2

  This  e‐book  is  licensed  under  Creative  Commons  Attribution‐Noncommercial‐Share  Alike  2.5  South  Africa  licence.  You  can  do  most things with it quite freely, so long as it’s  non‐commercial.  For  commercial  enquiries  you can email me at mikmikko@gmail.com.     Feel free to email, print or bluetooth this to  anyone  you  think  might  find  it  useful,  but  when you do, please attribute it to me.  Thanks for reading and enjoy,     Mikko Kapanen, 2010 in Cape Town.       

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Thinking and doing: content based audio 
A few words (4)  1. First things first (7) 
• Listen, watch, learn, adapt – it’s not copying, but observing and  learning from others.            • Coming up with ideas – getting creative and critical at the same  time.  • Learn the technology – making sure you are ready for the job. 

2. On the field (26) 
• Don’t cut corners with your material – collecting audio.  • Know  your  material  and  then  trust  in  it –  dealing  with  your  material. 

3. Putting it all together (39) 
• Working  with  the  script  –  writing  and  recording  a  script  that  bridges everything together.    • Do it with style – hook the listeners and take them to places.   

4. … and finally (54) 
• Know your placement – finding home for your baby. • Re‐thinking everything – after the basics, where to next?

Last words (69)   
[  3  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

A few words   
This  e‐book  is  about  content  based  audio.  All  the  different  considerations  that  go  into  making  some  kind  of  coherent  audio  package. I could have just said documentary or feature making, but I  think  that  would  have  limited  the  thinking  and  that  is  what  I  don’t  wish  to  happen.  Radio  documentaries  and  features  are  not  very  common  anyway.  The  statement  that  can  seem  a  bit  general  and  unscientific can be proven with a simple content analysis.     Right  now,  turn  your  radio  on.  Start  from  the  FM  stations  below  90  and  continue  for  as  long  as  there  is  sound  coming.  After  going  through FM do the same with AM should there be anything else there  (that depends on where you are, of course, as well). I bet one of my  perfectly  functioning  kidneys  that  it  was  mainly  music  –  unless  you  did this at the time when news are on – or some people talking about  something  relatively  meaningless,  maybe  one  or  two  serious  interviews,  but  did  you  hear  any  pre‐packaged  documentaries  or  features? I doubt there were many.    So,  we  could  ask  ourselves,  why  bother?  It’s  a  very  good  and  important  question,  which  in  my  opinion  deserves  a  better  answer  than simply, well, we shouldn’t. The principles of the craft are useful  for things other than what they were initially designed for. We must  also  think  is  the  lack  of  content  based  material  on  popular  radio  an  inevitable  aspect  of  the  way  things  are,  or  are  we  just  lacking  creativity to realise the next steps. 

[  4  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

This is why we must look for opportunities around us and see where  we could fit this kind of material in. Or what else could we produce  with  the  same  methods.  Maybe  something  a  bit  more  commercial?  Maybe  something  online?  Now  we  are  getting  somewhere  so  we  mustn’t stop.    In  the  very  end,  after  going  through  the  whole  process,  I  encourage  us to re‐think the whole thing. I firmly believe that we can use these  skills strategically to create if not a new industry, then at least a new  way  of  viewing  audio  content.  Therefore  I  suggest  that  when  you  read  this  e‐book,  you  keep  an  open  mind.  You  don’t  have  to  limit  yourself either by thinking about audio productions only, but you can  also consider how these ideas relate to any media; new or old.    I am covering the process in an order starting from the beginning to  the  very  end  and  even  beyond,  but  that  doesn’t  mean  that  it’s  the  right way. The process doesn’t work in a way that you finalise one bit  and  move  to  the  next  one  and  so  on.  Nothing  really  is  ready  before  the final piece is ready so you can always revisit what you have done.     There  are  a  few  things  written  here  that  are  basically  things  you  almost definitely should do, but mostly these are just ideas. They are  ideas  that  you  can  apply  to  your  workflow and that can help you to  create  something  that  makes  sense.  You  should  question  everything written here because without critically engaging you  don’t  really  have  that  clear  of  an  idea  why  you  are  doing  what  you  are  doing.  So  remember,  if  someone  asks  why  you  are 

[  5  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

producing  your  piece  the  way  you  are,  you  must  be  able  to  explain  the rationale. And because I read it somewhere isn’t good enough.    What  I  am  less  interested  to  dwell  too  much  on,  is  what  is  a  documentary,  feature  or  any  other  piece  of  content  based  audio.  There  are  conventions  and  ways  that  generally  work,  and  for  definitions  I  have  heard  as  a  general  rule  that  a  longer  piece  that  stands on its own is a documentary and shorter, perhaps background  clip that needs a specific context – a debate or so – could be seen as a  feature.  They  both  are,  as  far  as  I  am  writing  about  them  here,  pre‐ packaged,  which  means  that  they  aren’t  live,  and  they  are  based  on  something that is actual and real. So not a radio drama for instance.  But all the points made here focus more on how to create something  rather than how to copy something.    So there. The next pages have things that you can think about and do;  starting from pre‐production, then collecting your audio material, for  your  post‐production  and  for  when  you  have  a  final  piece  in  your  hands.      

         
[  6  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

1.  First things first   
The first part deals with matters before you even get properly started.  It’s  all  about  knowing  what  you  are  getting  into,  releasing  your  creativity and ensuring that you are ready to hit the streets with your  recorder. 

 

           
[  7  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Listen, watch, learn, adapt  
… it’s not copying, but observing and learning from others.      If  you  are  a  radio  student,  I  hope  you  listen  to  radio.  Just  to  know  what  you  are  dealing  with.  Ideally  you  listen  to  more  than  just  one  station  that  plays  hit  music  with  a  tight  rotation.  Although  it  is  also  good  to  listen  to  those  since  a  lot  of  radio  students  end  up  working  for  such  stations.  Or  maybe  you  do  not  listen  to  conventional  radio,  but rather subscribe to podcasts, listen to audio books or some other  kind of audio content besides music. If not, but you still somehow feel  determined that you’re doing the right degree, you might need to fit  at least some of these things into your routines.    If  you  want  to  produce  audio documentaries then listening to audio  documentaries is a good start. Not that many students have done so  before coming to the university. The fact, that there seems to be such  a  few  of  them  easily  available  might  also  be  an  indication  of  something about the industry that you need to consider, but for now  you can find some examples from the Internet. Here’s a few options  to start with:      • PRX (Public Radio Exchange) – after free login you can listen to  other’s work and add your own.  • BBC Radio 4’s selected documentaries  • BBC World Service documentaries  • BBC 1Xtra documentaries  [  8  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

  Sure, there’s a bit of a BBC bias there with the links and also, since the  content  online  tends  to  undergo  changes,  I  do  hope  that  the  links  work  when  you  click  them.  These  are  only  examples  and  I’d  recommend  you  to  spend  some  time  and  Google  (or  Blackle)  a  few  more.  It  really  is  just  to  see  what  has  been  done  and  how.  If  we  let  nature  to  take  its  course,  we  might  hear  very  few  documentaries  ever.    To understand the craft of making documentaries make sure you also  watch  them  from  TV,  online  or  get  some  on  DVD:s.    The  great  thing  about  these  is  that  they  are  done  with  much  more  resources,  time  and  money  and  there  are  generally  so  many  more  of  them.  Learn  what they do right and think about how you could do that in radio in  general  and  with  whichever  topic  you  are  interested  to  cover  in  specific.    That really is the key idea with everything. What do others do right  and  how  can  you  do  the  same?  Not  to  copy  the  result  of  whatever  they  did,  but  to  understand  the  train  of  thought  behind  it  and  then  apply  it  in  your  circumstances,  with  your  personality,  the  subject  matter,  target  audience  and  format  of  the  station  you  work  for  or  wherever else your piece will end up. To use an example of stand‐up  comedy, you shouldn’t copy the jokes and punchlines from someone  else,  but  you  can  think  what  makes  the  jokes  funny  in  their  timing,  subject  matters,  angles  and  how  they  are  generally  constructed  and  then use those ideas as they fit to your own material.    

