Table of Contents

Cover Page

Preface

Part 1 Topics

1. Overview
2. General Considerations
3. Landed Housing
4. Strata Landed Housing
5. Flats
6. Condominium Flats

Part 2 The Guidelines at a Glance

1. Landed Housing
2. Strata Landed Housing
3. Flats and Serviced Apartments
4. Condominium Flats
5. Geylang Urban Design Guidelines (GUDG)

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As at Nov 2015

DEVELOPMENT CONTROL PARAMETERS FOR
RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT
This handbook is subject to revision from time to time. Nothing herein shall be construed to exempt the person
submitting an application or any plans from otherwise complying with the provisions of the Planning Act (Cap 232,
I998 Ed) or any rules and/or guidelines made thereunder or any Act or rules and/or guidelines for the time being in
force.
While every endeavour is made to ensure that the information provided is correct, the Competent Authority and
the Urban Redevelopment Authority disclaim all liability for any damage or loss that may be caused as a result of
any error or omission.

Important Note:
You are advised not to print any page from this handbook as it is constantly updated.

URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY

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PREFACE

The Development Control Group of the Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) plays an important
role in guiding and facilitating the physical development of Singapore.

As part of URA’s on-going efforts to provide efficient and pleasant service to the public to facilitate
property development, it has produced a series of handbooks on development control to inform and
guide the public on the procedures in submitting development applications.

This Handbook on Parameters for Residential Development is the latest in the series. The other
handbooks in the series are:

* Conservation Guidelines

* Parameters for Non-Residential Development

OFFICE ADDRESS:

URBAN REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY, 45 Maxwell Road, The URA Centre, Singapore
069118.Telephone No. - 62216666. Cable Address: SINURA CS-Mailbox: GVT 380 Fax: 62243466
Internet Address: http://www.ura.gov.sg/

PURPOSE OF THIS HANDBOOK

The Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA) is Singapore’s national planning authority. Its task is to
plan and facilitate the physical development of Singapore and ensure that Singapore’s limited land
resource is put to optimal use. Through this role, URA aims to transform Singapore into a great city
to live, work and play in.

URA strives to facilitate developments by streamlining policies and making its guidelines and
standards as transparent as possible. This handbook explains in detail the various development
control parameters for residential development in Singapore such as building setbacks, building
coverage, intensity, height, etc.

The guidelines set out in this handbook for the various development control parameters will
generally be applied by URA in the consideration of a development application. However, if the
circumstances of a case or the planning considerations relevant to a case so warrant, URA may in
its discretion decide to depart from these general guidelines. Persons intending to carry out a
development are advised to take this into consideration in the conduct of their affairs and check with
URA through enquiries or development applications to confirm if their proposals can be allowed.

The guidelines, principles and illustrations found in the handbook series are not exhaustive in
covering all possible site conditions and building designs. In evaluating the development
applications, URA reserves the right to evaluate and impose conditions not covered in the handbook
in respond to the specific design of the development proposal on a case-by-case basis.

For further information on this handbook, please call the Development Control Group Enquiry Line
at 62234811.
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(c) HOUSING TYPE They may be: i) Detached houses (bungalows).4 ha. They are low density housing. iii) Non-condominium flats development on small sites below 0. 2 Flats development whether condominium or not. (b) DENSITY They may be the low. semi-detached houses. The low intensity and low-rise flats are low density housing.4 ha or larger. ii) Condominium flats development on sites of 0. 3 A relationship of the 3 ways of classifying residential development is shown in Figure 1 Figure 1: Classification of Residential Developments 4 . are mainly medium and high density housing. strata detached houses (strata bungalows). medium and high density housing development.PART 1 1 OVERVIEW 1 Residential developments in Singapore are broadly classified according to the following: (a) REGISTRATION INSTRUMENT They may be landed (with land title or strata title) or non-landed (with strata title or strata lease) properties. strata semi-detached houses. strata terrace houses and mixed strata landed housing. terrace houses.

Back to Main 5 . semi-detached houses. terrace houses II and strata landed housing. (b) FLATS Condominium flats developments or non-condominium flats developments.4 The different residential developments and their guidelines are explained in this handbook according to the types of housing as follows: (a) LANDED HOUSING Detached houses (bungalows). terrace houses I.

building setbacks. condition. This will allow the developers and QPs the freedom to choose the schemes that best fit their business and operational needs. the intensity of residential development is expressed in terms of Equivalent Plot Ratio (EPR). You may click on them for further details: 6 . It was expressed in terms of persons per hectare (ppha). bonus GFA incentives need to be managed properly. Hence. 6 Under this framework. These bonus GFA incentives are given to help realize various planning objectives for the city. Please note that all additional GFA granted under the bonus GFA incentive schemes will not form the future development potential of the sites upon redevelopment. height. ALLOWABLE INTENSITY 3 The maximum allowable intensity of residential development is guided by the gross plot ratio control (GPR) specified in the Master Plan. there are guidelines on the housing type and form. they add to the development bulk and intensity beyond what was planned for. density was used to measure the intensity of residential development. the balcony scheme encourages tropical architecture while the lighting incentive scheme helps to enhance our city's image and highlight the distinctive Singapore skyline.2 GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS INTRODUCTION 1 Residential development in Singapore is controlled by plot ratio and building height at the macro level. INTENSITY 2 Before 1 Sept 1989. 5 However. For example. At the micro level. For the appropriate use of approved residential properties. as long as the cumulative bonus GFA is within the overall budget of 10% above the Master Plan GPR. The full potential of the GPR may not be achievable because of limitations imposed by site configuration. all bonus GFA incentives are consolidated in a menu of bonus GFA schemes and the usage of the bonus GFA items from the menu will have to observe an overall budget of 10% for additional GFA allowed beyond the Master Plan under bonus GFA schemes for each development site. the developers and QPs is free to determine which bonus GFA scheme(s) to adopt and the quantum of bonus GFA to use under each scheme (subject to compliance with the guidelines of the individual schemes). as such bonus GFA are allowed over and above the MP GPR control for a site. This is derived from the formula EPR = Density x 0. layout.0056. The bonus GFA incentive schemes are listed below. Essentially. the GFA of the incentivised features are allowed above the MP GPR control. site coverage and the requirements of technical authorities that affect the site. for a site that qualifies for multiple bonus GFA incentive schemes. As there is a limit to the amount of additional bulk and intensity that can be accommodated for a site and collectively within an area without adversely affecting the effectiveness of GPR and GFA as planning tools. Plot ratio and building height are subject to planning evaluation depending on the locality except for areas specially designated for landed housing development. please refer to web page at Change of Use guidelines. With the revised development charge system based on gross floor area (GFA). BONUS GROSS FLOOR AREA (GFA) ABOVE MP ALLOWABLE INTENSITY 4 URA grants bonus GFA incentives to encourage the provision of specific building features or uses.

envelop control plans. For other types of residential development. the resultant building height in terms of storey is determined by the gross plot ratio prescribed for the site. telecommunications and military installations. Figure 2: List Of Street Block. unless the site is affected by height control plans. Some developments may be required to comply with the approved technical height controls of other authorities like aviation path restrictions. Tampines 2/93-E Road and the Existing Service Road/Back Lane(Superseded by Master Plan 2008) 9 Area Bounded by Chuan Hoe Avenue/Parry Avenue/Phillips 4/93-E Avenue and Sandilands Road(Superseded by Master Plan 2008) 10 Devonshire Road 2/94-E 11 Hillview Terrace Area (Refer to URA/DC Plan Release 1/2001-E) 3/94-E 12 Area Bounded by Macpherson Road. 1 Jalan Masjid(Superseded by Master Plan 2008) 1/91-E 2 Lorong 23 Geylang 3/91-E 3 Area bounded by Onan Road/Carpmael Road/Ceylon Lane/HDB 4/91-E Land 4 The Junction of Fowlie Road/Marshall Road 5/91-E 5 Ceylon Road 6/91-E 6 Area bounded by Boon Teck Road/Jalan Kemamam 1/92-E 7 Holland Village Area at the Junction of Holland Road & Holland 1/93-E Avenue 8 Area bounded by Valley Road. Wan Tho Avenue and Bidadari Christian Cemetery & Upper Serangoon Road 13 Upper Thomson Road 2/95-E 14 Sophia Road 3/95-E 7 . Upper Serangoon Road. Cedar 4/94-E Avenue. Envelop Control & Revised Height Control Plans STREET BLOCK PLANS S/NO ROAD NAME URA/DC PLAN RELEASE NO. Upper Aljunied Road.Green Mark Incentive Scheme Balcony Rooftop ORA Community / Sports Facilities Underground Pedestrian Linkages to MRT Conserved Bungalow Lighting Incentive Scheme Art Incentive Scheme Orchard UD features BUILDING HEIGHT 7 The allowable building height is expressed in terms of number of storeys for landed housing development. Willow Avenue. street block plans (see Figure 2) or other approved special control plans.

104 .01) 6/95-E 18 Thomson garden Estate 7/95-E 19 Paya Lebar Gardens 8/95-E 20 Hong Leong Garden Estate 1/96-E 21 Sembawang Hills Drive 2/96-E 22 Makepeace Road 3/96-E 23 Sembawang Road 1/98-E 24 Upper Bukit Timah Road 2/98-E 25 Along Yan Kit Road 3/98-E 26 Dido Street/ Dafne Street/ Aida Street 1/2000-E 27 Lowland Road 2/2000-E 28 Killiney Road/ Devonshire Road 3/2000-E 29 Jasmine Road 4/2000-E 30 Along Upper Thomson Road/ Jalan Keli/ Jalan Todak/ Sin Ming 5/2000-E Road (Rescinded on 26.06. 15 Flower Road (Superseded by Master Plan 2008) 4/95-E 16 Everitt Road 5/95-E 17 Playfair Road (Rescinded on 26.09.06.2003) 31 Along Upper Thomson Road/ Lorong Mega/ Thomson Ridge/ Jalan 6/2000-E Pelatina (Rescinded on 26. 126-183. 471.190 Hillcrest Road 2/2001-E 35 Pheng Geck Avenue/Wan Tho Avenue/Puay Hee Avenue 1/2003-E 36 Cashew Terrace 2/2003-E 37 Clementi Green Estate 3/2003-E 38 Changi Heights 1/2004-E 39 Lasia Avenue 2/2004-E 40 Peach Garden 3/2004-E 41 The Inglewood 4/2004-E 42 Along Upper Thomson Road/Jalan Todak/Sin Ming Road/Lorong 5/2004-E Mega/Thomson Ridge/Jaln Pelatina 43 Along Upper Thomson Road/Jalan Keli/Jalan Todak/Soo Chow 6/2004-E Walk/Lorong Mega/Thomson Ridge/Jalan Pelatina 44 Chun Tin Road 7/2004-E 45 Along Telok Blangah Road (Lots 2592) 8/2004-E 46 Along Telok Blangah Road (226-184.STREET BLOCK PLANS S/NO ROAD NAME URA/DC PLAN RELEASE NO.2003) 32 Faber Avenue/ Faber Crescent/ Faber Terrace/Ayer Rajah 7/2000-E Expressway 33 Hillview Terrace (Addendum to URA/DC Plan Release 3/94E 1/2001-E 34 House No. 468 & 469) 9/2004-E 47 Along Telok Blangah Road/Wirshart Road 10/2004-E 48 Along Telok Blangah Road (Lots 561) 11/2004-E 49 Along Cheong Chin Nam Road 12/2004-E 50 Along Jalan Jurong Kechil 13/2004-E 8 .114 and 132 .

88A. 1 to 73 (odd numbers) and No. 90A. 2 21/2004-E to 68 (odd numbers) Kismis Avenue 59 Along Seletar Road from Jalan Lebat Daun/Jalan Joran to Seletar 22/2004-E Close 60 Along Li Hwan Walk. 2 to 12 (even numbers) Jalan Ayer 1/2010E ENVELOP CONTROL PLAN S/NO ROAD NAME 1 Beach Road 2 Upper Circular Road 3 Robertson Quay 4 Mohamed Sultan / Martin Road 5 River Valley Road / Tank Road NOTES: * The details of the Envelop Control Plans are available for browsing and purchase at the URA Customer Service Centre. 2 to 38 (even) Ernani Street. 183 to 205 Yio 2/2008E Chu Kang Road 70 Balestier Road Between Thomson Road and Moulmein Road 3/2008E 71 House No. 26 to 60 (even numbers) Watten Drive 62 House No. 1 to 73 (odd numbers) Cheng Soon Garden and No. 90. 51 Along Jalan Leban/Jalan Kuras and Jalan Gelenggang 14/2004-E 52 Along Upper Thomson Road/Casuarina Road 15/2004-E 53 Jalan Legundi/Sembawang Road 16/2004-E 54 Along Jalan Kayu 17/2004-E 55 Along Jalan Kayu/Lorong Samak 18/2004-E 56 House Nos. 5 to 41 (odd numbers) and No. 2 to 18 (even numbers) 2/2005-E Watten Rise and No. House No. 2 to 28 (even numbers) Watten Close and No. 88. 1 to 41 (odd) Norma Terrace 72 House No. 92 & 92A Yuk Tong Avenue 2/2006-E 68 Houses at Pang Seng Road and House Nos. 27 to 27J Wan Tho 1/2008-E Avenue 69 House Nos. 1 to 41 (odd & 1/2009E even) Rienzi Street and House No. 9 . 263 to 289 1/2006-E (odd numbers) Holland Road 67 House No. Li Hwan Terrace. Li Hwan 1/2005-E Place & Li Hwan Drive 61 House No. 49 to 61 (odd numbers) Watten Estate 66 Jalan Jelita. 11 to 69 (odd numbers) Jalan Wangi 3/2005-E 63 Ford Avenue 4/2005-E 64 Richards Place/Richards Avenue 5/2005-E 65 House No. 1 to 35 Jalan Limbok and House Nos. 2 – 2P Jasmine Road and 2 to 30 Gardenia Road 20/2004-E 58 House No. Jalan Tenang and Nos. The URA Centre. No. STREET BLOCK PLANS S/NO ROAD NAME URA/DC PLAN RELEASE NO. 57 – 87 Jalan Salang 19/2004-E 57 House No. 2 to 24 (even numbers) 6/2005-E Watten Drive. Li Hwan Close. Jalan Istimewa.

9 For planning purposes and as a general guide. as there would be less site coverage. * Where relevant. * The boundaries of the various street block plans and a brief summary of the controls are also available for browsing at the URA Customer Service Centre.8 Medium High Density up to 2.4 Landed Housing (low density) (resultant from height) HEIGHT CONTROLS FOR FLATS AND CONDOMINIUMS 10 The maximum storey height allowed are stipulated in the Master Plan. As for the revised height control plans. However.6 Low Density up to 1. the storey height limits for flat and condominium housing developments in many areas have been increased from that stipulated in the Master Plan to allow for more flexibility in design and to free up more space for communal use. This would allow developers and their architects more opportunities to introduce better landscaping and recreational facilities. taking into account the existing height of its surrounding developments and other planning considerations. the residential development will be evaluated on its own merit.* The details of the street block plans can be found in the circulars released to the Professional Bodies under the respective URA/DC Plan Release Number and URA release date respectively. The application of the height controls is illustrated in Figure 2a. 8 If there is no prescribed building height.8 High Density up to 2. 11 The revised storey heights for standard typologies shown in the Master Plan are as follows (subject to compliance with technical height controls): 10 . the various housing density in terms of GPR are as follows: DENSITY GPR Very High Density >2. Envelope Control guidelines for landed housing may be applicable. Please refer to the Residential handbook Landed Housing paras 7 to 10 for details of the Envelope Control guidelines. please refer to the MP 2008.1 Medium Density up to 1.

4 4 5 1.8 >30 >36 12 The revised storey heights would only apply to sites that conform to the standard typologies in the above table. where the current height restrictions would remain to protect the visual amenity of the Singapore Botanic Gardens. etc.8/20 storeys).6 10 12 2. (c) sites where there are urban design requirements (eg along the Singapore River). 11 . technical height controls or security sensitivities. They would not apply to the following areas where the storey heights as stipulated in the Master Plan (if any) would still be applicable: (a) sites that do not conform to any of the standard typologies above (eg GPR 2. and where there are street block controls.8 30 36 >2. STOREY HEIGHT GROSS PLOT CONTROL RATIO Master Plan Revised 1. conservation areas. and (d) sites within the vicinity of the Singapore Botanic Gardens (see Figure 2b). (b) sites where the heights are indicated in the Master Plan as being ‘subject to detailed planning’ or ‘subject to evaluation’.1 20 24 2.

stringent than any other height control FLATS It takes into Same as above Same as Same as above INCLUDING consideration the above CONDOMINIUM height of existing S development in the surrounding areas and the prescribed height in the designated landed housing area plans or the Master Plan NOTE: If any of the special height control is more stringent than the normal storey height control. the absolute landed housing example. it is to be complied with.for guidelines installations. 12 . Figure 2a: Application of Building Height TYPE OF NORMAL SPECIAL HEIGHT CONTROL DEVELOPMENT HEIGHT CONTROL DC prescribed Urban design Conservation Absolute technical height height in terms of guidelines guidelines constraints number of storeys LANDED It shall not exceed If the site is If the site is If the site is affected by HOUSING 3-storey height affected by affected by aviation paths restrictions . the technical height in terms of plan in the Master Geylang Urban AMSL will have to be Plan whichever is Design Guidelines complied with if it is more lower. control or the approved urban approved military and prescribed height design height conservation telecommunications in the designated control .

For a building with a pitched roof. from the top of one floor to the top of another floor). 13 . the absolute floor-to-floor height control (maximum) has to be complied with.e. 14 A floor height is measured from the floor level of one storey to the floor level of the next storey (i. This helps to ensure that the overall height of buildings of the same number of storeys buildings is comparable. Figure 2b: Height Control around Singapore Botanic Gardens OVERALL HEIGHT AND FLOOR-TO-FLOOR HEIGHT 13 As the building height is regulated in terms of number of storeys.

Figure 3a: Floor-to-Floor Height Control * *Floor-to-floor height control is not applicable for landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines. Please refer to the Residential handbook Landed Housing paras 7 to 10 for the Envelope Control guidelines. the line joining to the points where the roof rest). 14 .the top most storey height is measured from the top floor level to the springing line (i. See Figure 3a.e.

5m 5.6m SKY TERRACE Not applicable 3. Please refer to the Residential handbook Landed Housing paras 7 to 10 for the details of Envelope Control guidelines. 15 . 2 Mezzanine floor.6m will apply. subject to the overall absolute height being maintained (Refer to Figure 3b and 3c for illustration).0m floor-to-floor height. If allowed. Only such sky terrace floors will be allowed a 5.15 The floor-to-floor height control for residential building is as follows: TYPE LANDED NON-LANDED RESIDENTIAL( FLATS & RESIDENTIAL* CONDOMINIUMS) STOREY GPR 1. 16 Variation to the floor-to-floor height of each storey can be allowed.6m 5. if any is treated as a floor and regarded as a storey for planning evaluation purposes. the overall building height (in metres) must comply with the control in relation to the proposed number of storeys.6m 5.4 SITES GPR 1.0m 5.0m STOREY *Floor-to-floor height control is not applicable for landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines.0m TOP STOREY 3.6m 3. Otherwise. NOTES: 1 *A sky terrace floor is a storey where the sky terrace areas within the 45-degree line occupy at least 60% of the floor plate. 3.0m ALL OTHER STOREY 3.6 AND ABOVE SITES ST 1 STOREY 4.6m 3.

Figure 3b: Example of Floor-to-Floor Height Control and the Overall Allowable Height 16 .

Figure 3c: Example of Floor-to-Floor Height Control Whereby Unused Height from Sky Terrace Floors cannot be Transferred To Other Floors 17 .

and is used for sky terrace and other communal purposes.17 For developments with sky terrace floors1. 18 This additional height can only be distributed to sky terrace floors within the development. 19 To illustrate the relaxation of the guideline. Spaces for M&E services located directly beneath the sky terrace floor can also be included under the additional height. can enjoy an additional height of 10m. the overall height control will be relaxed.0m NOTE: 1 A sky terrace floor refers to a floor where the sky terrace areas within the 45-degree line occupy at least 60% of the floor plate.0m maximum floor-to-floor height for each floor.0m 21-30 15. Drop-panels are not allowed at the soffit along the perimeter of sky terrace floors.0m 31-40 20. 18 . a typical 12-storey commercial development that has an overall aggregate height of 60. if the development includes at least one sky terrace floor (Refer to Figure 3d for illustration). The additional allowable height over and above the overall aggregate height for the development is tabulated: Proposed Storey Height Additional Height Allowable Over The Overall Aggregate Height For Of Development Developments With Sky Terrace Levels 7-20 10.0m 41-50 25. based on the proposed storey height of the development. as the intention is to encourage the provision of high volume open communal spaces.0m >50 30.0m under the current guideline based on 5.

Figure 3d: Illustration on the Relaxation of the Overall Aggregate Heights for Developments with Sky Terrace Floors 19 .

and (d) Developments within areas with special detailed control plans. ii) Create a distinctive image of the city in the tropical climate through extensive greenery at the ground and sky-rise levels. such as the Singapore Botanical Gardens. as well as 2 mixed-use parcels along Orchard Boulevard in Paterson Hill Subzone. within the developments. i) Within Central Area: Downtown Core (part). (c) Developments with height control of 6 storeys or less. Straits View (part). including street block and conservation envelope control. either on the 1st storey or upper levels. Marina South. 22 Additional storeys are not permitted even if the building height does not exceed the overall control height (in metres). GREENERY 23 LANDSCAPE REPLACEMENT AREA POLICY IN STRATEGIC AREAS (a) As more and more of our land is taken up by buildings. 20 The relaxation will be applicable to all developments. and iii) Bring about environmental benefits such as mitigating the urban island heat effect and improving the air quality through the plants’ transpiration and dust particles filtration. The Landscape Replacement Areas guidelines will guide new developments and redevelopments in strategic areas to provide greenery and communal areas. 21 Please note that the overall building height of the development is still subject to the various specific technical height controls for the site. (b) The Landscape Replacement Areas guidelines are set out to achieve the following objectives: i) Enhance the quality of life in our urban areas by providing spaces of relief and greenery which are close to users. we need to ensure that the greenery lost on the ground is replaced within the development. (c) The provision of LRA is required for all new developments as well as redevelopment projects in the following areas (see Figure 1-1 to 1-25). and Orchard (part) Planning Areas. except for the following: (a) Developments within Conservation Areas. to ensure that the planning intention for these low-rise developments is not compromised. (b) Developments within the vicinity of height sensitive areas. 20 . This will enable people to continue to access communal spaces well landscaped with greenery even as our environment becomes more built up.

For developments outside of Central Area that are subjected to a technical height constraint of 80m Above Mean Sea Level (AMSL) and below. as well as 2 mixed-use parcels along Orchard Boulevard in Paterson Hill Subzone Growth Areas 1-1 Kallang Riverside 1-2 Jurong East Planning Area 21 . shrubs and ground cover is required to make the landscaping more attractive. it is recognized that in areas where there is a technical height control. Tampines Regional Centre and Paya Lebar Central as well as commercial and commercial/residential developments within Town Centres (d) The total size of the landscape areas must be at least equivalent in size to the development site area. PLAN LOCATION Central Area Downtown Core (part). ii) Outside of Central Area: Regional Centres and Growth Areas including the Jurong Lake District. (f) At least 40% of the development site area. A combination of trees. Straits View (part). or overall required Landscape Replacement Areas. Covered Communal Ground Gardens. designed with sufficient soil depth to accommodate the proposed types of plants. should be for permanent planting. Kallang Riverside. there could be design constraints to the provision of 100% landscape replacement. and verified and endorsed by URA. Punggol Creative Cluster. or could be covered if they qualify for GFA exemption under the prevailing guidelines for Planter Boxes. palms. These communally-accessible landscape areas could be uncovered and exposed to the sky. Woodlands Regional Centre. whichever is higher. Marina South. (e) The LRAs have to be provided on the first storey or upper levels of the development. the required landscape replacement areas will be lowered to 70% of the development site area. The Landscape Replacement Areas shall be implemented according to the approved plans. and Orchard (part) Planning 1-1 Areas. and Communal Landscaped Areas on the 1st Storey. (g) Development Applications for new erections or redevelopment within the designated areas shown in Figure 1-1 to 1-25 must include a landscape proposal (refer to Appendix 2) and declaration on the Landscape Replacement Areas provided. Sky Terraces. However.

