the work of CRS include follow-up assistance to communities in defusing and resolving racial conflicts due to Hurricane Katrina. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, CRS will continue to resolve race-related conflicts in areas such as housing, education, community relations, and the administration of justice. In addition, CRS is continuing to address the global immigration and cultural changes that affect this country since September 11, 2001 CRS’ nationwide conflict resolution and violence prevention activity now deals with a more complex set of dynamics. These dynamics stem from the growth of intolerance and distrust directed against Arab American, Muslim, and Sikh (AMS) people and those people perceived to be Arab American, Muslims, or Sikh. Community peace and stability have both weakened, because of the significant demographic changes in the United States based on an influx of new racial and ethnic immigrant groups. These ever expanding factors increase the need to be calculated into the host of vulnerabilities community’s face that give rise to an increase in hate incidents, increase in cultural and communication barriers, and racial friction as competition for jobs and services. All these issues impact community peace and stability. Although counter terrorism efforts have sought to build confidence and trust in the Government, it has also created a constant reminder of pending risks and dangers associated with terrorist actions. The war in Iraq, economic downturn, fewer state and local resources, and the arrival of new immigrants combined, create conditions for racial and ethnic discord and tension, and result in an increase of demands for CRS services. CRS also continues to face the challenge of having to constantly reintroduce its services to community and local government leaderships, because these are often short-termed, limited tenure positions. Police community relations surrounding excessive use of force and the possibility of racial violence related to these incidents in minority communities consume more than half of CRS’ work. CRS is also called upon to address racial harassment and violence in elementary and secondary schools and on college and university campuses, as well as hate incidents involving desecration of houses of worship.

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CRS Internal Challenges CRS faces continuing internal challenges as it must monitor the Nation for jurisdictional cases, and do its best to respond to each with limited resources. In FY 2006, CRS responded to nearly 600 community incidents and conflicts arising from issues of race, color or national origin. CRS currently operates with a field staff of 39 employees for 50 states and 6 territories. Regional staff workers are restricted in the number of cases that CRS can handle by time, budget, and location. CRS will continue to focus its internal efforts on building new staff capacities through succession planning, regular, sustained, high-quality all-staff in-service training, and field/headquarter detailees to build mediation and management capacities of new hires. The majority of current vacancies are funded at the GS-09 level, which will inherently present an expected learning curve, but will also allow for CRS to reach a 56 person team and stay within its budgeted FTE. High quality standards for leadership, in-service training, state mediation certification, standardized measurable work plans, and improved tracking and coaching systems on service delivery and case reporting is a part of the CRS work ethic. II. Summary of Program Changes The Fiscal 2008 CRS budget request does not consist of any increases/offsets to its program. This section is not applicable to CRS.

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III. Appropriations Language and Analysis of Appropriations Language Appropriations Language For necessary expenses of the COMMUNITY RELATIONS SERVICE [$9,794,000] $9,613,000: Provided, that notwithstanding any other provision of law, upon a determination by the Attorney General that emergent circumstances require additional funding for conflict resolution and violence prevention activities of the Community Relations Service, the Attorney General may transfer such amounts to the Community Relations Service, from available appropriations for the current fiscal year for the Department of Justice, as may be necessary to respond to such circumstances: Provided further, that any transfer pursuant to the previous proviso shall be treated as a reprogramming under section 605 of this Act and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that section. (Department of Justice Appropriations Act)

Analysis of Appropriations Language The FY 2008 President’s Budget Uses the FY 2007 President’s Budget language as a base so all language is presented as new.

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IV. Decision Unit Justification A. Community Relations Service Community Relations Service TOTAL 2006 Enacted with Rescissions 2006 Supplementals 2006 Enacted w/ Rescissions and Supplements 2007 President’s Budget Adjustments to Base and Technical Adjustments 2008 Current Services 2008 Program Increases 2008 Request Total Change 2007-2008 Community Relations Service Information Technology Breakout (of Decision Unit Total) 2006 Enacted with Rescissions 2006 Supplementals 2006 Enacted w/ Rescissions and Supplements 2007 President’s Budget Adjustments to Base and Technical Adjustments 2008 Current Services 2008 Program Increases 2008 Request Total Change 2007-2008 Perm. Pos. 56 0 0 56 0 56 0 56 0 Perm. Pos.
1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0

FTE 48 0 0 56 0 56 0 56 0

Amount $9,536,000 $215,000 $9,751,000 $9,613,000 $181,000 $9,794,000 $0 $9,794,000 $181,000

