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I,. ...

australian
f I y ing
s a u c eY rl x ' t(G o
a

r e Ylew

v o l- 1 NO 1
JANUARy 1966
AUSTRALIAN F L YING SAUCER REVTEW

V oI. 1, N o. 1
DECEIIBER, 1959

EDITORIAL

T h i s m a g a z i n e is d e vo te d to a se r io u s study of uni dent,i fi ed fl yi ng obj ects, commonl y


k n o w n a s r r f l - yin g sa u ce r s".

M ^c - f c i- hiinoc nfl Flrrino sArr.prq nan ha ownlainod aq iolq m a fo n n q u r o a - fh a n halln,


- * t- 'l ns '
oln lr r r t a qmall nannanraoa nf l-heqo nannnf e ic r r l _ _ fo n l r r i n o vn l i n a h l e

F l w i n s s n u o - a r r e n o r ts sh o u ld b e e xa :n in e d w i Lh ar rncr ni nd w l ^el even -.he haeksror:nd of


t h e o b s e r v e r is r e lia b le . Wh e n a p r ie st, tw o doctors ard tw o company di rectors gi ve
precise r e p o r ts a b cu t u n kn o wn a ir b o r n e obj ects i n the sky, thei r testi moni es can not be
ignored.

F o r l a c k o f an y o th e r sa r isfa ct,o r y e xp - Lanati on, ci vi l i a-n i nvesti gators bel i eve that
flying s a u c e r s co m e fr o m o th e r wo r ld s in space. The maj ori ty of sci enti sts can not sub-
cnri h6 +^ -hi 1-h-.n! hdna rsp 'haI' .r^ ihink +hFra i q a nl enof srril-rhl c fnn hiohon
- -nF a Ff a rru r ef rrrb rrv r

Iife in the so - L a r sysL e m e xce p r ch e e a r th, w hi -Le ocher sol ar syst,ems are much too far
from us.

However, there are a str o n o m e r s in th e worl d today w ho a:'e progressi ve enough tc admi L
the possibility of sp a ce tr a ve l- b e twe e n the i sl ands of l -i fe scattered i n the ocear of
space.

F r a n k H a l - s t e a d , a r e p u ta b le a str o n o m e r of Mi nnesota, sai d duri ng an i nLervi ew w i th rhe


r a d i o c o m r n e n ta to r F r a n k Bd wa r d s: t' I fe e l that w e have had vi si tors from spaca - j ust as
I f e e l - t h a t i n th e u n ive r se we a r e n o t al -one.rt

O v e r R a d i o M o sco w Dr . F e lix Se g a l, a So vi et astrononer, has stated hi s befi ef that


h e i l s S n o - e i n io lr ise r r f.h a n m a n ' n n ssih l.r eyrsi ed vnn
rr vnt.hen
v ra u r n-anetS .
Pr H e al -S O femafked
t.harrrthe heinos nnrld alncedrr hc making fliohts inln qnano llT)n sa.'^l qrrooaq+q
. !!. v ! -q r vq66svu!

meetings Ith e se sp a ce
with orher t,r a ve l- I ers.rl

According t o Dr . Willia - n Ho we l- ls o f Ha r vard, "i ntel l i gent bei ngs abound i n the uni -verse
a n d m o s t o f th e m fa r o l- d e r th a n we a r e .t' Y et most astronomers ca.n not accept the theory
t h a t w e h a v e visito r s fr o m sp a ce b e ca u se bf the di stance factor i n i nterstefl ar travef.
I f p - L a n s f o r "p h o to n r a y" p r o p u - L sio n o f space rockets are under w ei gh on thi s earth, is
it illogical to th in k th a t a n o ld e r civili sati on i n the cosnos has al -ready surpassed us
i n t e c l i n o l - o g y a n d is a b le L o n a vig a te space shi ps fl yi ng w i th a speed approachi ng that
of light?

Venus and Mars wifl be photographed in the immediate future. This exploration will- settle
t h a t p a r t , o f th e "fl- yin g sa u ce r co n tr o ve rsyrrw hi ch concerns thei r ori gl n. The di scove:'y
o f a n a d v a n c e d civlfisa tio n o n M a r s wifl- el evate thi s subj ect to the l evel of a branch
of science.

lPet er E. Nor r is , LL. B. : P. 0. B o x ) 2 , Toorak, Melbourne, Victoria, Austral-la


c0-EDrrORs
I
I A ndr ew P. Tonas : G . P. 0. Box 1 1 2 0 , S y d n e y , N . S . W. , A u s t r a l i a

SUBSCRIPTION
RATES )/- (AusLrali-an) or $t per year postpaid.

THrS QUARTERLY "UFORUM"(UrCrOnrA) & "UFO BUr.T,FT]N,,(m.S.W.)


MAGAZINEAMALOAMATES
AN ANGLICANPRIEST CONTACTSP]LOTS
OF AN UNKNOWNCRAEI OVER NAd GUINEA

Th A Fx f . r. or d i n a r w e x D e r i e n ce o f th e Re v. F a th e r Willi am B ooth Gi Il i s uni que i n the


hi q l - anrrJ unf
! r4rrr urnr ri d e n t i f i ^ n flr r .in o vnv uuv
r LJ fr S
l-v,ia
v
n fe rr ! e se a r ch . F ather Gi l I i s a.n ordai ned pri est of
+ha Chrrrnh nf Fnolrnri nf anichana TTnirranci--- HiS eCCIeSiastiCaf and
-1, --dru
d @
^ 6r auuaus
-n-irr--a
aca demic background puts th e sta r n p o f r e lia b ility on thi s report.

Th e V ic t oria . n F l - y i n g S a u ce r Re se a r ch So cie ty a n d th e U FO Investi gati on C entre of N .S .W.


have int erv i e w e d F a t h e r GilI. A r e su m e o f th e se ta pr-recorded i ntervi ew s i s presented
bel o w.

a. F at her G i l l , will yo u b e kin d e n o u g h to le t u s know the nature of your acti vi ti es


j-n recent years i-n Papua?
A. I have b e e n o n t h e sta ff o f th e An g lica n M ission i n P apua for thi rteen years - ny
main interest up there has been educational workr a-nd I have been working mainly on the
nort h-eas t c o a s t o f P a p u a , in Go o d e n o u g h Ba y a r e a , about ni nety mi l es from S amarai ,
Mi l ne B ay .
A. F at her G i l I , w e u n d e r sta n d yo u , o r yo u r m issio n fol k, had a seri es of i nteresti ng
experiences during the month of Jr.rne - when, and on what dates did these occur? Afso
wh at d. id y o u t h i n k a b o u t, u n id .e n tifie d flyin g o b je cts before your experi ences?
A. Unt il my sighting I th o u g h t UF Os we r e a fig m e n t of i magi nati on or some el ectrl cal
phenomenon . W e l 1 , t h e f ir st sig h tin g o ccu r e d o ve r Wai mera about tw enty-fi ve mi l -es from
us. I t was o b s e r v e d . b y Dr , Ke n Ho u sto n a t a p la ce cal fed Wai mera, near Tagora, and that
wa s lat e N o v e m b e r o f f a st ye a r . At Bo ia n a i itse lf, w here Itm w orki ng, the fi rst recorded
i n ci d. ent w a s o n t h e n i g ht o f Su n d a y, 2 1 st Ju n e . M y ow n observaci ons bega.n on 26th June
and extended over a nurnber of days.
a. Ta-lci.ng them, then, in date order, when d.i.d the first sighting that you saw occur?
A. That w a s o n 2 6 t i n J u n e , a t 6 .4 5 p .m ., a n d it conti nued unci -L i 1.04 p'm.
C)
q. Orrpr whinh distnio- wrs tha ohiaet Seen?

A. Milne B a y d i s t r l c t , o ve r Bo ia n a i.
A. Did th e o b j e c t - a p p e a r so lid ? m e ta llic? g a se ous? transparent?
A. W elI , i t a p p e a r e d . so lid ., ce r ta in ly n o t tr a r - ) sp arent nor gaseous; w e i ust assume i t
wa s meLalli c f r o m o u r o wn e xp e r ie n ce o f L h in g s L h a L Lravel and carry men'
a. Was a n y s o u n d p e r c e p tlb le ?
A. No.
a. Did t h e o b j e c t c h a ig e co lo u r ?
A. Yes , i t c h a n g e d f r om a b r illia n t
rrhita
yrrrf li rr* h r
!46 u ur aor if r r ac {'o n nf I l^ a
v!

d ul l y ellow , o r p e r h a p s p a le o r a n g e ,
wh en it wa s c l o s e .
a. Did t h e o b j e c t h o v er , o r r e m a in
* ^+ i^-- ..-- -ine? s v 4rJ v!i

