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Modular coordination is a concept of coordination of dimension


and space, in which buildings and components are dimensioned
and positioned in a term of a basic unit or module, known as
1M which is equivalent to 100 mm.

It is internationally accepted by the International Organization


for Standardization (ISO) and many other countries.

The introduction of modular coordination in building will


constitute a positive step to streamline the industry towards
proper metrication in building planning, design, construction,
assembly and manufacturing of building materials and
components.

Thus, the modular coordination can facilitate the achievement


of greater productivity in the building industry by virtue of its
ability to discipline the dimensional and spatial coordination of
a building and its components.

Moreover, modular coordination allows a more flexible open


industrial system to take shape.

The principal objective of implementing Modular Coordination


is to improve productivity in the building industry through
industrialization.

With the introduction of Modular Coordination in building, the


concept will provide a positive step to streamline the industry
towards proper metrication in building planning, design,
construction, manufacturing and assembly of building materials and
components.

Benefits of Implementing Modular


Coordination
The benefits of practicing modular coordination is to provide a practical
approach towards the following:
Facilitates cooperation between building designers, manufacturers,
distributors, contractors and authorities.

In the design work, enables buildings to be so dimensioned that


they can be erected with standard components without undue
restriction on freedom of design.

Permits a flexible type of standardization, which encourages the


use of a limited number of standardized building components for
the construction of different types of buildings.

Optimizes the number of standard sizes of building components.


Encourages as far as possible the interchangeability of
components, in whatever materials, forms or methods of
manufacture

Simplifies site operations by rationalizing setting out, positioning


and assembly of building components.

Ensures dimensional coordination between installation


(equipment, storage units, other fitted furniture, etc.) as well as
with the rest of the building.

PLANNING GRID
A module can be defined as a basic dimension which could for
example form the basis of a planning grid in terms of multiples and
submultiples of the standard module

TYPICAL MODULAR COORDINATED


PLANNING GRID
Structural Grid used to locate structural components
such as beams and columns.

Planning Grid- based on any convenient modular


multiple for regulating space requirements such as rooms.
Controlling Grid
based on any convenient modular multiple for location of internal walls,
partitions dc.

Basic Module Grid


used for detail location of components and fittings.

All the above grids, being based on a basic module, are contained one
within the other and are therefore interrelated.

These grids can be used in both the horizontal and vertical planes thus
forming a three dimensional grid system.

If a first preference numerical value is given to M dimensional


coordination is established.

DIMENSIONAL COORDINATION

The practical aims of this concept are to :1. Size components so as to


avoid the wasteful process of cutting and fitting on site

Obtain maximum economy in the production of components.

Reduce the need for the manufacture of special sizes.

Increase the effective choice of components by the promotion of


interchangeability

Dimensional Grids

the modular grid network defines the space into which


dimensionally coordinated components must fit. An important
factor is that the component must always be undersized to
allow for the joint which is sized by the obtainable degree of
tolerance and site assembly
principal aim
to achieve dimensional compatibility between building
dimensions, span, or spaces and the sizes of components
or equipment by using related modular dimensions

Basis of modular coordination

Basic module M = 100 mm

the smallest module to be used to coordinate position


and size of components, elements and installations.
not for the structural framework

modular coordination design rules

1. basic module M = 100 mm

2. horizontal planning module


MH = 3M (300mm)

3. vertical planning module


MV = M (100mm)

4. reference systems for


positioning of components
and spaces
basis of modular coordination
the use of modules

Multi modules 3M, 6M, 9M, 12M . . .

planning modules for main dimensions of framework

especially the span (horizontal dimensioning)

M M
submodules
2 4
for sizing of components requiring increment smaller than M
not for planning modules

for displacement of different modular grids


a reference system to define coordinating
spaces and zones for building elements and assemblies

a system of points, lines


and planes - grids

used mainly during planning /


design stage
Graphic Conventions
Dimensioning Lines

Zone & Spaces


Basic Symbols
ZONES
zone
wall zone
floor zone
roof zone
Controlling Reference System
controlling plane.
controlling zone.
controlling dimension.
modular floor plane.
floor to floor height.
floor to ceiling height.
height of floor zone
floor to roof height
height of roof zone.
horizontal controlling dimensions vertical controlling dimensions
Building Component Sizing
Component
A building product formed as a distinct unit.

Modular Component
A component whose coordinating sizes are modular.
Element
A part of a building or structure having its own functional identify, such as
a footing, a floor, a roof, a wall or a column.

Modular Element
An element whose coordinating sizes are modular.

Preferred Dimension
A dimension chosen in preference to others for specific purposes.