FTE
1 1 0 1 0 1 0 1 0

Amount
$795,000 0 $795,000 $821,000 $0 $847,000 $0 $847,000 $26,000

1. Program Description CRS’ program contributes to the Department’s Strategic Goal 3: Prevent and Reduce Crime and Violence by Assisting State, Tribal, Local, and Community-based Programs. Within this Goal, CRS specifically addresses the Department’s Strategic Objective 3.3 – Uphold the rights of and improve the services to America’s crime victims and promote resolution of racial tension. CRS has implemented several strategies, which are intended to effectively address the issues of discriminatory practices based on race, color, or national origin, which impair the rights of people. Some strategies are: • Law Enforcement Mediation (LEM) Program is a two day (16 hours) program designed to equip the attending officers with basic knowledge of mediation and conflict resolution skills as they apply directly to law enforcement. Our program focuses on the

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officer's need to respond to any given conflict or dispute (in particular, race and ethnic based issues) in a minimum of time, with a maximum of effectiveness. The traditional method of policing in response to many disturbance calls where a solution is dictated meant callbacks to the same disturbance. The CRS LEM is a mediation and conflict resolution approach that offers opportunity for more lasting solutions based on the disputants’ involvement in resolving their issues of conflict. The process involves empowering the community to resolve an instant dispute with assistance, but also instills skills and knowledge with the citizens to resolve other disputes without the necessity of a police presence. The course focuses on particular issues in minority communities. • Anti-Racial Profiling Program is a program that reviews the history and concept of profiling by police in the addressing criminal activity. The program focuses on the differences and complexities of using race as a factor in police investigations and the impact of racial profiling on minorities. Through a series of videotape and role playing exercises, law enforcement and community members learn how to avoid the use of racial profiling as well as how to defuse such allegations whenever they arise. Arab-Muslim, Sikh (AMS) Cultural Awareness Program builds a cadre of community-based free trainers capable of delivering law enforcement training across the country to heighten awareness, increase knowledge and develop skills to effectively communicate about Arab, Muslim, and Sikh cultures in order to reduce tensions and strengthen unity in communities. These trainers work side-by-side with CRS staff and follow standardized and approved CRS curriculum. City - Problem Identification and Resolution of Issues Together (City-SPIRIT) Program is a recently developed program that resolves race related conflicts within cities and communities in a collaborative effort. Following years of field testing, CRS assists city and other local forms of government with existing racial conflicts in a communitywide problem solving process to better understand and to address racial tensions and conflicts that may exist in the schools, work places, businesses and neighborhoods. Examples of this work are evident in Pittsburg, Kansas and Monroe, Louisiana.

CRS introduced and updated several management systems to more effectively address racial tension and violence in major cities. CRS intensified its emphasis on staff development and training of staff on the fundamental skills of conflict resolution. CRS holds national staff training sessions to enhance and refresh contemporary conflict resolution strategies and mediation skills. CRS instituted an internal skills certification process for fundamental tools that are used in conflict resolution cases. CRS continues to strengthen its emphasis on local capacity building by having Conciliators focus on the implementation of collaborative partnerships and other mechanisms for strategically empowering and sustaining peaceful communities. The services of CRS are tracked by a case management database. Quality assurance is measured by a weekly headquarters review of every new case in the CRS system. Headquarters then provides weekly operational written and constructive feedback to all 10 Regional Directors. Regions are directed to hold bi-monthly staff meetings to review casework feedback. Progress on casework has been significant from a technical and quality perspective.

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The following charts depict CRS performance and workload. These case numbers show marked change in activities as a result of a policy change, which occurred at the beginning of Fiscal Year 2005. The policy change required CRS to focus more heavily on crisis resolution and mediation versus outreach and has impacted each area of the CRS case activity.

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PERFORMANCE AND RESOURCES TABLE Decision Unit: Conflict Resolution and Violence Prevention - Program Operations DOJ Strategic Goal/Objective: III. Assist State, Local and Tribal Efforts to Prevent and Reduce Crime and Violence WORKLOAD/ RESOURCES
Final Targe t FY 2006 Actual FY 2006 Es tim ate FY 2007 Changes Current Services Adjustm ents and FY 2008 Program Changes Requested (Total) FY 2008 Request

Workload

Total Costs and FTE
(reim bursable FTE are included, but reim bursable costs are bracketed and not included in the total) TYPE/ STRATEGIC OBJECTIVE Program Activity FTE $000 FTE $000 FTE $000 FTE $000 FTE $000

56 PERFORMANCE

$9,536

49

$9,431

56

$9,613

FY 2006

FY 2006

FY 2007

0 $181 Current Services Adjustm ents and FY 2008 Program Changes FTE $000

56

$9,794

FY 2008 Request

FTE Conflict Resolution and Violence Prevention

$000

FTE

$000

FTE

$000

FTE

$000

[

]