A. It both hovered artd remained


stationary.
a. What was its speed in flight?
A. Muc h f a s t e r t h a n a p a sse n g e r p 1 a n e .
a. T he h e i g h t y o u m e ntio n wa s a co u p le o f lh o u sa :-rd feet. Whi ch cf *"re f:Il ow i ng obj ects
held at ar m t s l e n g t h w ou ld yo u h a ve d e scr ib e d a s apparent si ze? - a grap::i rui t?
A. Yes .
O Dps n n ' h o I L A w e a t h e r :
A. W ell, t h e w e a t h e r va r ie d o ve r th e fo u r h o u r peri od. I have i *, r:::r'ded here' A t the
beginning, a t 6 . 4 5 p . m . , th e r e we r e p a tch e s o f lo w cl cuC over Ta4..rz a:tc Menapi , that i s
wes t a l t d e a s t o f u s, a n d cle a r o ve r h e a d . At 7 .10 i t w as recorded that a cfoud cei l i ng
ov erh e a d w a s a t a b o u t 2 OOO fe e t....I m a y r n e n ti on thai at thi s ti me the obi ect w as under
t he c l o u d e e i l i n g ; th e n a t 8 .2 8 th e r e wa s a cLear sky overhead, but there w as heavy
c loud. o v e r t h e w e s t a t T a g o r a . At 8 .5 0 cL o u d w as formi ng agai n overhead, and for the
nex t h o u r o r s o t h e r e we r e p a tch e s o f clo u d o ver the sky, then at 10.!O w e recorded
t hat 1 t w a s v e r y o ve r ca st, a .n d .b y th a t tim e the uni denti fi ed fl yi ng obj ect had gone and
we ha d h e a v y r a i n a t 1 1 .0 4 - th a t' s wh e n we fini shed the recordi ng.
a. w h a t w e r e y o u d o in g a t th e tim e yo u sa w the obj ect, and how di d you happen to
not ic e it?
A. I c a . n i e o u t o f th e d in in g r o o m a fte r d in n er and casual l y gLarl ced at the sky w i th the
purpo s e , I s u p p o s e , o f se e in g Ve n u s. We L I, I saw V enus but I al so saw thi s sparkl i ng
object w h i c h w a s t o m e p e cu lia r b e ca u se it sp arkl ed, and because i t w as very, very
hnioh
vr r6 ra ' fu, a n r l i f r ^ r 2 s a b o ve Ve n u s a n d so th a t ca used me to w atch i t for a w hi l e, then I
s aw i t d e s c e n d t o w ar d s u s.
A. W e r e t h e r e a n y witn e sse s to th is?
A. Y e s , t h e r e w e r e th ir ty- e ig h t o f u s.
a. What flurther r e "la r ks wo u ld yo u m a ke r e g a rdi ng thi s fi rst si ghti ng of yours?
A. WeIl, o f c o u r s e , th e wh o le th in g wa s m o s t extraordi nary; the facL that w e saw w hat
appea r e d t o b e h u ma n b e in g s o n it, I th in k, is Lhe i mportanb Lhi ng. Ib i s certal n-y Lhe
imvrnnn -u(a!aur f . : r d e y e i f .ir o
r,,,P L h in o t. ' u s- T h p v we r e noL noti ceabl e a-c fi rst - they cal ne dow n,
t he o b j e c t c a m e d o wn a t a b o u t, I sh o u ld sa y, 4OO feet, maybe 450 feet, perhaps l ess,
may be I O O f e e t . I t is ve r y d ifficu lL to j- d g e at that Li m'e of ni ght and nob havi ng expeF
ienc e i n m e a s u r i n g e le va tio n , icr s p u r e ly g u e ssw ork, buL as w e w atched i t, men came out
f rnm - f . h i s o h i e c t -
vvJ ev v, a n d a n n e a r e d o n th e t,o o o f i t on w hat seemed to be a deck on top of
t he h u g e d i s k . T h e re we r e fo u r m e n in a ll, o ccasi onal l y tw o, then one, then three, then
four - we noted the various times that men appeared, and when one, two and three appeared
anri nnc rnrj Lwn anrj -hon rrr*hanq nra 'hraF fr-rr erd Lw. and So on. And then fater alf

t hc s e w i t n e s s e s w h o a r e q r r ite su r e th a c o u r r ecords w ere ri ghb, they agreed w i th bhem, and


saw these men at the same time as I d.id - they were able to sign their na.mes as witnesses
of wh a t , w e a s s u m e wa s h u m a - n a cL ivity o r b e in g s of some sort, on the obi ect i tsel -f, A nother
pecul-iar thing about it was this shaft of bl-ue llght which emanated from what appeared
t o be t h e c e n t r e o f th e d e ck. No w fr o m tim e bo ti me men, these men, seemed to be w orki ng
at s o m e b h i n g o n L h e d e ck; b h e yr d b e n d fo r wa r d and appear to mani pi rl ate somethi ng on the
dec k , a n d t h e n s t r a ig h te n th e m se L ve s u p o cca si ona-Iy, w oul d turn around j .n our di recti on,
but on the whofe they were interested in something on the deck. Then from tirne to time -
this blue l-ieht - rather like a thin spotlight emanated skywards to stay on for a second
or t w o , a n d t h e n switch o ff. I r e co r d e d th e times that w e saw that bl ue l i ght come on
and o f f - f o r t h e r e st o f th e n ig h t. Afte r a fl that acti vi ty i t ascended a:rd remai ned very
high.
a. W h a t d i d t h e cr a ft lo o k like ?
A. L i k e a d . i s k w ith sm a lle r r o r .r n d . su p e r str u cture, rhen aai n on top of bhat another ki nd
of superstructure - round rather like the brldge on a boat. Underneath it had four J-egs
in pa i r s p o i n t i n g d ia g o n a L - L y d o wn wa r d s - t,h e se appeared to be fi xed, noL. retraccabl e, and
f ook ed . b h e s a m e o n th e L wo n ig h ts - r a b h e r like tri pods. 0n second ni ght the penci l beam
c ane o n a g a i n f o r a fe w se co n d s, cwice in su ccessi on'

-1*

'r*:,-i' -rd,'

h1 f"
A. Do y ou h a v e a n y c l u e s a s to th e d im e n sio n s o f the obj ect?
A. Trm a v e r y p o o r m a t h e m a ticia n b u t I, a t th e tim e, dared to say that i t w as about
t hi rty-f iv e to forty f e e t a t th e b a se a n d p e r h a p s twenLy feet at the top.
A, Did y ou t r y t o e s t a b l ish co n ta ct with th e p ilo ts of the craft?
A. We did. As one of the men seerned to lean over as though over a rail and look down on
us, I waved one hard overhead arrd the figure did the sa.ne as though a skipper on a boat
waving to someone on a wharf. Coul-dn't see the rail- but he seemed. to lean over something
w i th arm s ove r i t . . . . c o u l d se e h im fr o m ju st b e lo w wai st up. A nani as, the teacher,
waved both hands overhead ald the two outside figures waved baek with two arns over heads.
Then Ananias and I both waved arms and al-l- four figures seemed to wave back - no doubt
that rnovement made by arms was arrswered by the flgures.
a. What wa s t h e r e a c t j . o n o f th e n a tive s a t sig n a ls?
A. S urpris e d a n d d e l i g h t ed . Sm a ll m issio n b o ys ca lled out - everyone beckoned to i nvi te
t he beings d o w n b u t n o a u d ib le r e sp o n se s....n o e xp r e ssi ons di scerni bl e on the faces of the
mc n ra l-ho r .lik
. r ror v hi^h+
- ynlqr
r 4Jr anq nn a f n n - t l - 'a l l rf il ^slr^u a^ +
L rrfSrru.

a. Did t he m a c h i n e c a u s e a .n y n o ise ?
A. No engin e n o i s e h e a r d a t a n y tim e b y a r yo n e d u r ing the w hol -e seri es of si ghti ngs.
S. W e unde r s t a n d y o u t r i ed to sig n a l th e b e in g s with a torchl i ght?
A. Yes , we f l a s h e d t h e lig h t a n d th e o b je ct swu n g l i ke a pendul -um, presumabl y i n
r ecognit lon. W h e n w e f l - a s h e d th e to r ch fig h b to wa r d s it, i t hovered, and carne qui te cl ose
t owa rds t he g r o u n d . . . . a n d we a ctu a lly th o u g h t it wa s goi ng to l and but i t di dntt. We w ere
a ll v ery dis a p p o i n t e d a b o ut th a t.

THE PORTMORESBYFILM.....DOES IT
SUPPORTFEV. FATHERGILLIS CASE ?

A sb rip of m o t i o n p i c t u r e film co n ta in in g n in e ty- fo u r frames corroborates the N ew Gui nea


si ghti n g of R e v e r e n d W . B . Gill- . T h is is th e so - ca l- Ie d P ort Moresby fi l m taken by T.C .
D ru ry, Deput y D i r e c t o r o f th e Civil Avia tio n De p a r tm ent i n N ew Gui nea, on A ugust 21rd,,195J.

Th i s illus t rat io n , d r a w n fr o m th e a cl-


u af frames o f t h e f i l m , s h o ws a d isk-
sh aped objec t in flighb.

Mr. W . M c Mah o n , M i n i s t e r fo r Air ,


st a Led aL t n e t i m e u h a t e x p e r t,s o f
t he R. A . A . F . h a d e x a m i n e d th e fllm .
Th e o bjec t d i d n o t d e c r e a s e sp e e d in
ascent and, made ninety <iegree man-

According t o M r . D n u r y u h e n o L io n
p icture was t a k e n a t m i d d ay. F ir sL
a cl -o ud appe a r e d i n a c l e a r sky.
O ut of t his cfoud a silvery o b je ct
emcnocd f I eshi no hni oh l- I rr i n f ha crrn
Tl mqde en ehnrrnt niohf od _f rrnr sfnaioh-f rrn u r i +h nn nodrrnrian in cn a a ,4
-rnol - - - .n 1 n g
U p on reac hing a greater a l titu d e it le ve fle d off aEain wiih anoi her ahr r r nt r i oht- ano- l ed

Th e PO RT MO R E S B YF I L M i s at p r e se n t in th e hands of the Intel -l i gence cf the R .A .A .F.

According t o t h e f o r m e r M in iste r fo r Air , th e m a n wh o took chi s moti on pi cture Ia


is
r el i a bl e , c re d i b l e person." T h e film h a s b e e n se e n b y the U ni ted S Lates A i r Force experts.
I t i s s ril-I officially u n e xp la in e d .