[  9  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

For some reason this is too easy to misunderstand so make sure that  you don’t.     A few years ago I was asked for some consultation help for a possible  TV  talk  show  production.  I  recommended  that  they  should  start  off  by looking carefully into what is done in another show that was very  popular at the time – what made the show successful – and then try  to apply the thinking behind it to their show, so that it could achieve  the  same  success  with  its  target  audience.  I  was  met  with  a  polite  “with  all  due  respect…”  answer,  which  suggested  that  while  having  asked  for  my  opinion,  they  didn’t  listen  to  it  at  all.  In  fact,  they  completely missed the point, and regardless of my repeated attempts  to clarify, they probably walked away thinking that I had asked them  to mimic someone else. I am hardly surprised to never have seen the  show  on  TV.  Not  that  I  am  any  kind  of  TV  concept  guru,  but  some  things are just common sense.    You can, and probably should, pick and mix the best ways and ideas  that you see and hear out there. Analyse what makes a conversation  on the commercial station entertaining, how is the content dealt with  in  talk  radio,  how  does  the  advertising  industry  come  up  with  a  unique  selling  points  and  how  does  a  community  station  make  you  feel  like  you  part  of  something?  Are  those  methods  effective  and  is  there anything there that could help you? Maybe what you don’t like  will help you to realise what you do like and will want to use instead.  You don’t need to have all of these elements applied, certainly not at  the  same  time,  but  it  helps  to  understand  them.  Writing  and  producing  a  radio  advert  is  a  very  different  craft  to  a  documentary, 

[  10  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

but how do they, when they are done right, communicate a message  in thirty seconds?     Things  that  appear  to  be  far  from  each  other  come  closer  when  we  take a step back and lose our focus on the details and replace it with  analysis  of  their  effectiveness.  And  since  radio  documentaries  are  a  relatively  small  pool  to  fish  from,  you  must  find  the  inspiration  wherever it may be.     As  a  student  you  are  the  future  of  radio  and  media,  and  as  a  university  student,  you  may  be  part  of  the  future  of  managing  the  media  and  radio.  Use  your  time  well  as  a  student  and  learn  to  understand  the  radio  industry  and  also  its  shortcomings;  it  has  got  many. But it has got many strengths as well. It is not necessarily a get  rich quick scheme; or even get rich in your lifetime scheme, but it is  an  efficient  way  to  communicate.  Audio  is  the  only  format  of  media  people  can  really  consume  safely  while  driving  and  hence  the  morning  and  afternoon  traffic  hours  are  important  for  radio.  It  is  relatively  cheap  to  produce,  receivers  are  cheap  to  purchase  and  therefore  are  much  more  common  than  TV:s.  It  doesn’t  require  literacy or a lot of electricity, and it also has a certain intimacy that at  least  for  me  makes  interviews  and  conversations  more  enjoyable  than with some visuals, although you are free to disagree with me on  that one (or with anything else for that matter).     I  always  make  a  distinction  between  audio  and  radio.  It  is  true  that  radio content is audio content, but you can also use audio in an online  environment,  on  CD:s  or  even  files  you  copy  on  computer  or 

[  11  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

exchange with your bluetooth device. As a file, audio (such as MP3) is  much lighter to upload, download or stream online than video. What  the  Internet  does,  and  has  done,  is  erase  many  of  the  geographical  limitations.  Of  course  the  digital  divide  is  a  reality  and  the  Internet  has  created  new  kinds  of    groups  not  determined  by  their  geographical  locations,  but  by  their  interests  and  unfortunately  also  access  to  technology  (which  at  times  is  tied  to  geography  as  well).  But the same content can be broadcasted on‐air as much as it can be  uploaded online. Podcasts are a convenient form of audio as they can  be subscribed to, and after that the subscriber doesn’t have to search  for  them  but  receives  every  episode  as  soon  as  it  is  uploaded.  I  will  later  on  talk  more  about  placing  your  audio  content  online,  but  for  now  the  point  is  that  the  Internet  adds  up  to  opportunities  rather  than  takes  away  from  them.  When  you  are  producing  content  you  should start thinking about both platforms.    Regardless  of  radio’s  role  in  our  music  consumption,  there  will  probably always be some need for content. Change is constant. It isn’t  something that has happened, but something that is happening right  now  as  it  always  does.  And  change  is  fine.  As  practitioners  we  just  need  to  understand  how  it  impacts  on  our  work.  For  content  based  audio  this  change  looks  positive  anyway,  since  the  Internet  opens  more global potential for even very focused content.  

[  12  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Coming up with ideas   
… getting creative and critical at the same time.    When I was an undergraduate student one of my lecturers told us: if  you want to have a good idea, come up with ten and pick the one that  is  good.  That,  he  said,  was  based  on  the  general  rule  of  90%  of  everything  being  rubbish.  No  matter  how  many  times  I  was  turning  this idea in my head, I had to agree with it.    Initially it sounds like  hard work, but it is not like someone is going  to come and ask for evidence or an industry standard business plan  for  every  idea.  The  whole  concept  needs  a  bit  of  demystifying  because we come up with ideas all the time and out of those ten you  may end up having five ridiculous, few that kind of make sense, one  that is okay, and one good one. Some of them are just half ideas and  some build on the bad ones. Maybe your final one is a combination of  few, or that crazy thought that you stripped down into a doable one.  This bit is not the science; it is just for you to think about in order to  avoid  too  much  unjustified  satisfaction  with  the  first  thought  that  enters your head.     When you hear someone saying trust your first instinct, be careful. Of  course it might be an amazing concept, but at the same time it might  be something that everyone else has also thought first and then gone  with it. When I was a presenter on a hit station I used to spend quite  a  bit  of  time  writing  my  scripts.  My  goal  was  to  write  some  jokes  about current affairs and such; basically just punchlines to amuse the  listeners  (and  possible  more  than  them,  my  peers  and  myself).  A  [  13  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

