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12.

Struve Functions and Related Functions


MILTONABRAMOWITZ'

Contents
Page
Mathematical Properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496
12.1. Struve Function H.(z) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 496
12.2. Modified Struve Function L.(z) . . . . . . . . . . . . . 498
12.3. Anger and Weber Functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 498
Numerical Methods . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 499
12.4. Use and Extension of the Tables . . . . . . . . . . . . 499
References . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 500
Table 12.1. Struve FunctioQs (OSzS-) . . . . . . . . . . . 501

(2/~) s-
z
t-*&(i)dt, z=0(.1)5,5D to 7D

Table 12.2. Struve Functions for Large Arguments . . . . . . . . . 502

Jz [l&(t)-YO(t)]t-'dt, ~-'=.2(-.01)0, 6D

The author acknowledges the assistance of Bertha H. Walter in the preparation and
checking of the tables.

1 National Bureau of Standards. (Deceaeed.)


49s
12.1. Struve Function E,(%) 12.1.11 E& (2/-1)-H1
DifferentialEquation and General Solution
12.1.12
d
- (zE,)
= zH,-1
12.1.1 dz
dLw zdw
22 -+ -+(z*-vy)w= 4(32)+ d 1
-6 2W+#)-z-H,+~
dzZ dz 12.1.13 - (z-H,)-
&r(v+3) dz
STRUVE FUNCTIONS AND RELATED FUNCTIONS 497
StruvcsIn-1
12.1.25

$la
T
2
t-lHl(t)dt=-Ht(z)+-
I2 I 2l t-* l&,(t)dt

y=
12.1.26

I
1-1 &(t)dt=l--
:[ 2--
1W-3
2

zd
+11.31.51.5- . . .]
12.1.27
p-.- H,(t)dt=r(3P)2---1 tan (
w- ar+1)
34
(l2Pl<1 2v>9cr-8)
If j,(z)=s H,(t)tdt
0

12.1.28
FIGURE
12.3. StruvejunAms. f,+i= (2v+ I)~,(z)-z+H,(z)
21.+1
E.(z), 2-3, 5 +(v+ (gv>--3)
1)2~+~311yv+4t)
Speeial Pmpertiea
1.1
Asymptotic Expansions for Large
12.1.14 H,(z)20 (z>O and v l 4) 12.1.29
1 m-1
W+3)
12.1.15 H.(z)-Y,(z)=- C R=
r(v+#--k)(%>
2k- ,+I+
I 10

H- (m+t,(z)=(-l)mJ.+t(z) (nan htegerlo)


2 4
(la% 4<4
12.1.16 H,(z)=(z) (l--cos 4 If v is real, z positive *
where B,,,=O(~ZI.-~~-~).
and m+#-v2O, the remainder after m terms is
12.1.17 of the same sign and numerically less than the
~+(z)=(gy (I+$)-(:-(sin .+E) Z
first term neglected.
12.1.30
2 [.
1*3*5
(m an integer)
12.1.18 H,(zemTf)=em(+l)TfH.(z) a(.+~,(~)-;1 ! 1l.3
1 23 zI 2
+ . . .]
12.1.19 Eo(Z) =-4 5 2k+1
Ik-0
JZt+1(4

12.1.31
(law 4<*>

12.1.20 2 2
HI (Z) =---
I I Jo(z)+;
4
8 4k--1
m JZt(Z) HI(^) -Y I (-;
~ 1+
2
[ 1
g-~+-
1l.3 1-3*5
26
- . . .]
(la% 44
<
12.1.21 H,(z)= 2(2/2)+ ,(1; ;+v, ;;-;) 12.1.32
so
- IF
.\I* VL+8) 2
[EJ(t)-Yo(t)ldt-; [In (24+rl
Integrals (See chapter 11)

12.1.22 SO t-
m
l&,(t)dt=s
I
--c2 m

I k-1
(-1)+(2k)!(2k-l)!
(k!)1(22) (la= zl<4
12.1.23 where y=.57721 56649 . . . is Eulersconstant.
s,Eo(t)dt 2 [5-
=;
z1 z4
1.32.4
1
24
+--11.3*.5*.6 ...
1 12.1.33
0
2 (-1)[(2k)!]
12.1.24 s,t-pH,+l(t)dt=
2
-z-H,(z)
s. t-j m t ) - y o (t)ldt-G % (k!)1(2k+1)(22)
Q