PLAN LOCATION 1-3 Paya Lebar Planning Area 1-4 Tampines Planning Area 1-5 Punggol Planning Area 1-6 Woodlands Planning Area Town Centres 1-7 Ang Mo Kio Planning Area 1-8 Bedok Planning Area 1-9 Bishan Planning Area 1-10 Boon Lay Planning Area 1-11 Bukit Batok Planning Area 1-12 Bukit Merah Planning Area 1-13 Bukit Timah Planning Area 1-14 Choa Chu Kang Planning Area 1-15 Clementi Planning Area 1-16 Hougang Planning Area 1-17 Marine Parade Planning Area 22 .

PLAN LOCATION 1-18 Novena Planning Area 1-19 Pasir Ris Planning Area 1-20 Punggol Planning Area 1-21 Sembawang Planning Area 1-22 Sengkang Planning Area 1-23 Serangoon Planning Area 1-24 Toa Payoh Planning Area 1-25 Yishun Planning Area (h) Where relevant. all non-landed Residential developments will be required to meet minimum greening standards. or Certificate of Statutory Completion (CSC) (when TOP is not required). 23 . URA’s clearance of the completed Landscape Replacement Areas is required before the Commissioner of Building Control issues the Temporary Occupation Permit (TOP). 24 RESIDENTIAL LANDSCAPE REPLACEMENT REQUIREMENTS (a) Beyond strategic areas3[1]. (b) The new Landscape Replacement Area requirements (LRA) for non-landed residential developments specifically target the provision of communal greenery and the levels of greenery provision will be tiered according to the development’s intensity as shown in Figure 21.

NOTE: 1 For information on the boundaries of the strategic areas. Sky Terraces. conserved buildings in historic conservation areas will be exempted from the above requirements.g.g. and developments with storey height constraint of 4-storeys and below as well as developments subjected to severe technical height controls.4 < GPR < 2. As these communal landscaped areas are intended to serve the public and/or building users. they should be easily accessible to the public and/or building users during normal opening hours for the development4[2]. and Communal Planter Boxes). to qualify for GFA exemption under the existing LUSH guidelines (e. (e) A landscape plan (refer to Appendix 2).8 GPR ≥ 2. perspectives and relevant sections showing the proposed landscaping scheme for the ground and upper levels (both the covered garden and the open to sky areas) are to be submitted as part of the development application.4 1. or if covered. (f) URA will exercise flexibility on the above requirements when evaluating individual developments affected by technical constraints (e. party wall developments. Only the softscape areas will be counted towards meeting the LRA requirements. (d) The landscaped areas should either be open-to-sky. 24 . the communal landscaped areas in a shopping mall should be open and accessible to the public during the mall’s normal operating hours. please refer to the Residential handbook General Considerations para 23 2 For example. developments with conserved buildings. Figure 21 LRA requirements in non-landed GPR ≤ 1. In addition. Covered Communal Ground Gardens.8 Residential developments Overall greenery provision 35 40 (as % of site area) 30 On-ground greenery provision 30 35 (as % of site area) 20 (c) The landscaped areas should include a suitable variety of plants which are planted in permanent and preferably sunken planting beds to enhance the spatial and visual quality. developments subject to specific urban design requirements.

5 and 15 th Storeys. the development provided Landscape Replacement Areas on the 1 .Appendix 2 EXAMPLE OF LANDSCAPE PLAN AND INFORMATION REQUIRED st th th (In this simulated example. The plans below are the sample landscape plans for the 5 storey landscape). The applicant should amend the information as needed for the various requirements/incentives under LUSH. 25 .

This scheme will now be re-termed as Secondary Covered Communal Ground Garden.25 COVERED COMMUNAL GROUND GARDENS (a) The Covered Communal Ground Gardens GFA Exemption scheme aims to encourage better design and integration of on-ground greenery spaces at the 1st storey. (b) The scheme consists of the following: (i) Predominant Covered Communal Ground Garden: Additional covered spaces at the first storey can be considered for GFA exemption if these spaces provide substantial ground greenery with good spatial quality. or (ii) Secondary Covered Communal Ground Garden: The existing GFA exemption for Communal Landscaped Area under the 45 degree line at the first storey will continue to apply. Guidelines to Qualify for GFA Exemption for Predominant Covered Communal Ground Garden (c) The following criteria will serve as a guide on the grant of GFA exemption (refer to illustration shown in Figure 22): 26 .

Figure 22

(d) In evaluating the GFA exemption for the covered landscaped areas, URA will take
into consideration the design, integration and the spatial quality of the communal
garden areas at the ground level (e.g. how the open landscaped area is designed to
flow seamlessly into the covered areas) and its contribution towards the overall
quality of the development (e.g. the covered ground garden should be bright and airy
with quality landscaping).
(e) The communal ground garden should occupy a significant portion of the ground level
space. The covered garden areas should occupy at least half of the first storey
building footprint
(f) A minimum of 60% of the covered garden spaces proposed for GFA exemption
should be lushly landscaped. The remaining 40% of the GFA exempted spaces can
be set aside for meaningful and effective communal gathering and activity spaces,
and unenclosed communal facilities. These spaces could include garden paths,
playgrounds, covered pool, and covered drop-off points; and
(g) Both the covered and uncovered landscaped area should include suitable varieties of
plants which are planted in permanent and preferably sunken planting beds to
enhance the spatial and visual quality of the space. As these communal landscaped
areas are intended to serve the public and/or building users, they should be easily

27

accessible to the public and/or building users during normal opening hours for the
development5[3]. They should not be tucked away in dark or obscure corners at the
first storey which will not be conducive for landscaping as well as public use. The
GFA exemption will not be applicable to such residual spaces at locations where
users are unlikely to use meaningfully.

(h) While uses like ORA can be proposed within the covered communal ground gardens,
the ORA areas will be computed as GFA. To prevent downstream abuse of the GFA
exempted area, appropriate design interventions should be adopted to minimise easy
conversion of the GFA exempted areas to usable commercial spaces subsequently.
The communal ground garden also should not be easily enclosed and converted to
any other uses in the future.

Submission requirements
Similar to the other LUSH initiatives, a landscape plan showing the proposed landscaping scheme
for the i) entire ground level (both covered and uncovered) is to be submitted as part of the
development application for the predominant covered ground garden proposal ii) for the area that
the applicant is proposing for GFA exemption. As part of the GFA exempted space in the former
scenario could be outside the 45 degree line where sunlight could be limited, the landscape plan
should include suitable plant species or a plant palette that can thrive and sustain in the shady
environment6[4]. See Appendix 2 for more details

NOTE:
3
For example, the communal landscaped areas in a shopping mall should be open and accessible to
the public during the mall’s normal operating hours.
4
Please refer to the following publications for more detailed planting references:
a) 1001 Garden plants in Singapore (2nd edition)(2006), NParks
b) CS E09:2012 - Guidelines on planting of trees, palms and tall shrubs on rooftop (2012), NParks
c) A Selection of Plants for Green Roofs in Singapore 2nd Edition (2008), NParks
d) Trees of our Garden City, 2nd edition (2009), NParks
e) Concise Guides to Safe Practices on Rooftop Greenery and Vertical greenery (2013), NParks

28

26 LANDSCAPE DECK

(a) In line with providing an alternative option to developers to constructing fully
submerged car parks or multi-storey car parks, landscape decks can now be allowed
within residential flat and condominium developments. The deck can accommodate
greenery and communal facilities and is partially covered with earthfill, to give a visual
impression of a sunken basement. Uses such as car parks can be tucked beneath it.
(b) The landscape decks are allowed within medium and high-density flats and
condominium developments with a site area of at least 0.4ha. These flats and
condominiums must be designated for Residential use at a Gross Plot Ratio of above
1.4 in the prevailing Master Plan. The minimum site area of 0.4ha is to ensure that
the site is sufficiently large enough to accommodate the deck without unduly affecting
the amenity of the neighbouring developments.
(c) The landscape deck cannot be allowed for sites which are within existing landed
housing areas and which abut landed housing areas, in order to safeguard the low-
rise character of such areas.
(d) In general, the guidelines stipulate the allowable envelop, maximum deck height, the
extent of the exposed basement walls and greenery to be provided. As one of the
objectives of the landscape deck is to provide greater opportunities for additional
greenery on top of the current mandatory provisions, deck structures would thus have
to be located outside the 2m planting strips and green buffers.
(e) The detailed guidelines on landscape deck are shown in Figure 7.

Figure 23: Guidelines for Landscape Deck In Residential Flat and Condominium
Developments

Locational Criteria The landscape deck is allowed in all flats and condominiums which satisfy the
following:
i. Sites with Gross Plot Ratio (GPR) greater than 1.4 in the Master Plan
ii. Not located within existing safeguarded landed housing areas
iii. Not abutting existing safeguarded landed housing areas (even if the GPR of
the site is greater than 1.4)
iv. In addition, sites which qualify would also have to satisfy the minimum 0.4ha
site area requirement.
Detailed 1. Envelop a. Deck structures are to start outside the
Guidelines planting strips/green buffers.
An envelop stipulation would be b. Deck structures are to be contained within a
See Figures 23.1 able to regulate the bulk of the 1:2.5 gradient envelope.
and 23.2 for deck structure without dictating its
possible deck design configuration.
treatments 2. Height cap a. The height of the landscape deck should not
exceed 5m (max), as measured from the
A height cap ensures that the existing platform level. Otherwise, it would
landscape deck would not result in be counted as an additional storey, subject
excessive increase in the to the 40% site coverage control.
building’s height.

29

5. the streetscape would not be c. there is hence no need for an additional coverage cap. c. The earth- By having at least 60% of the berms/earthfills are to be contained within basement wall covered into the the 1:2.5m(max). the earthberms/earthfills within the 1:2:5 envelop shall be properly landscaped rather than just turfed over. including water bodies with deck provides additional greenery water plants are not counted as part of this 30% greenery provision. the residential blocks on deemed sufficient enough to top of the deck will still be subject to the 40% control the bulk of the landscape (max) site coverage control. the deck would not appear rather than just turfed over. as well as along the common boundaries. In addition. Greenery provision a. Storey height definition / a. deck at the ground level. Boundary wall Porous fence is encouraged so that the landscaping / planting on the earth berm on all To enhance the visibility of the facades. as a totally above-ground b. d. In addition to the greenery on the deck surfaces. 30 . the height of any exposed. Solid greenery provision along the roads walls are not encouraged. openings (basement access marred. is visible from the street level. At least 30% (min) of the deck surfaces is to be provided with greenery. strip/green buffers. To ensure that the landscaped water features. these 30% (min) deck surfaces would have to contain at least 500mm (min) of soil for planting purposes. excessive earthfill to raise the landscape deck height There is a need to limit the extent (as measured from the existing platform of exposed building wall so that level) to beyond 5m is not allowed. b. untreated building surfaces should be within 1. To facilitate plant growth. Landscape decks that comply with the detailed guidelines are not counted as site The envelope stipulation is coverage. Artificial turfing.5 envelop and properly landscaped earth. Artificial turfing. Earthfills are allowed within the planting structure. within the remaining 70% deck area. Site coverage a. Conversely. water bodies can still be proposed. 6. However. the boundary wall / fencing should be appropriately designed. At least 60% of each façade the basement basement protrusion wall area is to be covered by means of earth-berms/earthfills.3. points/ventilation openings) and/or hard surfaces of the basement wall (either treated or untreated with vertical green) cannot exceed 40% (max) of the basement wall area. However. 4.

2: Possible Deck Treatment Guidelines for Landscape Deck in Residential Flat and Condominium Developments (not to scale) 27 COMMUNAL PLANTER BOXES (a) Well-designed communal planter boxes contribute to the aesthetic quality of the built environment.1: Possible Deck Treatment Guidelines for Landscape Deck in Residential Flat and Condominium Developments (not to scale) Figure 23. URA thus grants GFA exemption for communal planter boxes subject to the following criteria: (i) Maximum width of 1m width.Figure 23. (ii) Maximum 500 mm depth (for planting purpose) (iii) They shall be sufficiently externalized (b) URA will consider communal planter boxes which are more than 1 metre wide for GFA exemption if the wider planter boxes are part of an overall scheme designed to 31 .

if the applicant were to apply for additional GFA exemption for areas located outside the 45 degree line or for the barrier-free and fire escape corridors. planned with sufficient soil depth based on the types of plants proposed. enhance greenery provision for the development. (b) To enjoy the GFA exemption. This 45-degree line guideline is necessary to encourage developers to provide lofty sky terraces so as to enjoy greater GFA exemption. (See Sample in Figure 8) 32 . Secondary access to the sky terrace from strata units can be supported. iii) Planting should be incorporated on permanent and preferably sunken planting. The maximum area for GFA exemption is defined by the area under the 45-degree line taken from the edge of the overhead projection. (e) Quality Communal usage* on sky terraces: i) The sky terrace should be as meaningful and effective communal gathering and activity spaces. *A Landscape Plan and relevant sections for the sky terrace showing the proposed landscaping scheme and communal facilities is to be submitted as part of the development application. Some space should be set aside for the provision of communal facilities and furniture to enhance the usage of the sky terrace. ii) The greenery on the sky terrace should be enjoyed by the building users as well as be visible from the surrounding environment. ii) At least 60% of the perimeter of the sky terrace is to remain open and unenclosed. iii) The sky terrace should be of a meaningful size and configuration to facilitate communal usage. Applicants applying for the GFA exemption will have to justify the merits of their design and demonstrate how they will maintain the landscaping. the proposed depth of the sky terrace should be at least 5m. 28 SKY TERRACES (a) Sky terraces play a key role in contributing towards to our vision to make Singapore a City in Garden. iv) For sky terraces in residential developments that occupy less than 60% of the floor plates. ii) The sky terrace must be accessible to all occupants of the building and there should be at least one set of communal access via a lift or staircase serving the sky terrace. (d) Lush Greening on sky terraces: i) The sky terrace is to be lushly landscaped* with a suitable variety of plants. The objectives are: i) To serve as quality communal spaces and. sky terraces are required to be open to the public or the building occupants to fulfil the communal usage objective. the sky terraces should serve a minimum of 2 strata units to ensure that they remain as communal space. (c) Perimeter Opening for sky terraces: i) At least 40% of the perimeter of the sky terrace is to remain open and unenclosed. ii) To contribute towards the overall greenery and environmental quality of the surrounding area. As a guide.

The photographs submitted should demonstrate that the landscaping and planting have been implemented in accordance with the approved landscape plan. Figure 24: Example on submission a landscaping plan (f) Completion of sky terrace at strata/ land subdivision stage. 33 . URA will require the submission of as-built photos and/or site inspection of the sky terrace at the strata or land subdivision stage whichever is applicable.

no structures or use would be allowed on it. This means that all roof features. 30 An attic space (see Figure 4a) should satisfy the following conditions*: (a) The floor to roof height of the attic space must not exceed 5m at any point. Please refer to the Residential handbook Landed Housing paras 7 to 10 for details of the Envelope Control guidelines. With the 2 simplified controls. a greater variety of roof designs can emerge to make the roofscape more interesting. and there should be no access to it except for maintenance only. must be kept within the 45 degrees attic roof pitch. only small openings in the form of dormer windows can be allowed on the side of the sloping roof resting on the springing line (see Figure 4b).e. not to be separated as an independent unit). subject to the following conditions: (a) No separate strata subdivision of the attic space to form an independent unit from the residential unit below. Please note that where a flat roof is proposed above an attic. As we have already allowed opening on one side of the attic. *These attic controls will not be applicable to landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines. with the exception of dormer windows and the 1.0m high parapet wall or railings. and (b) The primary access to the attic is to be taken from the internal staircase within the unit below. varied and in keeping with the scale of landed housing development (see Figure – 4c-4e for examples of allowable attics and Figure 4f for non-allowable forms). A separate exit from the living space on the attic level is allowed. It is not an additional storey.ATTIC 29 An attic is an incidental space under the sloping roof. 34 . (b) The floor of the attic shall be level with the springing line. The attic space should form part of the space extension of the unit below and to be accessible from the unit (i. and (c) The maximum allowable pitch of the main roof shall be 45 degrees. including proposals with staggered springing lines (The springing line is where the sloping roof meets the vertical wall). and at least one side of the sloping roof must rest on the springing line.

g. 35 . bungalows. the position of the pitched roof for the attic is subject to evaluation based on the context of the site. flats or strata bungalows) located within or at the fringe of established landed housing estates especially good class bungalow areas. Figure 4a: Attic Space* Figure 4b: Isometric View* For all residential developments (e. URA reserves the right to impose conditions not covered in the handbook.

flats or strata bungalows) located within or at the fringe of established landed housing estates especially good class bungalow areas. Figure 4c: Allowable Attics* For all residential developments (e. the position of the pitched roof for the attic is subject to evaluation based on the context of the site. bungalows. URA reserves the right to impose conditions not covered in the handbook. 36 .g.

g. flats or strata bungalows) located within or at the fringe of established landed housing estates especially good class bungalow areas. the position of the pitched roof for the attic is subject to evaluation based on the context of the site. bungalows. 37 . URA reserves the right to impose conditions not covered in the handbook. Figure 4d: Allowable Attics* For all residential developments (e.

bungalows. flats or strata bungalows) located within or at the fringe of established landed housing estates especially good class bungalow areas. the position of the pitched roof for the attic is subject to evaluation based on the context of the site. 38 .g. URA reserves the right to impose conditions not covered in the handbook. Figure 4e: Allowable Attics* For all residential developments (e.

(b) the location of the site in relation to the main road. a certain amount of shopping floor space for personal service trades is allowed in a residential development. and 39 . SHOPPING QUANTUM 31 Generally. Figure 4f: Non-allowable Forms* *These attic controls will not be applicable to landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines. The consideration takes into account the following factors: (a) the scale of the development as reflected in the total gross floor area. (c) the character of the surrounding developments. Please refer to the Residential handbook Landed Housing paras 7 to 10 for details of the Envelope Control guidelines.

(d) the planning intention of the surrounding area.

32 The allowable shopping quantum is therefore subject to planning evaluation. If allowed in a
residential development, all proposed shopping gross floor area shall be added to the proposed
residential gross floor area to derive the overall gross plot ratio.

33 For flat and condominium developments, the following guidelines apply:
(a) shops for personal service trades are allowed. Independent offices are not allowed.

(b) the allowable shopping quantum is 3m² per 1000m² of the proposed residential gross
floor area. For example, If the flat development has 20,000 m² of residential gross
floor area, it can have 60m² of shopping gross floor area. However, the total gross
floor area inclusive of the shopping GFA cannot exceed the permissible gross floor
area for the site.

ROAD BUFFERS
34(a) All developments are required to provide a buffer between the road reserve line and the
building. The exception is when there are urban design requirements allowing the buildings to abut
the road reserve line/site boundaries such as residential developments in the Central Area. See
Figure 5a
i) For residential developments within the River Valley Planning Area, Newton Planning
Area and Orchard Planning Area, the standard minimum road buffer is 7.5m (of
which 3m is for the green buffer), regardless of the category of the road that the
developments face.

ii) For residential developments in the Central Area other than those in the River Valley,
Newton and Orchard Planning Area, the buffer standards will be determined by urban
design considerations.
34(b) Setback controls of buildings from public roads are determined by the road buffer only. The
minimum buffer width or setback of building depends on the hierarchy of the category of the road
the site fronts, the type and height of development. See Figure 5 for details. For roads that are not
categorised, the minimum road buffer (i.e. 7.5m for residential developments) applies.

34(c) For landed housing developments bounded by public roads on more than one side, the
boundary from which the vehicular access point is located is deemed to be the "front". (The front
can be any part of the house and is not determined by its internal layout eg, it need not be where
the living room opens out towards). The road buffer control at the "front" of the house varies with the
category of roads (see Figure 5). For example, if vehicular access to a 3-storey house is taken from
a Category 2 road, the buffer standard for the "front" of the house will be 12m.
For the other boundaries that are not the "front", the buffer standards stated in Figure 5 will still
apply, except for houses facing a Category 5 road. Where they face a Category 5 road, the buffer
standard is the same as the minimum boundary clearance requirements (see Figures 5b & 5c). For
Good Class Bungalow developments with double road frontages, but without any site constraints,
the road buffer requirements shall apply for both road frontages.

40

Figure 5: Road Buffers and Building Setbacks
1 2
RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ROAD BUFFER GREEN BUFFER
(MINIMUM) (WITHIN ROAD
BUFFER)
Category 1 Residential (6 storeys or above) 30 m 5m
Residential (up to 5 storeys) 24 m 5m
Multi-Storey Car park (MSCP) 15 m 5m
Category 2 Residential (6 storeys or above) 15 m 5m
Residential (up to 5 storeys) 12 m 5m
Multi-Storey Car park (MSCP) 7.5 m 3m
Category 3 Residential (6 storeys or above) 10 m 3m
Residential (up to 5 storeys) 7.5 m 3m
3
Multi-Storey Car park (MSCP) - -
4
Category 4-5 Residential 7.5 m 3m
& Slip Road Multi-Storey Car park (MSCP)
3
- -

NOTES:
1 For the central Area, the buffer standard for residential developments in the River Valley/Orchard/Newton Planning Area is
7.5m (min). The buffer standard for residential developments outside these three Planning Areas as well as other types of
developments within the Central Area will be determined by urban design considerations:
2 The following definitions are adopted for the interpretation of buffer zones
(i) A buffer is defined as a strip or an area of land which falls either between the road reserve and the building line or
between the building lines of neighbouring structures.

(ii) A physical buffer is a buffer within which car parks, driveways, cycle tracks, jogging tracks, walkways and small
ancillary structures e.g. guardhouses, flag-poles lamp posts, sign posts/boards, bin centres, gas pressure regulator
kiosks, gas governor houses -types A &:B, overground (electricity) boxes, ring main compact units-reinforced
concrete structure/fenced-up area, below-ground-level structures may be permitted. A new objective-based guideline
has been introduced to allow greater design flexibility to locate ancillary structures within the physical buffer. The new
objective-based guidelines replace the prescriptive guidelines on the allowable type of ancillary structures. For details
of the guidelines, see "Figure 18: Objective-based Guidelines on Minor Ancillary Structure within the Physical Buffer
and The Building Setback Area" in Part 2 General Considerations.

(iii) A green buffer is the segment within the road buffer that is meant for tree planting and turfing only. Where planting
strips are to be provided, these should be clearly annotated as tree planting in all submission plans to Development
Control.

3 The road buffer for MSCP s facing a Category 3-5 road is based on that for the predominant use of the development regardless
of the height of the MSCP. This is to achieve a consistent streetscape along these smaller roads.

4 For landed housing with the sides/rear fronting a Category 5 road, the buffer standard is the same as the minimum boundary
clearance requirements. There is no need to provide any green buffer.

5 Reserves for drains sewers and minor roads bordering along expressways or major arterials, may be considered as part of
required buffers for expressways and major arterials.

6 For a drainage reserve with a width greater than that of the buffer and bordering along expressways or major arterials. a
planting strip is to be provided within the site nearer to the building line. An additional buffer zone will not be required. However,
the Drainage Department, ENV may impose such requirement from time to time for technical reasons.

7 The classification of the road category is obtainable from LTA through the purchase of the Road interpretation Plan (RIP).