friend  of  mine  said  that  if  in  my  evening  show  I  go  with  the  first  punchline  that  comes  into  my  mind,  listeners  may  have  heard  that  same joke in a slightly different versions many times during that day.  News stories after all, are the same for everyone. You may not write  jokes,  like  I  don’t  much  either  anymore,  but  we  still  benefit  from  considering our angle.     Having said this – and I hope I am not stating too much of the obvious  – it is not about never going with your first idea. Just as long as it isn’t  your only idea and therefore wins by default.    Another  thing  that  is  good  to  keep  in  mind  is  that  you  are  not  supposed to prove your already existing opinion. That would be just  a self‐congratulating exercise and it has very little journalistic, or any  other kind of value. Make mind maps, think about the different sides,  but  at  least  give  the  material  a  chance  to  differ  from  what  you  thought.  If  you  find  out,  for  instance  in  one  of  your  interviews  something  that  changes  the  nature  of  your  piece,  then  that’s  okay.  Follow that. You have just found something out and it does not ruin  your  idea,  but  your  idea  has  developed  into  something  else;  something better probably, and even if not, it’s better that you found  out it now rather than when already finished the last edits.     Coming up with an idea involves thinking about an angle that would  be interesting; maybe something that is not overdone by every media  outlet, and knowing your target audience and where you would like  to  have,  at  least  theoretically,  your  work  to  be  broadcasted.  Remember that while it is important to be realistic about the industry 

[  14  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

you  aim  to  work  in,  your  studying  times  may  be  the  last  times  for  years when you get to experiment, and it would be a  shame not to do  that. Try things out and think creatively.     Besides having to know who you are targeting, you should also think  about  how  are  you  going  to  reach  them.  Is  your  story  going  to  be  a  human  interest  one,  a  hard  news  story  or  something  else.  Thinking  about  these  things  will  help  you  when  you  think  of  who  you  would  like to talk to, and what kind of other material you would ideally like  to have included in your final piece.    There  isn’t  one  set  way  for  a  creative  process.  Even  if  there  was,  wouldn’t  that  be  against  the  whole  idea  of  creativity?  There  are  different  methods  and  they  work  for  different  people.  I  find  mind  maps very useful. I started off drawing them into my note book. I still  do that but I also have one of those boards on the wall in my working  space so I can actually conveniently see the idea when I am writing. I  also use free software called FreeMind which allows me to have the  ideas  archived  on  the  computer.  I  am  not  convinced  it  is  the  best  software  available,  but  it  is  decent.  I  recommend  you  to  go  and  explore the options from this list if you feel that it could be useful.     There is nothing wrong with doing mind maps by hand and most of  the time it is faster and you get to record the idea as it comes without  having to, for instance, wait for your computer to turn on.     If  you  are  only  starting  to  experiment  with  mind  maps  you  might  need to ‘let go’ a bit. It is possible that it is you, who is standing in the 

[  15  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

way  of  good  ideas.  Don’t  be  shy  with  a  mind  map;  it  isn’t  your  final  product and it doesn’t have to cover absolutely everything before you  start. It only has to make sense to you.   

   
Mind map: this is just an example of how I thought this segment to be like.  

  After my initial mind map I usually go either for a long walk or a run  (depends  on  your  exercise  preferences,  but  if  you  don’t  run,  try  walking). For me it is a very good time to think. Philosopher Friedrich  Nietzsche  said  “only  thoughts  which  come  from  walking  have  any  value.”  Whether  you  agree  with  him  on  this  one  or  generally;  or  rather  even  if  you  would  disagree  with  him  generally,  a  moderate  version  of  the  statement  makes  sense  to  me.  Lets  just  say,  walking  may be good for developing ideas.     I already introduced the idea of letting go; to stop worrying about are  you  making  a  fool  out  of  yourself  whether  someone  is  watching  or  not. When you let go physically, it gets difficult not to let go mentally.  And I mean that in a good way.    

[  16  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Letting  go  physically  can  be  a  very  difficult  thing  to  do  for  many  people, but there’s a way that works at least for me. Not accessible to  everyone – and by no means reduced to a tool of work – children are  great  assistants,  because  they  don’t  care  and  therefore  you  can  lose  yourself with them as well. If you’ve got siblings, cousins or even own  children  then  give  it  a  go;  volunteer  to  baby‐sit  (mentioning  your  ulterior  motive  is  optional,  but  don’t  forget  your  actual  responsibilities for the young human being and his/her parents). No  one will look at you weirdly if you go and play in the park with a child  and  therefore  no  one  thinks  you’ve  gone  mad.  Maybe  these  things  don’t concern you, but in case you feel self‐conscious then try to find  ways to overcome it.     Also, using drawing and colours is said to be good for creativity.    Getting in touch with your creativity is not about being silly as such. I  personally find it easier to think outside of the box when I am not on  the  computer  trying  to  force  ideas.  I  talk  about  letting  go,  but  don’t  forget  to  also  critically  engage  with  your  ideas;  are  they  actually  as  great as you thought, and most of all, are the realistic.     On top of creativity, the ideas need a more  pragmatic approach. This  is  where  the  journalistic  side  comes  in.  I  have  covered  some  of  the  ideas already in the previous segment, but knowing what others do,  and have done, is important so that you are not doing the same story  with the exact same angle, because there is a chance that the others  had  more  resources  and  found  better  interviewees.  Remember  that  you  don’t  produce  these  things  in  a  vacuum,  but  in  the  context  of 

[  17  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

some  kind  of  industry  or  community.  Unless,  of  course,  it’s  only  for  you and maybe your mum to enjoy, but realistically, that is an honest  goal to very few of us.     You must also understand the significance of what you are doing and  familiarise yourself with some background of the story. How much of  that  is  necessary,  depends  on  the  style  and  approach  of  your  piece.  You  should  also  consider  is  your  documentary  going  to  be outdated  before it is finished. News stories age quickly. If you have the luxury  to decide yourself and don’t want to hurry, think about more timeless  stories or at least something, that still makes sense to listen to a week  from now.    At this point I’d like to repeat my disclaimer: I am only offering ideas;  tools  for  your  tool  box  and  you  must  decide  which  ones  are  appropriate.  This  isn’t  a  list  where  you  must  tick  boxes  and  it  definitely  isn’t  a  gospel.  These  are  ideas  that  have  helped  me  and  therefore I offer them to you to think about. There isn’t an order for  these things so when you deal with ideas, however they come is good.     The thoughts I’ve described and ideas I have introduced are as they  have been taught to me after my own interpretation, preferences and  experiments with them. Since it is your process, don’t be afraid to be  creative to get creative as well.    It’s also good to have the confidence to change your focus when you  realise  a  better  idea,  for  example  from  an  interview  you  have  recorded.  Sometimes  you  can  have  a  very  rough  idea,  go  and  get 

[  18  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

material and start building on that. That method has also worked for  me  well.  The  only  thing  that  I  can  think  of  to  be  a  sort  of  an  unbreakable rule is to keep an open mind.