56

$9,536

56

$9,613

0

$181

56

$9,794

Cases w here CRS services w ill help Perform ance resolve community racial violence and Me asure conflict Cases w here CRS services w ill prevent Efficiency potential community racial violence and Me asure conflict OUTCOME Communities w ith Improved Conflict Resolution Capacity

590

584

637

22

659

113

180

112

4

116

703

764

759

27

786

Data Definition, Validation, Verification, and Lim itations: CRS collects and maintains data in a case management system, CRSIS, w hich establishes standard criteria for recording and classifying casew ork. CRS Regional Directors review and approve all case inf ormation entered into CRSIS by conciliators; the data is review ed and verified by analysts and managers at CRS Headquarters. CRSIS is w eb-based and allow s for easier access to data. CRS continues to update the system to better manage data requirements and improve the accuracy of the data collection.

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PERFORMANCE MEASURE TABLE Decision Unit: Conflict Resolution and Violence Prevention - Program Operations
FY 2000 Perform ance Report and Perform ance Plan Targets Actual Perform ance Measure Perform ance Measure OUTCOME Measure Cases w here CRS services w ill help resolve community racial violence or conflict Cases w here CRS services w ill prevent potential community racial violence or conflict Communities w ith Improved Conf lict Resolution Capacity N/A Actual N/A Actual N/A Actual 705 Actual 494 Target 520 Actual 546 Actual 584 Target 637 Target 659 FY 2001 FY 2002 FY 2003 FY 2004 FY 2005 FY 2006 FY 2007 FY 2008

N/A

N/A

N/A

471

94

100

105

180

112

116

N/A

N/A

N/A

1176

588

620

651

764

759

786

N/A = Data unavailable

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2. Performance, Resources, and Strategies a. Performance Plan and Report for Outcomes

The Conflict Resolution and Violence Prevention Activities program contributes to the Department’s Strategic Goal #3: Prevent and Reduce Crime and Violence by Assisting State, Tribal, Local and Community-based Programs. Within this Goal, the program specifically addresses the Department’s Strategic Objective: 3.3 – Uphold the rights of and improve the services to America’s crime victims and promote resolution of racial tension. Each region, composed of 3-4 Conciliators and one Regional Director, conducts an appraisal of racial tension in collaboration with state and local officials to determine projects that require immediate attention and demonstrate the greatest need for inclusion in a work plan for resolving racial conflict or violence. Annually, the work plan addresses those communities within each region that require conflict resolution services on an annual basis. Approximately 75% of the region’s workload is direct crisis response services, 5% administrative, and 20% comprehensive projects that address the Annual Appraisal of Racial Tension (AART). Most CRS Conciliators have a common set of programmatic tools, such as mediation, conflict resolution, technical assistance, and specific conflict-related training programs that respond to racial tension and violence. b. Strategies to Accomplish Outcomes

CRS strategies include the Law Enforcement Mediation (LEM) and Anti-Racial Profiling Programs; Arab, Muslim, and Sikh (AMS) Cultural Awareness Program; and, the City Problem Identification and Resolution of Issues Together (City SPIRIT) program. [See Section III, 1. Program Description for detail of CRS strategy programs.] These strategies are specifically designed to assist states, local communities, and tribal governments in resolving racial violence and conflict. CRS has been working collaboratively with four major customer groups: (1) investigative and law enforcement agencies; (2) courts, state, local and tribal governments, and federal agencies, including U.S. Attorneys, FBI, CRT, ENRD, CRM, HUD, DOI, DOT/TSA, DOED, and domestic immigration officials; (3) schools, colleges, and universities; and (4) community groups and other organizations to assist and resolve racial violence and conflict. CRS develops strategies that focus on bringing together the energy of community leaders, organizations, and citizens to work towards crime-prevention and providing safe neighborhoods and communities for all Americans through cooperation and coordination with other Department of Justice components. CRS provides comprehensive services that empower communities to help themselves and maximizes the federal investment at the local level. In order to fulfill the strategic goals of the agency, the management team will continue to stress contemporary mediation skills development, increase accountability on implementation of policies focusing on community conflict driven cases, overall performance work plans, and reaffirm a merit award system for outstanding work. CRS has implemented new systems and will continue to improve upon existing systems in order to meet its goals. CRS’ success can be
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evaluated on how well its strategies address progress made in reaching the Department’s Conflict Resolution and Violence Prevention Activities goal to which it contributes, in addition to keeping the peace in cities throughout the country when events occur that could essentially turn into major riots, violence and property damage.

c.

Results of Program Assessment Rating Tool (PART) Reviews

No programs in the CRS budget account have been subject to a PART Review independently.

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VII. EXHIBITS

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