Was the dis k s i m i l a r to the cr a ft .o b se r ve d b y Re v. F ather Gi l l and the thi rty-ei ght
n ati ve wit nes s e s ?
INVESTIGATING NE\,'' GUINEA SIGIIIINGS
R.A.A.F. INTELLIGENCE

Inordert o g e t a S t a t e m e n i l r om Ca n b e r r a o n th e Ne wGu in e a sig h tings,Mr.P eterN c,rri s,


L L. B . , t he P r e s i d e n t o f t h e V i cto r la r iF lyin g Sa u ce r Re se a r ch so cietyw rotetotheD i rector
1 !!!' H i s l etter reads:
of A ir F o r c e I n t e l l i g e n ce o n 1 2 th se p te m b e r ,

M y S o cie tyh a sb e e n u n d e r ta kin g in ve stisati onsi ntothea}l egedsi ght-


ings of un l d e n t i f i e d f l y i n g o bje ctsr e p o r te d b yth e Re v.F a th e r W.B .Gj -rl ofB oi anai
A nglic an M j - s s i o n , P a p u a , Ne w Gu in e a '

S l n ce F a th e r Gilla n d h isr r a r r ywitn e sse sreportedexchangl ngsi gnal s


th e se sighti ngs, once establ i shed as authenti c'
wit h hu m a n o l d b e i n g s a b o a r d th e o b je ct, gui ded machi nes'
f u r n i s h t n e m u ch - co ve te d p r o o f th a t the uFOs are i ntel l i gentl y
appear t o

submi t your D epartment the fol l ow i ng


S c c o r d .in g ly, I r e sp e ctfu lly
th a t ]o u - will sL e fit to a s si st us i n our enqui ri es:
ques t ion s , trusting

l . H asth e De p a r tm e n tin itia te d e n q u ir ie si ntoFatherGi Ll l scl ai ms?


and accuracy of these w i tnesses?
If s o, h a s a n y c o n c l usio n b e e n r e a ch e d . a s to th e veraci ty

2 . I f th e r e p o r tsa r e r e g a r d e d .a sg e n u in e ,hastheD epartmentarri ved


and origin of the objects described therej'n?
at a^r-ryconclusion as to the
"utt-ti"
i n fact' i nvesti gated the reports' is
) , If tr r e De p a r tm e n t h a s n o t'
do not constitute the infringement of
the Department satisfied that these incid.ents
A us t rali a n t e r r j - t o r i a l j u r i Sd ictio n b ya ir cr a fte m a r r a tin g fr o m a nal i enearthnati on?

Yours trulY,
( si- g n e d) P eter E ' N orci s' TT''B '
Pres', V i ctori an Ftyi ng S aucer R eseal 'ch S oci etyt'
Ho n .

T herep l y f r o m t h e D i r e c t o ra te o fAi.r F o r ce ln te llig e n ce ,De p a r tnentofA i r,C anberra,


arrived about a month later.

I 'De a r M r . Norri-s,

yo u r le tte r of 12th S eptember' 1959'


T ha n k yo u fo r

of any sightings by Gi1] in New Gulnea'


We have no official i-nformation
but we are now making enquiries lnto the matter'

Yo u r s si ncerel y,
( sig n e d) l 'F' Gl l son (S quadron Leader)
rF+h 1Q69
^n+^hor
THE LUNAR PRO BE

A courist fr o m Sin g a p o r e tr a ve llin g easu al ong the equaLor vi a E quador and C ongo w oul d
c o v e r a b o ut 2 5 ,0 0 0 m ile s o n h is a r o u nd-the-w orl d tri p, If w e stretch thi s di stance as a
yardsbiek a n d m u - L r - ip ly it, te n tim e s, the obher end of thi s huge yard.sti ck w o-rl d reach
t h e n o o n . Ha d u h e m o o n a :r d lh e e a r th been sLari onary, i t, w oul d have been a eomparati vel y
e a s y t a s k to a im a t th e m o o n a n d h it i t. B ut both bodi es are movi ng. Luni k II reached the
n o o n o n S e p L e m b e c llth a n d th e la u n ch ing of Luni k III, an aut,omati c i nterpl aneLary
station, w a s a n n o u n ce d o n Octo b e r 4 th.

T n i s l - a r L ce r n - sh a p e d su a L io n with a g ui dance system a,nd eqri pment to photograph the hi d.den


s i d e o f t h e m o o n r e a ch e d its cL o se st poi nt to the moon - 4,)75 mi l es - on October B th.
T h e 6 0 0 l b sa te llite to o k p ictu r e s o f the other si de of the moon for forty mi nutes on
O c t o b e r 8 th , wh e n it wa s a b o u t 4 O,OO O mi l es from the moon. The moon probe poses t11e
f nl I nr r ir r n , r a c *i
Ysuu v r J r ^r un.c .

IS TIIE MOCN A DEAD PLANET?

DO COSMIC VISITORS USE TIIE MOON AS A BASE?

Not until m o r e sp a ce sta tio n s o r b it around the moon, or the rockets actual l y l and there
w o u l d t h e fir st q u e stio n b e a n swe r e d , B ecause of the absence cf w ater and atmosphere
plan' a n d a n im a - L life o f th e L e r r - str ia- tvpe car. no1 exi sL .l n che moon. B ut, bacteri a
mav live on th e m o o n .

T h e s e c o n d q u e stio n is ve r y p r o vo kin g . It i s thoughr uhat a more evoLved humani by on


another planet co u ld h a ve m a ste r e d space Lravet. If s:, i rs astrona'Jrs nay be usi ng Lhe
m o o n a s a b a se .

Professor Wa lte r Rie d e l, fo r m e r ly Dir ector of the V -2 P enemunde B ase, offers the fol -
I o w i n g o p in io n in r o fe r e n ce to L h e fI,i :rg saucers: "I', i s possi bl e that rhese machi nes
c o m e f r o m M a r s u sin g th e sid e o f th e moon i nvi sl bi e to earth as a base,rt

D r . J o h n R u sse ll, h e a d o f th e Un ive r slty of S outhern


Ca-Lifornia Astr o n o m y De p a r tm e n r .r su p porLS P rofessor
Riedel b y sa yin g : "If th e r e we r e flyin g saucers from
M a r s s c r u t in isin g o u r p L a n e t,, r - h e n th e back si de of Lhe
M o o n w o u l d b e a n id e a l sta g in g p la tfo r m for them.
M a r t i a - n s p a ce cr a ft co u ld ( a t th e tim e of the new
moon) circle a r o u n d th e m o o n se ve r a l ti mes before
landing a n d still g o u n o b se r ve d . An d once l anded
o n t h e b a c k sid e , r h e y wo u ld b e a b so lutel y safe from
further d ete ctio n la te r .t'

The "neu" ldce ol the


Wil-l lunar e xp lo r a tio n co n fir m th e se supposi ti ons? moon. ds seen bu the
Russian satellite camera.

SPACE INVASION ON T}A


AGENDA OF UNITED NATIONS

Portugalrs d e le g a te , Dr . Va sco Ga r in , tol d. the U ni ted N ati ons on October 27th that the
S o v i e t p r o p o sa l fo r to ta l wo r ld d isa r manent rai sed many del i cate questi -ons. H e sai d.
i t w a s n o t a b su r d to im a g in e a su d d e n i nvi .si n of earth by "aggressi ve w arri orst' from
a n o t h e r c ele stia l b o d v.

"Our f o r c e s, in clu d in g ch o se o f th e S ovi et, U ni on, w oul -d. cuL a poor fi gure lf w e had onIS
k niv es and pocket s l in g s with wh ich to d e fe n d oursefves", D r. Gari n sai d.

Howev e r , t h e S o v i e t Un io n d o e s n o t se e m to th ln k that there i s any dal ger from space.


During h i s t r i p t o De tr o it, F r o l Ko zlo v, So vie t Fi rst D eputy P remi er, referred to the
Rus s ian t h e o r y t h a t th e Slb e r ia n M e te o r o f l- !0 8 w as a "cosmi c shi p| and sai d: "A number
of y ear s a g o a b i g , b u r n in g o b je ct ta :- id e d in o ur country. S ome pecpl e say i t w as a meteor-
it e, b u t o t h e r s s a y it wa s a M a r L ia n r o cke t sh ip that burned up i n the atmosphere." A
report er s u g g e s t e d th a t if th a t we r e tr u e , a Sovi et-A meri can al l i a:-rce ml ght be needed
agains t t h e M a r t i a n s . M r . Ko zlo v la u g h e d a n d started to agree. Then he sai d: "P erhaps the
Mart ia: ts a r e a l s o a p e a ce fu l p e o p le . T h e n we shoul d not make w arl i ke al l i ances agai nsl
t hem, b u t w o u l d t r y to live ln p e a ce with th e m ' ..'"

M. P. s D I S C U S S I NTERPLANETARY D IP LOMA C Y

Lord F r a s e r o f L o n s da le a ske d in th e Ho u se o f Lords on June I3Lh, I9r9, i f the Government


s ought o r r e c e i v e d a n y a d vice "a s to th e p o sslb i l i ty or probabl l i ty that any senti ent
c reat ure s live i n o th e r wo r fd s, a n d wh e th e r a ly a'utempts at communi cati on have been con-
s idered o r f o r e s h a d o we d ."

Itth e Go ve r n m e n t d o e s not i ncl ude communi catl ons w i th al l y pose


Lord H a i l s h a m r e p l i e d th a t
lble in h a b i t a l l t s o f o th e r wcr ld s a m o n g th e o b je cts of the U ni ted K i ngdom space research
progra- n m e . C e r t a i n l y th e Go ve r n m e n t h a s n o t so ught or recei ved any advi ce as to w hether
s ent ien t creatures l ive in o th e r wo r ld s....." (LnU C H ten)

T he exi s t e n c e o f i n t ellig e n t b e in g s th r o u g h o u t the gal axy a]-l d possi bl y even i n our sol ar
s y s t em i s s e r i o u s l y co n sid .e r e d b y th e fo r e r n o st astronomers of the w orl d.