41

Figure 5a: Map showing Central Area Boundary

42

Figure 5b: Detached House (except good class bungalows) with Front and Side Facing Roads 43 .

ledges. 36 Bay windows. The details are in Figure 5d. 44 . roof eaves and other minor buildings features which do not significantly increase the building bulk of residential developments could be allowed to encroach into the road buffer or building setback requirement from the common boundary under certain circumstances. excluding any strip of land that is required by the state for road or drainage widening requirements. Figure 5c: Detached House with Front and Rear Facing Roads BUILDING SETBACKS 35 Building setbacks are measured from the site boundary.

a minimum 2. 45 .5m into 0.5m high from the building Envelope Control guidelines road buffer floor) setback Planters (cantilevered box structures for planting purposes) Air-Conditioner ledges (ledge for the placing of air. not road buffer into Allowed to exceeding one structural bay building protrude *Not allowed within 2m rear & side protrude width and cantilevered at setback 0. a 3m rear and side setback from the GCBA boundary will be applicable for any new erection. AC condensers should preferably be located on the roof with proper screening. 4 For individual landed housing (excluding strata landed housing) plots with multiple road frontage. the minimum building setback requirement of side or rear will apply. road buffer Normally provided as a horizontal extension of the floor slab) Other horizontal sun- shading devices. 6 Where the landed housing plot abuts a Good Class Bungalow Area. 2 This table does not address the GFA and site coverage treatment for these appendages. RC ledges Allowed so (light weight cantilevered to  long as it is long as it is awning or RC ledge without  protrude 1. the same requirements apply for terraces/patio. See figures 5b & 5c. 5 For landed houses (excluding strata landed housing) facing a category 3-5 road. The location of AC ledges within landed housing area is subject to con equipment only) evaluation.5m into 3m supports) Allowed to protrude Baywindows protrude 0. 3 Setback requirement for other building features not covered under the matrix will be assessed based on its merits. reconstruction or Addition and Alteration proposal on the landed housing plot. URA may vary the guidelines for development proposals to minimise any potential impact they may have on the nearby developments after considering the specific site context and conditions. Outside GCBA.0m into road buffer Secondary building roof    Allowed Allowed so eaves. fins or any other mirror decorative features (includes light weight  Not allowed within 2m setback for 1st and cantilevered screens spaced  2nd storey apart for sun-shading Allowed purpose without vertical  to Only allowed to protrude 0.5m into setback for landed housing under the 0.4m setback from the boundary is allowed for a single storey car porch of minimum 3m width.0m into buffer 5 setback strip window openings or doors. Terraces/patio for good class bungalows are required to be setback minimum 5.5m into least 0. site coverage. Non – landed Landed housing (including Strata Landed) housing Within Within setback from common boundary Within setback Within road Appendages 4 road from buffer buffer common GCBA Non-GCBA boundary  Main building roof eaves Allowed to protrude 2. except when the boundary fronts another category 5 road and the vehicular access is not taken from this boundary.1m. attic.0m into setback not within not within 2.4m Allowed to protrude 1.5m setback applicable for 3rd storey and   strata landed housing* Allowed to (raised windows. Figure 5d: Setback requirement for appendages allowable in residential developments (excluding rear garden housing) Note: 1 While the general planning guidelines (eg building setback from boundaries. the buffer requirements will generally apply. etc) are applicable for most development proposals. building heights.0m vertical supports to provide Allowed to green into planting weather protection over protrude 1.

46 .CAR PARKING REQUIREMENTS 37 Car parking requirements are currently prescribed by the Land Transport Authority (LTA). it should preferably be single plot and of regular shape. This is subject to the following: (a) a minimum plot area for open space of 1000m². Car parks shall be provided in accordance with the standards laid down in The Parking Places (Provision of Parking Places and Parking Spaces) Rules and LTA's guidelines. a plot smaller than 1000m² based on the same rate may apply subject to confirmation from N'Parks.) (b) it should be suitably located within the proposed development and be conveniently accessible to the public.e. (If the computed open space requirement is < 1000m². These private car parking lots must be physically integrated/contiguous to the respective residential strata lots and capable of being formed into single strata lots. 40 Unless explicitly approved as private car parks in the approved plans. i.05m² to every 56m2 of gross floor area. It should be free from encumbrances at the subdivision stage. It should not be low lying nor subject to flooding. 42 Where a landed housing proposal abuts an expressway or major arterial roads. a maximum of 2 private car parking lots are allowed to be provided within each unit. drain or other reserves. 38 The minimum parking requirement for residential development (except for public housing) is one parking lot per unit. In each development. excluding open surface car parks. These private car parking lots will be excluded from GFA computation and no subsequent conversion of these car parking lots to other uses will be allowed. (d) the terrain of the open space plot should generally be flat. and (b) the configuration or the open space plot is reasonably regular. It should not be separated by road. OPEN SPACE PROVISION 41 The standard provision of open space as required by the National Parks Board (N'Parks) for a landed (land title) housing development is 4. and (e) the open space plot is to be vested in the State before the issue of CSC. (c) it should not be fragmented. part of the open space provision can be allowed to fall within the buffer zone subject to the following conditions: (a) the depth of the open space plot is 3m (minimum). 39 For residential strata titled units. all car parks are to be treated as common property.

EARTHWORKS GUIDELINES A) Within setback distances Earthcut or earthfill are generally not allowed within the setback distances of the site (Figure 6a). the extent of earthworks allowed will be subject to evaluation on a case by case basis. 47 . with large differences in platform levels within the site. OBJECTIVE The objective of the earthworks guidelines is to ensure that the proposed earthworks respect the existing terrain of the site as much as possible in relation to the surrounding areas. and alter the natural typography of the area. the earthfilled area will not be counted as an additional storey as long as the overall aggregate building height complies with the maximum allowable building height measured from the allowable platform level (see Figure 6b). The earthcut or earthfill may also result in the building of retaining walls that tend to mar the streetscape and adversely impact on the surrounding areas. generally. Hence. earthworks (be it earthcut or earthfill) on any development site should be minimised.] B) Within the build-able area (i. If the earthfill of more than 1m is allowed. C) Entire development site Earthfill involving the entire development site may only be considered if the proposed earthworks are required to meet the technical requirements of the Drainage Department. c) When the earthcut is necessary to build a fully submerged basement to abut the site boundaries. Such earthfill would be allowed up to the Minimum Platform Level (MPL) stipulated by the Drainage Department.e. However. the area within the setback distances shall be reinstated to the original platform level upon the completion of the basement. outside the setback distances) Earthworks within the build-able area of more than 1m are subject to evaluation on a case by case basis.*EARTHWORKS Extensive earthworks to a site is not desirable as it may drastically change the existing terrain of the site. or between the site and the road so as to create a workable platform level. [Note: For (a) and (b) above. b) When the sites are on undulating or sloping terrain. For (c). they can be considered under the following situations: a) When the proposed earthworks is to match the existing platform levels of the neighbouring sites.

Figure 6a: Buildable Area and Setback Area 48 .

RETAINING WALLS 43 High retaining walls are unsightly and they mar the landscape.see figure 6c: (a) the height shall be less than 1. particularly for small in-fill plots. (c) retaining walls higher than 1.0m for landed housing. They should be avoided wherever possible. the earthfilled area is not counted as a storey as the overall building height measured from the allowable platform level does not exceed 19.4m. If they must be built and can be allowed. they shall observe the following requirements . Such retaining walls along the boundaries1 need not be tiered as these are temporary measures.0m/1. (d) the total visible height of the solid boundary-cum-retaining wall shall not exceed 2. 44 In areas where the Drainage Department stipulates a minimum platform level for drainage purpose.8m. the raised platform level can be extended to the edge of the site. (b) the height shall be less than 1. of which the solid boundary wall shall not exceed 1.5m wide 49 .8m. pending the redevelopment of the neighbouring land to the same minimum platform level.5m may be considered if alternative measures like terracing are found not practical because of site constraints and the need for extensive excavation. a road and a waterbody with drainage reserve equal or more than 17.5m for non-landed housing developments which are usually on large sites. Figure 6b: 5-storey flat development in GPR 1. NOTE: 1 except along boundaries that abut foreshore.4 area Note: Although the earthfill within the buildable area is more than 1m.

semi-detached and terrace houses). detached. If one side of the structure is fully exposed and the other three sides are generally submerged into the ground.5m 50 . it is regarded as a storey.e.0m above the ground level. For floor numbering purpose. BASEMENT PROTRUSION FOR LANDED HOUSES ON SLOPING GROUND 46 For landed houses (i. the exposed basement at the rear and side of these houses on sloping ground are allowed to protrude 2.0m above the ground level on all sides. it will be regarded as a storey and not a basement for planning evaluation purposes. it can be called a basement. Figure 6c: Guidelines for Retaining Walls BASEMENT 45 A basement is a sunken structure which does not protrude more than 1. If the protrusion is more than 1.

This is to maintain compatible building heights along the street. For sites where the ground slopes upwards from the front to the rear of the building.above the existing ground level. The exposed basement at the rear and the side of landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines are only allowed to protrude 1. This applies to existing ground that slopes downwards from the front to the rear or from one side to the other of the building. No additional earth-fill or earth-cut to increase or reduce the height of the exposed basement to 2. The height of the exposed basement protrusion is to be measured to the existing level of the natural terrain. 51 . the current control of 1m (maximum) for the exposed basement protrusion still applies.5m high will not be counted as an additional storey (see Figure 7a). earth cut for an access driveway at a lower level may be allowed subject to a maximum width of 4m (see Figure 7a).5m above the existing ground level as the remaining 1m protrusion has already been subsumed within the overall permissible envelope. The exposed basement protrusion not exceeding 2. For such sites.5m will be allowed.

as illustrated in Figure 7b. Figure 7a: Basement Protrusion for Landed Houses on Sloping Ground* *Max 1.5m protrusion for landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines BASEMENT SETBACKS 47 The setbacks for basements. 52 . are. (b) Submerged basement structure can be built up to the road reserve line provided the portion underneath the green buffer/planting strip is submerged at least 2m or more below the ground level. From Road Reserve Line (a) Basement protruding above ground can be built right up to the green buffer/planting strip.

the side and rear setback shall remain at 2m. The side of a basement wall abutting any site boundary must not have any openings into the adjoining site (b) For good Class Bungalow area. if a site is higher than the neighbour’s land. However. to allow greater flexibility to incorporate natural ventilation to 53 . Figure 7b: Basement Setbacks BASEMENT OPENINGS 48 Basement protruding up to 1.g. drainage) to be complied with and the basement does not cause any adverse impact to the adjoining property. sewerage. In other words.From Side or Rear Boundary (a) Basement may be built up to the site lot boundary provided there are no technical requirements (e. the basement on the higher site may be required to be setback from the lot boundary.0 m with vertical openings on the side walls can be allowed for all types of development.

This is to safeguard the streetscape and amenity of these landed housing areas Guidelines for Vertical Openings 49 Basement with higher vertical openings on the side walls is only allowed if they are for natural ventilation to meet Building and Construction Authority’s requirements.0 m. basement walls without any openings shall comply with the maximum basement protrusion of 1.5. The guidelines are as follows (see Figure 7c): (a) Basements can be exposed up to 2. (c) Vertical cutting of the earth resulting in a trench around the basement is not allowed. higher vertical openings and horizontal openings within the setback distance can be allowed for the types of developments as indicated below: Types of developments Vertical openings * Horizontal openings Non-residential Allowed Allowed Flats & Condominium Allowed Allowed Strata Landed Not Allowed Allowed NOTE: * The guidelines for higher vertical openings to basements are not applicable to all types of developments within the designated landed housing areas.0 m basement exposure with openings. However.e.0 m. Figure 7c: Vertical Openings 50 There is no control on the extent of the vertical openings or the types of cover over the vertical openings subject to the requirements of the other technical departments.0 m from the point where the platform level meets the basement wall. This means that the earth around the basement wall can be cut to slope down to achieve the 2. (b) The extent of the slope within the green buffer or planting strip shall comply with NPark’s gradient control of 1:2. voids to basement) 54 .basements in the building designs. The protrusion measured from the level at the site boundary shall not exceed 1. Guidelines for Horizontal Openings (i.

As a reference of what constitutes effective screening. subject to provision of effective screening to hide the view to the basement (see Figure 7d). Figure 7d: Horizontal Openings 55 . 52 There is no control on the type and form of screening which can be trellis or other forms of construction. the details in Figure 7e can serve as a guide.51 Horizontal openings to the basement are allowed within the setback distance outside the green buffer and planting strip.

05. 56 . 10 & 11 for illustration. a bin point and a meter compartment. For ancillary structures located within the green buffer.07. (To be administered by NPARKS with effect from 1 August 2005.pdf) For types of ancillary structures located within the physical buffer or building setback. are to be adequately set back as stated in accordance with Figure 8.nparks. air-conditioner condenser. They can either be designed to stand alone. or combined as one structure to house a guardhouse. In either arrangement. water tank. bin point and guardhouse are allowed within the green buffer strip. For details of the objective-based guidelines. Please refer to NPARKS’ Circular: http://www. the new objective-based guidelines would apply. For details of the guidelines.0m or 25% of the available road frontage.gov. whichever is greater. electric substation. please see "Figure 17: Objective-based Guidelines on Ancillary Structures within the Green Buffer and 2m Planting Strip Along Common Boundaries" in Part 1 General Considerations.sg/cms/docs/about- us/circular19. applicant can choose to either apply the prescriptive guidelines or the objective-based guidelines if the structures proposed are not in the list. the total width of the structures must not exceed 3. please see "Figure 18: Objective-based Guidelines on Minor Ancillary Structures within the Physical Buffer and The Building Setback Area" in Part 1 General Considerations. etc. Other minor ancillary structures like other meter compartment. See Figures 9. The use of these ancillary structures must be restricted to the intended purpose. Figure 7e: Screening Details ANCILLARY STRUCTURES 53 Swimming pool.

8m (maximum).5 storey) 3m from Category 3 road 6.6 KV/LV (1 storey) 3m from Category 4 road 3m from Category 5 road 2 Water tank To follow road buffer standards 2m 3 Sunken swimming pool 5m from Category 1 road 2m 4 3-5m from Category 2 road 3m from Category 3 road 3m from Category 4 road 3m from Category 5 road Raised swimming pool To follow road buffer standards 2m Air-conditioner condenser & air. Figure 8: Setback Requirement for Ancillary Structures TYPE OF ANCILLARY REQUIRED SETBACK FROM THE REQUIRED SETBACK FROM STRUCTURES ROAD THE OTHER BOUNDARY LINE 1 Electric substation (ESS) : 5m from Category 1 road 2m 4 22 KV/6. the owner is to take appropriate measures to prevent the splashing of water into the neighbouring property.0m from the common boundaries to minimise noise nuisance 3 Sunken swimming pool in land titled housing developments need not set back from common boundaries and Category 5 road.8m Total frontage of all Bin point Not Applicable 1.0m from the common boundaries to minimise noise and other nuisance to the neighbouring property. minimum 3m setback shall be provided from the common boundaries.6m exceed 3m or 25% of the road frontage available. Figure 9: Guidelines for Minor Ancillary Structures within the Green Buffer SIZE CONTROL HEIGHT CONTROL FRONTAGE CONTROL Meter Compartment Not Applicable 1. For good class bungalows.8m(In line with the maximum these structures height for boundary wall) within the green buffer should not Guardhouse Not Applicable 2. 57 . 5 Air-conditioner condensers and air-conditioning ledges is to be located minimum 2. whichever is greater.5 storey) 3-5m from Category 2 road 22 KV/LV (1. 4 The setback control is the green buffer requirement based on the predominant use of the development. However. The proposed water pump (if any) is to be located minimum 2. To follow road buffer standards 2m 5 conditioning ledges NOTES: 1 -Height of electric substation shall not exceed 6m (measured up to the springing line) -Transformers open to the sky should be properly screen off to reduce any noise nuisance 2 Proposed water tank is allowed to abut the side and rear boundary walls of landed housing sites provided that the water tank height does not exceed the boundary wall height of 1.6KV (1.

for flat 58 . This is to ensure that no structure is added as it is tantamount to an additional storey which may not be allowed in areas where there is storey height restriction. should be left uncovered at all times unless otherwise approved by the planning authority. Similarly. if any. Figure 10: Minor Ancillary Structures Allowed within the Green Buffer Figure 11: Minor Ancillary Structures within the Green Buffer ROOF GARDEN or FLAT ROOF 54 Roof garden.

roof eaves and sun-shading devices facing public roads shall be allowed within the physical buffer but not within the green buffer. The area below these features will not be computed as GFA and site coverage. only the area within the 2. 1.0m.roof. l. and 2. Likewise. Tennis courts on flat roof must observe the setbacks stated in Figure 12.5m (i.0m-width from the roof eaves line will be excluded from site coverage computation. For roof eaves and sun-shading devices located at the 6th storey and above of all types of developments. weather-protected staircase. ROOF EAVES AND SUN-SHADING DEVICES 56 For roof eaves and sun-shading devices located below the 6th storey of all types of developments. This is to allow sunlight and rain to reach the plants grown in the green buffer. i. no structures or other uses are allowed on the roof top unless otherwise approved by the planning authority.e.(d) stated above. (See Figure 5d for details on the setback requirements for these features for residential developments) (c) For all developments. (d) The owner of the development shall comply with the Written Permission condition to take appropriate measures to prevent spillage of rainwater to the neighbouring sites arising from the roof eaves and sun-shading devices. For such cases.0m. Architect shall declare and highlight any uncovered spaces within a building upon submission of the proposal for evaluation. the QP is to indicate the site coverage line on the Calculations Plans. (b) The features shall comply with the setback guidelines from the common boundaries of the development. the area below will not be computed as GFA and site coverage if the features comply with the following conditions: (a) The features shall be column-free and shall not be accessible except for maintenance purposes only (the QP is to declare this on the proposal plans).0m for non-landed residential developments and non-residential developments. open space. rooftop gardens shall be provided with covered.6m for landed housing within GCBAs.0m control will not be computed as GFA while the area beyond the 2.. a 2.e. there is no control on their width if these comply with conditions (a) . 59 .0m control will be computed as GFA. drainage reserve of width >6m wide) 55 To safeguard functionality and usability of access. For roof eaves and sun-shading devices wider than 2. if their width does not exceed 2. regardless of their width.0m for landed housing in non-GCBAs. Figure 12: Setbacks for Tennis Courts on Flat Roof SETBACKS MINIMUM SETBACK REQUIREMENT Setback from public road Road buffer requirement Setback from property boundary 6m Setback from property boundary fronting open areas 4.

61 So long as the drainage reserve is to be vested to the State. and not for access.9m that can potentially be used as access points will need to be highlighted in the submission plans for URA’s evaluation and approval. 58 For landed housing developments. which is separated by the drainage reserve and building setback is to be measured from the drainage reserve. The plot ratio of one plot cannot be transferred to the other plot. DRAINAGE RESERVE 60 If a drainage reserve within a site has not been vested to the State.HEIGHT OF PARAPET WALL 57 There is no control on the height of parapet walls for high-rise developments. Excessively high parapet walls will be evaluated on a case by case basis. The width of the drainage reserve should not be part of the required building setback. 60 .9m above the floor slab. They are intended to provide ventilation and lighting. each plot has to be developed in accordance with the allowable Master Plan landuse and intensity. it can be included in the calculation of the allowable gross floor area for the development. WINDOWS 59 Windows are generally understood to mean raised openings that are at least 0. the maximum allowable height for the parapet wall located within minimum setback distance is 500mm. Full height windows and windows that are lower than 0. This is to facilitate the screening off of unsightly rooftop services.

d. This is to safeguard a reasonable degree of openness in 61 . However. subject to a cap of 10% inclusive of planter boxes. Submission of Letter of Acceptance (LOA) with Security Deposit (SD) to BCA within one month from Letter of Offer (LOO). 63 Balconies are covered semi-outdoor spaces. where applicable.3 dated 1 Aug 2013].0. b. private non-landed residential developments (involving all new building projects with GFA of 2. the balcony bonus GFA scheme up will be subject to the quantum and conditions specified in the table below. Not only do they allow for natural ventilation and lighting. and Payment of Development Charge (DC) or Differential Premium (DP).GUIDELINES TO ENCOURAGE THE PROVISION OF BALCONIES IN RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS 62 Balconies are important features of tropical architecture.must have a continuous perimeter opening of at least 40% (see Figure 14a). 64 To reward developers who make the extra effort to strive for higher buildability. The additional balcony GFA is subject to payment of development charge or differential premium. BCA’s acceptance of the preliminary buildable design score computation. The gross floor area (GFA) of balconies in residential developments (flats and condominiums) can be computed over and above the Master Plan (MP) allowable gross plot ratio (GPR). 67 Besides meeting the buildability pre-requisites. Submission of a valid BCA’s confirmation letter. and design score. balconies. 65 From 1 Nov 2014. Uses drywalls for all internal dry areas in the development. Uses drywalls for all internal dry areas Uses drywalls for all internal dry in the development. c. they promote healthier living and facilitates more greenery in our high-rises. areas in the development. and At least 65% of the bathrooms are PBUs. Up to 10% additional GFA beyond the Master Plan GPR for balconies if: It achieves at least 10 points above the minimum legislated buildable design score. whichever is applicable. 66 The approval of the Balcony Bonus GFA under the revised scheme is subject to: a. this additional GPR can only be used for balcony GFA and will not form the future development potential of the site upon redevelopment. from 1 Nov 2013. buildability detailed design and implementation plan of the development [see BCA circular No: BCA BC 15. Compliance with all other planning and urban design requirements for the site.000m2 or more) can apply for the balcony bonus GFA scheme up to the quantum and subject to the conditions specified in the table below: Up to 3% additional GFA beyond the Up to 10% additional GFA beyond Master Plan Gross Plot Ratio (GPR) the Master Plan GPR for balconies for balconies if: if: It achieves at least 10 points above the It achieves at least 10 points above minimum legislated buildable design the minimum legislated buildable score. and At least 65% of the bathrooms are PBUs. if any.

this would not apply to existing developments whose building form. would not qualify for the additional GFA.balconies to distinguish them from indoor spaces. subject to a cap of 10% of the existing and approved GPR inclusive of planter boxes. which are commonly provided at the utility areas for the purpose of drying clothes. if any. However. height or use are not in accordance with the planning intention as indicated in the Master Plan. 68 Existing developments whose GPR have exceeded the Master Plan intensity would also qualify for the additional balcony GFA. For instance. It also reinforces the planning objective of giving GFA incentive for balconies to facilitate planting and high-rise greenery. an hotel or flat development within a designated landed housing area or good class bungalow area would not qualify for the 10% additional GFA. Figure 14a: Computation of Balcony Perimeter Opening 62 . Service balconies. The guideline will allow more flexibility in designing balconies where a variety of balcony forms can be considered in addition to the usual rectilinear forms (see Figure 14b). Building Height Plan or Special and Detailed Control Plan.

balcony screens to provide shade can be allowed. For cases where the screens are not installed upfront by the developer. 72 The provision of balcony screen designs upfront not only facilitates the MC in guiding subsequent installations by individual strata unit owners. balconies are not allowed to be enclosed with walls or glass panels into rooms. and b) The proposed balcony screen is capable of being drawn open or retracted fully. Developers can propose a single screen design or a few designs for the end-users to choose from. it also ensures some level of consistency 63 . 70 Balcony screens are to be designed upfront and approved as part of the development application process for all new residential developments with proposed balconies (including the residential component of mixed-use developments). Figure 14b: Balcony Forms that can be considered as long as they meet the min 40% perimeter opening control 69 Balconies are intended to be semi-outdoor spaces. Figure 14d shows a balcony screen that is not allowed. the developer has the option to choose whether to install the screens upfront or not. provided that they comply with the following performance criteria: a) The proposed balcony screens are porous enough to allow for natural ventilation within the balcony at all times even when the screens are fully drawn closed. Safety grilles are independent from balcony screens and are precluded from complying with the above performance criteria for balcony screens. However. Figure 14c shows some possible designs of balcony screens that can be considered. 71 While the screen designs are to be submitted upfront. unless there are significant changes to the screen design. the approved balcony screen design will be used by the management corporation (MC) to guide subsequent installation by individual strata unit owners. Future replacement of the approved screen design will be regulated and decided by the MC and need not be referred to URA for approval. Therefore.

73 When submitting development proposals with balconies. Example 1 Example 2 64 . The QP is also required to show the computation of perimeter opening for the proposed balconies and ensure that they comply with the 40% (minimum) perimeter opening.in the appearance of the building façade. the qualified person (QP) is required to demarcate the balcony area clearly on the Calculation Plan and declare the total balcony area that exceeds the MP allowable GPR on the application form to take advantage of these guidelines. This will avoid inconsistent ad-hoc enclosures by individual owners which could detract from the original building design and appearance.

Example 3 Figure 14c: Possible Designs of Balcony Screens Figure 14d: Balcony screen that is not allowed Note: The screen designs shown above are from overseas and are meant as examples only. Actual design proposals need not be limited to those shown above as long the performance criteria are met. 65 .

Qualified Persons (QPs) should consider the screening requirements in the early stage of their planning and design to avoid abortive work subsequently. Figure 16: Special Control Area 66 . Upon submission. 76 Figure 18 provides general guidelines on screening within the special control areas.5m wide drainage reserve cutting through the site III Developments with a frontage to the sea IV Developments with or adjacent to reservoirs and stormwater collection ponds V Developments adjacent to rivers or canals with drainage reserve less than 17. reservoirs and water frontages shall refer to Figure 15 below: Figure 15: Guidelines for developments adjacent to the various types of waterbodies SCREENING REQUIREMENT FOR DEVELOPMENTS WITHIN SPECIAL CONTROL AREAS I Developments adjacent to rivers and canals of at least 17. URA will advise if the particular development is required to provide screening.WATERBODIES SUBMISSION AND DESIGN GUIDELINE 74 Development projects adjacent to major waterbodies like rivers. canals.5m wide drainage reserve II Developments with rivers or canals of at least 17.5m 75 Developments within the special control areas as shown shaded in Figures 16 & 17 are subject to screening requirements.