[  19  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Learn the technology   
…making sure you are ready for the job.    Technology doesn’t make the media, although media production uses  it.  A  lot.  For  some  reason  many  of  the  radio  students  seem  to  think  that  understanding  recording  levels  and  audio  quality  is  like  understanding  the  relativity  theory.  The  very  basic  technology  that  gets you far in radio is not very complicated and most of all, once you  master  it  on  a  decent  level,  you  don’t  really  have  to  think  too  much  about it anymore. Sounds like a reasonable deal to me. Then you can  focus on your great ideas.     Besides  adverts,  the  main  reason  for  people  to  change  the  radio  station is a bad signal, and I’d imagine that would apply to any kind of  sonic  irritation  including  inaudible  interviews,  cacophony  and  general chaos created by bad recording.     It  really  doesn’t  matter  how  good  your  idea  is  and  how  much  you  worked  for  it  if  you  cut  corners  with  this.  This  is  the  point  that  not  doing it right can make all of the material useless. And if it is useless,  don’t use it.    As a radio student you should go out with a recorder and record for  no  other  reason  than  to  learn  how  to  do  it  properly.  Try  it  out  and  while at it, maybe you will end up with a small sound effects library  and some cool atmospheric backgrounds you can use later on.    

[  20  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Is it better to record from far and turn the recording levels up or to  be quite close with levels turned down? Find that out.     Take  also  into  consideration  that  microphones  can  differ  so  it  is  important to get to know how the one that you are using works.     Have  a  good  read  through  of  the  manual  of  the  equipment  you  are  using  and  become  familiar  with  using  it  in  practice.  Recording  is  something that should become an act of muscle memory like driving  a car. If you are a driver you know that initially you had to focus on  which pedal is which, how to change gears and even not to forget to  indicate  when  you  are  turning.  After  driving  for  some  time,  and  I  doubt it happens in any other way, you stop thinking about most of  these  things.  They  just  happen.  You  can  drive  a  distance  without  thinking once about changing gears yet surely you have done it.     When  you  gain  confidence  and  get  the  recording  and  other  production to a comfortable level you are really in a position to focus  on your content and expression. If you don’t, you might find yourself  ruining  the  interviews  by  either  bad  audio  quality  or  losing  your  focus  to  questions  and  interaction  as  you  stare  at  the  recorder  and  try to ensure that everything is fine with it. Neither one of the options  give  you  any  good  results;  what  they  do  is  make  either  you  or  the  interviewee look and sound bad. In all likelihood, it actually does it to  both of you.     Also, always wear headphones. You wouldn’t write an essay without  a  screen  on  your  computer,  just  hoping  that  what  you  are  typing 

[  21  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

reads well, so don’t record without headphones either. The example  may  sound  a  bit  extreme,  but  that  is  how  it  is;  a  kind  of  guessing  game  with  a  hope  that  things  will  be  okay.    When  you  monitor  the  recording you know what kind of material you go home with and you  can fix the levels while it still matters. With interviews you can also  end  up  having  very  disturbing  background  noises  that  you  don’t  necessarily  pay  attention  to  without  the  headphones;  air  conditioning, computers, ambulances, dogs, playground… you get the  idea.     Unless  those  additional  sounds  are  an  integral  part  of  the  story  and  something that you want to have as describing the situation or space,  try to avoid them. Even if you want them, you are usually better off  recording  them  separately  and  mixing  in  when  you  are  compiling  your  work.  If  something  is  making  a  sound  you’d  rather  not  have,  don’t be afraid to ask if it is possible to go and record the interview  elsewhere.  People  generally  understand  when  you  explain  your  reasons and most of the time, especially at events or in public spaces,  just going around the corner will be enough.     These things are more common sense than pure technological know‐ how, but without paying attention to the recording as a practice you  may just not realise them in time.    It  is  always  good  to  aim  for  the  best  possible  quality  and  never  use  bad quality audio, but even after all the hard work there can still be  some annoying noises on the background, or keeping the levels was  tricky as the interviewee was moving too much. When you listen to a 

[  22  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

lot of the talking content in radio, you hear that many interviews are  telephonic  which  makes  their  quality,  realistically  speaking  often  quite horrid and always a bit compromised. It seems that there is an  unspoken agreement that this is acceptable in radio and without it a  lot  of  content  would  not  exist.  So  use  your  own  judgement  with  the  quality  of  audio  you  have  recorded,  but  set  the  standard  a  little  bit  higher than where you instinctively would have it.     Learning  the  technology,  like  many  things  in  general,  is  first  about  learning  the  basics  and  creating  a  routine.  The  creativity  follows  usually  afterwards  when  you  try  things  out,  but  even  that  has  got  more to do with what type of raw material you collect than how you  record that audio. I will later on write more about your material, but  for now, as we are still talking about the equipment and how to use it,  consider making yourself a checklist.     The good thing about checklist is that once you’ve written everything  down, you might not even need to consult it, as you remember these  things  already.  That  is  not  to  say  that  it’s  not  good  to  confirm;  it  generally is good to confirm.     On your checklist you should have ideas like…    • Checking the equipment before going out to collect audio  All the necessary cables (check your microphone cable by  recording a bit – broken ones can add horrible cracks to  your material or simply not record)  

[  23  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Enough  batteries  with  enough  power  (have  some  spare  ones)  Recorder and microphone  Depending  on  your  recorder,  are  all  the  recording  settings as you want and need them to be?  Headphones  Enough  space  on  your  memory  card  or  MiniDisc  depending what you are using. I recommend to have a lot  more  space  than  what  you  estimate  you’ll  need.  Sometimes  we  get  surprised  with  what  is  available  and  it’s good to be prepared.      • When  on  the  location,  whether  inside  or  outside,  listen  to  the  sounds of the space and identify potentially problematic ones.  On  top  of  alarms,  sirens  and  air‐conditionings  take  wind  specifically  into  consideration  as  for  microphone  it  is  not  just  sound, but rather something blowing in it which compromises  the quality of recording even making it unusable.    • Record  atmosphere,  because  it  can  be  very  useful  later  on  when in edit.    • Before  recording  an  interview  or  collecting  any  audio,  make  sure that you are happy with the recording levels.    • Make  sure  that  the  recording  starts  and  runs.  People  have  made the mistake of having the recorder on pause which feels 

[  24  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

like recording as you hear the sounds from the headphones and  the levels are showing, but the numbers on the display of your  recorder are not changing.    • When  you  record,  depending  on  the  equipment,  be  sure  that  you  don’t  record  over  previous  tracks  and  lose  other  interviews.    • When  you  transfer  the  material  to  a  computer  name  the  files  appropriately and save them in a folder that you can easily find.      These are just some examples that will help you to create a workflow.  A routine. All of this, after some practise, is like remembering which  pedal in the car is the brake and which is the accelerator.     Later on I will talk more about editing audio which is another aspect  of the process that needs some technical skills.    Now that we have covered the basics of what we are doing, in what  kind  of  context  and  even  how  are  we  able  to  make  it  happen  technically, we are ready to start collecting our raw material.  
           

[  25  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

2.  On the field   
The second part deals with collecting the material and getting the best  out of the interviews, ideas on how to deal with what you’ve got, what  do you say about it and what does it say about you. 