I n A us t r a l i a M r . W . F. Cr a b tr e e , th e Sta te L a b o ur member for K ogarah, asked the Mi ni ster


f or Ci v i l D e f e n c e ( M r . He ffr o n ) to ta ke p r e ca u ti ons agai nst i nterpl anetary reprl sal attacks.
Mr, Cr a b t r e e s a i d : "T h e r e is a d e fln ite r isk that superi or bei ngs i n outer space mi ght
s t art retaliating i f we ke e p u p th is in d iscr im in ate fi rl ng of i nterspace rockets."

In rep l y to the D a i ly M ir r o r ( Sya n e y) Mr. Cr a b tree had thi s to say:

W e r e y o u s e r i o u s wh e n yo u a ske d yo u r q u e sti on i n the H ouse l ast ni ght (S ept' i !th)?


A.
A. Oh, y e s l I was q u ite se r io u s.
a. Do you seriously th in k th e r e is a n y th r e a t of repri sal s?
A. It i s p o s s i b l e th a t if th e r e a r e su p e r io r bei ngs on other pl a:]ets w ho know that
roc k et s a r e b e i n g f ir e d a t th e n fr o m e a r th lh e y mi ght retal i ate'
a. Y o u t h j - n k t h a t th e y m ig h t fir e r o cke ts a t us?
A. They might fire r o cke ts o r ta ke so m e o th e r actl on.
Do you think, th e n , th a t r e p o r ts o f flyln g saucers are a.n i ndi cati on that these outer
a.
s pac e a r e a s a r e i n h ab ite d ?
A. The rnany reports o f flyin g sa u ce r sig h tin g s from reLi abl e sources gi ve w ei ght to
t he ar g u m e n t t h a t t h e r e co u ld b e life o n o th e r pl anets.
a. H a v e y o u e v e r m a d e a stu d y o l flyin g sa u cer sci ence?
A, N o , m i n e i s a la ym a n ' s p o in t o f vie w. All I know about them i s from the reports
in t he n e w s p a p e r s . Bu t I a m a b so lu te ly su r e th at sci entl sts shoul d be equal l y certai n
t hat th e r e i s n o l i f e in o u te r sp a ce b e fo r e th ey fi re any more rockets.
a. D o y o u t h i n k t h e r e is a n y d a :r g e r o f r e ta liati on by the moon?
A. T h e m o o n , o r o th e r p la n e ts; I se e th a t some sci enti st has al ready sai d that there i s
lif e on the moon.
you mean the report o f th e So vie t scie n tist w ho sai d he bel i eved that there w ere
a.
mic ro-o r g a n i s m s o n th e m o o n , p r o b a b ly ve r y sm al l a:-rd pri mi ti -ve?
A. I d o n r t k n o w w h a t typ e o f lj- fe - Ir m o n ly speaki ng as a l ayma:r'
A. Do you think t ha t sh e lte r s o u g h t to b e b u i l t?
A. T h e r e i s n o u se b u ild in g sh e fte r s unti l w e know w hether there i s any danger.
a. D i d y o u a sk yo u r q u e stio n in Pa r lia ment to try to get Mr. H effron to tal e some
uf v
aa+ inn?
- ^c it ir r a
Pvp!

A. f h e q u e s tio n wa s d e sig n e d m o r e to see i f I coul -d aw aken the peopl e to the fact


that t h e r e c ou ld b e a r e a l d a n g e r fr o m other pl anets.
l tpossi bi l -
Also i n -uuPs e nu,tt
t et,vm
r ber a R- i,ich ir ' - isi. r d r ^ r a r,o a S ovi et sci enti st w arni ng of the
ities o f e x p l o r a tio n , if n o r o f in va sio n , by the i rl habi .tarts of al other sol ar system.rr

M r , C h r i s t o p h er Sh a wcr o ss, Q.C., wa s wr lti ng i n hi s capaci ty as chai rman of the


provisional In stitu te o f Sp a ce L a w ( U.K. ). H e w rote to the P resi dent of the Internatl on-
a I A s t r o n a u t i c al F e d e r a tio n o n sp a ce T r avel , P rocessor Leoni d sedov.

In his fetter, Mr. Sh a wcr o ss wr o te th a t there shoul d be i ntensi ve study at i nternati onal -
qneeo _ .r a VA
I ar r al nn +w-
hor v yn tn a h l a m
v tqu r . . - e1
4 nu
d d@
u a nro6eur!s inrrolfied ri nr r vvu vv -
-

VICTORIAN FLYING SAUCERRESEARCH$AAIEry \I E ]C S U F O OBSERIIER


CORPSESTABLISHED

A sub-conmittee o f th e VF SRS h a s r e ce n tly been set up under the di recti on of commi ttee
nembers Norman Hall and Judy Magee to establish a state-wide organisation known as the
Victorian U FO Ob se r ve r Co r p s, wh ich wil- l operate under the aegi s of the S oci ety.

M o r e r h a n 1 9 0 e o u n r ,r y n e wsp a p e r s we r e circu.Iari sed by the sub-commi ttee aJId thei r gen-


e r o u s c o - o p e r a tio n h a s r e su lte d in th e enrol ment of i nterested persons from al l parts
of the state.

T h e n e t w o r k o f Ob se r ve r s wil- I fu n ctio n pri nci pal fy by reporti .ng to headquarters the


a p p e a r a n c e o f a n y u n u su a l o b je cts o r lig hts i n the skl es above thei r respecti ve dl st-
ricts. I t i s h o p e d . th a t sig h tin g s r e p o r ted frorn al l parts of the state by Observers
will ultimately r e ve a l a d .isce r n ib le p a ttern i n U FO appearances. Observers w i l f afso
act as public r e la tio n s o ffice r s o f th e S oci ery by di ssemi nati ng i nformati on perLai n-
i n g t o U F O s th r o u g h th e n e ws m e d ia o f thei r di stri ct.

REVEFEND FATHER GILL


ADDRESSESVFSRS MEETING

ApproximateLy 2 3 O p e r so n s a tr e n d .e d a p u bti c meeLi ng orga:ri sed by the V FS R S at N l chol as H al I,


Mathnrrnnc .n On t.n h e r r Q+ L f- L a a n Er 6 +Lar Gi II qvdescri be
vr ], hi s recent
vv S l ghti ngs of U FOS over
N e w G u i n e a , T h e a u d ie n ce liste n e d r a p tly to Father Gi l l ts hour-l ong address, and then asked
questions f o r a fu r th e r J0 m in u te s.

T h e m e e t i n g r e ce ive d g o o d n o tice s in th e fol l ow i ng morni ngrs press. Father Gi l l has subsequ-


e
ur r vn t l v
L.r a n n e a r -o d o n ARV Ch a n n e l 2 ls n n n r :lar sA ssi rn l tP ennl ert and w as al -so heard A ustral i a-
sPPeL!
ttS cope".
w i d . e o n t h e ABC we e kly r a d io se ssio n

V FS R S
MEMBERSHIP

Membership to the VFSRS costs one guinea per a.nnum (husband-wlfe membership S1,10. O per,
|tA ustral -i .a:r Fl yi ng S aucer R evi ew t'
a n r i u m ) . M l m b e r s r e ce ive m e m b e r sh ip ca r d . s, free copi es of
and. full- library fa cilitie s. T h e lib r a r y contai ns a comprehensi ve sefecti on of U FO w orks,
which are mail-ed on loa.n to any part of Vi.ctoria. Further details of membershj-p may be
o b t a i n e d . b y m a kin g a p p l- ica tio n to th e S ecretary, Mi ss D orothy Gi l -l man, at P .O. B ox )2,
T o o r a k , V i c t o r ia .

VFSRS Pr esident: Peter Nor is Vice-Pres. & Treasurer: Ben Spencer


OFFICE Scnr etar r r : flnr nf.hr
v v r r Jr Librarian: Geoff Rumpf Asst. Lib.: Norman Hall
Cillma-
v. n
BEAFERS Co m m itte e : Ju d y M a g e e , Norman HalI, Claude Bezzi, Rodney Coutts, Ian Godden
R us s ian Scientists B e l - ie ve There 1s

PLANT, ANIMAL AND HL]MAN LIFE ON MARS

Rec ent d i s c o v e r l e s i n th e n e w scie n ce


of A s t rob i o l o g y ( c o m p ile d fr o m L IF E
ON OTi{ER WORLDS bY L. GoLosnitskY,
Moscow , 1 !f!)

Is t here l i f e o n o t h e r p la n e ts? T h is q u e stio n is one


of t he d e e p e s t a r l d m ost co m p lica te d wh j- ch e xclte the
human mi n d . E v e n t h e n e a r e st p la n e ts a r e se p a r a te d
from ear t h b y a : l a b y s s o f u n ive r sa l- sp a ce ' Is it
pos s lble to aseertain co r r e ctly th e p r e se n ce o f li fe
Ln a c ele s t i a l b o d . y s itu a te d m illlo n s o f m ile s fr om
the earth?

T his most d . i f f i c u l t p ro b le m , o n ce th o u g h t in so lu b l -e
has been r e c e n t l y s o l v e d ' b y a So vie t scie n tist -
G abriel Ad.rian Tikhof' As a r e su lt o f h is la b o u r s w i thl n
the wall- s o f t h e A I m a - Ata Ob se r va to r y a n e w scie nce w as
born - a s t r o n o m i c a l b io lo g y o r , b r ie fly a str o b io lo gy'

In biolog y t h e c h e m i c aL r e a ctio n o f a livin g su b stance


with the substa.nces of the environment bears the
name of r n e t a b o l i s m . L e t u s ta ke a sto n e ' It h a s no
ex c ha: rge o f s u b s t a n c e s with th e e n vir o n m e n t' 0n
t he c ont r a r y , t h e b e t te r it is iso la te d fr o m th e
ac t ion o f t h e e n v i r o n r ne n t - th a t is, fr o m th e a cti on
of wat er , a t m o s p h e r e , ch a n g e o f te m p e r a tu r e , th e
longer w i I I i t b e p r e s e r ve d . A livin g o r g a n ism is
in continuous inter-action with the surrounding
env ironm e n t - it eats, a b so r b s wa te r a n d b r e a th e s'
I t buiLd . s i t s b o d y f r om th e a ssim ila te d su b sta n ces and
t h a t w h i c h is u se d u p a n d n o t r e q u lr e d ' As
ex c ret es
a res ult o f t h e c o n t i nu o u s m u ta tio n o f su b sta n ce s'
t he orga n i s m s g r o w , de ve lo p a n d m u ltip ly' T h e se bi o-
I ogic al p r o c e s s e s o f g r o wth , d e ve lo p m e n t a n d m u ltl -
plic at ion distinguish a livin g su b sta n ce fr o m n on-
liv ing matter.