Figure 17: Special Control Area 67 .

All parts are to be used as a whole and are to be considered 68 . Notes: The following building regulations should be observed by the Qualified Person (QP) when complying with any security screening: a Claddings b Natural Light and ventilation c Energy Conservation Requirements d General Building requirements (full-height glass wall or panel is to be designed to withstand the lateral design loads in Table 4 of the Fourth Schedule) e Prohibited Construction Material (Reflective Glass) Details of the above regulations are available from BCA’s Building Control Regulations 2003. 78 There are three parts to the objective-based guidelines. if not impossible to remove. There are no constraints on the type of screening measures that can be used and some measures that have been approved include the following: a blank wall b external concrete/metal fins c re-orientation of the building such that windows/openings/balconies do not have direct view towards the protected area. Roof screening The parapet wall at the rooftop should be at least 3m high and access to the rooftop from a public area should be secured by a lockable door/hatch. The door/hatch can be electronically linked to an alarm system monitored by the building management. Figure 18: General Guidelines on Screening for Special Control Areas OBJECTIVE-BASED GUIDELINES 77 A new objective-based guidelines have been introduced to give architects and developers greater design flexibility to suit their needs and requirements. They are the main intention. if available. Visual Screening Screening measures should be permanent fixtures that are difficult. objectives and performance criteria.

sg/cms/docs/about- us/circular19. Ancillary structures in general refer to auxiliary.07.gov. particularly. 79 There should be several variations in the layout that are able to meet the objectives. The complementary technical recommendations will provide a guide for such situations. The new objective-based guidelines will serve to complement the current prescriptive guidelines. the development proposal should satisfy the main intention. supplementary structures erected to support the main use. They are structurally independent and not physically attached to the building. Whenever possible.05. The new objective-based guideline replaces the current prescriptive guidelines. Please refer to NPARKS' Circular: http://www. (a) Main Intention This set out the purpose of the design element (b) Objective This elaborates the main intention and indicates the desired outcome to be achieved in completed developments (c) Performance Criteria This provides a basis for judging whether the objectives have been met.when designing the development proposal. objectives and performance criteria of the design element. it may not necessary satisfy all of them OBJECTIVE-BASED GUIDELINES FOR ANCILLARY STRUCTURES 80 The new guideline aims to achieve greater innovative design and better utilisation of space within the propose development.nparks. Each development must be considered against all criteria but depending on particular circumstances. The detail guidelines are shown in Figure 20. The detail guidelines are shown in Figure 19. (a) Ancillary Structures within the Green Buffer and 2m Planting Strip along Common Boundaries *(To be administered by NPARKS with effect from 1 August 2005. The new objective-based guidelines will safeguard the intentions of the green buffer and 2m planting strip along common boundaries. as to how the performance criteria can be addressed and how the evaluation of the proposal can be done. 69 . (b) Ancillary Structures within the Physical Buffer and Building Setback Area The new objective-based guidelines safeguard the intentions of the physical buffer and building.pdf).

While lush roadside. c) Ancillary structures proposed within the tree planting strips (green buffer and the peripheral 2m tree planting strips) should be minor. The tree planting strips (green buffer and the peripheral 2m planting strips) should preferably through ground or with soil area large enough to accommodate the particular rooting habits and they must be free from underground services. Height of structures should be suitable for the intended use and not hinder the growth of trees. 3 Performance This provides a basis for judging whether the objectives have been Criteria met. b) To provide adequate spacing (both above ground and under ground) for healthy growth of trees. The guideline serves to safeguard the area provision for tree planting purposes. b) There shall be adequate space for trees to grow to their full spread hence no structures should be close to the tree. to be enjoyed by both developments as well as contributing to the overall greenery in Singapore. the green buffer within a private development creates the opportunity for the private developers and residents to actively contribute. or with limited hard surface impact within the green and peripheral tree planting strips. Each development must be considered against all criteria but depending on particular circumstances. 2m Planting Strip The peripheral planting strips are to provide a quality green and pleasant space between neighbouring developments. c) To allow flexibility of structures that contribute to the landscaping efforts. 4 Additional Notes Ancillary structures in general refer to minor structures erected to & Clarifications support the main use of the site. 2 Objectives This elaborates the main intention and indicates the desired outcomes to be achieved in completed developments. The planting pattern can be singular in regular planting distance or cluster planting. open space tree planting and greenery are maintained by Nparks. Exceptions are minor structures that 70 . a) To reinforce the purpose of the green buffer and to preserve the green and garden city image. contribute to the landscape efforts or screened by soft landscape. There should also not 1 be any "tree under tree" situation . peripheral tree planting strips and yet provides design flexibility to allow for minor ancillary structures.Figure 19: Objective-based Guidelines on Minor Ancillary Structures within the Green Buffer and 2m Planting Strip Along Common Boundaries No Parameter Details 1 Main intention To better reflect the intention of the green buffer. The guideline serves to safeguard the area provision for tree planting purposes. Green Buffer Both the public and the private sector have a role to play to help achieve streetscape greenery in Singapore. a) There should be a sufficient amount of shade tree-planting and landscaping to enhance the built environment to serve as screening while reducing glare and heat. it may not necessary satisfy all of them.

i) Landscaping structures should generally be open and contribute toward the landscaping efforts. etc. iii) Aeration trough may be provided to ensure sufficient aeration if structures are proposed to encroach within the 4m x 2m (for 2m tree 2 planting strip). and are subjected to the prevailing planning controls for such structures.width of boundary) / 6 (Such trees generally grow up to 15m high) Or No. We encourage landscaping structures like trellis. we recommend that the small or medium tree to be planted at every 5-6m interval. a minimum area of 4m x requisite width (if 2 green buffer or planting strip requirement less than 4m). water features. The number of trees (small to medium) to be planted could follow the guideline as illustrated in Figure 18. or 16m (for all other planting width of 4m or more) with a minimum 2m soil depth to be safeguarded for healthy tree growth and aeration. dependent on the choice of trees. b) For every proposed tree. ii) Minimum recommended distance from any proposed element to the centre of the tree/palm is 2m. inspection chambers. ii) Minor technical structures should generally be screened by soft landscaping. of small/medium trees = (nett length of boundary) / 6 A list of recommended species considered shade tree is shown in Figure 19. might be Recommendation addressed. Where trees are to be planted. 19. These are not classified as ancillary structures but considered independent minor structures. It does not preclude other measures that could be s proposed to meet the stated objectives.3 & 19.No Parameter Details are commercially operated such as Outdoor Refreshment Areas (ORAs) and Automated Teller Machines (ATMs).7 for illustration on the flexibility provided).5.6 & 19. 4 x 3 (for 3m tree planting strip) or 16m area (for wider planting buffer). or certain aspects of them. Generally. Formulae: No of small/medium trees = (length of boundary . c) Type of structures proposed. i) All planting areas should preferable be flat of gradient 1:40. 71 . the gradient of the planting area should not be steeper than 1:2. a) In general. and also provide flexibility to minor structures due to technical requirements like fire hydrant. However the minimum 2 x 2 x 2m planting soil volume must not have any encroachment. See Figures 19.5. garden furniture. meter compartments. it is recommended that the total road frontage coverage of the minor structures along the green buffer is not more than 25% and the minor structures should not be more than 5m in height.4.2.1. 5 Technical This provides on how the criteria. (Refer to Figures 19. This applies to any underground services that are required to transverse through the tree planting area.

if necessary). the height and width are to be clearly shown. e) All proposed green buffer / planting verges are indicated as tree- planting strip only. not exceeding the height of the boundary wall as these do not contribute to the landscaping efforts. For enclosed structures such as guardhouses or sentry post. of trees are to be clearly shown. these should generally be kept at 1.No Parameter Details For minor technical structures. If these are proposed within the green buffer.6m (to the roof springing line). b) A legend for the proposed trees is to be provided. 6 Applications of a) Can be applied to all developments that have green buffer or 2m Guidelines planting strip provision. 7 Submission Proper annotated Landscape Plan and justification in line with the Requirements objectives should be submitted for considerations and evaluation. For all other amendments. Landscape Plan Requirement a) Location and species of proposed small to medium size shade trees are shown. there any any changes to a) the proposed number of trees. The Landscape Plan will form part of an attached document with the Written Permission. b) Applicant can choose to either apply current prescriptive guidelines or The objective-based guidelines if the structures proposed are not on the prescriptive list. these should generally be proposed beyond the green buffer. an amendment application would still be applicable. and b) the type of ancillary structures and its height and width. f) Widths of all proposed planting provision provided are indicated. The gradients of all proposed slopes are shown. the height of these minor operational structures should not be more than 2. 72 . g) All slopes are shown on plan with standard symbols.8m maximum height. d) Types of ancillary structures with justifications (in separate document. QP is required to forward the revised Landscaping Plan together with the previous approved plan to DCD prior to Temporary Occupational Permit. Note: Amendment approval is required if after the issuance of Written Permission. c) Computation of no.

Tree-planting Strips and The Required Tree Planting 73 .1: Illustration (Site Plan View) Of Green Buffer.Note 1 "tree under tree" situation refers to planting new trees within the shade of any existing tree. Figure 19.

2a: A List of Recommended Tree Species Species Approximate Height Recommended When Mature (m) Spacing (m) MEDIUM SIZED TREES Acacia mangium 12 8 Amherstia nomilis (Pride of Burma) 12 16 Arfeuillea arborescens (Hop Tree) 12 10 Bauhinia blakeana (Hong Kong Bauhinia) 8 12 Cananga odorata (Kenanga) 15 10 Cassia fistula (Golden Showers) 18 12 Cinnamomum iners (Wild Cinnamomum) 12 10 Citharexylum quadrangulare (Fiddle. 12 8 wood) Cochlospermum religiosum (Buttercup 10 10 Tree) Eucalyptus botryoides (Gum Tree) 15 12 Eucalyptus viminalis (Gum Tree) 15 8 Eugenia cumini (Jambolan) 15 12 Eugenia jambos (Rose Apple) 8 12 Eugenia polyantha (Buah Salam) 15 12 Gnetum gnemom (Meninjau) 15 8 Gustavia sp 5 8 Lagerstroemia speciosa (Rose of India) 12 12 Maniltoa browneoides (Handkerchief Tree) 15 12 Melaleuca leucadendron (Gelam) 12 10 Melia indica (Nim Tree) 15 12 Mimusops elengi (Bunga Tanjong) 12 18 Plumeria spp (Frangipani) 8 10 Podocarpus rumphii 15 12 Pongamia pinnata (Mempari) 15 12 Podocarpus polystacyus (Sea Teak) 15 8 Saraca indica (Sorrowless Tree) 8 12 Saraca thaipingensis (Yellow Saraca) 12 12 Tamarindus indica (Tamarind Tree / 12 12 Asam) Xanthostemom chrysanthus 12 12 Eugenia oleina 10 12 Eugenia spicata 12 12 Eugenia longifolia 12 12 SMALL TREES Brassaia actinophylla (Australian Ivy 10 6 Palm) Callistemon citrinus (Bottle Brush Tree) 6 8 Callistemon viminalis 8 8 Carallia brachiata 8 6 Cratoxylum formosum (Pink Mempat) 10 8 Crotoxylon cochinchinense 12 8 Erythrina glauca (Coral Tree) 8 10 74 . Figure 19.

3: Illustration (Plan View) Of Green Buffer / Tree-planting Strip and the Safeguarded Aeration Area 75 .2b: Illustration of Tree Spacing Figure 19. Species Approximate Height Recommended When Mature (m) Spacing (m) Kopsia flavida (Penang Sloe) 8 8 Kopsia singaporensis 8 8 Melaleuca genistifolia cv Golden Gem 6 8 Figure 19.

5: Illustration (Site Plan View) Of Green Buffer / Tree-planting Strip and the Required Tree Planting (Variation) 76 .Figure 19.4: Illustration (Elevation View) Of Green Buffer / Tree-planting Strip and the Safeguarded Aeration Area Figure 19.

Figure 19.6: Illustration (Site Plan View) Of Green Buffer / Tree-planting Strip and the Required Tree Planting Figure 19.7: Illustration (Site Plan View) Of Green Buffer / Tree-planting Strip and the Required Tree Planting 77 .

building size. thereby directly enhancing the environmental quality of the area in relation to streetscape. noise and other pollutants from the road. thereby supporting or providing support to the main use. building setback and yet to provide design flexibility to allow for minor ancillary structures. Structures should generally be located in the communal area and form part of the common property. The road buffer serves to safeguard a physical separation space between the building and the road. The side and rear building setback This is to protect the occupiers of the building and adjacent buildings by minimizing overshadowing and visual intrusion. c) To ensure that the size and the visual bulk of the ancillary structures are acceptable within the development and to the surrounding built environment. a) Structures proposed within the physical buffer should be ancillary to the main use. thereby directly enhancing the environmental quality of the area in relation to the physical landscape. it may not necessary satisfy all of them. a) To achieve the purpose of using the physical buffer and building setback as a strip or an area of open space to segregate the main uses. and building density. not physically attached to the main building. thus segregating the two different main uses. is protected. Physical Buffer This is a component of the road buffer that aims to protect the occupiers of the building from visual intrusion. b) Ancillary structures are to be structurally independent. The setback requirement serves to safeguard a physical separation space between the building and the boundary in relation to the height of the proposed building. 3 Performance This provides a basis for judging whether the objectives have been Criteria met. Any projected structures encroaching into the physical buffer and/or building setback are to be fully cantilevered from the main buildings. character and building density. d) To ensure that the environmental quality in relation to streetscape. 78 . 2 Objectives This elaborates the main intention and indicates the desired outcomes to be achieved in completed developments. Each development must be considered against all criteria but depending on particular circumstances. safety and welfare of the neighbourhood and community. All proposed uses should be compatible and complimentary to the main use and does not compromise the health.Figure 20: Objective-based Guidelines on Minor Ancillary Structure within the Physical Buffer and the Building Setback Area No Parameter Details 1 Main Intention To better reflect the intentions of the physical buffer. b) To allow the flexibility of erecting ancillary structures that contribute to the convenience or the needs of occupants in the main buildings.

No Parameter Details c) These structures should be of reasonable height (not exceeding 6m) and size and located such that it would not significantly add to the building bulk. adequate measures are to be taken to reduce the glare on the 79 . mar the streetscape or cause obstruction. These structures should not clutter the physical buffer thereby marring the visual appearance of the public streetscape. In addition. Height of ancillary structures should be appropriate to the development setting and the surrounding built environment. the above performance criteria is not & Clarifications applicable to religious icon or religious symbolic structures located in planning zones other than Place of Worship. The height. ii) Functional structures contribute to the convenience and needs of the users of the main building. incense burners are considered as operational structures for place of worship and other relevant developments only. that do not significantly add to the building bulk and are required to be located in the open. These are not classified as ancillary structures but considered independent minor structures. Equipment and unsightly structures should be screened from view of public street and neighbouring plots to reduce any noise or other nuisance. d) There are 5 categories of ancillary structures and the specific standards for each category are as follows (See Figure 20.1 for the examples for each category). car porch cover. c) For all lighting installations. These should generally be open- sided structures e. b) Ancillary structures in general refer to minor structures erected to support the main use of the site.g. Exceptions are minor structures that are commercially operated such as Outdoor Refreshment Areas (ORAs) and Automated Teller Machines (ATMs). creating a pleasant environment for the users of the main building. v) Operational structures in industrial and warehouse developments. should be designed to limit the adverse effects and minimise nuisance. iv) Communal structures for recreational use should be designed to minimise nuisance and dis-amenity to the public and neighbours. Equipment and structures should be properly screened off to reduce any noise and unsightly appearance. Attempts should be made to ensure nuisance and dis-amenity to the public and neighbours are minimised. iii) Ancillary structures that aesthetically enhance the development should be of appropriate size. i) Utility structures support the main use of the site. These structures would be subject to planner's evaluation on a case-by-case basis. and are subjected to the prevailing planning controls for such structures. covered linkways etc. strategically located and tastefully designed to blend with the overall layout of the development. length and location of the structures should be appropriate and not excessively massive for the intended purpose. 4 Additional Notes a) Due to religious sensitivity. especially those for tennis and basketball courts.

5 Application of This new set of objective-based guidelines will replace the prescriptive Guidelines guidelines.No Parameter Details adjoining development.1 are deemed to have satisfied the performance criteria. The positive examples as shown in Figure 20. 80 .

1: Positive Examples of Various Types of Ancillary Structures Utility Functional Aesthetic Communal Operational Electrical Open sided car Landscape Unenclosed for industrial and substation park sheds furniture tennis court warehouse development only: Bin Centre Entrance Entrance Unenclosed gate/post archway basketball court Temporary Car porch storage shed OG Boxes Development Pavilions Driveways / signage Loading and Water bulk meter ramps unloading shed BBQ pits Landscaping Swimming pools Lamp post Flag pole features Industrial water pipes Inspection Guardhouse Landscaping for industrial and chamber & minor lighting warehouse sewer lines development Vehicular impact only: guard rails Gas pressure Incense burner regulator kiosk Covered link ways Gas governor houses. Figure 20. type A&B Fire hydrant Metering compartment Fire engine hardstanding areas Above ground electrical boxes 81 .

Negative Examples of Various Types of Ancillary Structures that are NOT allowed Utility Functional Aesthetic Communal Operational (for industrial and warehouse development only) Any structures Any structures Any structures Any structures Any structures more than 6m in more than 6m in more than 6m in more than 6m in more than 6m in height (for height height height height substation this height is Raised RC measured to the platform more Raised Oil tank / LPG roof springing than 1m in height swimming pool tank / Storage line) more than 1m in tank height Exposed Water Air cooler tank structures Silo Mobile crane / Gantry crane Cooling tower Hopper shed Back to Main 82 .

The bungalow plots in the GCBA should have a minimum development size of 1400m². 40% or *45% depending on the plot size . DETACHED HOUSES OR BUNGALOWS 2 A detached house or bungalow is a free standing dwelling unit within a plot of land – see Figure 1. they should have a minimum plot size of not less than 400m² unless the existing lots are already subdivided with a land area less than this.3 LANDED HOUSING LANDED HOUSING 1 Landed housing are low-rise/low density residential development. For plots outside the good class bungalow areas (GCBA). They are categorised according to the following: (a) Land title (i) detached house (bungalow). (iii) strata terrace houses. 83 . The plot can vary in size. (ii) strata semi-detached houses. (iv) mixed strata landed housing. (ii) semi-detached house.See para 9. All bungalow plots are subject to a maximum site coverage control of 35%. (b) Strata title (No condominium status allowed) (i) strata detached houses (bungalows). (iii) terrace house I or II. There are various landed housing forms in Singapore.

Figure 1: Bungalow Guidelines (outside GCBA)* *Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m rear and side setback. 84 . Please refer to Envelope Control guidelines paras 7 to 10.

(b) abutting the common boundary as a result of the adjoining unit being demolished or redeveloped into other housing form. Figure 2a: Semi-detached House Guidelines* *Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m rear and side setback. This includes a (i) semi-detached bungalow house.SEMI-DETACHED HOUSES 3 A semi-detached house (see Figure 2a) is a dwelling house: (a) partially attached on one side to any number of other units. 85 . (ii) semi-detached terrace house (also known as corner terrace). (iii) back-to-back semi-detached house ( see Figure 2b). Please refer to Envelope Control guidelines paras 7 to 10.

Figure 2b: Back-to-Back Semi-detached House Guidelines* *Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m rear and side setback. 86 . Please refer to Envelope Control guidelines paras 7 to 10.

For the terrace II. 87 . the building wall and roof eaves are setback 2m (fixed) and 1m from the road reserve respectively. A standard plot size and typical layout are shown in Figure 4. Please refer to Envelope Control guidelines paras 7 to 10. namely. front setback from the road is based on buffer requirement (see Figure 3). The width of the terrace plot may vary but it should not be less than 6m wide for the intermediate units and 8m for the corner units. 5 There are 2 types of terrace houses. Figure 3: Terrace House I Guidelines* *Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m rear and side setback. For terrace house I. terrace house I & terrace house II.TERRACE HOUSES I & II 4 A terrace house is a house on a lot which forms part of a row of at least 3 dwelling houses abutting the common boundaries with party walls.

(b) For new estates: TTII guidelines can apply to new landed housing areas. it can be allowed in isolated private residential estate where such compact development forms an enclave on its own and has no adverse impact to the surrounding residential estates. 88 . should form an enclave on its own (see Figure 4a). sale of site for landed developments. Alternatively. example. the TTII development. when completed. provided it is developed comprehensively as a distinct TTII estate. Figure 4: Terrace House II Guidelines Location 6 Terrace house II (TTII) must be sited within its own enclave or satisfy the following criteria: (a) Within existing estates: If the development site is located within an existing landed housing estate.

8 The Envelope Control guidelines adopt a volumetric approach. This envelope is determined by a combination of setbacks from the road and common plot boundaries. which will serve as a three-dimensional limit for the landed house. which allows the design of landed houses to be guided by the size and shape of the permissible building envelope. Figure 5 shows the Envelope Control for two and three-storey landed houses. 89 . Figure 4a: Examples of Enclaves of Existing Landed Housing Plots Where TTII guidelines May Apply Envelope Control Guidelines 7 Landed houses undergoing new erection or reconstruction will be subject to the Envelope Control guidelines. 1[1] This is subject to URA’s detailed assessment on a case-by-case basis to minimise disamenity to neighbouring properties.5m high. as well as the allowable height that a house can be built up to. The Envelope Control guidelines simplify the guidelines for landed housing and provide developers and homeowners more flexibility in the design of landed housing while safeguarding the low-rise character and amenity of landed housing estates. with the topmost floor being 3.5m respectively for two and three-storey landed houses. The set back from the front and rear building facade is defined by the 45 degree line1[1]. The overall allowable height is 12m and 15.

Figure 5: Envelope Control for 2-Storey Landed house and 3-Storey Landed Houses 90 .

and floor-to-floor height.9 With the new Envelope Control guidelines. 91 . The intention is to safeguard the ambience and character of bungalow development. and the plot size deficiency is to be limited to one plot only.5m 30m 1400m² Other bungalow 10m nil 400m² Semi-detached house (including 8m nil 200m² corner terrace I) Back-to-back Semi-detached house 10m nil 200m² Terrace house I (intermediate units) 6m nil 150m² Terrace house II (corner units) 8m nil 80m² Terrace house II (intermediate units) 6m nil 80m² 15 For good class bungalow development. Site Coverage 11 Site coverage control is only applicable to detached house or bungalow development. roof eaves. etc. depth and size may be considered if the proposal is an infill development on existing plots which are already subdivided with land area less than 1400m2 each. car porch setback. Alternatively. basement protrusion. contribute to the total environmental quality of a bungalow area.g. together with other similar units. It also helps to ensure that there are sufficient open areas around the compound of each bungalow which. some of the current development control guidelines on specific building features will no longer apply to landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines as these have already been incorporated within the overall permissible envelope. 10 Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines should continue to adhere to the2- storey or 3-storey height control applicable to the respective landed estates. In such situations.) will continue to apply. the original plot size for each plot before surrendering must not be less than 1400m2. 12 There is no site coverage control for semi-detached and terrace houses. variations in plot width. 13 The site coverage controls vary with the plot size as follows: (a) Good Class Bungalows (1400m²): 35% (b) Other Bungalows (>800m²): 40% (c) Other Bungalows (<= 800m²): 40% (d) Other Bungalows (<= 800m²) in 2-storey mixed landed and 2-storeysemi-detached housing areas: 45% Plot Size 14 The minimum plot dimensions and plot sizes for all types of landed (Iand title) housing development are as follows: HOUSINGFORM PLOTWIDTH(min) PLOTDEPTH(min) PLOTSIZE(min) Good class bungalow 18. These include guidelines on the attic profile. the reduction should be less than 10% of the minimum plot size of 1400m2 and be due to the surrender of land to the government for a public purpose like road widening. on earthworks. All other relevant and prevailing development control guidelines (e.

at least 4. a plot smaller than 1000m² based on the same rate will apply. 92 . This is to secure a sufficiently wide strip of land (at least 6m) between 2 pairs of access points to facilitate roadside planting and provide some space for kerbside parking within landed housing estate (see Figure7a). 16b However. Access Point for New Landed Houses 16a All vehicular access for new landed housing developments. especially terrace and semi- detached houses. If the computed open space requirement is <1000m². should be paired-up. an open space plot area of 1000m² or more will have to be provided.e. Generally. The 6m length is the current minimum requirement of NParks to enable small trees to be planted along these estate roads. Figure6: Development of Good Class Bungalow Plot Open Space Provision 16 For landed housing (land title) development.05m² green open space shall be provided for every 56m² of gross floor area. for new landed housing plot with plot width of more than 10m. two access points located side-by-side with each other. where possible i. its access point need not be paired up with the adjacent unit provided it can provide the full continuous 6mplanting verge within the plot width of the site (see Figure7b).

other bungalows. it should not be separated in future. semi-detached houses and terrace houses share the same setback requirements. However. The main building setback for 93 . the existing access arrangement can remain. for accesses that are already in a paired arrangement today. Figure7a: Paired Access Points Figure7b: Truncated Access Points Setback Requirements 17a Other than the terrace house II and good class bungalows.Access Point for Existing Landed Houses 16c For existing landed housing developments.