[  26  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Don’t cut corners with material  
… collecting material.    The moment you start recording your raw material is a great one. At  least  I  like  it  a  lot.  It  is  when  the  ideas  and  concepts  you  have  been  working on and thinking about become real and also get tested. It is  possible  that  the  realities  as  reflected  in  the  interviews  you’ve  recorded make your whole concept a bit redundant, but even that is  okay.  It’s  just  evidence  that  we  don’t  really  know  what  the  documentary  is  about,  or  at  least  what  is  it  saying  until  at  the  very  end.  It’s  good  to  keep  an  open  mind  and  allow  the  changes  to  take  place rather than to try to force the initial view.    If we take the process to its very basic level you’ve got two ways to  get  things  started:  an  ease‐your‐way‐in  interview  or  the  deep‐end‐ option.   Especially if you feel that you could use some more information and  confidence  before  facing  the  hard  questions  then  start  off  with  someone  who  is  either  an  easier  person  to talk to (should you have  access  to  that  knowledge)  or  someone  who  is  less  central  to  your  story.  This  kind  of  interview  gives  you  confidence  and  ensures  that  you  have  some  audio  secured.  The  value  of  getting  started  should  never be underestimated.     The  deep‐end‐option is when you decide to tackle the most difficult  thing  first  and  then  build  the  rest  around  it.  It  is  a  good  way  to  do  things  if  you  feel  that  you  understand  the  subject  well  or  otherwise  [  27  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

feel  particularly  strong  and  confident.  Quite  often,  after  this  it  becomes easier to find and record the rest of the material as you have  the main substance of the story already collected. Although, of course  there can be more big interviews lined up, but you are at a good start.     You never know exactly what kind of material you will end up with,  but  it  is  good  to  consider  the  order  in  which  you  intend  to  talk  to  people.  Sometimes,  you  can  kick  yourself  for  realising,  during  your  very  last  interview,  an  interesting  angle  or  a  question  you  should  have asked everybody. These are the things that you can never know  so there is  no point in worrying about them. Just imagine if this could  happen and then start based on your best guess.    It is good to have at least a rough wish list of who you would like to  interview.  Be  prepared  to  think  on  your  feet  and  react  quickly;  at  times  a  chance  for  a  great  interview  will  present  itself  without  warning. Sometimes your interviewees will recommend other people  that  you  could  find  interesting  and  other  times  they  may  cancel  or  just  not  show  up,  although  most  often,  they  do  the  interview  as  agreed.     Before  going  to  record  an  interview  it’s  good  to  think  of  good  questions,  and  if  possible  have  more  of  them  than  what  you  think  you’ll need. Some interviewees answer your first five questions when  you’ve  only  asked  one.  And  you  only  had  prepared  six.  Not  that  it’s  that  much  of  a  problem  necessarily,  if  you  get  your  material,  but  I  always  try  to  add  a  few  questions  in  the  end  that  sort  of  invite  the  interviewee  to  expand  the  story  and  identify  other  aspects  that  I 

[  28  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

haven’t  known  or  just  thought  of.  After  all,  they  probably  are  specialist in the field  and I am only covering the story.     Your questions should be rather open than closed ones. That means  that  they  should  not  be  answered  by  yes  or  no.  Sometimes  you  can  prepare a great question that covers all the facts and reflects on them  appropriately  and  then  your  interviewee  says  “yes,  that’s  correct.”  Now that is what you got recorded. Make sure that your interviewees  give  you  all  the  good  stuff  even  if  you  yourself  would  know  the  answers already. It is their voice you are after because your own you  can record whenever.    When you think of the style of your piece you might have an idea of  its  treatment.  Are  you  going  to  edit  the  answers  and mix them with  your studio recorded voice‐overs, or are you going to use them as an  interview with your questions in the mix as it happened? Regardless  of  how  you  will  use  them,  a  good  interview  is  generally  more  of  a  recorded  conversation  than  a  questionnaire.  React  to  the  answers  you  are  given  and  follow  them  up,  ask  for  more  clarification  and  further  questions  even  if  they  are  not  on  your  list.  There’s  an  old  anecdote,  which  can  actually  be  an  urban  legend,  where  a  radio  DJ  asked  a  caller  “So  how  has  your  day  been?,”  the  caller  responds  “It  hasn’t been good. I was horseback riding, fell and broke my leg.” The  DJ responds “Okay, what song would you like to hear?”     As conversational as your style may be, you as an interviewer should  try  to  keep  quiet  as  much  as  you  can  when  you  are  not  saying  anything. In a normal conversation we make all kinds of small noises  

[  29  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

of  agreeing  or  being  surprised  (yeah,  oh,  umm,  mmm,  aha),  but  whether you use your own voice in your documentary or not, those  sounds  can  be  rather  annoying,  yet  difficult  to  edit  away.  You  don’t  want  to  have  your  “yeah,  I see” on top of a very interesting answer.  As  an  interviewer  you  must  come  up  with  ways  of  encouraging  the  interviewee by nodding, facial expressions or anything you can come  up with. Keep an eye contact as much as you can. You don’t have to  say anything out loud to be part of a conversation. At least not all the  time.    Depending  on  your  story  and  approach  you  can  have  an  interview  with  many  different  kinds  of  people.  Many  politicians  and  public  servants  are  infamous  for  giving  you  official  statements  which  tend  to be rather dry accounts. It is something we are quite used to and we  don’t  think  too  much  about  it,  but  it  is  also  something  that  many  people find boring. Think twice before using long interviews like that  if it doesn’t fit your target audience. Some academics know so much  about their specialisation that their answer seems to last forever and  you  know  you’d  need  a  quick  30  second  summary  of  25  minute  monologue. I have found that a good way to achieve that, is trying to  summarise vaguely by saying something like “so if I have understood  correctly it is about a and b.” After that I often get a nice half a minute  summary that explains how it is about a, b, c, d and f. It doesn’t work  every time, but it surprises me still, how often it does.     It may happen quite naturally when you are working on a story that  you  end  up  with  a  set  of  questions  that  you  could  ask  almost  from  anybody. That kind of general list of question is good and works well 

[  30  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

especially if you are at an event, such as a conference, fair or festival  where you may get interviews from people who are interesting, but  you didn’t prepare questions for. If you end up in a situation like that  and  you  don’t  immediately  have  anything  particularly  insightful  to  ask, start of with very general questions to buy yourself time to think  on  your  feet  and  hopefully  come  up  with  better  questions  towards  the end of the interview.    It  is  important  to  know  how  long  your  final  piece  will  be  when  you  collect the audio or even work on the interview questions. Sometimes  it is easier to say something in a longer time than in a short one, but  however  long  your  documentary  is,  make  sure  you  have  enough  material.     When I was doing my first work placement in the late nineties, one of  my  friends  had  been  sent  to  a  press  conference  to  interview  a  Swedish pop rock group the Cardigans. The band was busy and being  a trainee he hardly got the first turn to ask his questions in the midst  of professional music journalists. He eventually came back with four  minutes  of  audio.  His  assignment  had  been  a  seven  minute  feature.  Now  remember  those  four  minutes  were  not  edited  audio  but  raw  material that had all of his questions amongst other things. He hadn’t  thought of doing an emergency voxpop to meet the required time so  he had to reflect. He wrote a script that he read to fill the time.     I  can’t  even  remember  how  it  sounded,  did  it  make  any  sense  and  how was it received by his supervisors, but this is an alarming story,  not one of triumph. Even if he would have managed to get away with 