W hat c o n d i t i o n s a r e ne ce ssa r y fo r life ? F ir stly the


temperature on the planet should not be too high
nor too low. Both extreme cold and extreme heat are
dangerou s f o r p r o t e i n s o f wh ich th e b o d ie s o f p l arts Academician G. Tikhov
and animals are made uP.

water is an important component paf.t of any organisn'


secondly, the pJ-anet must have water.
substances and varj.ous vital- processes take place by mearrs of
The passage of nutritive
wat er.

the planet must have an aerial- envelope - an atmosphere. the Air is necessary
Thirdly,
p r e ssu r e wh ich keeps w ater i 'n the fl ui d state.
mainly b e c a u s e i t i s a tm o sp h e r ic

n e ce ssa r y fo r tife - a sul tabfe temperature (not too hi gh


S uc h ar e t h e t h r e e co n d itio n s
or t oo l o w ) , t h e p r e s e n ce o f wa te r a n d th e p r e sence of ai r'

Mars is ln m a n y r e s p ects sim il- a r to e a r th .


I t rev o l v e s a r o u n d its a xis in 2 4 h o u r s J/ m in utes. Its day i s onl y sl i ghtl y l onger
t han t h e t e r r e s t r i a l d a y. It h a s ch a n g e o f se a sons - as on earth, w i nter col -d i s repl aced
by warm sprlng days, then surnmer fofl-ows spring a.nd autunm comes in place of summer.
Howev e r , e a c h s e a s o n is twj- ce a s lo n g a s o n e arth. Mars has w ater and ai r.

B ut t he r e a r e m a n y d iffe r e n ce s b e twe e n th e p h ysl cal condi ti ons of earth and Mars' Mars
rec eiv e s l e s s s u n l i g ht a n d " wa r m th . Its d ia m e te r i s hal f that of the terrestri al . Thi s
det erm i n e s t h e p h y s ica L co n d itio n s o n th e p la n et - there i s l ow er temperature on Mars thar,
on ear t h a n d t h e a i r is m o r e r a r ifie d .

T he ma t e r i a l u n i f o r m l ty o f th e u n ive r se p e r m its one to thi nk that there are l i kew i se radi o-


ac t iv e s u b s t a n c e s i n th e co m p o sitio n o f M a r s, and they w ere more ptenti ful mi l l i ards of
y ears a g o t h a n a t t he p r e se n t tim e . Nu cle a r fu si on energy had then w armed up the crust
of t he p l a n e t a l d r e su lte d in a vio le n t vo lca n ic acti vi ty'

T he s u r f a c e o f t h e m o o n te ll- s u s h o w vio le n tly vol cani c acti vi ty mani fested i tsel f


ev en o n t h e s m a l l p la :- r e ts in th e e a r ly p e lio d s of thei r. evol uLi on. The crusi of thi s
s mall s a t e l l i t e o f e a r th is co ve r e d with a b u n dant craters a:l d mountai ns, cracks and
c lef t s . All this i s th e r e su lt o f p a st vo lca n ic acti vi ty. D uri ng vol cani c erupti ons
t he bo w e l s o f a p l a n e t e m it ste a m a r r d ca r b o n di oxl de. C arbon di oxi de pl ays the same rol e
as gLa s s i n a g r e e n ho u se - it p r e se r ve s th e warnth on the surface of the pl anet.

Cons eq u e n t l y , i n t h e d ista n t p a st M a r s h a d a humi d, hot cl i mate. It i s then that l -1fe


c ould h a v e , o r r a t h e r sh o u ld h a ve b e g u n in a natural w ay. Therefore, the organi c w orl d
on Mar s d e v e l o p e d i r- r th e p a st in co n d itio n s o f a hot cl i rnate.

T he ob s e r v a t i o n s o f M a r s a r e ve r y d i- fficu lt b ecause of the huge di stance betw een i t


and t h e e a r t h , T o d lsce r n m in u te d e ta ils o n th e smal l di sk of the pl anet through the
t eles c o p e c a . n b e d on e with g r e a t d ,ifficu lty in the rare mi nutes of reLati ve cafm of the
rary es + . r i a l atmosnhere, In th ls ca se p o we r fu l magnl fi cati on does not hel p. Wi th a
magnif i c a t i o n o f i B OO tim e s th e p la r e r - will b e seen nuch w orse tha:l w i th one of 800
t im es . T r u e e n o u g h , its d isk will- b e ccm e la r g e r, but i t w j l l fcse bri ghtness a:rd the
v ibrat io n s o f t h e ea r th r s a tm o sp h e r e will ca u se i Ls:ni nute detai l s i ,c cl ui ver al d fa.de-

S c lent i s t s h a v e t r i e d. sin ce th e la st ce n tu r y to fi nd a w a;r to i mprove the vi si bi l i ty


of Ma r s . G . A . T i k h o f h a s su cce e d e d . in so fvin g thi s probl er.. H e has i ntroduced l i ght
f ilt ers f o r o b s e r v a tio n s. T h e se a r e g la ss p la tes cf vari oud col ours through w hi ch i s
ex amin e d t h e t e l e s c o p ica lL y e n la r g e d im a g e o f the pl anet.

Light filters m a k e it p o ssib le to o b se r ve su r face detai l s of the pl anet i n the rays of


one de f i n i t e cofour. T h e y str e n g th e n th e co n tr ast betw een di fferentl y col oured formati ons
a: rd im p r o v e t h e v i s i b ility o f th e fa in tly co lo ured and w eakl y i l l umi nated detal l s.

t'seas"
F or exa m p l e , t h e r e d llg h t filte r co n sid e r a b ly darkens the greeni sh patches of the
o u t w e ll o n th e lig h t b a ckg r o u n d of the conti nents. It i -mproves the vi si bi l i ty
whic h s t a n d
of " c a n a l s t ' - t h e myste r io u s th in lin e s wh ich cover the surface of Mars. C hal gi ng the red
f j. lt er to a g r e e n on e we sh a ll se n e w fo r m a tio ns so far i mpercepti bl e - w hi te streaks
c ros s in g the C i s k of th e p la n e t in d iffe r e n t dl recti ons, someti mes proj ecti ng beyond the
edge o f t h e disk. T h e se a r e clo u d s slo wly flo a ti ng i n the ai r above the pl ai ns of Mars.

t h e visib illty o f su r fa ce d etai l s on the pl anet, l i ght fi l ters are abl e


B es j-d. e s i m p r o v i n g
t o det e r m i n e p r e c i s e ly th e co lo u r to n e s o f th e obj ects. For exanpl e, al l green obj ects,
s een t h r o u g h a g r e e n g la ss a p p e a r ve r y tig h t, red ones dark and w hi te as green.

su cce ssive ly th r o u g h vari ous l i eht fi l -ters, i ts col our can be


B y obs e r v i - n g a : ' r o b j e ct
d . e t e rm in e d . An d a s e a ch su b sta n ce has a defj .ni tel y characteri sti c col -ouri ng,
unmis t a k e a b l y
w hat materi al s the
light fii-ters e n a b l e u s to d .e cid e , with a g r e at degree of probabi l i ty,
formations o n th e su r fa ce o f M a r s a re made of. Thus, for i nstance, by means of
dj. f f ere n t
I ight filters, i t h a s b e e n a sce r ta in e d . th a t the pol -ar caps of Mars are composed of i ce,
ttcontinentstt are sandy-clay plains similar to
a1d partiall-y of snow, a1d, that the orange
rr r e d s a n d . s t t o f ce r ta in d e se r ts in ce n tr a l A si a'
t lre
Tne s u r f a c e o f M a r s is co n sid e r a b ly le ve lle d . 0n i t w e can not see any mounbai n ri dges
and it s v a s t d e s e r t s a r e n o t ln te r se cte d b y ch ai ns of mountai ns. It i s onl y i n certai n
plac es - i n t h e d e s er t o f th e n o r th e r n h e m isp h ere and near the south pol e that w e see
t hrough t h e t e f e s c o p e b r ig h t, wh ite sp o ts. T h is i s permanent snow , shi ni ng i n the sun on
t ops o f l o n e l y m o u n ta in s.

What d o e s t h e e v e n re lie f o f M a r s su g g e st? F lr stl y, that the processes of the formati on


of m ou n t a i n s h a v e l o n g ce a se d o n th e p la - n e t. Secondl y, that the vol canoes aJrd mountai ns
whic h m u s t h a v e a p p - ^ a r e d in th e e a r fy sta e s o f the evol uti on of the pl a:ret, have al read.y
been d e s t r o y e d b y e ro sj- o n a n d win d in th e co u r se of hundred.s of mi l rl ons of years.

I f in t h e p a s t M a r s h a d h a d iittle wa te r a n d the ai r h :d h co n 1 /.P\ +h i n ha pn rr n n u^ c-


u :- - u
^ fa
lev elling o f t h e s u r fa ce co u ld n o t h a ve g o n e so far.