Please refer to Envelope Control guidelines paras 7 to 10. Figure8a: Front and Rear Building Setback Control* *Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m rear and side setback. Figure8b: Side Building Setback Control 94 . 8b & 9. They are shown in Figures 8a.landed houses hence varies depending on the types of landed (land title) housing.

17c However to prevent disamenity to other residents and undue obstruction to servicing/repair works.*Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m rear and side setback. Rear Setback of Terrace/Semi-detached Houses That Abut Existing Back lanes 17b The1st storey rear extension of terrace/semi-detached houses can abut existing back lanes. This is because the back lanes (with widths of 4 to 6m) serve to provide adequate setback between 2 rows of houses. new door and window openings can be allowed at the walls or boundary walls abutting the back lanes. (c) For houses abutting state owned back lanes. Please refer to Envelope Control guidelines paras 7 to 10. New openings or enlargement of existing openings along privately owned back lane swill not be allowed unless the applicant has prior written consent from the back lane owner. A planning condition would be imposed requiring the closure of the openings along the back lane in the event the back lane is redeveloped. 95 . should open inwards. (b) There should not be any structural encroachment into the back lanes. (e) Any new openings. (d) For houses abutting privately owned back lanes. if allowed. but they should not be enlarged or shifted. existing door or window openings can remain. The guidelines for 1st storey rear extensions to abut back lane are illustrated in Figure 8c. all such rear extensions will have to comply with the following requirements: (a) The height of the rear extension should not exceed that of the actual first storey.

the car porch shall be a single storey structure. The parapet wall shall be constructed of material that accords visual porosity. Figure8c: Guidelines for first Storey Rear Extensions to Abut Back lane Setback for Car porch. bay window and other features from the front. tempered glass and railing. Only the following minor works are allowed on the car porch roof: (a) A maximum 1. Bay Window & Other Features 17d The setback distance for car-porch.g. (b) A maximum 1m wide sun shading canopy. Terrace Area. terrace area.0m high parapet wall around the perimeter of the car porch roof. e.5mbuilding setback line. The car porch roof can be used as an open balcony or garden and it is to remain as an open-to-sky and unenclosed area. Where a car porch is provided within the 7. rear and side lot boundary are in Figure 9. cantilevered from the building wall to provide weather protection over the openings to the car porch roof (c) Planters for landscaping 96 .

4m 3m 3m 5 Roof Eaves 2.4m 1m 1m GCBA 5 Columns 2. Figure9: Setbacks of Car porch.6m 3 7 Bay Window / Planter boxes / Minor Decorative Fins / Horizontal Sun-shading Devices TERRACEII NA 2m 2m 2 OTHERS st nd 5 1 /2 storey 7m 2m 2m rd 5 8 8 3 STOREY 7m 2.6m 1. and can be allowed within the front setback and3 rdstorey rear and side setbacks (max 500mm protrusion into the setback distance) if it is raised at least 500mm above the floor slab.4m 1m 1m GCBA 5 Columns 5.5m Notes: 1 While the general planning guidelines (eg. The setback is measured from the boundary to the external wall/glass for the baywindow. 2 Include Terrace I semi-detached houses and bungalows outside GCBA.1m 3m 3m 5 Roof Eaves 5. Bay Window & Others BUILDING FRONT REAR SIDE (min) (min) (min) 69 Car porch TERRACEII Columns *2m *2m 2m Roof Eaves *1m 1m 1m 2 OTHERS 4 Columns 2. 97 . building heights. URA may vary the guidelines for development proposals to minimise any potential impact they may have on the nearby developments after considering the specific site context and conditions. building setback from boundaries. etc) are applicable for most development proposals.5m GCBA st nd 5 1 /2 storey 7m 2. Examples of light- weight screen include angled louvers or slanted vertical panels. (d) For semi-detached and terrace houses only.See para 14b below.5m 2. where one side of the car porch abuts the neighbour’s boundary.Car porch fronting a category 2 road would be allowed to encroach into the physical buffer but its length should not exceed the standard provision for a car park(5m). site coverage.5m 2.4m 1. attic.6m 1.4m 2m 2m 5 Roof Eaves 2.1m 1. Terrace Area.4m 2m 2m 4 Roof Eaves 2. a 1. 4 Applicable for sites fronting category3 to 5 road. unless the adjoining neighbour agrees to do without the screen wall.6m 9 Terrace Area TERRACEII Columns *2m *2m 2m Roof Eaves *1m 1m 1m 2 OTHERS 5 Columns 2.8m high light-weight screen wall shall be built along the common boundary of the car porch roof to provide the neighbour with some privacy. 3 A bay window is a cantilevered window.

6 For site which slopes upward from the road level. 7 The horizontal sun-shading devices refer to light weight cantilevered screens for sun-shading purposes without vertical supports. and can be allowed within the front setback and3rd storey rear and side setbacks (max 500mm protrusion into the setback distance) if it is raised at least 500mm above the floor slab. This may also be considered for intermediate terrace houses provided if site context allows for it (e. 98 .width of3. which do not significantly increase the building bulk. Height of Common Boundary Wall Abutting Car porch / Patio Area for Semi-detached Houses 18a The height of the common boundary wall abutting the car porch / patio area of semi-detached houses can be allowed up to the 1st storey ceiling height. ‘basement garage’ if permitted. where the car porches are paired and aligned). Additional covered car-porches beyond the 3. The building and car porch setback from the road reserve line is relaxed to 3mand the building setback from the rear boundary shall have a minimum of 7.0m width are to be set back in accordance with setback requirements for Terrace Area (e. 9 The required setback distance for the accessible area on the car porch roof/terrace area when used as open balcony/garden shall follow the requisite setback of the main building.5 Applicable for sites fronting category3 to 5 road. 8 Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m setback control. Applicable only for a car porch with max.5m -see Figure11. Bay Windows 18b A bay window is a cantilevered window. Figure10: Examples of Bay Windows in Conventional Housing Estates “REARGARDEN” LANDED HOUSING 19 The building setbacks for “rear garden” landed housing (land title) allow houses to provide for a larger garden at the rear while having a narrower building setback from the road reserve line (front boundary).g.0m (column to column) facing the road.1m for front and 3.0m for side/rear are required for additional car porches proposed for GCBA). 5. Please refer to examples (a) and (b) in Figure10.g. is to comply with the setback requirement similar to that of a car porch.

Please refer to Envelope Control guidelines paras 7 to 10. 21 “Rear garden” housing must be sited within its own enclave or satisfy certain locational criteria within existing or new estates as follows: (a) within existing estates: houses with the proposed rear garden should form their own enclave to segregate them from the rest of the estate with their own access road. The access road normally takes the form of a cul-de-sac. Figure11: Terrace Houses I (Rear Garden)* *Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m rear and side setback. 20 The various building setbacks for “rear garden” housing are: FROMROADRESERVELI FROM REAR FROMSIDEBOUNDA NE BOUNDARY RY (front boundary) st nd Main building 3m 7. - Covered terrace .1m - Roof eaves 1m (applies to roof eaves . 5. 99 . - of the main roof) Notes: 1 Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m side setback.5m 2m (1 &2 storey) 1 rd 3m (3 storey) Car porch 3m .

a total of eight estates were safeguarded for “Rear garden” landed housing. Peach Garden. 100 . (safeguarded since 1980 and only 2 storey detached houses [bungalows] and strata detached houses [strata bungalows] are allowed) (b) Bungalow areas. 22 Since the introduction of the “Rear garden” landed housing guidelines in19 Apr 1996. (b) within new estates: rear garden landed housing can be allowed within designated are as specially planned or set aside for such housing layout. (only detached houses [bungalows] and strata detached houses [strata bungalows] are allowed) (c) Semi-detached housing areas. (detached houses [bungalows]. Changi Heights. strata semi-detached houses and mixed strata detached/semi- detached housing are also allowed) and (d) Mixed landed housing areas (all landed and strata landed housing types are allowed except for terrace house II which is subject to evaluation). Clement Green Estate. The Inglewood. Figure 12: Designated Landed Housing Areas 24 The existing safeguarded landed housing estates comprise: (a) Good Class Bungalow Areas. REDEVELOPMENT OF LANDED HOUSING ESTATES 23 Well established existing landed housing estates in Singapore are already safeguarded to protect the character of these private housing estates . They are Hong Leong Garden. strata detached houses [strata bungalows]. Ford Avenue and Yuk Tong Avenue. Lasia Avenue.see Figure 12(Details on the safeguarded landed housing areas can be found in “The Designated Landed Housing Area Plan” which is available for browsing at the URA Customer Service Centre).

condominiums and any form of landed properties.25 The housing form which can be allowed in these areas are indicated in Figure 13. Figure 13: Housing Control in Designated Landed Housing Areas DESIGNATE HOUSING FORMS BUILDING D LANDED HEIGHT HOUSING DETACH STRATA LINK SEMI.STRATA MIXED TERR TERR STRATATE OTHER FLAT AREAS ED DETACH ED DETAC SEMI. STRATA ACE ACE* RRACE MIXED S** (BUNGA ED HOU HED DETACH DETACHED HOUS HOUS STRATA LOW) (BUNGA SES ED /SEMI. The other residential areas are for mixed housing like flats. ES I ES II LANDEDHO LOW) DETACHED USING GOOD Allowed Allowed Not Not Not Not allowed Not Not Not allowed Not allowed Not 2 CLASS allow allowed allowed allowe allowe allow storeys(ma BUNGALOW ed d d ed ximum) AREAS BUNGALOW Allowed Allowed Not Not Not Not allowed Not Not Not allowed Not allowed Not 2 or 3 AREAS allow allowed allowed allowe allowe allow storeys ed d d ed depending onprescribe SEMI Allowed Allowed Allow Allowed Allowed Allowed Not Not Not allowed Not allowed Not d height DETACHED ed allowe allowe allow control HOUSINGA d d ed REAS MIXED Allowed Allowed Allow Allowed Allowed Allowed Allowe Allowe Allowed Allowed Not LANDING ed d d Allow HOUSINGA ed REAS NOTES: *Subject to evaluation **Include condominium 101 .

Figure 14: Good Class Bungalow Areas The followingare Good Class Bungalow Areas (GCBA)# 1 Belmont Park 21 Gallop Road/ Woollerton Park 2 Bin Tong Park 22 GarlickAvenue 3 Binjai Park 23 HollandPark 4 Brizay Park 24 HollandRise 5 Bukit Sedap 25 Kilburn Estate 6 Bukit Tunggal 26 King Albert Park 7 Caldecott Hill Estate 27 Leedon Park 8 Camden Park 28 MarylandEstate 9 Chatsworth Park 29 NassimRoad 10 Chee Hoon Avenue 30 OeiTiong Ham Park 11 Chestnut Avenue 31 Queen Astrid Park 12 ClunyHill 32 Raffles Park 13 ClunyPark 33 RebeccaPark 14 CornwallGardens 34 Ridley Park 15 DalveyEstate 35 RidoutPark 16 Eng Neo Avenue 36 Swiss Club Road 17 Ewart Park 37 VictoriaPark 18 First /Third Avenue 38 WindsorPark 19 Ford Avenue 39 White House Park 20 Fourth /Sixth Avenue NOTE: # refer to Figure 14. These bungalows have a minimum plot size of 1400m². site coverage control of 35% and their own setback requirements which are different from other smaller bungalow developments.GOOD CLASS BUNGALOW AREAS (GCBA) 26 There are 39 GCBAs comprising prime residential land safeguarded for good class bungalows – see Figure 14.1 102 .

the following criteria must be met: (a) the lot to be subdivided must be at least 2800m² (after setting aside for road widening/DR etc). if any.1: Bungalow Areas SUBDIVISION OFCONSERVED BUNGALOW LOTS IN GCBA 27 Subdivision of conserved bungalow lots in GCBAs is allowed. Figure14. The number of deficient plots to be allowed shall depend on the number of conserved bungalows on the site. (d) the deficient plot must be contiguous with the conserved bungalow plot.<1400m²). Site containing one or more conserved bungalows can be subdivided into smaller standard bungalow plots (1400m²) such that the conserved bungalow plot occupies larger than 1400m². 28 In carrying out the subdivision. The larger plot area for this conserved bungalow plot can be offset against another contiguous bungalow plot provided the two together shall not be less than 2800m². (b) the deficient plot (i. (c) the total of the deficient plot size and the plot size of the conserved bungalow must not be less than 2800m² (after setting aside for road widening/DR etc). 103 . and (e) the proposed new bungalows and the conserved bungalows shall comply with the requisite site coverage and setback requirements.e. is not less than 1000m².

Figure 15: Subdivision of Conserved Bungalow Lots in GCBA (allowable situation) 104 . Figure 16shows the situation of 1 conserved bungalow on a plot >1400m² with 2 proposed deficient plots which cannot be allowed because only one residue plot with deficient plot size is allowed for each conserved bungalow.29 Figure 15 illustrates a subdivision involving a deficient plot.

the semi-detached house with a plot size of 400m² can be developed into a pair of new semi-detached houses if the 105 . In areas where semi-detached houses are allowed. width 10m). House owners making the change are advised to inform their immediate neighbours of their approved plans as early as possible and to seek their cooperation and understanding to minimise inconvenience to both parties. Figure16: Subdivision of Conserved Bungalow Lots in GCBA (not allowable situation) REDEVELOPMENTOF EXISTINGSEMI-DETACHED HOUSE OR TERRACE HOUSE 30 With the relaxation of plot sizes for bungalows and semi-detached houses in 1991. To optimise land use. The planning authority has received planning applications for redevelopment of existing semi-detached and terrace houses into more units or other housing forms. 31 The conditions for redevelopment are as follows: (a) From Semi-detached to Bungalow or a new pair of Semi-detached Houses A semi-detached house with a plot size of 400m² and a plot width of 10m can be developed into a bungalow provided the plot size of the remaining semi-detached unit is capable of being redeveloped into a new bungalow (minimum plot size 400m2. these redevelopments are generally allowed if they can satisfy the planning guidelines.

5 34 After the adjoining semi-detached house is redeveloped into other allowable housing forms. (c) From Semi-detached to Terrace Houses In areas not designated for bungalows or semi-detached. The redevelopment of a semi-detached house into terrace houses abutting an existing semi-detached house is not allowed so as not to downgrade the remaining semi-detached unit to a corner terrace house and limit its redevelopment potential . 106 .4. See Figure 17. the previously approved remaining semi-detached unit can remain as approved. (b) allow the adjacent owner access to the site to maintain or repair the roof and the exposed blank wall of the remaining semi-detached house or terrace house.3. the 2ndunit in a row can detach itself from the 3rd unit and pair up with the last unit to form a pair of semi-detached houses or it can detach from the corner house and itself becomes a corner terrace house . However. an engineer’s certification of the structural stability of the remaining unit. taking into the consideration the allowable redevelopment of a unit of a pair of semi-detached house into other housing forms. the remaining semi-detached house can be retained or be redeveloped into a bungalow provided the plot size is large enough and the plot width is not less than 10m. width 16m). On redevelopment of one of the semi-detached houses. joint redevelopment of a pair of semi-detached houses into terrace houses is allowed if it can comply with the minimum plot width and size for terrace houses.e.see Figure 17. the person undertaking the redevelopment must do the following: (a) plaster and paint the exposed blank wall and neaten any exposed roof of the remaining semi-detached house or terrace house as soon as the existing building(s) on the subject site is demolished. 32 For all redevelopments which leave an existing party wall bare and exposed. a semi-detached house is thus defined as: (a) a dwelling house partially attached on one side to any number of other units. For example.see Figure17. and provided the adjacent affected unit (from which it is detached) has a minimum plot size of 200m² and width of 8m (i. and provided the adjoining terrace plot has 8m plot width and 200m2 plot size.1. This includes semi-detached bungalow houses and semi-detached terrace houses (also known as corner terrace) or (b) a dwelling house abutting the common boundary as a result of the adjoining unit being demolished or redeveloped into other housing forms. the creation of a new blank party wall at the common boundary fora new house is not allowed (unless it is in accordance with an approved street block plan). For intermediate terrace houses built in the past with wide frontage and large plot size. width 10m) or a new pair of semi-detached units (minimum plot size 400m2. (b) From Terrace House to Bungalow or Semi-detached House A corner terrace house plot can be redeveloped into a detached or a new pair of semi- detached houses if it can comply with the minimum plot width and size. any unit in a row of these houses can be redeveloped to other landed housing forms if the plot size and width are sufficient to allow the change.2 &17. (c) submit to the Building and Construction Authority. 33 While the detachment of a building from an existing party is allowed under the conditions stated above. capable of being rebuilt into a corner unit in future). plot width is 16m or more provided the plot size of the remaining semi-detached unit is also capable of being redeveloped into a new bungalow (minimum plot size 400m2. -see Figure17.

For existing or proposed landed housing in non-safeguarded landed housing areas.1: Redevelopment of Existing Semi-detached House to Bungalow or Semi- detached House* NOTES: *These figures show the guidelines pertaining to landed housing located within safeguarded landed housing areas. Figure 17. Semi- detached and Corner Terrace NOTES: These figures show the guidelines pertaining to landed housing located within safeguarded landed housing areas. Figure 17. 107 . please refer to the guidelines on ‘Site Area’ under Flat and Condominium Developments. please refer to the guidelines on ‘Site Area’ under Flat and Condominium Developments.2: Redevelopment of Existing Intermediate Terrace House to Bungalow. For existing or proposed landed housing in non-safeguarded landed housing areas.

Figure 17. For existing or proposed landed housing in non-safeguarded landed housing areas. Figure 17. 108 .4: Redevelopment of Existing Semi-detached House to Terrace House NOTES: These figures show the guidelines pertaining to landed housing located within safeguarded landed housing areas. For existing or proposed landed housing in non-safeguarded landed housing areas. please refer to the guidelines on ‘Site Area’ under Flat and Condominium Developments. please refer to the guidelines on ‘Site Area’ under Flat and Condominium Developments.3: Redevelopment of Existing Intermediate Terrace House to Bungalow. Semi- detached and Corner Terrace NOTES: These figures show the guidelines pertaining to landed housing located within safeguarded landed housing areas.

g.0m. (c) the plot with the deficient plot width must comply fully with the minimum plot size of 200 sq metres and all other development control guidelines e. road buffer. all other plots within the same development must comply fully with the minimum plot width). 109 .5: Redevelopment of Existing Bungalow to Terrace Houses MARGINALDEFICIENCY IN PLOT WIDTH FOR IRREGULAR-SHAPED LANDED HOUSINGPLOTS 35 Semi-detached and corner terrace houses on irregular-shaped landed housing plots within existing landed housing estates can be allowed marginal deficiency in plot width provided the following criteria is satisfied: (a) the average width of the subject plot with the deficient plot width is to be at least 8m. This is to ensure that the resultant buildable footprint allows for a meaningful layout. and (d) the deficiency in plot width is to be confined to one plot per development on an in-fill site(i.e. setback. Figure 17. etc. (b) the absolute minimum plot width for the subject plot at the narrowest side is to be 4.

2b).6 provides examples of irregular-shaped plots to illustrate the criteria above. Figure 17. triangular or elongated with long road frontage and shallow depth) are more relaxed than regular plots.36 Figure 17. (b) the odd-shaped configuration is an existing plot configuration and not created by subdividing regular or less regular-shaped plots (refer to Figure 18. semi-detached and detached houses on existing odd-shaped plots (e. This relaxed setback does not apply to proposals where the odd-shaped plot is created out of further subdivision of land for 2 or more units (refer to Figure 18. Beyond the 8m width.6: Examples of Irregular-shaped Plots Where Marginal Deficiency in Plot Width Can Be Allowed LANDED HOUSINGON ODD-SHAPED PLOTS 37 The front setback requirement for corner terrace.g. The standard front setback of 7.1 for illustration. This is because the buildable footprint of such plots with long road frontage will be severely constrained if the standard 7.5m will apply for a width of 8m.5m road buffer requirement. measured from the common boundary line with the adjoining neighbour.The criteria to qualify for the more relaxed front setback for such plots are: (a) constrained site where the resultant building footprint cannot achieve a meaningful layout after complying with the standard 7. Refer to Figure 18. All other controls such as the setback of car porch follow the guidelines for landed housing. 110 . a reduced front setback of 2m is allowed.5m buffer requirement from the road is applied.2a).

111 .1: Setback Requirement for Odd-Shaped Landed Housing* *Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m rear and side setback. Please refer to Envelope Control guidelines paras 7 to 10.e. (c) the odd-shaped site fronts a minor road (i. category 4 or 5). (d) the site is not in a good class bungalow area. Figure 18.

2a: Example of sites that cannot qualify for the reduced front setback 112 .Figure 18.

the following criteria must be complied with: (a) the proposed additional gross floor area does not exceed 50% of the approved gross floor area. (c) structurally changes to the existing landed dwelling house such as replacing or constructing new columns/beams and reconstructing existing floor slabs do not exceed 50% of the existing. 113 . (d) changes/replacement of entire roof. regardless of increase in height as long as it does not involve an additional storey. Figure 18. (e) addition of an attic provided the increase in GFA is less than50%. (b) the external walls that are to be removed and replaced with new walls do not exceed 50% of the approved external walls.2b: Example of Sites That Cannot Qualify For the Reduced Front Setback DEFINITION OF“ADDITIONS&ALTERATIONS’’ VERSUS “RECONSTRUCTION’’ OF LANDED DWELLINGHOUSES 38 To qualify as an “Additions & Alterations’’ to a landed dwelling house.

from semi-detached house to detached house. Back to Main 114 .Proposals that do not comply with any of the above criteria are considered as “Reconstruction’’. for example. The following works are deemed as reconstruction regardless of whether the works exceed 50% of the existing building: (a) Increase in storey height–Changes/replacement of any part of the roof when it involves an additional storey (b) Change in housing form– Works which result in a change to the landed dwelling house form.

which allows the design of landed houses to be guided by the size and shape of the permissible building envelope. Envelope Control Guidelines 6 New erection or reconstruction of strata landed housing will be subject to the Envelope Control guidelines. The Envelope Control guidelines simplify the guidelines for landed housing and provide developers and homeowners more flexibility in the design of landed housing while safeguarding the low-rise character and amenity of landed housing estates. Figure 1 shows the Envelope Control for two and three-storey landed houses.4 STRATA LANDED HOUSING STRATA LANDED HOUSING (Strata Title) 1 Low-rise/low density residential developments with strata title arrangement are known as “strata landed housing” developments. as well as the allowable height that a house can be built up to. which will serve as a three-dimensional limit for the landed house.5m high. This envelope is determined by a combination of setbacks from the road and common plot boundaries. subject to compliance with the location criteria (see Figure 1). 5 The strata title arrangement is used to define the extent of private and communal areas within the strata landed housing development. 2 A strata landed housing development with communal facilities can comprise one of the three basic types: (a) Strata detached houses (bungalows) (b) Strata semi-detached houses (c) Strata terrace houses (to comprise at least three strata terrace units) 3 Mixed strata landed developments comprising any combinations of the three basic types can be allowed.5m respectively for two and three-storey landed houses. 7 The Envelope Control guidelines adopt a volumetric approach. 1[1] This is subject to URA’s detailed assessment on a case-by-case basis to minimise disamenity to neighbouring properties. The overall allowable height is 12m and 15. 115 . with the topmost floor being 3. The upper storeys and basement of each strata unit are not to be subdivided into separate strata units. The set back from the front and rear building facade is defined by the 45 degree line1[1]. These housing forms add variety and choice to the residential property market. Condominium status not will be accorded to such developments. Areas classified as Communal Open Space are not to be included in the boundary of the individual strata units. 4 Each strata unit within the strata landed housing development is to have a minimum building footprint with ground contact of 50 m2. This treatment is applicable to developments comprising entirely of strata landed housing as well as developments consisting a mix of strata landed housing and apartment units.