[  31  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

it, you must remember to get enough material because it is not about  getting away with things anyway.    There  are  no  rules  really  how  much  is  enough  raw  material  for  a  story of any length. You must have enough. That is the most definite  answer I can give you. Some old school documentary makers demand  hours and hours of raw material, but I wouldn’t worry about that. In  the modern media production environment we don’t have the luxury  of  time  like  some  previously  have  had.  We  must  produce  stories  much faster than before so having those hours and hours of audio is  not only a massive task to record, but also to listen to and edit later  on.     I  have  been  talking  a  lot  about  recording  interviews  and  they  are  often  the  substance  of  your  story.  They  are  not,  however,  all  that  matters.  Earlier  I  had  mentioned  how  you  can  learn  about  documentary  making  from  TV  and  film.  If  a  TV  documentary  would  only  have  talking  heads  –  the  footage  of  people  talking  to  camera  –  and  occasionally  footage  of  the  narrator talking, they would have to  have  pretty  amazing  content  for  us  not  to  change  the  channel.  But  that  is  still  how  we  often  without  questioning  produce  for  radio.  There is very little sound environment there. We pause our recorder  when  interesting  things  are  happening.  By  interesting  I  don’t  mean  only  very  exciting,  but  just  sounds  that  signify  moments,  places  or  just  human  beings  on  their  job.  If  you  interview  someone  in  their  office, then a phone call or someone at the door is what signifies that.  If  it  happens  in  the  middle  of  your  interview  you  can  edit  it  for  the  beginning  as  something  that  takes  us  into  a  new  space.  If  you  are 

[  32  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

going  to  interview  someone  start  the  recording  before  you’ve  met  them. Get the audio of that meeting when they introduce themselves  to you. It can be nice way to get into the actual answers. This way you  also  avoid  the  often  awkward  moment  of  setting  up  your  recorder.  That is the time when the interviewees get nervous so skip that if you  can.    The  supporting  audio  material;  atmospheric  sounds,  more  specific  signifiers  or  observed  interactions  can  be  almost  anything  that  is  sound.  When  you  are  collecting  it,  keep  your  eye  on  the  recording  levels and look for the best place to record from. To collect this audio  it  really  helps  you  to  ask  what  are  the  people  in  the  film  documentaries doing right and how will I translate that into audio?     Collecting the audio tape, as this type of material is sometimes called,  is a different practice from the rest of the recording as you don’t have  to worry about asking the questions and from a participant you have  become  more  of  an  observer.  Your  TV  equivalent  would  be  a  cameraman instead of the journalist or a reporter that you are when  you are recording the interviews.     In radio production we often have more roles than in other media as  the production teams are small. Chances are, you are the production  team.  It’s  good  to  be  comfortable  with  all  the  different  roles.  At  the  end,  the  content  must  be  relevant  and  interesting  and  it  must  be  packaged in a way that it deserves.      

[  33  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Know your material and then trust in it  
… dealing with your material.   

As  you  have  been  collecting  the  material  you  have  created  a  good  sense  of  what  you  got.  There  is  always  a  chance  that  one  more  interview would improve the final product, but there is also a chance  that  it  wouldn’t.  I  mentioned  earlier  that  you  should  have  enough  material  so  that  you  don’t  have  to  fill  and  kill  time  with  nonsense.  Don’t claim lightly that you’re done collecting the audio, but don’t get  obsessed  with  more  material  either.  Never  finishing  your  work  will  only mean that no one ever gets to hear the final product and in the  context  of  university,  it  means  that  you  are  late  for  the  deadline.  That’s  never  a  good  way  to  score  points  no  matter  how  noble  a  reason you have.     Already when you are collecting the audio you get a rough idea when  something  really  useful  has  been  said.  Make  at  least  mental  –  if  not  written – note where these good bits are so you remember where to  start looking for them. It is also during recording your material that  you start realising what is the direction your piece is taking; what it is  actually saying.    It  is  really  difficult  to  know,  or  even  guess,  how  engaged  your  listeners  are  going  to  be  and  how  carefully  they  will  listen.  How  carefully  do  you  usually  listen  to  radio?  The  more  you  trust  your  audience  the  less  you  have  to  stress  ideas.  I  remember  one  film  documentary  –  I  won’t  name  it  here  as  I  wish  only  the  best  for  its  producers  –  that  felt  like  it  might  never  end  as  all it really  achieved  [  34  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

was  repetition  of  one  idea  and  it  lasted  for    close  to  an  hour.  There  was  the  same  thing  said  with  different  words  by  different  people in  different places, but all that was said was that one thing.     If it was not for the reasons of politeness, I would have walked away  after the first ten minutes even though the topic was something that I  thought should have been very interesting.     Basically overemphasising one message is like explaining your jokes;  everyone  got  it  already  and  if  they  didn’t,  how  well  will  it  go  down  just  because  now  you  are  making  it  obvious?  It  is  a  very  tricky  balance  between  under  and  overestimating  the  attention  of  your  audience.     Consider how clear your message is, and is it enough that one person  makes one point? Even if everyone agrees, you don’t have to use the  same type of clip by different people over and over again.     Some  people  say  things  because  they  just  think  that  it’s  the  right  thing  to  say  without  any  critical  engagement  with  whatever  meanings those words have. If that is obvious enough to make a point  on  something  interesting;  the  interviewees  character  for  example,  and  if  his  or  her  character  is  important  in  your  piece  then  you  can  keep  it,  but  otherwise,  be  harsh  on  people  saying  empty  lines.  Not  ideally to their face, but in the edit. These lines represent the kind of  language that makes people call politics boring. Well, politics maybe  boring  or  just  complicated,  but  ideally  your  piece  should  be  able  to 

[  35  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

package the boring – if that’s what it has got to be – at least in a more  interesting way.     If  you  have  enough  material,  you  don’t  have  to  use  any  weak  meaningless statements that no one even fully understands.     Listen  to  all  of  your  material  and  try  to  find  interesting  bits  which  you can then mix together. Later on I will talk more about editing and  compiling  your  final  product,  but  when  you  listen  through  the  interviews, try to identify topics and ideas from different people that  would  work  very  well  together  either  juxtaposed  or  supporting  and  complementing  each  other.  At  best  you  could  create  an  interesting  almost tennis match‐like feel where you don’t have to even comment  much yourself.    At  this  point  you  should  also  consider  how  does  your  collected  material  represent  the  different  sides  of  the  story.  The  mistake  that  happens when you are trying to prove your opinion to be the truth is  that you are not inclined to talk to anyone who would disprove it. It’s  good to talk to people who you disagree with and there is no need to  worry  about  people’s  opinions.  If  they  are  very  offensive  you  don’t  have  to  use  them  and  if  you  feel  that  they  emphasise  a  point;  even  one that is the very opposite of what they are intended to, then you  can use it. People are smart enough to make up their own mind.     If there is no realistic or sensible way of getting any dissent voices in  your  work  then  you  can  acknowledge  that.  If  you  have  tried  to  contact a person who represents the dark side of the story and he or 