%Gr(V+#) (18%d< lZ
*See page 11.
498 S T R W E FUNCTIONS AND RELATED FUNCTIONS

Asymptotic Expanaiona for Large Orders Asymptotic Expamion for Large I a i


12.1.34
2(3z)
H,(z)--Y, (z)&zl;Fr(v+))
k-o
2 @
k
$+l
12.2.6 L,(z)-~-,(z)
(-l)k+lr(k+i)
(laxzl< 3*,1 . 1 <14) &-
1
*
2 (;)- (brg <id
r(v+)--k) -
k-o
.+1 21

bo= 1, bl =242, b =6 (U/Z)~- 4, ba=20( v / z ) ~ -(v/z)


~
Integral8
12.1.35
2(32) -
ks k!bk
d+ (14>14)
12.2.7
H.(z)+iJ.(z)-&r(y+f)

12.2. Modified Struve Function L,(s)


SO z*
b(t)dt=; 2 [y+l* z4 26
. 35 . 4+1* . 32 . 52 . S+
.. .]
Power Seriee~Expadon
1-
12.2.8 SO Mt)-b(t)Idt-;
2
[In (22)+r]
12.2.1 L,(z)=-ie--?- H,(iz) ,-; 2 (2k)! (2k-l)!
.) (z/2)k * k-1 (k!)*(2z)* (lw
4<34
C0 r (k++)r (k+Y++)
=() Z)+l k-

Integral Representatione 12.2.9 SD 2


L1(t)dt=b(z)-- z
*
Relation to Modified Spheriehl Benne1 Function
12.2.2 L,(2) = ~(zP) fsinh (z cos e) sin*@
J;;W+3) (n an integerzo)
12.2.10 L++il (~)=I(~+f)(z)
(aY>-$)
12.2.3

-&w+3) sop
12.3. Anger and Weber Functions
I-,(s)-L,(z) - 2(2/2) sin (ts)(l+t2).-* dt
Anger% Function
(9P<3,Z>O)

Recurrence Rehatiom 12.3.1 J,(z)=LJwcos


* o
(Ye--sin e) ds
12.2.4 L,-i-L,+i=-2v (2/2)
z L,+&r(v+B) 12.3.2 Z) = J,(
Jm( ,Z) (n an integer)

12.2.5 L,-1 +L,+1=2L:- (0) Weber% Function


6 W+@
12.3.3
* o
Jr
E,(z)=ai sin (14- z sin 0) de

end Weber#
Relatione Between Anger# Function

12.3.4 sin (w)J,(z)=cos (m) E,(z)-E-,(z)


12.3.5 sin (m) E,(z)=J-,(z)-cos (m) J,(z)
Relatione Between Weber% Fanction and Struves
Function

I If n is a positive integer or zero,

12.3.6 E,,(z)=-
E
Clr (k++) ($2)a-*-l-Hn(Z) *
Wk-0 r(n++k)
12.3.7
FIGURE
12.4. ModiJied Strumfuncth.

*seepage n.
L.(z), fn=0(1)6
E-,,(z)=-
(-
I z
l)a+J%(n-k-+)
F(k++)
(32)- r+tr+1-H-,(z) *
STRUVE FUNCTIONS AND RELATED FUNCTIONS 499
12.3.8 I 12.3.10