) will continue to apply. All other relevant and prevailing development control guidelines (e. on earthworks. Figure 1: Envelope Control for 2 Storey & 3 Storey Strata Landed Houses 8 With the new Envelope Control guidelines. roof eaves.g. These include guidelines on the attic profile. 116 . etc. 9 Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines should continue to adhere to the 2- storey or 3-storey height control applicable to the respective landed estates. some of the current development control guidelines on specific building features will no longer apply to landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines as these have already been incorporated within the overall permissible envelope. basement protrusion. car porch setback. and floor-to-floor height.

Greenery within the 2m planting strips and green buffers can be better achieved if they are maintained by the Management Corporations as communal spaces. drains and ventpipes. Figure 2: Location Criteria for Strata Landed Housing FORM STRATA STRATA SEMI. It is an indication of how much the site has been built on. The 2m planting strips and green buffers which form part of the minimum 45% COS provision. a 2 m-wide (minimum) green planting strip is to be provided along all sides of the development site boundary except where it fronts a public road. at least 25% must be set aside for on-ground greenery. in which case. these should be clearly annotated as tree planting strip in all submission plans to Development Control.LOCATION CRITERIA 10 The location criteria for the various strata landed housing development are in Figure2. The planting strip for tree planting purpose should be continuous (except where an access road is required). (b) Site Coverage Site coverage is a measurement of the footprint of all buildings expressed as a percentage of the nett site area. The maximum control for such developments located in GCBAs is 35%. and shall be free of encroachment from structures such as boundary wall/retaining wall. Where planting strips are to be provided. This is because PES being privately owned cannot form part of the communal greenery. 117 . the relevant green buffer requirement shall be provided. Of the 45%. The maximum site coverage allowed for strata landed housing developments located outside GCBAs is 40%. (d) Green Planting Strip To preserve Singapore’s image as a garden city. NOTE: 1 The nett site area excludes land to be set aside for road widening & drainage reserve. should not contain any Private Enclosed Spaces (PES). Areas classified as COS are not to be included in the boundary of the individual strata plots. (c) Communal Open Space Requirement with Minimum On-Ground Greenery Control A minimum 45% of the nett site area1 of the strata landed housing development is to be set aside for the provision of Communal Open Space (COS). STRATA TERRACE DETACHED DETACHED (BUNGALOW) Location Criteria Bungalow areas Semi-detached Mixed landed (including GCBA)/ areas/Mixed landed housing areas Semi-detached housing areas areas/Mixed landed housing areas PARAMETERS 11 The parameters for strata landed housing developments are: (a) Site Area There is no minimum control on the site area as long as the other requirements listed below are met.

5m 7. please see "Figure 19: Objective-based Guidelines on Ancillary Structures within the Green Buffer and 2m Planting Strip Along Common Boundaries" in Part 2 General Considerations.0m green.gov. Applicant can choose to either apply the prescriptive guidelines or the objective-based guidelines if the structures proposed are not in the list. type of the development and the building height. A new objective-based guideline has been introduced to allow greater design flexibility and to safeguard the intentions of the buffer requirements.0m green.5m 7. (5. the new objective-based guidelines replace the prescriptive guidelines.0m green. Such ancillary structures can be allowed as long as the objectives and performance criteria are met. (3. (e) Buffer Requirements All developments fronting a road in Singapore must observe a certain green buffer distance and building setback distance from the road. (ii) Setback from Common Boundaries A strata unit within the development site is to be set back 3m (minimum) from the common site boundary with another property.5m physical) (f) Setback Requirements The setback requirements are as follows: (i) Setback from Road The setback controls of buildings from public roads are determined by the road buffer only (see Figure 3). Where a development site fronts two or more public roads. side or rear of the strata unit faces the common site boundary.0m from expressway.0m green. See Figure 2 for details. 19m physical) 7. some minor ancillary structures are allowed for functional reasons. (3. (3.0m physical) 4. Please refer to NPARKS’ Circular: http://www. the buffer requirements from the roads will be applied to all boundaries fronting the roads. (To be administered by NPARKS with effect from 1 August 2005.0m for minor road to 5.corenet. 118 . The buffer requirement depends on the hierarchy of the road.sg/einfo/circulars/htmlandpdf/NPARKS_2005071901.pdf) For the type of ancillary structures located within the physical buffer or building setback. The green buffer ranges from 3.0m green. please see "Figure 20: Objective-based Guidelines on Minor Ancillary Structures within the Physical Buffer and The Building Setback Area" in Part 2 General Considerations.5m to 24m wide.5m physical) 4. For details of the objective-based guidelines. the buffer varies from 7. For strata landed developments. For details. Figure 3: Buffer requirements for Strata Landed Housing CATEGORY 1 CATEGORY 2 CATEGORY 3 CATEGORY 4 CATEGORY 5 EXPRESSWAY MAJOR MAJOR OTHER MAJOR MINOR ROADS ARTERIAL(A) ARTERIAL(B) ROADS & SLIP & SLIP ROADS ROADS 24m 12m 7. This guideline applies whether the front. Although the green buffer is meant for tree planting and turfing only.5m physical) 4. (iii) Using Drainage Reserve/Open Space to Offset Requisite Setback Further reduction of setback through the use of drainage reserve/open space is not permitted.5m (5.

(g) Spacing between Strata Units
Owners/developers and QPs are free to decide the suitable front, side and rear spacings
between strata units within the development site.

(h) Building Orientation
Owners/developers and QPs are free to decide the orientation of strata units within the
development site.

(i) Storey Height
Strata landed housing developments can be 2 or 3 storeys high, depending on the allowable
height prescribed in the designated landed housing estate plan or the Master Plan.
Basements and attic are allowed.

(j) Floor-to-Floor Height
The floor-to-floor height control for the 1st storey is 4.5m and 3.6m for the upper storeys.

(k) Building Length
Owners/developers and QPs are free to decide their desired building length.
(l) Setback of Strata Landed Housing from Good Class Bungalow Areas (GCBA)
(i) The minimum setbacks of strata landed housing from Good Class Bungalow Areas
(GCBA) are in Figure 4. The setback applies whether the front, side or rear of the
strata unit faces the common site boundary with the GCBA.

(ii) The revised setbacks would enable developments to achieve their development
potential while ensuring that the amenity of the GCBA would not be compromised.

Figure 4: Setback of Strata Landed Housing from Good Class Bungalow Areas

STOREY HEIGHT MINIMUM SETBACK FROM GCBA BOUNDARY
1-2 storeys* 3m or Road buffer requirement (if fronting road)
3 storeys 25m

*Roof terrace, if proposed, shall be orientated to face away from the good class bungalows.

(m) Maximum Number of Strata Units Allowed
The maximum number of allowable units in strata landed housing developments is
determined based on the typical footprint for the respective conventional landed housing
form. This helps to ensure that strata landed housing developments are compatible with the
environment of the surrounding landed housing estate.

The formulae which determine the maximum number of allowable units in the various types
of strata landed housing developments is in Figure 5.

119

Figure 5: Formulae which determine the maximum number of allowable units in strata
landed housing developments1

Type of strata landed Formulae to calculate maximum number of DUs allowed2
housing developments
Outside GCBAs 40% of site area
Y

Where Y = Typical footprint for the relevant conventional landed
housing form3

Within GCBAs 35% of site area
Y

Where Y = Typical footprint for a Good Class Bungalow3

Mixed strata landed (B x Y) + (SD x Y) + (T x Y) ≤ 40% of site area
housing developments
comprising more than Where B = Number of detached housing units
one housing form (e.g. SD = Number of semi-detached housing
a mix of terrace, semi- units
detached and detached T = Number of terrace housing units
housing units) outside Y = Typical footprint for the relevant
GCBAs conventional landed housing form3

NOTE:
1 Notwithstanding these guidelines, should a strata landed housing development be proposed in an area with localised problems (e.g.
severe infrastructural capacity issues), URA may impose tighter requirements including restricting the number of allowable units further in
consultation with other agencies.
2 The number of units will be rounded down to the nearest round figure.
3 The typical footprint of the various conventional landed housing forms is 100 m 2 for terrace and semi-detached housing, 200 m2 for
detached housing, and 500 m2 for Good Class Bungalows.

(n) Vehicular Access Provision
Multiple accesses from public roads to strata landed housing developments are not allowed.
Individual strata units shall not have direct vehicular access from public roads. Vehicular
access to any strata unit within the development site shall be taken only from a common
driveway. The driveway need not be linked to the strata unit.

(o) Car Park Provision
The car park provision is to comply with LTA’s car parking standards. Each strata unit can
have up to 2 private car park lots. These private car parks lots within the strata unit boundary
are to be contiguous with the respective strata unit and capable of being formed into a single
strata lot. The private car park lots will be excluded from gross floor area computation and
cannot be subsequently converted to other uses.

(p) Commercial Quantum
Commercial uses are not allowed within strata landed housing developments.

120

(q) Private Enclosed Space (PES)
There is no control on the material for the enclosure or fencing that defines the extent of the
PES. However, the PES enclosure or fencing must not exceed 1m in height to ensure that
PES retains an open and outdoor character. The design of the PES should effectively
protect the PES from falling objects and litter from other units within the development. The
PES which forms part of the strata title cannot be located within the 45% COS, 2m planting
strips and green buffers.

Back to Main

121

LOCATION 4 Flats are allowed in mixed housing areas zoned residential in the Master Plan or Development Guide Plan. 2 The building height of flats varies from 4 storeys to 30 storeys or even higher.000sqm. Flat 122 . the breakaway proposal must comply with the plot size requirement of the relevant landed housing form. where the development of a flat / condominium involves a breakaway from the existing landed housing within a non-safeguarded landed housing area. It has its own separate access usually taken from a common property area.000sqm. can be considered on a case by case basis. Flats development will not be accorded condominium status as they do not satisfy condominium criteria.000sqm. it is usually intensively developed with minimum communal open space under the common ownership of the residents. (iv) The actual parcellation and configuration of the redevelopment proposals will continue to be left to private negotiation between the land owners concerned as long as the guidelines on minimum plot size in paragraphs (i) and (ii) and other prevailing development control guidelines are met. if the breakaway proposal is for landed housing development within a non-safeguarded landed housing area. semi-detached and mixed landed housing. as well as on left behind plots of previously approved breakaway cases that are less than 1. Each unit is for residential purpose only. (ii) In addition. 3 Strata subdivision is allowed for the residential units. They form the bulk of medium to high density housing in Singapore.5 FLATS FLATS DEVELOPMENT 1 Flats or apartments in Singapore are non-landed housing developments. (iii) However. the site could contain one or more apartment blocks. Depending on the available land area. In either case. (v) Proposals for redevelopments of existing residential flat developments on infill sites. See Figure 1 for illustrations. This is to ensure that there is more openness and sufficient space for the provision of meaningful landscaping and communal facilities within the development. PARAMETERS 5 The parameters for flat developments are: (a) Site Area (i) The minimum site area for a flat development is 1. the aggregate land area for the left-behind plots must also satisfy the minimum plot size of 1. See Figure 1 for illustrations. The units can either be strata titled or be on lease title. They are not allowed in areas designated for bungalow.

buffer requirements) such that it is not capable of independent redevelopment: a) A 3-storey height control zone for a minimum width of 6m abutting the left-behind landed house. or subject to other development constraints (e. the redevelopment proposal is to adhere to the following guidelines where the left-behind plot is less than 400m2 in plot size or 10m in plot width.g. applicants can build a townhouse or part of a block of flats up to 3-storey. and b) An agreement cannot be reached between the owner of the left- behind plot and the other owners after extensive discussion. (vii) In allowing the waiver for flat developments. In such cases. e. 123 . Within this low rise zone. Car parks or clubhouses) would not be supported as they may adversely affect the amenity of the left behind house.g. developments that are located within areas affected by streetblock plans or the Geylang Urban Design Guidelines will be subject to their respective requirements. (vi) While the minimum plot size requirements apply for most cases. Other communal and commercial uses (eg. the applicant should show clear documentary evidence of any prior negotiation with the owner of the left-behind plot. and b) Only residential use is allowed within the low-rise zone that abuts the left-behind landed house. URA will consider waiving the minimum plot size control of the left-behind plot under the following situations: a) The owner of the left-behind plot does not wish to participate in the en- bloc development despite being informed of the limited development potential of his land if it is left out of the redevelopment. in their streetblock plan or urban design guidelines. normal setback requirements apply for the proposed breakaway flat development. (viii) Where a waiver of the minimum plot size of the left-behind plot is granted and the size of the left-behind plot is not less than 400m2 and is capable of independent redevelopment. The usual development control requirements such as road buffer and building setbacks would still apply for the rest of the development outside the low-rise zone.

It is an indication of how much the site has been built on. the relevant green buffer requirement shall be provided. these should be clearly annotated as tree planting strip in all submission plans to Development Control. and shall be free of encroachment from structures such as boundary wall/ retaining wall. 124 . (d) Green Planting Strip To preserve Singapore’s image as a garden city. a 2m-wide (minimum) green planting strip is to be provided along all sides of the development site boundary except where it fronts a public road. drains and vent pipes. (c) Communal Open Space There is no Communal Open Space (COS) requirement for flat developments. The planting strip for tree planting purpose should be continuous (except where an access road is required). Figure 1: Redevelopment of Existing Landed Houses to Flats and Other Landed Housing Forms within Non-Safeguarded Landed Housing Area (b) Site Coverage Site coverage is a measurement of the footprint of all buildings expressed as a percentage of the nett site area. Where planting strips are to be provided. in which case. The maximum site coverage allowed for flats development is 40% (including covered car parks).

See Figure 2 for details. The green buffer ranges from 3. the new objective-based guidelines replace the prescriptive guidelines. Such ancillary structures can be allowed as long as the objectives and performance criteria are met. (e) Buffer Requirements All developments fronting a road in Singapore must observe a certain green buffer distance and building setback distance from the road.pdf) For the types of ancillary structures located within the physical buffer or building setback.0m from expressway fronting the road. Please refer to NPARKS’ Circular: http://www. some minor ancillary structures are allowed for functional reasons. type of the development and the building height. please see "Figure 20: Objective-based Guidelines on Minor Ancillary Structures within the Physical Buffer and The Building Setback Area" in Part 2 General Considerations. the buffer varies from 7.The 2m planting strips and green buffers which form part of the communal greenery provision within the development. For details of the objective-based guidelines. The buffer requirement depends on the hierarchy of the road.sg/einfo/circulars/htmlandpdf/NPARKS_2005071901. (To be administered by NPARKS with effect from 1 August 2005. For details. For residential developments.corenet.gov.5m to 30m wide. Applicant can choose to either apply the prescriptive guidelines or the objective-based guidelines if the structures proposed are not in the list. 125 . Greenery within the 2m planting strips and green buffers can be better achieved if they are maintained by the Management Corporations as communal spaces. A new objective-based guideline has been introduced to allow greater design flexibility and to safeguard the intentions of the buffer requirements. should not contain any Private Enclosed Spaces (PES). Although the green buffer is meant for the tree planting and turfing only. please see "Figure 19: Objective-based Guidelines on Ancillary Structures within the Green Buffer and 2m Planting Strip Along Common Boundaries" in Part 2 General Considerations.0m for minor road to 5.

0m OR ABOVE green 25m green 10. For flats beyond 36 storeys. Figure 2: Buffer requirements for Residential Developments BUILDING SETBACK FROM ROAD RESERVE LINE HEIGHT Category 1 Category 2 Category 3 Category 4 Category 5 Expressway Major Major Other Major Minor Roads Arterial(A) Arterial(B) Roads & Slip & Slip Roads Roads UP TO 5 24. 126 .0m 7. the setback from the road will be applied to all boundaries fronting the road. Where the buffer requirement is more than the revised requisite setback from the road.5m (3. sandwich site.5m (3.5m physical) physical) physical) physical) 6 STOREYS 30. 19m green. (iii) Incremental Setback per Storey The taller the block.0m 10. Where a development site fronts two or more roads (e.5m (3.0m 7. 7. 4.0m 15.0m (5. 7.g. (iv) Using Drainage Reserve/Open space to Offset Requisite Setback Further reduction of setback through the use of drainage reserve/open space is not permitted.0m (5.5m 4. 4.0m (3. See Figure 4 for a few possible configurations).0m 12.0m STOREYS green. the buffer will apply. the greater the requisite setback.0m green 7.0m green.0m green.0m physical) physical) physical) (f) Setback Requirements The setback requirements are as follows: (i) Setback from Road Flats and condominiums share a common standard for setback from the road (see Figure 3). corner site.0m (5. (ii) Setback from Common Boundaries The setback requirements from the common boundaries for flats are in Figure 3. the setback requirement is capped at the same setback as for a 36- storey residential building.0m (5.5m physical) green.

7 6 3.2 32 11.2 7.4 14.0 3.8 23 8.4 25 9.8 5 3.6 5.8 15 6.1 24 9.6 15.3 12.4 11.6 22 8.0 31 11.1 9.1 20 7.5 7 3.8 8.0 3.1 11.4 9.2 36 and above 12.0 12 5.7 9.0 9.4 4 3.2 28 10. Figure 3: Revised Setback Standards for Flats and condominiums STOREY HEIGHT REVISED SETBACK FROM SETBACK FROM COMMON BOUNDARIES PUBLIC ROAD FOR (IN METRES) FLATS AND FLATS CONDOMINIUMS CONDOMINIUMS (IN METRES) 1 3.0 2 3.6 12.2 9 4.5 NOTE: A bay window is a cantilevered window and can be allowed within the setback distance (max 500mm protrusion into the setback distance) if it is raised at least 500mm above the floor slab.4 8 4.0 3.7 14.5 33 11.3 4.3 21 8.1 14.0 3.9 13.3 17 6.7 26 9.7 11 5.3 15.8 19 7.7 12.0 12.6 18 7.5 14 6.5 11.9 10.0 35 12.7 34 12.5 13.0 10 4.2 10.4 29 10.9 6.8 14.2 13 Road buffer requirement 5.2 13.1 16 6.6 10.9 27 9.5 8.0 3 3.0 15.7 30 10.8 11. 127 .3 10.

this will refer to the proposed GFA for the residential component. excluding bonus GFA 128 . the maximum number of allowable Dwelling Units (DUs) per residential development will be determined based on the following formula: MP Allowable GPR* x Site Area Maximum number of DUs per development ≤ 70 sqm * Excludes bonus GFA. If the proposal is for a mixed development.4 and other low-density residential estates that are within the Central Area. For flat and condominium developments within GPR 1. Figure 4: Examples of Development Sites Fronting 2 or More Roads (g) Maximum number of Dwelling Units (DUs) for flat and condominium developments Within the Central Area (see Map 1) (i).

4 and other low-density residential estates. The maximum number of allowable DUs for flat and condominium developments within these estates will be determined based on the following formula: MP Allowable GPR* x Site Area Maximum number of DUs per development ≤ 100 sqm * Excludes bonus GFA. (ii). this will refer to the proposed GFA for the residential component. excluding bonus GFA (iv).g. For all flat and condominium developments in the Telok Kurau. For all flat and condominium developments outside the Central Area. If the proposal is for a mixed development. Residential with 1st Sty Commercial or Commercial & Residential developments) within these GPR 1. Joo Chiat and Jalan Eunos estates (see Maps 2-5). Outside the Central Area (iii). excluding bonus GFA 129 . this will refer to the proposed GFA for the residential component. The cap will also apply be applicable to the residential component of mixed-use developments (e. excluding the residential estates shown in Maps 2-5. the maximum number of allowable Dwelling Units (DUs) per residential development will be determined based on the following formula: MP Allowable GPR* x Site Area Maximum number of DUs per development ≤ 70 sqm * Excludes bonus GFA. a more stringent DU guide based on the road capacity of the estate will be used. Kovan. If the proposal is for a mixed development.

Map 1: Central Area Map 130 .

Map 2: Telok Kurau Residential Estate 131 .

Map 3: Kovan Residential Estate 132 .

Map 4: Joo Chiat Residential Estate 133 .

as opposed to building fully submerged basement car parks or multi-storey car parks. partially covered with earthfill. to give an impression of a sunken basement. it is an option for developers to consider. As the landscape decks are not meant to replace the current mandatory greenery provision of the 2m planting strips and green buffers. Landscape decks are essentially raised platform. subject to compliance with locational criteria. Uses such as car parks can be tucked beneath it. 134 . Landscape decks allow for additional communal greenery and facilities. the deck structures are not to encroach onto these areas. For details of the landscape deck guidelines. please see “Figure 21: Guidelines for Landscape Deck in Residential Flat & Condominium Developments” in Part 1 General Considerations. Map 5: Jalan Eunos Residential Estate (h) Landscape Deck Landscape decks can be now be allowed within residential flat and condominium developments. Being an alternative building form. thus enhancing the identity of the development.

3.6 AND ABOVE SITES ST 1 STOREY 5.Storey Flat Development (k) Storey Height Flat developments are at least 4 storeys high. higher storeys are allowed if there are no urban design and/or technical constraints or special requirements affecting the site.0m ALL OTHER STOREY 3.0m TOP STOREY 3. However.0m NOTE: A sky terrace floor is a storey where the terrace areas within the 45-degree line occupy at least 60% of the floor plate.0m floor-to-floor height. a living room facing or a blank wall (see example in Figure 5). regardless of whether the facade has a bedroom facing.6m 5. SIA. 135 . there is no specific guideline on building spacing.6m SKY TERRACE STOREY 3.6m 3. Only such sky terrace floors will be allowed a 5.6m 5. The allowable building heights are indicated in the Development Guide Plans. the requisite setback is the same.6m will apply. Figure 5: Revised Setback Standards for a 4.(i) Spacing Between Buildings Currently. In certain areas. (l) Floor-to-Floor Height The floor-to-floor height control for flats and condominium developments is as follows: STOREY GPR 1. You are advised to refer to this guide and adopt the good practices highlighted in it.4 SITES GPR 1. (j) Building Orientation For a building of a certain storey height. Otherwise.0m 5. SIP and URA have jointly released an Industry Guide of Good Practices to minimize wall-like developments on 4 March 2010. however. REDAS.

if the proposed sky terrace floor is less than 5. If any floor is used as a sky terrace floor.0m. All other floors are 3. it will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis. and a higher floor-to-floor height beyond 3. However. If allowed. If any floor is used as a sky terrace floor. Figure 6a: Example of Floor-to-Floor Height Control and the Overall Allowable Height 136 . subject to the overall absolute height being maintained (see Figure 6a for illustration). a floor-to-floor height of 5. For residential development sites proposed on GPR 1. the floor-to- floor height control for the 1St storey is 5.0m.6m. the ‘unused’ height cannot be transferred to other floors (see Figure 6b for illustration).4 sites in the 2008 Master Plan.6m is required. the overall building height (in metres) must comply with the control in relation to the proposed number of storeys.Variation to the floor-to-floor height of each storey can be allowed.0m is allowed.