@!ff
T he m o o n h a s p r e s e r v e d tr a ce s o f a n cie n t vo lca n i c
ac t iv lt y o n f y b e c a u se th e g a se o u s a n d wa te r y e nvel -
opes a r e a b s e n t .

O n Mars w e o b s e r v e a n e n tir e ly d iffe r e n t p ictu r e .


I t s ev e n r e f i e f tells u s a b o u t th e p a st a g e s o f the
plaret when it had abundant water and the aj.r was
dens er a n d m o r e h u m id th a n a t p r e se n t. Slo wly but
s urely w a t e r a n d w i n d le ve fie d th e M a r tia n m o u ntai ns,
des t , roye d r o c k f o r n a tio n s, t,r a n sfo r r in g th e m i:r r:
s and an d c l a y d u s t .

T he t hick n e s s o f t h e p o la r ca p s is u n kn o wn . T h ey
are not s i m p l y f r o s t a s so r n e scj- e n tists th in k. In
s pring f r o s t w o u l d ha ve e va p o r a te d in to th e a tmos-
phere w i t h o u t m o i s t e nin g th e so iL a n d ye t, in fact, MA R S bhrough u-tra-vi ol et ard
we do o b s e r v e a c o n sid e r a b le we ttin g o f th e so i-1. i nfra-red fi l ters, N ote thi ck-
A round t h e m e l t i n g ed g e s o f th e sn o w ca p a d a r k ness of the atmosphere on l eft.
band is f o r m e d w h i c h sh o u ld b e a fe w sco r e m il- es
wide. T h i s i s t h e d 3 _ p k- n i- o ! r b a M cn + .
- 1 .1so iL absorbi ng che w ac-r fror the me'ti ng snow .

I s t here o x y g e n i n t he M a r tia n a tm o sp h e r e wh ich i s essenti aL for the breathi ng of ar-ri mal s


and pla r r t s ? Y e s , b u t ve r y little , Bu t ca r b o n d ioxi de i s present i n a quanti ty doubl -- that
of t he e a r t h . T h i s d isco ve r y - v{ a s m a d e in 1 9 4 7 a-nd i t has a-n i mporta:tt beari ng on the sol -
ut lon o f t h e p r o b l e m a s to th e p o ssib il.ity o f life on Mars. A fter aLl , carbon di oxi de is
t he f oo d o f p l a - n t s .

I f earth p l a n t s h a v e a d a p ce d t,h e r q se lve s r o se ve re ccl d and drasti c changes of Lernperabure,


Mart ian vegetacion n.u st h a ve a d a p t,e d icse ll to the severe c-Li mace of uhe p_an-L i n the pro-
c es s of i t s h i s t o r i c a l e vo lu tio n . T h u s, p la n t li fe i s probabl e onl vl ars. B ut are there anv
phenom e n a o n t h i s p l - a n e t wh ich su g g e s+ . th a t ve g etaLi on on Mars real l y exi sts? Y es, uhey
hav e be e n o b s e r v e d .

T his is w h a t A c a d e m i c ia n N.P. Ba r a b a sh e v wr ite s in hi s arti cl e "Li fe in the U ni verset':


t 'At
t he p r e s e n t t i m e th e a tte n tio n o f a str o n o m e rs i s d.raw n mai nl y to thet'seasrrand "canal stt
of Mars . O b s e r v a t i o n s o f a n u m b e r o f a str o n o m e r s, i ncJ-ud.i ng G.A . Ti khovts and my ow n, show
t hat s o m e d a r k s p o t s h a ve ve r y o fte n cle a r ly m ani fested greeni sh and bl ui sh hue. There are
s pot s w h i c h b e c o m e g r e e n in sp r in g , ye l- L o w in summer a:rd, eventual l y, pass i nt,o greyi sh
t ones . S o m e s p o t s r e ma in g r e e n in su m m e r a n d winter. From these observati ons a supposi ti on
can be made that Mars has vegetation which becomes yellow in autumn and some perhaps
ev ergree n , unlike o u r e o n ife r o u s tr e e s.t'

S eas ona f c h a n g e s o n Ma r s a r e r e m a r ka b ly sim ila r to the changes of co.l our of the vegetaLi ve
c ov ering ol L,he earth. T h e y r e se m b te th e sp r in g aw akeni ng and the bl ossomi ng of terresl ri al
1'o oa + a+ i Lr i FL * La
^q 1116 L tl duuuilur w ttg l I u 9 Iu
fvrrv
.he m esse n se n s
," u !!ur 16! of tha eor ir o sever e wintar- neoi n Lo hl ow .
^ns-

I n t he s p e c t r u m o f th e r a d ia tio n o f e a r th flo r a there i -s al w ays a characteri sti c ba.nd


of c hl o r o p h i l l a b s or p tio n in th e r e d r a ys - a dark l j -ne at the red end of the spectrum.
T his l i n e i s c a u s e d o y r h e fa ct u h a t ch L o r o p h yll grai ns absorb red rays, usi ng thei r
ttseastt
energy f o r t h e m a n u fa ctu r e o f n u tr itive o r g a n ic substances. If i n the spectrum of the
of M ar s a c h l o r o p h i l l a b so r p tio n lin e we r e d isc overed i n the red rays, certai n proof of
t'seas" H ow -
t he exi s t e n c e o f v eg e ta tio n co ve r in g th e te r r itory of the w oul d be obtai ned,
ev er, L h e m o s t r h o r ou g h r e sb s co u ld n o t d isco ver ch-orophyl l absorpti on l i nes. Many sci enb-
is t s h a v e c o n c l u d e d b e ca u se o f th is th a t th e r e i s no vegetati on cn Mars.

P on r i n g o / e r p r o b le n , O.A. T ikh o v n o ciced Lhe fol l ow i ng l act. Invesui gaLors have


-his
c ompd i . e d t h e o p t i c a l p r o p e r tie s o f th e "se a st' of Mars w i th earth pl ants, l i vi ng i n the
t roplc a L o r t e m p e r a te clim a te s. Bu t th e clim a te of Mars i s very severe ar.Ldi ts surface
rec eiv e s 2 ] t i m e s l e ss su n lig h t a n d wa r .m th th a-n the earth.

S inc e a l - l p l a n t life is co n n e cte d with th e su n ard depends on the sunrs l i ght and w arrnth,
1t f oL f o w s t h a t p l a nts o n d ista n t Mars m u st h ave necessari l y evoi ved the abi Li ty to absorb
iho croro r- t.he q.r'. n"--i Flh- r-- S!.

O ur pl a n t s a r e s a t i sfie d with th e wa r m th ca r r ie d by the red rays. Thi s quanti ty of heat


is obv i o u s l y n c t s u fficie n t fo r th e M a r tia n p fa-nts.- In order to grow and devel op success-
-f hc
rc,l11,
ur L,y Fh-
uIr-.y mrrcr rncnnh lho ononov nnl- nlrr nF rFd hrl. ol' ot.her longwave ravs -
fi-s---.. La Jr.r2_-ed.

t'seast'
How wo u l d t h i s a b i l i ty b e e xp r e sse d o u twa r d ly? Fi rst of al l , the w oufd not di ssi p-
at e t h e i n f r e - r e d r a ys wh ich ca r r y h a lf o f th e sunrs heat. Therefore, on pl ates sensi ti ve
ttse a st' but have a dark col our - somethi ng that
t o inf r a - r e d rays, th e m u st n o t b e wh ite,
is obs e r v e d i n r e a l i ty. Se co n d ly, ch lo r o p h yll absorpti on l i ne i n the red rays of the
Mart ian p l a n u s n r i s ' L e xte n d in r o th e o r a n g e , Sel l ow ,and pacti a-Iy i nto the gneen rays
(whic h c a r r v a n o c h e r .h ir d o f th e su n r s h e a t) and thus becomes i nvi si bl -e. Therefore, jn
tr s6 ssr r l i ne must be absent. S uch
t he s p e c t r u m o f t h e M a r tia r r th e ch lo r o p hi l l absorpti on
is , in f a c t , t h e c ase .

T hir^ '. ,
o e - f urhr r6
qu M . r l iA- n p r l.s sr .n o n o ' v a h sr r h 'he or w aran secrl on of C he vi si bl e
-now avd-
s pec rru m - t , h a L i s , n e d , ye tlo w a n d p a r t- L y g r een rays, then the coLd rays - Lhat i s, parL
of t he g r e e n , b l u e , in d ig o a n d vio le t, p r e d o m inate i n the refl ected l i ght and gi ve the
plant a cold colour.

A nd in a s m u c h a s t h e co lo u r o f th e o b je ct is d el :ermi ned by the rays i t refl ects, the Marti a:l


v egeua t , i c r m u s t h a ve g r e e n ish - b lu e o r b fu ish col our, w hi ch i s, i n facl , the case.

T hus G. A . T i k h o v h a s r e m o ve d th e o r e tica lly th e basi c obj ecti ons to the exi stence of veget
at ion o n M a r s .

How c o u l - d t h e s e e x pla n a tio n s b e ch e cke d ?

G.A. Tikhov d-cided to a la lyse th e o p tica l p r operri es of pl ants l i vi ng i n the tundra, on


tunns
vP U n
u- f n i q h rm ,r v o 4r
r n fvu. ain . r n in sc1 /cr e o o n d ifr n n s annro:nhi no those of Mars. A b the same
- - tb- r

t im e h e m a d e u h e f o lL o win g b cld su p p o sitio n : the opbi cal properti es of the norbhern artd
high m o u n t a i n p l a n t s m u st r e se m b le th e p r o p e r ties of the Marti an vegetabi on. S peci al
exped.ltions were sent to the sub-arctic a.rid the rnountains of Pamir to study properties of
nont he n n n n d h i o h altit.r r r ' le n le n ts,
4ru 11t6f r
T h e e xh a u stive materi al col l -ected has ful l y confi rrned
t he c o r r e c t n e s s o f a ll co n clu sio n s a n d su p p o siti ons of A cademi ci an Ti khov.