[  36  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

she  has  declined  or  not  been  reached,  then  you  can  say  that.  I  personally  would  not  wish  to  make  it  too  dramatic  or  judgemental;  again, people are smart enough to decide for themselves.    These editorial questions of what to include are the ones where you  have  to  use  your  judgment  informed  by  your  target  audience  and  platform where your work would end up in. Whatever you decide, I’d  advice  you  to  avoid  trying  to  shock  people.  That  usually  makes  one  half of the people upset and another thinks you’re a fool.      It is not, however, the attempt of shocking that strikes me alarmingly  often.  It  is  probably  because  of  the  commercial  and  promotional  cultures  where  we  live  in  that  has  shifted  the  presenting  of  content  towards  overtly  positive.  Not  that  one  should  be  negative  just  because,  but  commercial  media  also  veils  the  promotion  of  films,  music or almost anything with a feel of journalism, and this seems to  have  had  an  impact  on  even  the  content  that  is  not  paid  for  by  the  promotional budgets.     It’s  important  to  think  about  this  quite  critically.  Especially  every  time  you  have  used  words  like  phenomenal,  amazing,  breathtaking,  unbelievable or so. Firstly, you should not use them because there are  much better words out there, and secondly, when you think of those  words,  consider  are  you  having  an  honest  unbiased  angle  to  your  story? It’s not that some things aren’t great, but just like, regardless  of what the hit station presenter tells you, no Britney Spears song is a  classic,  there  should  not  be  an  urgency  to  describe  anything  with 

[  37  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

unrealistic  phrases.  If  something  is  really  amazing,  then  make  sure  your material communicates that without you having to underline it.     At least for me, the promotional sounding content on a platform that  is  not  promotional  makes  me  suspicious,  and  if  I  feel  like  you  are  trying  to  make  up  my  mind  for  me,  I  instinctively  react  against  it.  I  will later on talk about the potential of using content based audio in  other ways and that includes advertising and promotion, but unless it  is  clear  that  the  purpose  of  the  content  is  commercially  inclined  (money has been paid for it to advertise of promote something), keep  it closer to neutral.    The rest of the audio material, such as the audio tape and all kinds of  atmospheric sounds, work as signifiers of spaces where you wish to  take the listener and transitions when you move forward to the next  segment in your final piece. Later on I will talk more about them, but  try to have a high standard with this material as well and don’t just  have any odd buzzing of the bees in the mix even if there were bees  where  you  recorded.  Or  if  you  do  want  to  have  it  as  a  part  of  your  final  piece,  consider  its  strengths  and  weaknesses.  Without  pictures  such things demand an explanation or they remain unexplained and  more as a confusion, taking the attention from the real substance of  the  story.  Ideally  it  should  be  there  to  support  it  and  putting  it  in  a  context. 

[  38  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

3.  Putting it all together 

 
The third part is all about finishing touches and making sure that your  work is both clear and coherent, but also enjoyable. More specifically,  it explores the script writing and recording and final packaging.      

                        [  39  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Working with the script  
…writing  and  recording  a  script  that  bridges  everything  together.    At the time you start writing the script; your own links, you already  pretty  much  know  what  your  final  piece  will  be  about.  You  must  create  an  effective  workflow  that  makes  sense  to  you,  but  generally  speaking, I would expect you to have most of the other audio edited  at this point. It might not be finalised and honed, but it is in a rough  form  of  what  it  will  be  in  the  end.  That’s  purely  because  while  you  can’t guarantee that the material you have recorded others saying or  doing  makes  sense  when  mixed,  your  own  script  will  bring  things  together, clarify, summarise and generally help you to make a point.     Writing  a  script;  something  you  will  read  out  loud  is  quite  different  from writing an essay. It’s different from writing most things actually.  The  text  you  are  producing  must  be  something  that  sounds  natural.  Have you ever heard when people have written their public speeches  word for word and it sounds like they are reading it for the first time,  when  making  a  mistake  saying,  excuse  me,  and  then  continuing  the  reading? That is exactly how you are not supposed to write a script.  You  are  supposed  to  modify  your  writing  to  match  the  way  you  speak, not the other way around.    Use shorter and punchier sentences to write the script. Find ways of  efficiently  expressing  your  thoughts  in  a  nice  and  clear  way.  Don’t  worry  much  about  unnecessary  big  words  as  this  really  isn’t  about  trying to impress anyone with your endless vocabulary, or even word  [  40  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

games. The script serves a different purpose. It exists for everything  else to make sense and bridge the gap between different interviews  and spaces. Unless you are one of the few famous film documentary  makers the average people know by their name, you are not the star  of  your  documentary.  Not  even  if  you  are  a  character  in  it  as  a  participant,  observer  or  explorer  of  some  kind.  Actually, even  if you  are one of the famous documentary makers, you still shouldn’t be the  star of the show. Also, if you are one of them, I am flattered that you  are reading this, and struggle to understand why you would.    The script also is something that gives the feel to your work. Since it  ties things together, it also is the only thing that is really consistent.  Whether  you  have  the  interviews  to  support  the  point  you  are  making  or  you  supporting  the  point  that  the  interviews  make,  your  script;  the  voice‐overs  are  usually  what  gives  your  piece  its  style  more  than  any  other  speaker.  Of  course  there  are  other  stylistic  devices and in a while, we’ll talk more about editing, but on the talk  based content, in most cases it is you who has the greatest impact on  how the package will feel like.    I learned script writing in live radio. As a presenter I used to write a  script that had pretty much every word I said out loud written down.  Initially, they didn’t sound very natural, but because I also afterwards  listened to every link I had done that day, I managed to improve my  writing.  It  is  by  listening  to  yourself  recorded  that  you  not  only  get  used to your own voice and how it works, but also to how you speak.  After two years of me writing down all of my links, I found all of my  writing being influenced by it, and I had to learn again how to write 

[  41  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

just  for  text.  That  in  itself  is  hardly  your  goal,  but  you  should  probably try to keep both ways in your active toolbox.     One of the mistakes I often hear, especially in the news, is repeating  what  the  interviewee  says.  Actually,  since  the  order  is  usually  first  the link and then the clip, the journalist makes the interviewee sound  like they are repeating what has just been said.    Have you ever heard something like this:      Voice­over:  …  and  the  opposition  leader  says  that  she  disagrees  with  the  decision  the  government  has  made  in  the strongest possible terms.    Interview  clip:  I  disagree  with  the  decision  the  government has made in the strongest possible terms.      I wish I didn’t hear something like this quite so often as I do. Not by  professional journalist any more than from the students. And it’s not  always  as  clear  and  word  for  word,  as  there  are  varying  degrees  of  bad writing. Still, none of them are good.     A good script links interviews and other audio seamlessly together. It  gives the flair to the final work and its function is to take the content  forward to a direction that is coherent and meaningful. You can use  scripted  voice‐overs  to  introduce  the  interviewees,  to  introduce  the 