SIA. there is no specific guideline on building length. SIP and URA have jointly released an Industry Guide of Good Practices to minimize wall-like developments on 4 March 2010. However. Figure 6b: Example of Floor-to-Floor Height Control Whereby Unused Height from Sky Terrace Floors cannot be transferred To Other Floors (m) Building Length Currently. You are advised to refer to this guide and adopt the good practices highlighted in it. 137 . REDAS. (n) Setbacks for multi-storey car parks The setback distance for multi-storey car park building from the property/boundary line or road reserve line is as shown in Figure 7.

drainage reserve of width>6m) NOTE: Solid wall with no opening at the facade.e. This relaxation will be assessed based on the merits of the proposal i. Figure 7a (o) Setback of Flats from Good Class Bungalow Areas (GCBA) (i) The minimum setback of flats from Good Class Bungalow Areas (GCBA) are in Figure 8. based on the height and length of the multi-storey car park building and its impact on the surrounding environment. (lesser setback as adjoining development will not be affected in terms of noise. Figure 7: Setback for Multi-storey Car Park (MSCP) Setback from road Road buffer requirement Setback from property 6m (minimum) for MSCP with opening 4. open space.5m (minimum) boundary fronting open areas (i. It will apply if the proposal demonstrates that the integration of the MSCP with the residential tower block and results in a better designed development that will benefit the environment.e. (ii) The revised setbacks would enable developments to achieve their development potential while ensuring that the amenity of the GCBA would not be compromised. 138 .5(minimum) for MSCP with no boundary at the façade openings at the facade Setback from property 4. fumes or car headlight) A multi-storey car park building which abuts and is integrated into a residential tower block can be allowed to follow the same setback requirements as if the multi-storey car park building is a standalone building (see Figure 7a).

and so on 36 storeys and above 56m * Roof terrace. if proposed. as long as it is one of the approved designs. They will only need to install a covering of 2m in width from the external wall (see Figure 10) before selling the units. PES will need to comply with the guidelines in Figure 9 to retain a semi-outdoor character. b. To avoid ad-hoc coverings of PES by individual owners downstream that could mar the appearance of the development. a 7 storey flat would be set back 27m. All PES in non-landed residential developments. 139 . to ensure that basic protection from killer litter is provided. PES covers that would blend well with the overall design of the development are to be designed upfront and approved as part of the development application process. please click here. S/N Item Guideline 1 Covers a. Figure 8: Setback of Flats and Condominium from Good Class Bungalow Areas STOREY HEIGHT MINIMUM SETBACK FROM GCBA BOUNDARY 1-2 storeys* 3m or Road buffer requirement (if fronting road) 3-5 storeys 25m 6-35 storeys Setback to be increased by 1m beyond 25m for each storey height increase: eg a 6 storey flat would be set back 26m.2 Developers can propose a single cover design. It forms part of the private strata area of units which are sold to buyers. 2 For developments which do not have pre-approved covers. please click here. The structures must also comply with the relevant requirements from technical agencies.1 To qualify for the bonus GFA scheme. or a few designs for the buyers to choose from. 1 Applies only to developments approved by URA on or after 12 January 2013. as the covers will add to the bulk and massing of the building. will be counted as GFA under the 10% maximum bonus GFA allowed beyond the Master Plan (MP) stipulated GPR. developers will not need to install the entire cover. shall be orientated to face away from the good class bungalows. Homeowners will be given the flexibility and choice over the remaining cover for the rest of the PES. 2 Setback The PES must be situated outside the setback line. For more information. However. PES of developments approved before 12 January 2013 do not count towards the development’s GFA. MCSTs can also use these pre-approved designs to guide homeowners who wish to extend their cover beyond the 2m. including executive condominiums. (p) Private Enclosed Space (PES) A “Private Enclosed Space” refers to a semi-outdoor area adjacent to a strata unit. Full covers over the entire PES can be allowed.

3 3 Applies only to developments approved by URA on or after 12 January 2013. 4 For developments which do not have pre-approved covers. Figure 9: Guidelines for PES Figure 10: PES Covering and PES Enclosure or Fencing (q) Private Roof Terrace A “Private Roof Terrace” refers to a semi-outdoor area located at the roof level of a strata unit. 140 . including executive condominiums. 4 PES enclosure or Any PES enclosure or fencing that defines the extent of the PES shall fencing not exceed 1m in height as shown in Figure 5. This is to ensure the open and semi-outdoor nature of the PES. Private Roof Terrace of developments approved before 12 January 2013 do not count towards the development’s GFA. For more information. please click here. will be counted as GFA under the 10% maximum bonus GFA allowed beyond the Master Plan (MP) stipulated GPR. please click here. It forms part of the private strata area of units which are sold to buyers. All Private Roof Terraces in non-landed residential developments.3 Site Coverage The PES will count towards the site coverage of the development.

subject to the the technical height controls. Private Roof Terraces will need to comply with the guidelines in Figure 11 to retain a semi-outdoor character. where technical height controls. The floor. Covers will be the 45 degree envelop taken allowed over the entire roof terrace from the springing line. applicable.4 Developers can propose a single cover design. any structures private roof must remain open-sided as viewed from the external façade. The overall height of the structures also must not exceed development must also comply with 5m at any point. installation of the covers will be optional. should they wish to cover the private RT subsequently. 2 Height Control If the storey height control has If the storey height control has not been maxed out been maxed out Any covers on roof terrace floor The roof terrace will be taken to be must be setback according to an additional storey. Coverings can be allowed on private RTs. 2 Covers a. However. To avoid ad-hoc coverings of private RTs by individual owners downstream. Back to Main 141 .To qualify for the bonus GFA scheme. or a few designs for the buyers to choose from. covered or enclosed features within these areas will be counted as GFA. b. However. MCSTs can also use these pre-approved designs to guide homeowners who wish to install covers. There are not counted as GFA. Private roof terraces will not be allowed on top of the attic level. where applicable. S/N Item Guideline 1 Location Private roof terraces are only allowed on the flat roof of a building. 3 Structures within To retain the open and semi-outdoor nature of the RT. Homeowners can choose from one of the approved designs. terraces Figure 11: Guidelines for Private Roof Terraces Communal roof terraces are open to sky areas managed by the MCST which serve to provide landscaping and communal facilities for residents in the development. The structures must also comply with the relevant requirements from technical agencies. covers that would blend well with the overall design of the development are to be designed upfront and approved as part of the development application process.

too. (d) Green Planting Strip To preserve Singapore’s image as a garden city.6 CONDOMINIUM FLATS CONDOMINIUM FLATS 1 Unlike flat developments. This is to ensure that there is enough space to provide for communal and recreational facilities in a luxurious green setting.4ha. The development could comprise a mix of 4 storeys low-rise blocks and high-rise blocks of 30 storeys and above subject to the allowable height limit. The maximum site coverage allowed for condominium development is 40% (including covered car parks).000sqm. There are usually more generous provision of communal and recreational facilities in condominium flats. (ii) In addition. 2 In larger sites. Condominium flats. condominium housing requires a larger land area. semi-detached and mixed landed housing. (b) Site Coverage Site coverage is a measurement of the footprint of all buildings expressed as a percentage of the nett site area. For small sites. The communal facilities are under the common ownership of the residents and are provided for their enjoyment. form the bulk of medium to high density housing in Singapore. It is an indication of how much the site has been built on. (c) Communal Open Space (COS) There is no Communal Open Space (COS) requirement for condominium developments. They are not allowed in areas designated for bungalow. The residential units are only allowed strata subdivision. but with generous provision of communal and recreational facilities. PARAMETERS 4 The parameters for condominium flats are: (a) Site Area (i) The minimum site area for a condominium development is 0. LOCATION 3 Like other flats or apartments. a 2m-wide (minimum) green planting strip is to be provided along all sides of the development site boundary except where it fronts a public road: in 142 . condominium flats are allowed in mixed housing areas zoned residential in the Master Plan or Development Guide Plans. for all breakaway proposals from existing landed housing for either flat / condominium or landed housing developments within non-safeguarded landed housing areas. there could be only space for one apartment block up to the allowable height. the building height of condominium flats may vary among the various blocks of flats. the aggregate land area for the left-behind plots must also satisfy the minimum plot size of 1. (iii) The actual parcellation and configuration of the redevelopment proposals will continue to be left to private negotiation between the land owners concerned as long as the guidelines on minimum plot size in Para (ii) and other prevailing development control guidelines are met.

some minor ancillary structures are allowed for functional reasons.pdf) For the types of ancillary structures located within the physical buffer or building setback. Such ancillary structures can be allowed as long as the objectives and performance criteria are met. See Figure 1b for a few possible configurations). (e) Buffer Requirements All developments fronting a road in Singapore must observe a certain green buffer distance and building setback distance from the road.gov. these should be clearly annotated as tree planting strips in all submission plans to Development Control. type of the development and the building height.corenet. Applicant can choose to either apply the prescriptive guidelines or the objective-based guidelines if the structures proposed are not on the prescriptive list. 143 . the buffer varies from 7. the relevant green buffer requirement shall be provided. The planting strip for tree planting purpose should be continuous (except where an access road is required). Greenery within the 2m planting strips and green buffers can be better achieved if they are maintained by the Management Corporations as communal spaces. corner site. The green buffer (ranging from 3. and shall be free of encroachment from structures such as boundary wall/ retaining wall. The 2m planting strips and green buffers which form part of the communal greenery provision within the development should not contain any Private Enclosed Spaces (PES). Where planting strips are to be provided. The buffer requirement depends on the hierarchy of the road. A new objective-based guideline has been introduced to allow greater design flexibility and to safeguard the intentions of the buffer requirements. (ii) Setback from Common Boundaries The setback requirements from the common boundaries for condominiums are in Figure 1a.sg/einfo/circulars/htmlandpdf/NPARKS_2005071901. please see "Figure 20: Objective-based Guidelines on Ancillary Structures within the Green Buffer and 2m Planting Strip Along Common Boundaries" in Part 2 General Considerations. (f) Boundary Clearances The setback requirements are as follows: (i) Setback from Road The setback controls of buildings from public roads are determined by the road buffer only (see Figure 1a).0m for minor road to 5. the buffer requirements from the roads will be applied to all boundaries fronting the roads. Please refer to NPARKS’ Circular: http://www. For details of the guidelines.0m from expressway) fronting the road shall be free of encroachment from structures such as boundary wall/retaining wall. drains and ventpipes.5m to 30m wide. (To be administered by NPARKS with effect from 1 August 2005. the new objective-based guidelines replace the prescriptive guidelines.which case. For residential developments. Although the green buffer is meant for tree planting and turfing only. Where a development site fronts two or more roads (e. For details of the objective-based guidelines. (See “Figure 2: Buffer Requirements for residential Developments” in Part 1 Flats). please see "Figure 20: Objective-based Guidelines on Minor Ancillary Structures within the Physical Buffer and The Building Setback Area" in Part 2 General Considerations.g. sandwich site. drains and ventpipes.

the greater the requisite setback. 144 . the setback requirement is capped at the same setback as for a 36-storey residential building. For condominiums beyond 36 storeys.(iii) Incremental Setback per Storey The taller the block. (iv) Using Drainage Reserve/Open Space to Offset Requisite Setback Further reduction of setback through the use of drainage reserve/ open space is not permitted.

4 11.7 9.2 13.5 14 6.1 16 6.4 25 9.3 21 8.3 10.9 6.8 8.0 3 3.0 2 3.1 11.4 4 3.8 23 8. Figure 1a: Setback Requirement for Flats and Condominiums STOREY HEIGHT SETBACK FROM SETBACK FROM COMMON BOUNDARIES PUBLIC ROAD FOR (IN METRES) FLATS AND FLATS CONDOMINIUMS CONDOMINIUMS (IN METRES) 1 3.5 NOTE: Bay window.6 10.4 9.5 13.8 14.0 10 4.2 9 4.0 3.7 14.1 14.2 Road buffer requirement 13 5.1 20 7.9 27 9.4 8 4.4 29 10.7 26 9.2 28 10.8 19 7. 145 .0 3.0 35 12.1 9.3 17 6.2 36 and above 12.0 31 11.5 33 11.7 30 10.2 10.0 3.5 11. The width of the bay window shall not exceed the length of 1 normal residential structure bay. which is a cantilevered window with a maximum projection of 500mm and raised at least 500mm above the ground can be allowed within the setback distance.8 5 3.3 12.3 15.7 6 3.2 32 11.1 24 9.9 13.2 7.0 12 5.0 9.7 34 12.6 12.0 3.3 4.7 11 5.5 7 3.8 15 6.4 14.6 18 7.5 8.7 12.9 10.6 15.6 22 8.0 12.8 11.6 5.0 15.

excluding bonus GFA 146 .4 and other low-density residential estates that are within the Central Area. this will refer to the proposed GFA for the residential component. For flat and condominium developments within GPR 1. Figure 1b: Examples of Development Sites Fronting 2 or More Roads (g) Maximum number of Dwelling Units (DUs) for flat and condominium developments Within the Central Area (see Map 1) (i). If the proposal is for a mixed development. the maximum number of allowable Dwelling Units (DUs) per residential development will be determined based on the following formula: MP Allowable GPR* x Site Area Maximum number of DUs per development ≤ 70 sqm * Excludes bonus GFA.

this will refer to the proposed GFA for the residential component. The cap will also apply be applicable to the residential component of mixed-use developments (e. If the proposal is for a mixed development. For all flat and condominium developments in the Telok Kurau. For all flat and condominium developments outside the Central Area. Kovan. The maximum number of allowable DUs for flat and condominium developments within these estates will be determined based on the following formula: MP Allowable GPR* x Site Area Maximum number of DUs per development ≤ 100 sqm * Excludes bonus GFA. Residential with 1st Sty Commercial or Commercial & Residential developments) within these GPR 1. the maximum number of allowable Dwelling Units (DUs) per residential development will be determined based on the following formula: MP Allowable GPR* x Site Area Maximum number of DUs per development ≤ 70 sqm * Excludes bonus GFA. a more stringent DU guide based on the road capacity of the estate will be used. Outside the Central Area (iii). Joo Chiat and Jalan Eunos estates (see Maps 2-5).g.4 and other low-density residential estates. this will refer to the proposed GFA for the residential component. excluding bonus GFA (iv). excluding bonus GFA 147 . (ii). If the proposal is for a mixed development. excluding the residential estates shown in Maps 2-5.

Map 1: Central Area Map 148 .

Map 2: Telok Kurau Residential Estate 149 .

Map 3: Kovan Residential Estate 150 .

Map 4: Joo Chiat Residential Estate 151 .

to give an impression of a sunken basement. as opposed to building fully submerged basement car parks or multi-storey car parks. thus enhancing the identity of the development. subject to compliance with locational criteria. Being an alternative building form. For 152 . it is an option for developers to consider. the deck structures are not to encroach onto these areas. Uses such as car parks can be tucked beneath it. Landscape decks are essentially raised platform. Landscape decks allow for additional communal greenery and facilities. partially covered with earthfill. Map 5: Jalan Eunos Residential Estate (h) Landscape Deck Landscape decks can be now be allowed within residential flat and condominium developments. As the landscape decks are not meant to replace the current mandatory greenery provision of the 2m planting strips and green buffers.

there is no specific guideline on building spacing. REDAS. You are advised to refer to this guide and adopt the good practices highlighted in it. 3. (j) Building Orientation For a building of a certain storey height. condominium flats are high rise unless there are urban design and/or technical constraints or special requirements affecting the site.0m TOP STOREY 3.details of the landscape deck guidelines.0m floor-to-floor height. a living room facing or a blank wall (see example in Figure 1c).0m 5. In general.6m 3.6m 5. (i) Spacing between Buildings Currently. Figure 1c: Revised Setback Standards for a 4-storey Condominium Development (k) Storey Height Condominium developments vary in height. please see “Figure 21: Guidelines for Landscape Deck in Residential Flat & Condominium Developments” in Part 1 General Considerations. The allowable building heights are available in the Development Guide Plans.0m STOREY* NOTE: A sky terrace floor is a storey where the sky terrace areas within the 45-degree line occupy at least 60% of the floor plate.6m will apply. Only such sky terrace floors will be allowed a 5. SIP and URA have jointly released an Industry Guide of Good Practices to minimize wall-like developments on 4 March 2010.6m SKY TERRACE 3.6m 5. Otherwise.0m ALL OTHER STOREY 3.4 SITES GPR 1. (l) Floor-to-Floor Height The floor-to-floor height control for flats and condominium developments is as follows: STOREY GPR 1. However. the requisite setback is the same. SIA. 153 .6 AND ABOVE SITES ST 1 STOREY 5. regardless of whether the facade has a bedroom facing.

0m is allowed.0m. subject to the overall absolute height being maintained (see Figure 2a for illustration).0m. For residential development sites proposed on GPR 1.Variation to the floor-to-floor height of each storey can be allowed. All other floors are 3. if the proposed sky terrace floor is less than 5. However. the overall building height (in metres) must comply with the control in relation to the proposed number of storeys. the floor-to- floor height control for the 1st storey is 5. If any floor is used as a sky terrace floor. and a higher floor-to-floor height beyond 3. If allowed. If any floor is used as a sky terrace floor.4 sites in the 2008 Master Plan. the ‘unused’ height cannot be transferred to other floors (see Figure 2b for illustration). it will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.6m is required.6m. a floor-to-floor height of 5. Figure 2a: Example of Floor-to-Floor Height Control and the Overall Allowable Height 154 .

5m (minimum) fronting open areas (i. open space. Figure 3: Setbacks for Multi . or car headlights) 155 . Figure 2b: Example of Floor-to-Floor Height Control Whereby Unused Height from Sky Terrace Floors Cannot be Transferred to Other Floors (m) Setbacks for Multi-storey Car Parks The setback distance for multi-storey car park building from the property/ boundary line or road reserve line is as shown in Figure 3.e. drainage reserve of width >6m) NOTE : * Solid wall with no opening at the facade (lesser setback as adjoining developments will not be affected in terms of noise. fumes.Storey Car park (MSCP) setback from road road buffer requirement Setback from property boundary 6m (minimum) for MSCP with 4.5m (minimum) for MSCP with no openings at the facade openings at the facade* Setback from property boundary 4.

156 .e. It will apply if the proposal demonstrates that the integration of the MSCP with the residential tower block and results in a better designed development that will benefit the environment. You are advised to refer to this guide and adopt the good practices highlighted in it. REDAS. Figure 3a (n) Building Length Currently.A multi-storey car park building which abuts and is integrated into a residential tower block can be allowed to follow the same setback requirements as if the multi-storey car park building is a standalone building (see Figure 3a). based on the height and length of the multi-storey car park building and its impact on the surrounding environment. there is no specific guideline on building length. (ii) The revised setbacks would enable developments to achieve their development potential while ensuring that the amenity of the GCBA would not be compromised. This relaxation will be assessed based on the merits of the proposal i. However. SIP and URA have jointly released an Industry Guide of Good Practices to minimize wall-like developments on 4 March 2010. (o) Setback of Condominiums from Good Class Bungalow Areas (GCBA) (i) The minimum setback of condominiums from Good Class Bungalow Areas (GCBA) are in Figure 4. SIA.

Figure 4: Setback of Flats and Condominiums from Good Class Bungalow Areas (GCBA)

STOREY HEIGHT MINIMUM SETBACK FROM GCBA
BOUNDARY
1-2 storeys* 3m or road buffer requirement (if fronting road)
3-5 storeys 25m
6-35 storeys setback to be increased by 1m beyond 25m for
each storey height increase: eg
a 6 storey flat would be set back 26m;
a 7 storey flat would be set back 27m;
and so on
36 storeys and above 56m

*Roof terrace, if proposed, shall be orientated to face away from the good class bungalows.

(p) Development on Sites Separated by Road or Canal
If a site is physically separated by a proposed or existing public road or canal, the resultant
separated sites should each have a separate independent development, each with its own
amenities. Each site will be treated as an independent development for compliance with the
development control guidelines.

(q) Development involving 2 or more Contiguous Lots
Where the development is on contiguous lots and the design and layout are intended as a single
development, amalgamation of the plots under one lot number is required. Where there are existing
contiguous odd lots of State land which cannot be meaningfully developed on their own, the
developers may be advised to apply to the Land Office to have them amalgamated with the
development site.

(r) Private Enclosed Space (PES)
A “Private Enclosed Space” refers to a semi-outdoor area adjacent to a strata unit. It forms part of
the private strata area of units which are sold to buyers.

All PES in non-landed residential developments, including executive condominiums, will be counted
as GFA under the 10% maximum bonus GFA allowed beyond the Master Plan (MP) stipulated
GPR.1

To qualify for the bonus GFA scheme, PES will need to comply with the guidelines in Figure 5 to
retain a semi-outdoor character. The structures must also comply with the relevant requirements
from technical agencies.

S/N Item Guideline

1 Covers a. Full covers over the entire PES can be allowed. To avoid ad-hoc
coverings of PES by individual owners downstream that could
mar the appearance of the development, PES covers that would
blend well with the overall design of the development are to be

1
Applies only to developments approved by URA on or after 12 January 2013. PES of developments approved before
12 January 2013 do not count towards the development’s GFA. For more information, please click here.
2
For developments which do not have pre-approved covers, please click here.

157

designed upfront and approved as part of the development
application process.2 Developers can propose a single cover
design, or a few designs for the buyers to choose from.

b. However, developers will not need to install the entire cover.
They will only need to install a covering of 2m in width from the
external wall (see Figure 6) before selling the units, to ensure
that basic protection from killer litter is provided. Homeowners
will be given the flexibility and choice over the remaining cover
for the rest of the PES, as long as it is one of the approved
designs. MCSTs can also use these pre-approved designs to
guide homeowners who wish to extend their cover beyond the
2m.

2 Setback The PES must be situated outside the setback line, as the covers will
add to the bulk and massing of the building.

3 Site Coverage The PES will count towards the site coverage of the development.

4 PES enclosure or Any PES enclosure or fencing that defines the extent of the PES shall
fencing not exceed 1m in height as shown in Figure 5. This is to ensure the
open and semi-outdoor nature of the PES.

Figure 5: Guidelines for PES

Figure 6: PES Covering and PES Enclosure or Fencing

(s) Private Roof Terrace

A “Private Roof Terrace” refers to a semi-outdoor area located at the roof level of a strata unit. It
forms part of the private strata area of units which are sold to buyers.

158

All Private Roof Terraces in non-landed residential developments, including executive
condominiums, will be counted as GFA under the 10% maximum bonus GFA allowed beyond the
Master Plan (MP) stipulated GPR.3

To qualify for the bonus GFA scheme, Private Roof Terraces will need to comply with the guidelines
in Figure 7 to retain a semi-outdoor character. The structures must also comply with the relevant
requirements from technical agencies.

S/N Item Guideline

1 Location Private roof terraces are only allowed on the flat roof of a building.
Private roof terraces will not be allowed on top of the attic level.

2 Covers a. Coverings can be allowed on private RTs. To avoid ad-hoc
coverings of private RTs by individual owners downstream,
covers that would blend well with the overall design of the
development are to be designed upfront and approved as part of
the development application process.4 Developers can propose
a single cover design, or a few designs for the buyers to choose
from.

b. However, installation of the covers will be optional. Homeowners
can choose from one of the approved designs, should they wish
to cover the private RT subsequently. MCSTs can also use
these pre-approved designs to guide homeowners who wish to
install covers.

2 Height Control If the storey height control has If the storey height control has not
been maxed out been maxed out

Any covers on roof terrace floor The roof terrace will be taken to be
must be setback according to an additional storey. Covers will be
the 45 degree envelop taken allowed over the entire roof terrace
from the springing line. The floor. The overall height of the
structures also must not exceed development must also comply with
5m at any point, subject to the the technical height controls, where
technical height controls, where applicable.
applicable.

3 Structures within To retain the open and semi-outdoor nature of the RT, any structures
private roof must remain open-sided as viewed from the external façade.
terraces

Figure 7: Guidelines for Private Roof Terraces

3
Applies only to developments approved by URA on or after 12 January 2013. Private Roof Terrace of developments
approved before 12 January 2013 do not count towards the development’s GFA. For more information, please
click here.
4
For developments which do not have pre-approved covers, please click here.

159

Back to Main 160 .Communal roof terraces are open to sky areas managed by the MCST which serve to provide landscaping and communal facilities for residents in the development. There are not counted as GFA. No strata subdivision as a separate strata unit will be allowed. However. covered or enclosed features within these areas will be counted as GFA. MANAGEMENT CORPORATION OFFICE 5 The management corporation office should form part of the common property in the development.

b) Sun shading fins and all structural projection beyond the external walls. For 3 storey. Side/ Rear : 1 storey mixed Side/Rear : 2 rd landed and semi. attic.5 30 35% Front : 7.PART 2 THE GUIDELINES AT A GLANCE 1 LANDED HOUSING New erection or reconstruction of landed houses will be subject to the Envelope Control guidelines.5 Front Patio : 2. 4 Where the landed housing plot abuts a Good Class Bungalow Area. 5 Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m rear and side setback. the front setback would be according to the buffer requirements. reconstruction or Addition and Alteration proposal on the landed housing plot. Please refer to the Residential handbook Landed Housing paras 7 to 10 for details of the Envelope Control guidelines. etc) are applicable for most development proposals. 3 Applicable to sites fronting category 3 to 5 road.4 <800 45% (only in 2. c) Retaining walls should be =< 1. storey. Land Title: Landed Housing TYPE MINIMUM MINIMUM MINIMUM BUILDING SETBACK BOUNDARY PLOT WIDTH (M) DEPTH(M) COVERAGE CONTROL CLEARANCE SIZE(M²) (M) FOR ROOF EAVES (M) 2 3 DETACHED 400 10 No control 40% Front : 7. 161 . 2 Applicable to sites fronting category 3 to 5 road. 5 detached housing Side/Rear : 3 areas) 2 3 GOOD – 1400 18. a 3m rear and side setback from the GCBA boundary will be applicable for any new erection.0m should be terraced at minimum 300mm apart d) Boundary walls should be =< 1. URA may vary the guidelines for development proposals to minimise any potential impact they may have on the nearby developments after considering the specific site context and conditions. OTHER PLANNING REQUIREMENTS FOR LANDED (WITH LAND TITLE ) HOUSING a) Areas under roof eaves and sun shading devices are not included in GFA and site coverage if these features are within 2. should not exceed 500mm in depth.6 NOTES: 1 While the general planning guidelines (eg building setback from boundaries. building heights. Where the features project beyond the 2.0m in height. site coverage.8m.8m in height. For sites fronting a category 2 road.4 BUNGALOW Rear : 3 Side/Rear : 1. Addition & Alteration works to existing landed houses will continue to be evaluated under the conventional landed housing guidelines. Retaining wall > 1.0m wide and comply with the requisite conditions. where these walls just comply with or do not meet the minimum setback requirements. The excess area is treated as GFA and site coverage.1 3 CLASS Side : 3 Car porch : 2. the exemption is measured inwards from the edge of the roof eaves.0m control.5 Front patio : 5.4 st nd 3 >800 40% For 1 & 2 Car porch : 2. The total height of the boundary wall and the retaining wall should not be more than 2.