12.3.9

Numerical Methods
12.4. Use and Extension of the Tables We note that for n>6 there is a rapid loss of
significantfigures. On the other hand using 12.1.3
Example 1. Compute b(2) to 6D. From for 2=4 we find H9(4)=.0007935729, &(4)=
Table 12.1 IO(2)-b(2)=.342152; from Table 9.11 .00015447630 and backward recurrence with 12.1.9
we have 10(2)=2.279585 so that &(2)= 1.937433. gives
&(4) = .00367 1495 Ha(4) = A5800 94
Example 2. Compute &(lo) to 6D. From H7(4) = .O1510 315 H,(4) = 1.24867 6
Table 12.2 for z-'=.l. &(10)-Yo(10)=.06307~; &(4)=.05433 519 H1(4)=1.06972 7
from Table 9.1 we have Y0(10)=.055671. Thus, H5(4)= .16719 87 &,(4)= .13501 4
&(10)= .118743. a ( 4 ) = .42637 43
Example 3. Compute~Ho(t)dtfor 2=6 to Example 6. Compute L,(.5) for n=0(1)5 to
8s. From 12.2.1 we find L5(.5)=9.6307462X lo-',
5D. Using Tables 12.2, 11.1 and 4.2, we have L,(.5) =2.1212342X10-6. Then, with 12.2.4 we
get
b(.5)=3.82465 03X10-' &(.5)=.05394 2181
= -.125951+(.636620)(1.791759) b(.5)=5.36867 34X10-a &(.5)=.32724 068
+ A16764
Example 7. Compute L,(.5) for -n=0(1)5
=1.83148 to 6s. From Tables 12.1 and 9.8 we find &(.5) =
.327240, b(.5) = .053942. Then employing 12.2.4
Example 4. Compute H,(z) for 2=4, -n= with backward recurrence we get
0(1)8 to 6s. From Table 12.1 we have If,,(4)=
.1350146, H1(4)=1.0697267. Using 12.1.9 we find L-,(.5)= .690562 L-,(.5)=-75.1418
L-z(.5)= -1.16177 L-5( .5)= 1056.92
H-,(4) = -.433107 H-,(4) = .689652
L-a(.5) = 7.43824
H-z(4)= .240694 H-,j(4)=-1.21906
H-3(4) = .152624 H-7(4) = 2.82066 Example 8. Compute L,(z) for 2=6 and
H-4(4) = -.439789 &(4) =-8.24933 -n=0(1)6 to 8s. From Tables 12.2 and 9.8
we find &(6) =67.124454, L1(6)=60.725011.
Example 5. Compute H,(z) for 2=4, n= Using 12.2.4 we get
0(1)10 to 7s. Starting with the values of &(4)
and H1(4) and using 12.1.9 with forward recur- L-1(6)=61.361631 L-r(6)=16.626028
rence, we get L--p(6)=46.776680 L4(6) = 7.984089
L-a(S> =30.159494 L4(6) = 3.32780
&(4)= .13501 46 &(4) =.05433 54
H1(4)=1.06972 67 H7(4) =.01510 37 We nobe that there is no essential loss of accuracy
&(4)=1.24867 51 HS(4) =.00367 33 until n=-6. However, if further values were
Ha(4)= .85800 95 Hg(4) =.00080 02 necessbry the recurrence procedure becomes un-
H,(4)= .42637 41 H10(4)=.00018 $6 stable. To avoid the instability use the methods
H5(4)= .16719 87 described in Examples 5 and 6.
500 STRUVE FZTNCTIONS AND RELATED FUNCTIONS

References
Texta Tables

[12.1] R. K. Cook, Some properties of Struve functions, [12.8] M. Abramowits, Tables of integrals of Struve
J. Washington Acad. Sci. 47, 11,365-368 (1957). functions, J. Math. Phys. 29, 49-51 (1950).
[12.2] A. Erd6lyi et al., Higher transcendental functions, 112.91 C. W. Horton, On the extinsion of some Lommel
vol. 2, ch. 7 (McGraw-Hill Book Co., Inc., integrals to Struve functions with an application
New York, N.Y., 1953). to acoustic radiation, J. Math. Phys. 29, 31-37
[12.3] A. Gray and G. B. Mathews, A treatise on Beasel (1950).
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N.Y., 1931). and of some integrals involving Bessel and
112.41 N. W. McLachlan, Besael functions for engineers,2d Struvefunctions, J. Math. Phys.29;56-58 (1950).
ed. oh. 4 (Clarendon Press, Oxford,England, 1955). (12.111 Mathematical Tables Project, Table of the
[12.5] F. Oberhettinger, On some expansions for Beasel Struve functions L,(z) and H.(z), J. Math.
integral functions, J. Reaearch NBS 59 (1967) Phye. 25, 252-259 (1946).
RP2786.
[12.6] G. Petiau, La theorie des fonctions de Bemel,
ch. 10 (Centre National de la Recherche Scien-
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112.71 G. N. Watson, A treatise on the theory of Bessel
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bridge, England, 1958).