A lm os t a 1 l p l a n t s livin g in th e su b - a r ctlc, ledum (rhod.odendron dal furi cum), the "cuckoo


f lax " , dwarf birch a n d m a - n y o th e r s, like th e Marbi ari pl ants, do not have a chl orophyl l
abs orp t i o n line i n th e r e d r a ys.

T he re n a r k a b l e d i s c ove r ie s of G.A. T ikh o v h a ve actual -l y confi rmed the devel opment of l i fe


in t he universe a c co r d in g to u n ifo r m b io lo g ica l- l aw s.
-

T his is h o w a n e w s c i e n ce , a str o b o ta n y, wa s b o r n and has grow n i nto asbrobi ol ogy.

A re t her e a n y a n i m a l s o n M a r s? T e le sco p ic o b se r vati ons can gi ve no di rect answ er to


t his que s t i o n . B u t t h er e a r e in d ir e ct p r o o fs o f the exi stence of the ani mal w orl d on
Mars . V e g e t a t i o n o n Ma r s a s o n e a r th r e q u lr e s a conti nuous i nfl ux of carbon di oxi de.
Under t e r r e s t r i a l c o nd itio n s, a n im a ls e xh a fe ca r bon dl oxi de, and a-re the pri nci pal
s uppliers o f c a r b c n d io xid e b o th e a L m o sp h e r e .

A s . rc * . w c k n n t t n f r O SOUr Ce S Of Ca fb On d io xr d e of i rorsani
b 4 rf
e v oni
vr ! 6si
t1r n vnl
r r Mans. H nw crron -ho
gas is p r e s e n t i n t h e a tm o sp h e r e o f t,h e p la n e t in spi te of i ts constant absorpti on by the
plant s . W h e r e d o e s i t co r n e fr o m ? It ca n b e a ssu med that i t enters tha atmosphere as the
res ult of life f u n c t i o ns o f so m e a n im a ls in h a b iting the pl anet.

A re t her e rational b ein g s o n M a r s? We h a ve co m e to one of the deepest questi ons connected


rrith l-he nr^hlam
y! vursrr nf Iifp nn nlhan nlanp+q
_4ru v., +L^+
utrau of whether there are rationaf beinqs on
P
Mars.

We do not doul:t that in the infinite lmiverse there exists a multltude of planets
inh ah i-fo.4 hr r na+ innal lroinoe

In vrew of the uniformity of the laws of nature the evolution of the animal- worl-d on
Mars c ou l d h a v e r e a c h ed th e d e ve lo p r n e n t o f a h ig h nervous acti vi ty i n one of Lhe a:ri mal -
s pec ies d w e l l i n g there. An d th o u g h th e r a tio n a L bei ngs of Mars may not al t,ogeLher Iook
lik e m en , w o r k , t h i n k i n g a n d so cia l fife m u st b e rhei r general characteri sti c attri butes,
tr h u m a n ltie str
whic h un i t e r a t i o n a l o f d .iffe r e n t w or]ds.

Do we ob s e r v e o n M a r s a n y fo r m a L io n s wh ich co u fd be expl ai ned as arbi fi ci al i n ori gi n?


A whole l i n e o f s c i e n cists r e p - Iy to r h is q u e st,io n i n the affi rmati ve, attri buti ng to the
Ica n a lstt
Mart iart I t c a n a l s t t a n a r tificia l o r ig in . The are formati ons of extend.ed. l i nes
c ov ering w i t h a n e t w o r k th e e n tir e su r fa ce o f th e pl -anet. More than 1OOO'banal stt are know n
at t he p r e s e n t b i m e , Ab o u t lOO h a ve b e e n p h o to g r aphed, al Lhough to photograph Lhe "ca.nafs"
i< rron rr dif f inr r - l- l- ac +h o r r rho limi+ nvr f \ I/ i ci
I
l -v+'i l i +rv+++
r wiy .

A s t r n n o s ii .i o n h a s h e e n ntr t fnr w:nd


ue rr
+ he+
Pq v
lhqttca.nals ttar e l i nes of faU l ts in the c r qs t of
-L a n l n n aF wLrgv
Lar i naLur al
lv, for nar ions. u wav6- . i h's
l UIIIU
ev n'ar .ati on
U/ry 4] m eets w i th s er i ous
,
'

dif f ic ult ies , Cracks in th e cr u st ca n b e o f two ki nds. Thev can be cl efts in the surface
roc k s or t r o u g h - l i k e h o lL o ws.

L et us su p p o s e t h a t t he "ca r a lst' a r e cr a cks in the crust of Mars. Most of them are tw enty
Lo s ix uy . < i - L o n ^ t r e s wid ^ . Cr a c^ s . [ .- L ch wid .th w oui d c,rrespondi ngl l - nave a hu.;e depl h anu
would ap p e a r b l a c k i n co I- u r d u e t,o - ig e u a b ;o r p Li on. B esi des, uh cracks w oul d be vi si b]e
ttcarral st'
ait t he t i m e . H o w e v e r , we ca n n o t se e th e m a jo r ity of the i n w i nter, Its netw ork
r- -.1 a -f .rh- .- -tr6 ran =oo.
tr-aroas S:r^eno --:-^t sn-=t wj-h f.hawiro
v rru Y r+ r1 5 vr ^ 1..- n The

" c a. nals t ' d i r - c u l y join-d cr t,h e p o - a r ca p a p p e a r fi rsL, then those f;rther aw ay. In other
words , th e n e t w o r k o l th e "ca - 1 a ls" se e r r s L o sp r e ad on rhe pl anet from rhe pol e to rne equaror
B es ides , t h e o b s e r v a i io n s sh o w th a r m a n y "ca n a - stt are made up of l i rLte spoLs and sLri pes
of green i s h coLour.

I' ca n a tsr j peri od.i cal l y


Iu is ab s o l u L e l y obvious LhaL uhe wh ich appear on Lhe surface of Lh-
n-anof. and which a-o
4 v er-nnqed
vv|,Fvvvv
nf son2p21a oncerish rJrrs e?r n.f. hc nlprf.s hrl- ang Surface
form at ion s .

\I nrnr I a+ r r q q r r n n ^ q a t ha t th e ttca r ta lstt a a .e a system of faufts arLd Lroughs. The ori gi n of


troughs a s w e l f a s c l e fts is co n n e cte d with th e acti on of subterrarean tectoni c forces.
B ut c an w e i m a g i n e t h at th e vo lca n i- c fo r ce s co u ld cause ar i denti cal - type of si nki ng over
the entire surface uniformly on a pla.netary qnala? Sr r n h e q r r n n n q i fi n n ennaqnq m^q+ imnnnhahla

F urt her, rhe tectonic a ctivity o n M a r s is o b vio u sl y so w eak at present that w e do not observe
any v olc a n i c p h e n o m e na o n ib s su r fa ce . It fo llo ws that the formati on of so grarLdi ose a system
of c rus t c r a c k s c o u l d h a ve o ccu r e d o n fy in th e d i starrL past, hundreds of mi l fi ons of years
ago. A nd y e t t h e " c a . n a ls" a r e situ a te d m a ln ly in the desert and but few of them cross the
ll
^^ ^ ^ ll
In c ond.i t i o n s o l f r e q ue n t d u st sto r m s a f] h o l- Io ws on the surface of Mars w oul d i nevi tabl y
be f illed w i t h d u s t a n d sa n d to th e ir e d g e s.

t'canalst' i t can be defi ni tel y stated rhat they


A s t he t u r n g r e e n p e r io d ica lly in sp r in g,
repres ent z o n e s o f v eg e ta tio n . Bu t wh y is th is vegetati on aranged i .n regul ar extended
rows ?

ttcanal stt gi ves the arl sw er to thi s questi on.


T hc hy po t h e s i s o f t h e a r tificia l o r ig in o f th e
T his hy p o t h e s i s ; s u g g e sts th a t th e in te llig e n t inhabi tarrts of Mars, forced to fi ght w i th
t he dror r o h t . s - c o l ' l e c t wa te r wh e r e th e lce m e fts and di rect i t from there to the requi red
looa-i' . ie s pvlr 5o n s q c .- ^ ssa l
qr svste m r f ttca n a lstt. We can not, of course, di scern rhe actual -
^ covered w i th pl ants
wat erway s . A l l - w e c a n se e is th e cu l- tiva te d fie lds and the di stri cts
on irriga t e d s o l l w h i ch fo l- l- o w th e wa te r wa ys.

F ut ure e x p l o r a t i o n s wil- l- sh o w wh e th e r th is h yp o thesi .s i s coruect. The theory of the arti f-


ttca la l- stt sh o u ld n o t se e m fa ntasti c to us. We know that w e occupy an
ic ial orlgin of the
av erage p l a n e t w h i c h d o e s n o t p o sse ss a + e xce p tional posi ti on al nong the stel -l ar bcdi es.

O ur c ons c i o u s n e s s , o ur m in d is th e fe g itim a te h igher stage of the evol uti on of matter.


I f rat ion a l b e i n g s l i ve o n e a r th it is lo g ica l to admi t thei r exi stence al so on Mars,
] if e on w h i c h h a s u n do u b te d ly ta ke n a lo n g e vo lu ti onary j ourney.

U. F O INVES' IIGAT ION CENTRE vJ. )

Meets on the Lectures


F]RST TUESDAYIN TTIE MONTH are advertised in the
cl -assi fi ed secti on of the
S rrdncv Mo-ni ns H eral d
at 't he nn e a fr r n d a r r c

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LIBRARY & : Op e n e ve r y Fri day 6 - 9 p.m.