(iii) Planters for landscaping (iv) For semi-detached and terrace houses only. there shall be a minimum absolute 2. 162 . f) Car porch roof can be used as an open balcony or garden and it is to remain as an open-to-sky and unenclosed area.8m high light-weight screen wall shall be built along the common boundary of the car porch roof to provide the neighbour with some privacy. a 1. and can be allowed within the 7. unless the adjoining neighbour agrees to do without the screen wall. bay windows are not allowed within the 2m rear & side setback of the 1st. 2nd and 3rd storeys. regardless of dimensions and materials.4m setback distance provided from the front boundary. (ii) A maximum 1m wide sun shading canopy. Examples of light-weight screen include angled louvers or slanted vertical panels. For landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines. e.5m front setback rd distance* and 3 storey rear and side setbacks (max 500mm protrusion into the setback distance) if it is raised at least 500mm above the floor slab. tempered glass and railing.g. bay windows in all development types will be counted as GFA. ii) From 1 Jan 2009. cantilevered from the building wall to provide weather protection over the openings to the car porch roof. The setback is measured from the boundary of the external wall/glass of the bay window. * For a house with an existing deficient front setback. Only the following minor works are allowed on the car porch roof: (i) A maximum 1. where one side of the car porch abuts the neighbour’s boundary.0m high parapet wall around the perimeter of the car porch roof.e) Bay window i) Setback: A bay window is a cantilevered window. The parapet wall shall be constructed of material that accords visual porosity.

0m control. Side/Rear: 1 TERRACE-I Side/Rear : 2 rd For 3 storey. URA may vary the guidelines for development proposals to minimise any potential impact they may have on the nearby developments after considering the specific site context and conditions. the front setback would be according to the buffer requirements. The excess area is treated as GFA and site coverage. 5 Side/Rear : 3 2 3 TERRACE-I 150 6 No control No control Front : 7. b) Sun shading fins and all structural projection beyond the external walls. 2 Applicable to sites fronting category 3 to 5 road. c) Retaining walls should be =< 1.4 st nd For 1 & 2 Rear: 1 storey : 2 rd 5 3 Storey: 3 TERRACE-II 80 6 No control No control Front : 2 (fixed) 1m from all INTERMEDIATE Rear : 2 boundaries (including public road) CORNER 80 8 No control No control Front : 2 (fixed) 1m from all TERRACE-II Side : 2 boundaries Rear : 2 (including public road) NOTES: 1 While the general planning guidelines (eg building setback from boundaries. site coverage. a 3m rear and side setback from the GCBA boundary will be applicable for any new erection. where these walls just comply with or do not meet the minimum setback requirements. OTHER PLANNING REQUIREMENTS FOR LANDED (WITH LAND TITLE) HOUSING a) Areas under roof eaves and sun shading devices are not included in GFA and site coverage if these features are within 2. attic.4 st nd 3 DETACHED & For 1 & 2 Car porch: 2.4 DETACHED storey. 4 Where the landed housing plot abuts a Good Class Bungalow Area.0m in height. etc) are applicable for most development proposals. 5 Landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines will be subject to 2m rear and side setback. should not exceed 500mm in depth. 3 Applicable to sites fronting category 3 to 5 road. the exemption is measured inwards from the edge of the roof eaves.5 Front patio: 2. For 1 & 2 Car porch: 2.4 3 INTERMEDIATE Rear : Car porch: 2.5 Front patio: 2. For sites fronting a category 2 road.5 Front patio: 2.4 CORNER storey.0m wide and comply with the requisite conditions. Retaining wall > 1.4 st nd 3 SEMI. Land Title: Landed Housing TYPE MINIMUM MINIMUM MINIMUM BUILDING SETBACK BOUNDARY PLOT SIZE WIDTH (M) DEPT (M) COVERAGE CONTROL (M) CLEARANCE 2 (M ) FOR ROOF EAVES (M) 2 3 SEMI – 200 8 No control No control Front : 7. Where the features project beyond the 2. reconstruction or Addition and Alteration proposal on the landed housing plot.0m should be terraced at minimum 300mm apart 163 . building heights. Side/Rear: 1 Side/Rear : 2 rd For 3 storey. 5 Side/Rear : 3 2 3 BACK-TO-BACK 200 10 No control No control Front : 7.

and can be allowed within the 7. ii) From 1 Jan 2009. e) Bay window i) Setback: A bay window is a cantilevered window.d) Boundary walls should be =< 1. 2nd and 3rd storeys. Back to Main 164 . For landed housing under the Envelope Control guidelines. bay windows in all development types will be counted as GFA. bay windows are not allowed within the 2m rear & side setback of the 1st. * For a house with an existing deficient front setback.5m front rd setback distance* and 3 storey rear and side setbacks (max 500mm protrusion into the setback distance) if it is raised at least 500mm above the floor slab.8m in height.8m. regardless of dimensions and materials. there shall be a minimum absolute 2. The total height of the boundary wall and the retaining wall should not be more than 2. The setback is measured from the boundary of the external wall/glass of the bay window.4m setback distance provided from the front boundary.

Addition & Alteration works to existing landed houses will continue to be evaluated under the conventional landed housing guidelines. No condominium status. URA may impose tighter requirements including restricting the number of allowable units further in consultation with other agencies.5m physical ) (4. These must be contiguous with the respective strata unit and capable of forming into a single strata lot. OTHER IMPORTANT NOTES 1 Provision of 2m green planting strip along the periphery of the site or green buffer along public roads.5m physical) DEFINITION: Strata landed housing is a low-density residential development with communal facilities. It uses the strata title arrangement to define the extent of private and communal areas.Strata Title: Strata detached houses (bungalows). Landed .PART 2 THE GUIDELINES AT A GLANCE 2 STRATA LANDED HOUSING New erection or reconstruction of landed houses will be subject to the Envelope Control guidelines. This treatment is applicable to both developments comprising entirely of strata landed housing as well as developments consisting a mix of strata landed housing and apartment units.5m 7. should a strata landed housing development be proposed in an area with localised problems (e.g. Strata terrace houses. 4 Floor-to-floor height*: 1st storey = 4. Mixed strata landed housing PLOT BUILDING SITE COMMUNAL OPEN SPACE(COS) & SETBACK RATIO HEIGHT COVERAGE ON-GROUND GREENERY Resultant 2 or 3 Outside GCBA: 45% (minimum) of the nett site area From Public Road buffer storeys 40% (maximum) Road (see below) Of the 45%. 8 Maximum number of strata units allowable8[1]: 8[1] Notwithstanding these guidelines. 2 Minimum number of units for strata terrace housing = 3. 6 Each strata unit can have up to 2 private car park lots. severe infrastructural capacity issues).5m physical ) (4. 165 . The upper storeys and basement of each strata unit are not to be subdivided into separate strata units.5m 7. Strata semi-detached houses. 3 Minimum building footprint with ground contact of each strata unit = 50 m 2 . 7 Commercial uses are not allowed. 5 Multiple accesses from public roads are not allowed.5m (5m green) plus (5m green) plus (3m green) plus (3m green) plus (3m green) plus (19m physical) (7m physical) (4.5m Upper storey = 3.6m *The floor to floor height control is not applicable to strata landed housing subject to the Envelope Control guidelines. No strata unit to have direct vehicular access to/from public roads. 25% (minimum) must be From Property 3m Within GCBA: set aside for on-ground greenery Boundary 35% (maximum) From GCBA 1-2 storeys: 3m or road buffer (if fronting road) 3 storeys: 25m ROAD BUFFER REQUIREMENTS Category 1: Category 2: Category 3: Category 4: Category 5: Expressway Major Arterial (A) Major Arterial (B) Other Major Roads Minor Roads /Slip Roads /Slip Roads 24m 12m 7. Please refer to the Residential handbook Landed Housing paras 7 to 10 for details of the Envelope Control guidelines.

166 .g. a mix of Where B = Number of detached housing units terrace. semi-detached and SD = Number of semi-detached housing units detached housing units) outside GCBAs T = Number of terrace housing units Y = Typical footprint for the relevant conventional landed housing form2 Back to Main 9[2] The number of units will be rounded down to the nearest round figure. 200 m 2 for detached housing. Type of strata landed housing Formulae to calculate maximum number of DUs allowed9[2] developments Outside GCBAs 40% of site area Y Where Y = Typical footprint for the relevant conventional landed housing form10[3] Within GCBAs 35% of site area Y Where Y = Typical footprint for a Good Class Bungalow2 Mixed strata landed housing (B x Y) + (SD x Y) + (T x Y) ≤ 40% of site area developments comprising more than one housing form (e. and 500 m2 for Good Class Bungalows. 10[3] The typical footprint of the various conventional landed housing forms is 100 m 2 for terrace and semi-detached housing.

b) A maximum projection of 500mm is allowed within the minimum setback distance from all boundaries.5m physical) 6 storeys or 30m 15m 10m above (5m green) plus (5m green) plus (3m green) plus (25m physical) (10m physical) (7m physical) NOTES: 1) Provision of 2m green planting strip along the periphery of the site. 2) Bay Window.5m physical) (4.5m 7. a) From 1 Jan 2009.5m 7.5m (5m green) plus (5m green) plus (3m green) plus (3m green) plus (3m green) plus (19m physical) (7m physical) (4. Refer to Chart 2 Storey Car Park below Setback for flats from Refer to Chart 3 GCBA below BUFFER REQUIREMENTS BUILDING Category 1 : Category 2 : Category 3 : Category 4 : Category 5 : HEIGHTS Expressway Major Arterial (A) Major Arterial (B) Other Major Minor Roads Roads Up to 5 storeys 24m 12m 7. 167 . bay windows in all development types will be counted as GFA regardless of dimensions and materials.PART 2 THE GUIDELINES AT A GLANCE 3 FLATS AND SERVICED APARTMENTS Non .5m physical) (4.Condominium: Flats & Serviced Apartments PLOT RATIO BUILDING HEGHT SITE COVERAGE BUILDING SETBACK Master Plan control Master Plan control 40% (maximum) From Common Refer to Chart 1 Boundaries below From Public Road Road buffer requirements Setback for Multi.

6 22 8.7 26 9.9 27 9.1 11.0 3 3.8 5 3.0 15.0 3.2 10.5 NOTE: A bay window is a cantilevered window and can be allowed within the setback distance (max 500mm protrusion into the setback distance) if it is raised at least 500mm above the floor slab.7 34 12.4 14.7 12.1 16 6.6 10.4 8 4.9 10.5 13.0 12 5.3 10.3 15.6 12.8 23 8.4 9.5 14 6.0 35 12.1 24 9.8 8.4 29 10.3 17 6.3 4.1 9.3 12.8 15 6.8 11.7 11 5.4 4 3.0 31 11.8 19 7.0 2 3.5 8.2 9 4.7 6 3.5 33 11.4 11.7 30 10.0 3.6 5.0 9.0 3.6 15.2 7.5 7 3.0 3.7 9.7 14.0 12.1 20 7.6 18 7. 168 . Chart 1: Setback Requirements for Flats and Condominiums STOREY HEIGHT REVISED SETBACK SETBACK FROM COMMON BOUNDARIES ( in FROM PUBLIC ROAD metres ) FOR FLATS AND FLATS CONDOMINIUMS CONDOMINIUMS ( in metres ) 1 3.5 11.2 Road buffer requirement 13 5.3 21 8.2 13.9 13.1 14.2 32 11.8 14.2 36 and above 12.0 10 4.2 28 10.4 25 9.9 6.

based on the height and length of the multi-storey car park building and its impact on the surrounding environment. drainage reserve of width >6m) NOTE: * Solid wall with no opening at the facade (lesser setback as adjoining developments will not be affected in terms of noise.e.5m (minimum) fronting open areas (ie open space.Storey Car Park (MSCP) SETBACKS FOR MULTI-STOREY CAR PARK(MSCP) Setback from road Road buffer requirement.5m (minimum) for MSCP with no openings at the facade openings at the facade* Setback from property boundary 4. This relaxation will be assessed based on the merits of the proposal i. It will apply if the proposal demonstrates that the integration of the MSCP with the residential tower block and results in a better designed development that will benefit the environment. Chart 2: Setbacks for Multi . Figure A6-a 169 . Setback from property boundary 6m (minimum) for MSCP with 4. A multi-storey car park building which abuts and is integrated into a residential tower block can be allowed to follow the same setback requirements as if the multi-storey car park building is a standalone building (see Figures A6-a and A6-b). or car headlights. fumes.

Figure A6-b Chart 3: Setbacks of Flats and Condominiums from Good Class Bungalow Areas STOREY HEIGHT MINIMUM SETBACK FROM GCBA BOUNDARY 1-2 storeys* 3m or road buffer requirement (if fronting road)* 3-5 storeys 25m 6-35 storeys Setback to be increased by 1m beyond 25m for each storey height increase: eg a 6 storey flat would be setback 26m. if proposed. 36 storeys and above 56m *Roof terrace. Back to Main 170 . and so on. a 7 storey flat would be setback 27m. shall be orientated to face away from the good class bungalows.

a) From 1 Jan 2009. 2) Bay Window.5m plus (4.5m 7.5m storeys (5m green) (5m green) (3m green) (3m green) (3m green) plus (19m plus (7m plus (4. Refer to Chart 2 Storey Car Park below Setback from Refer to Chart 3 GCBA below BUFFER REQUIREMENTS BUILDING Category 1 : Category 2 : Category 3 : Category 4 : Category 5 : HEIGHTS Expressway Major Arterial Major Arterial Other Major Minor Roads (A) (B) Roads /Slip /Slip Roads Roads Up to 5 24m 12m 7.5m physical) physical) physical) physical) physical) 6 storeys or 30m 15m 10m above (5m green) (5m green) (3m green) plus (25m plus (10m plus (7m physical) physical) physical) NOTES: 1) Provision of 2m green planting strip along the periphery of the site.5m plus (4.PART 2 THE GUIDELINES AT A GLANCE 4 CONDOMINIUM FLATS Condominium Flats Developments PLOT RATIO BUILDING HEGHT SITE COVERAGE BUILDING SETBACK Master Plan Master Plan 40% (maximum) From Common Refer to Chart 1 control control Boundaries below From Public Road buffer Road requirement Setback for Multi. b) A maximum projection of 500mm is allowed within the minimum setback distance from all boundaries. 171 . bay windows in all development types will be counted as GFA regardless of dimensions and materials.5m 7.

9 27 9.3 10.5 14 6.1 14.0 12 5.7 14.5 8.2 36 and above 12.5 NOTE: A bay window is a cantilevered window and can be allowed within the setback distance (max 500mm protrusion into the setback distance) if it is raised at least 500mm above the floor slab.5 11.8 5 3.5 13.1 9.4 9.8 23 8.8 15 6.0 3.9 6.3 12.7 6 3.6 18 7.8 14.4 14.7 34 12.6 22 8.7 9.0 3.1 11.4 29 10.2 9 4.1 20 7. Chart 1: Setback Requirements for Flats and Condominiums STOREY HEIGHT REVISED SETBACK SETBACK FROM COMMON BOUNDARIES ( in FROM PUBLIC ROAD metres ) FOR FLATS AND FLATS CONDOMINIUMS CONDOMINIUMS ( in metres ) 1 3.4 4 3.2 10.8 19 7.3 15.6 12.7 30 10.4 11.2 7.0 35 12.4 25 9.7 11 5. 172 .8 11.8 8.0 3 3.3 4.6 15.0 3.0 3.6 10.0 2 3.4 8 4.3 21 8.3 17 6.6 5.9 13.0 15.7 12.5 7 3.9 10.1 16 6.0 31 11.2 28 10.7 26 9.0 9.1 24 9.2 13.2 32 11.5 33 11.0 10 4.2 Road buffer requirement 13 5.0 12.

Chart 2: Setbacks for Multi . drainage reserve of width >6m) NOTE: * Solid wall with no opening at the facade (lesser setback as adjoining developments will not be affected in terms of noise.Storey Car Park (MSCP) SETBACKS FOR MULTI-STOREY CAR PARK(MSCP) Setback from road Road buffer requirement. based on the height and length of the multi-storey car park building and its impact on the surrounding environment.e. fumes. A multi-storey car park building which abuts and is integrated into a residential tower block can be allowed to follow the same setback requirements as if the multi-storey car park building is a standalone building (see Figures A6-a and A6-b). Setback from property boundary 6m (minimum) for MSCP with 4. It will apply if the proposal demonstrates that the integration of the MSCP with the residential tower block and results in a better designed development that will benefit the environment. or car headlights. This relaxation will be assessed based on the merits of the proposal i.5m (minimum) for MSCP with no openings at the facade openings at the facade* Setback from property boundary 4.5m (minimum) fronting open areas (ie open space. Figure A6-a 173 .

Figure A6-b Chart 3: Setbacks of Flats and Condominiums from Good Class Bungalow Areas STOREY HEIGHT MINIMUM SETBACK FROM GCBA BOUNDARY 1-2 storeys* 3m or road buffer requirement (if fronting road)* 3-5 storeys 25m 6-35 storeys Setback to be increased by 1m beyond 25m for each storey height increase: eg a 6 storey flat would be setback 26m. 36 storeys and above 56m *Roof terrace. shall be orientated to face away from the good class bungalows. and so on. a 7 storey flat would be setback 27m. if proposed. Back to Main 174 .

a minimum depth of 4. PARAMETERS 3 The following parameters apply: (a) Building Form (i) Buildings within the GUDG area shall be party wall developments. the full party wall is to be provided. Paya Lebar Road. The main street block refers to developments along Geylang Road. Sims Avenue and Guillemard Road. Sims Way and Guillemard Road and create a consistent streetscape. The 4. (iii) For developments in the inner street block. 2 The design guidelines are stipulated in terms of the ‘main’ street block and the ‘inner’ street block.PART 2 THE GUIDELINES AT A GLANCE 5 GEYLANG URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES (GUDG) 1 The objective of the GUDG is to guide development works within the area bounded by Sims Avenue. See Figure 1 for the boundary where the GUDG applies.0m party wall shall begin exactly at the front setback. 175 . while the inner street block refers to the remaining developments along the lorongs within the GUDG boundary.0m full height party wall is required. (ii) For developments along the main street block.

5m setback area.0msetback area. (ii) The aggregate land area of the left behind plots must also meet the minimum plot size of 600sqm before any redevelopment can be approved. (ii) For sites along Lorong 22 and Aljunied Road. (ii) For developments along the inner street blocks. which are sited between two existing developments which have been redeveloped. The overall building height.0m from the common boundary line where there is no rear service road/ back lane. excluding the attic. except for residential & institutional developments along Guillemard Road. (iii) The exact front setback requirement is to ensure a consistent alignment of the front building facade. is not to exceed 26m (See Figure 2B). The overall building height. the front facades of the buildings are allowed to abut the road reserve line. Inner Street blocks (see Figure 2B) (i) The front facades of the building are to be set back exactly 3. A 3m green buffer for tree planting is to be provided within the 7.0m (minimum) from the road reserve line of any rear service road/back lane. (iv) The rear setback shall be 1. 176 . (iii) The overall building height is to be measured from the minimum platform level stipulated by the PUB. (iii) Any infill plots with site areas of less than 600sqm. For sites along the eastern side of Lorong 27A. is not to exceed 18m (See Figure 2A). This is to ensure that the development potential and quality of left behind plots will not be compromised. the front façades of the buildings are to be setback by exactly 7. are required to meet a minimum plot size of 600sqm to facilitate better communal spaces and car parking facilities. except for institution developments. (iii) The rear façades of the buildings are allowed to abut the road reserve line/ service road. will be assessed on a case-by-case basis.0m from the road reserve line/ service road at the front of the building. are required to abut the road reserve line/service road exactly. (ii) Residential & institutional developments along Guillemard Road are to be set back exactly 3.5m from the road reserve line. the storey height control is at 5-storeys. excluding the attic. (d) Setback Main Street block (see Figure 2A) (i) The front façades of the buildings.0m from the road reserve line. or 4. (c) Storey Height & Overall Building Height (i) For developments along the main street block. (iv) There shall be no openings along the common party wall. (b) Minimum Plot Size (i) New developments within the GUDG area. the storey height control is at 8-storeys. A 2m green buffer for tree planting is to be provided within the 3.

(iii) Covered walkways need not be provided for full residential & institutional developments along Guillemard Road. nor for other developments along the inner street blocks.0m green buffer for tree planting) 177 . including the car park and service areas (e. excluding the attic. should not exceed 5 development.0m. a covered walkway of 3. SETBACK Front Front To about road reserve line/service road For inner Lorongs except for residential & institutional 3.5m from road reserve (including 3. the internal clear width of the covered walkways is to at least2.4m. (f) Covered Walkway (i) For developments along the main street blocks and on the eastern side of Lorong 27A.0m width is to be provided along the front of the building to open out onto the open walkway within the adjacent Road Reserve. bin centre) shall be taken from the rear service road. (g) Roof The roof form is to be determined on individual merits. (ii) Where columns are provided. Attics can be permitted. an overall building height of 26.0m The overall height of the building is to be measured from the minimum platform level stipulated by PUB. (e) Vehicular Access Vehicular access to the developments.g.0m green buffer for tree planting).0m from road reserve (including developments along 2. storeys and an overall building height of should not exceed 8 storeys and 18. Vehicular access from the front of the developments is discouraged. SUMMARY OF GEYLANG URBAN DESIGN GUIDELINES (GUDG) MAIN STREET BLOCK INNER STREET BLOCK DESCRIPTION/ Design Controls for redevelopment Design Controls for redevelopment proposals along the lorongs within LOCATION proposals along Geylang Road. Guillemard Road For Lorong 22/Aljunied Road 7. The overall height of the excluding the attic. Sims the inner street blocks Avenue and Guillemard Road BUILDING HEIGHT The overall height of the development. provided they comply with the prevailing attic guidelines.

REDEVELOPMENT ROOF FORM To be determined on individual merits. For Conservation buildings. Access from the main street is PARK & discouraged SERVICE AREAS AIR CONDITIONER Air conditioner units are to be located out of sight from the main roads and UNITS & LEDGES lorongs.0m-wide covered walkway. the minimum depth of the party wall is 4.0m COVERED WALKWAY A 3. column expressed. except for along the provided along the front of the building with eastern street block of Lorong 27A.5m onto the rear setback for the inner street blocks. OTHER REQUIREMENTS BUILDING FORM Buildings are to be built from party wall to party wall. The rear building line is to be taken either from the rear boundary line or the road reserve line where applicable. For inner street blocks. along Guillemard Road. MAIN STREET BLOCK INNER STREET BLOCK Rear Rear To abut rear service road. 178 . Air conditioner ledges are allowed to encroach up to 0.0m Without back lane: 4. the prevailing guidelines regarding the location and screening of mechanical and electrical services will apply.0m MINIMUM PLOT SIZE The plot size for all new Commercial developments and Residential flat FOR developments within the GUDG area is to be at least 600sqm. Minimum setback: With back lane: 1. ACCESS TO CAR To be taken from the rear service road. Not required for full This will follow the guidelines residential & institutional developments indicated for the main street block. is to be Not required.

Back to Main 179 .