Preferred Size
A size chosen in preference to others for specific purposes.

grid reference
reference systems for positioning of
components and spaces

boundary reference
axial reference
interaxial reference
flush reference

boundary reference
coordinates the position of the
building components
determines the nominal size of
components
placement of component within
two Parallel modular coordinating
grids or planes so that it fills
the space or zone.

boundary grid
axial reference
coordinates the position of a
components by placing the
component so that the
middle-axis coincides with a
modular coordinating grid of
plane

axial grid
interaxial reference
coordinates the position and
dimension of building component
by a reference
flush reference
coordinates the position of components by
placing one surface of the component flush
on to a modular coordinating grid or
plane
modular zone

flush grid
horizontal coordination
MH = 3M (300mm)
Facades
are placed flushed on the outside to
a modular reference plane

external

n x 3M
internal

external
n x 3M

nx
n x 3M
3M
facades areinter
always placed partitions are placed flushed to the
on the outside
nalof the modular line modular line

INTERAXIAL PLANNING
the structural part of the component
is placed at the axis between two
modular reference planes spaced at
n x 3M

3M apart
nx
3M

BOUNDARY PLANNIG
the structural part of the
3M

t1

component is placed between a


INTERA BOUND technical coordination space (not
INTERAXIAL
XIAL BOUNDARY
ARY
PLANNING PLANNING necessarily modular because of
PLANNI PLANNI technical or economic reasons)
NG NG
vertical coordination
MV = M (100mm)
Floors are placed within a modular
floor zone of n X M increments
Floors to floor heights are vertically placed n X M
increments

n1 x M n3 x M

n2 x M

main controlling dimensions

roof
Roof Zone

zone Floor to
CeilingH eight floor to
W indow
Sill height
ceiling height
Floor
Zone

Floor to
Floor Height

floor
zone
D
H
oor H
eight
ead storey height
Changeof Floor Level

Fig3-10: Vertical ControllingDimensions


intermediate controlling dimensions

Roof Zone

roof
zone Floor to
CeilingHeight

window
head height
W indow
Sill height

window sill height


Floor

floor to
Zone

Floor to
Floor Height

floor zone
ceiling height

door head storey height


Door Head

height Height

Changeof Floor Level

Fig3-10: Vertical ControllingDimensions

designing with components


must be conceptualised early
in design stage
bearing on choice of planning
grids and approaches
structural components-
columns

beams

floor slabs

walls

staircases and lift cores


non structural components-

cladding
partition
doors, windows

Finishes-
ceiling finishes
floor finishes
wall finishes

columns
basic dimensions - 3M / multiples of 3M

dimensions fit into modular grid -


planning structural grid
dimensions are for finished dimensions

nx3M

nx3M nx3M

nx3M

BOUNDARYPLANNING

nx3M

DISPLACEMENTOFGRIDPLANNING
beams
beam depth are in the increments of M

floor zone with false ceiling


- beams accommodated in floor zone
- beams depth only affect services, not
walls / partition below

FloorZone

floor zone without false ceiling


- distance between base of beam and
floor slab must be modular to accommodate
the components below

WindowHead
Height

FloortoFloorHeight
floor slabs
depth in sub-modular
increments of 0.5M or
0.25M

precast slab-fit into


structural grid :12M
TopofFloorZone FloorFinish

Screed

Slab

Com position
ofFloorZ one

ServiceSpace

FalseCeiling

BottomofFloorZone

floor zone:
space allocated for floor assembly
extends from reference plane of ceiling
to the finished floor surface above it
ceiling accommodated within the floor zone
composition may vary
top of floor zone = top of floor finish
base of floor zone - bottom of ceiling of the
floor below
walls
precast load bearing walls
length of walls determined by
planning grid
dimensions - finished wall
dimensions
in cases wall do not fill the whole COMPONENTWALLS

wall zone, where structure allows,


wall should be lined with one side
of the zone to minimise number of
adaptation pieces
stairs
length of flights and landing dimensions are modular

goings, risers and widths of flights are as required by


statutory requirements
stairs located in between floor coordinating line

top of stair coincides with top of floor zone


Component
A term used loosely for items
that are manufactured offsite and
then assembled together with
other components.

If this is completed offsite then


the product is defined as a whole.

Careful design of components


and their interfaces is crucial for
effective manufacture and
assembly.
Panel Building System
Comprising walls, floors and roofs in the form of flat pre-
engineered panels that are erected onsite to form the box-like
elements of the structure that then require various levels of
finishing.
This term applies to all different material types
Pre-cast Flat Panel System

Floor and wall units are produced offsite in a factory and


erected onsite, ideal for all repetitive cellular projects.

Panels can include services, windows, doors and finishes.

Building envelope panels with factory fitted insulation and


decorative cladding can also be used as load-bearing
elements

Plant Room Module (preassembled)


Packaged or skid-mounted preassembled plant rooms
prefinished in the factory, ready for direct connection to
mains services Onsite (AHUs, fans, chillers, boilers, pumps
together with elements of the building envelope

Beam and Block Floor

Extruded or wet cast prestressed beams between 150 and


225mm deep, spaced to suit the applied loading and spans,
together with blocks of various types.

These may be purpose-made blocks with rebates to suit


the shape of the beams (tray blocks).

Also commonly used are specially shaped extruded or


expanded polystyrene blocks which provide a high degree of
insulation for ground floors