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Vlorldgrom
AN IJNIDE}iTIFIAFI,F ORIECT OVERROCKETMNGE

A bright oralge-coloured. f1-yi-ng object was seen at Woomera rocket range on JUJ-y 2oth.
It was not associ-ated with ang range firing, authoritles sald. A forecaster at the
Woom era m e t e o r o l o g i c a l o ffL ce - sta te d th a t th e o bj ect w as si ghted at 10.15 p.m., and
ttlt al most hori zontal l y, unl i ke most
rem ained v l s i b l - e f o r 1 ! se co n d .s. wa s tr a ve lling
ttlt but sl ow er than the averae
met eorite s r r , s a l d . t h e o ffice r . wa s m o vin g very fast,
met eorite . t r I t l o o k e d like a b r ig ht sh u ttle co ck, and appeared to breay i nto three
small parts, which burnt out.

FOURGLOWINGOB]ECTS OVERBROKENHTLL STOP SHOW

F our s tr a l g e g l o w i n g o b je cts a p p e a r e d . o ve r Br o ken H i l l at about 10.J0 p.m. on Jul y 21st


shortly after an unidentified fl-ying object was sighted at Woomera rocket range. The screen-
ing of a film at the drive-in theatre had to be stopped as the patrons left their cars
t o wat c h t h e o b j e c t s . Eve n th e p r o je ctio n ist le f t hi s box and fet the fi l m run on i ts
own.

Mr. Brla r Grosvenor, a co r r e sp o n d e n t o f th e Au stral i al B roadcastl ng C ommi ssi on, noti ced
what he thoqht was a falling star. Then there was a fal-l--out of four glowing objects
f rom t h e t a i l - o f t h e m a ln o n e . T h e se tr a ve l- Ie d i n sl ngl e fi l e at l ow l evel across the
sky and then faded from vlew, The main object, travell-lng at high speed, erupted then
anot her b a t l o f l i g h t a n d d isa p p e a r e d fr o m vie w.

T't410DOCTORSAND TWODIRECTORSREPORTA FLYING OBIECT

Dr. A, Quayle, a Brisbane specialist, Dr. C.A.M. Renou, a Melbourne surgeon, Mr. J.H. Horn,
a Director of General Motors - Holden and Mr. W.A. Green, Managing Director of Eagers
Holdings Ltd saw a disk about half the size of the fuII moon at 6.tO p.m. on July 8th,
near Karumba in the Gulf countrv in Northern Queensland.

Tfrrsh e n
w uh ico t
Jseu wa s a mi xtr r ncau nf
vr r r cllow-
J v 44v
oneen and r ed i r r i des c ent l i ght w i th an ex haus t-
lik e tail. I t t r a v e l l - e d . a t a b o u t th e sp e e d o f a C anberra j et bomber. The obj ect w as
s ilent a n d i t f l e w pe r fe ctly p a r a lle l to th e g r or.rnd. Its al ti tude w as esti mated to be
ttlt
2, O O C f e e t . M r . G r e en r e m a r ke d .: wa s so m e th ing that none of us had ever seen before.rr

GLOWINGOBJECTOVERPRINCE OF WAI,ESIST,AND

A huge, g l o w i n g r e d . o b je ct wa s sig h te d o ve r a hi l -l on P ri nce of Wal -es Isl -and by a nat-


ive woman, her husband. and three children on the night of July Bth, the same night a disk
was seen by two doctors a::rd two d.irectors in Northern Queensland. The natives reported
t -ha nhi a o t
vrre vvJvv
s + . e r r e d o v- a r o r o n th e h ill
v
fo r so m e ti rne, but coul -d not be observed duri ng the
day , A t n i g h t i t g a ve o ff a r e d d ish g lo w'

U.S. SPACEFORCE
U.S. AIR FORCEBECOMES

T he De f e n c e D e p a r t m e n t o f iJ.S.A. h a s n a m e d . th e A i r Force as the offi ci al S pace Force of


t he f ut u r e , I b h a s ha n d e d . to th e Air F o r ce so le respcnsi oi l i ty for al -f space transport
and f or t h e d e v e l o p me n t, p r o d u ctio n a .n d la u n ch lng of al -I space booster rockets.
- ADMISSION OF SOVIET AIR FORCE
THREE DISKS OVERMOSCOW

UFO Nac h r i c h t e n for A u g u st, R adar P ost of the V nukovo


1959, sa ys th a t th e C i vi l i an
qiohl-ino l l .i i q k- q h ^ ^ o d
Ainn nn l- at M aqoor r nono n t p d a _ryfng
f- .- ;- - oD Jecrs
- h i ^ ^ +- ll aI,
^+ rne
-h nf fhnao

peripher y of the city. T h e flyin g a ltltu d e wa s menti oned at 16,800 metres (approx.
55, 000 f e e t ) . T h e m i nir n u m d ia .n e te r wa s g ive n a s 80 metres (approx. 250 feet). The
S ov ier- A i r F o r c e d e r er m in e d th e p o sib io n o f th e obj ects and sent, j et i nt,erceptors, w hi ch
f ai-Led r o c o n e i n t o co n b a ct wib h th e m . T h e y d isappeared at a hei ght w el -l over r0
t'a:l
k i. onet , re s . I t i s m e n t,io n :: b r ie fl- y th a t a n r r o p Li eal i l l usi on", atmospheri c refLecr-
ion" or " a : l a L u r a - e xp L a r a b io n " is o u l o f b h e q uesLi on.

A CIGAR-SIIAPEDOB]ECT O\ER MELBOURNE

q .r r th o n r .1 .- r n
A
rr o
1 ioa n-q lrrnad ur r uPlu
16 4! nhlonr
v v J UUU in tho rf a
sud ri nr rob vl wYiY
lio
r rhr r6 '1 v nf th o - z'o A s rr ra4nr-J- n o .n l o
PU vPr !

in Melbo u r n e o n O c L o b e r 1 /L h . Eye witn e o se s d e scrl bed the obj ect as bei ng at feasb
I 0O f eet w i d e . l L w a s su r r o .r n d e d b y a !.,,h itish - r e ddi sh gl ow and appeared to have hofes
around i t s e d g e s . T h e We a th e r Bu r e a u sa id it wa s onl y a cl oud. The control tow er at
Melbourn e A i r p o r t s a j .d it co u L d h a ve b e e n a g ia r L B ri uari a ai rcraft. The obj ecL l ooked
-ik. p:oqp ja1, ir .^l \r)n cnrl i+ pnno:ncj o. sen.rds. tLpn
!!54Jv!gyy!@ 1lrpk n sovcral '.. rl, Off
"
v ert ic aLl v and vanished.

THOUSANDS
SEE BRIGHT LIGHT WITH TAIL OVER S11DNEY

Tne ligh t w a s s e e n a s lo n g a s fo r ty se co n d s a n d Lrave--Led over S ydl ey, ]eavi ng a fong,


inc andes c e n t trail f ro m we st- so u th - we st to e a st- north-east. The S outh H ead si gnal man
s-:F^d hrt 'ha 'an+. d'ri nnt. rnnaan l. l -ca hoioh!
aa! f6a r u
Arho- nhsarvers on :tre .rnr:nd

s aid jt t o o k e d I i k e a d isk wiL h a b o u L e ig h c co cen j el exhaust,s, It cravel Led at, hi gh


s peed a n d m a d e a w h i rr in g so u n d . So m e o b se r vcr s esbi mabed the hei ght of the obj ecL as
Lhat of a l o w - f t y i n g p Ia n e . AL u h o u g h th e lo ve ? n ment A stronomer, Mr. H arl ey Wood, i donL-
=ficri l ho e hia^- w ,c e rAraln l.Ve I ' ur:-
uvJL - -"r!r-"^1r15 quu-uaull- rL4vc us
"-en fa-LSed: CaI a neleof
be s ight e d f o r 4 0 s e co n d s? d o m e te o r s h a ve cr a ifs? oo uhey change col ours? can t,hey
f ly low w i t , h o u c l o s i n g a ltiL u d e ?

A n on nn f Fnnm ar olr : f nan i n q anoinopn ceid lhar - fh - n h 'o n r d a fi n i r a l v v rJ dsri ds nnt laqc
._ lr io h l o n r Fh p ri +L l i -Lr r .r
ne -L {n -., a. nq. - L W aS ^ O- l-hen \Ianrrq :f Frrtl <fn o n o l _ h
- .- - Il l a l l L ,l Ic -rbll- was
- a !u
hn ioh f ennr r olr ln m ak p fho qhrdnur.aqr h1r Lh^ n
-llv 6-a- --^c P- b - + L a p tr Je a | tO m OVe .
-.,

''TALK To SAUCERMEN'' SAYS RUSSIAN ASTRONOMER

Re'tss a .ra i n :o l 'i s^ n -. tl^An r a| nr ssihlv evjs- .cd rr r hhc n nl Sngl s a SOVi et as tfonom ef
suggest!C jir S :p L -fl b cr loth in a stabement, br oadcas u by M os c ow R adi o.

Tha a s l . n rr'^ o r ln Foliv Seoat- said - .1^e heir os vvtr r b ! enr r l d he al r eadv I'i Eht,s i nto
- ak i ng
s pac e. A r t e r n p t , r o h ave m e e tin g s wich th e se "o r her space LraveIIers, i f they exi st,
might b e a g o o d i d . e a ." Dr , Se g a l a d d e d r r A So vie t sci enti st has esti mated that one i nhab-
it ed pla l e t a r y s y s t e m m u st e xist fo r e ve r y m illion stars.trC onsequenbl y there must be a
v ery lar g e n u m b e r o f in h a b ite d p la n e ta r y syste m s i n our gal axy."On some of them -Li fe
ex is t s in lower f o r m s, but th e r e m u st b e p ta .n e ts, too, w hose l nhabj .tarl ts are even
hi J h- h f-h i^ n. i n l
-h6 - o
wfr d se vr rser lunPnlm
u r sor n
I ul " sv a
u .l ei d D
,!.n lSa
e boqer rl
,