[  42  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

questions, to provide commentary or facts, but you can also use it to  summarise. Many people you end up interviewing are very smart and  professional on their field, but not necessarily on the field of effective  communication. They can really slaughter a great point to the degree  that it makes no sense for you to use it. Or they can talk for an hour,  but  you  can  afford  to  allocate  them  four  minutes  in  your  piece.    In  cases like these, you can easily have a good solid interesting clip you  have edited and write script that says: Mrs X also mentioned that the  other concerns are a, b and c. Usually, you are able to say things in a  clearer  way  and  get  to  the  point  quicker.  This  kind  of  summarising  enables you to keep your work easier to follow, more straightforward  and it allows you to use the minutes you have to say much more.     If  you  have  been  at  an  event  such  as  a  demonstration  or  anywhere  that  would  be  worth  describing  to  the  listeners,  you  can  record  something  as  things  happen,  but  you  can  also  do  this  afterwards  by  writing it down on a script as it happened. It might lack the sense of  realism  and  urgency  that  a  link  recorded  while  it  was  happening  would have, but it can be more reflective and you can really consider  what were the important elements that should be covered.      It’s  a  fine  line  between  writing  commentary  and  writing  opinions.  You can reflect on the material you have used, you can link ideas and  make  conclusions,  but  I  would  really  advise  you  to  stay  away  from  giving opinions. Especially in a news story. In a human interest story  you can consider them, or even use them sparingly especially if you,  as a journalist, are part of the journey that is being followed. Then it  is  particularly  appropriate  to  tell  how  did  things  make  you  feel  and 

[  43  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

use your opinions as a sounding board to what the general thoughts  may  be,  but  even  that  is  separate  from  giving  your  opinions  as  the  truth.     If you have political or religious views, be particularly careful. There  are things that you may view to be true and righteous and therefore  appropriate  as  evidence  in  themselves,  but  others  may  have  very  different views. The best case scenario is that everyone who doesn’t  agree  with  you  will  discredit  anything  you  have  said  and  the  worst  case scenario is that you offend them. Offending people is always  a  tricky  thing;  it  can’t  always  be  avoided,  so  should  it  happen,  make  sure it’s at least for good reasons.     There are some technicalities to write a good script. Most of the time  when we open our word processing software on the computer we get  the default setting: Times New Roman on the font, size 12 and single  line  spacing.  As  useful  as  that  may  be  for  the  average  document,  it  doesn’t  do  much  for  the  script  writing.  If  you  work  for  different  media organisations there might be specific rules and standards, but  whatever script you write, use a bigger font size – I use 18. Use a font  that is easy for your eye; Times New Roman is not bad for that, and  especially if you write for someone else, but even if it is for yourself,  rather use a double line spacing as that allows notes to be made and  generally creates a sense of clarity.     On  top  of  the  general  rules,  I  personally  like  to  use  a  lot  of  space.  Unfortunately, when the script is printed, it’s not very environmental,  but  it  makes  me  feel  less  hurried  and  helps  me  to  emphasise  every 

[  44  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

part  the  way  it  must  be  emphasised.  I  use  a  lot  of  dots  and  write  a  separate  paragraph  for  everything  that  I  conceive  to  be  even  a  slightly separate thought. If I was to read this paragraph as a voice‐ over, the script would look like this:  

  On top of the general rules.. I personally like to use a  lot of space…..  It makes me feel less hurried.. and it helps me to  emphasise every part ….  I use a lot of dots.. and write a separate paragraph for  everything that I conceive to be even a slightly  separate thought.    
  It  is  my  personal  habit  that  I  use  the  dots  to  signify  the  length  of  break  I  want  to  take.  A  few  dots  is  just  a  small  break  but  the  more  dots I write, the longer a gap I intend to have. That gap is a stylistic  device  I  use  to  emphasise.  This  might  not  be  something  that  makes  much sense to you from my script, but I know exactly what it means.  You  will,  no  doubt,  find  your  own  ways  to  write  for  yourself.  When  you  write  for  other  people,  you  must  take  into  consideration  that  they can’t read your mind, but also that they don’t necessarily use the 

[  45  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

same words as you do naturally or that their way of speaking is very  different.  When  writing  for  others  you  might  need  to  be  more  general. Unless, of course, you know and understand exactly the way  they use language.    After all this work, you’ve got a script in your hands. That in itself is  not the final product – you still need to record it and mix with other  content. For now we are dealing with recording.     If you can, make sure you have enough time booked in the studio and  that  you  are  comfortable  with  the  equipment.  Basically  many  of  the  principles  I  talked  about  earlier  with  recording  on  location  apply  here  as  well,  although  the  setting  is  calmer.  Try  out  different  ways  and think about what is the purpose of your piece. Should you sound  serious,  curious  or  hilarious?  Emotional,  thoughtful  or  cold?  Having  written  the  script,  you’ll  have  a  clear  idea,  I  am  sure,  what  it  is  that  you need to do.     Listen  back  to  your  recordings  and  make  sure  that  every  word  is  pronounced correctly and the flow is as you need it to be. Try things  out; maybe a pause here and there and things like that. Or how about  even  longer  break  to  really  emphasise  and  give  the  listener  some  time – or rather – force them to think.    One  thing  that  you  can  always  keep  in  mind  when  working  with  a  script, whether you are writing or recording, is that this is where you  have  the  most  control.  You  don’t  have  to  rely  on  anyone  and  unless  you have limited access to the studio facilities or far too little time in 

[  46  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

your hands, you can keep on rewriting and rerecording until you are  happy.     And  what  if  you  don’t  have  an  access  to  the  studio?  For  whatever  reason.  There  are  many  DIY  ways  to  record  with  just  a  microphone  and recorder. I am not getting into them in any detailed way, but let  me  just  say  that  a  makeshift  studio  acoustics  can  be  achieved  with  soft  things;  pillows,  mattresses  and  fabrics  and  many  people  even  record underneath a blanket. It gives you a better sound quality and  excludes  many  noises  from  outside,  although,  of  course,  it  is  not  necessarily a very comfortable experience otherwise.                                   

[  47  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Do it with style  
… hook the listeners and take them to places.    One of the key ideas for everything that I’ve written about has been a  union of content and style. If you have a piece that lacks substance or  any kind of meaning – or just doesn’t reach a good enough standard –  it  won’t  reach  the  listener.  It  automatically  lacks  the  authority.  I  am  not  qualified  to  give  analysis  on  basic  human  psychology,  but  I  suspect that if your listener doubts the authority of anything in your  piece, she may as well doubt the legitimacy of everything. It’s harsh.  People  like  to  know  better  and  that’s  why  you  must  check  what  you’re doing.     But even that’s not enough. So, you don’t make any mistakes and you  even double checked how to pronounce the French name you had to  include,  and  no  one  can  catch  you  for  not  knowing  what  you  talk  about. You can even bring out some rather outstanding new data on  board and potentially improve the public discourse, but if your work  is  unlistenable  or  incoherent,  you  won’t  reach  many  people  either.  And radio is still a mass medium. The people who decide what to put  on radio have to think about that.     You’ve  worked  hard,  with  all  the  foot  work  of  finding  interviewees  and angles, this is the time when you put it all together – so shine.     How can you start off strong? Try to hook the listener from the very  beginning.  Start  with  a  provocative  short  comment  from  an  interviewee or any audio that you feel would make the listener feel “I  [  48  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

want  to  hear  more.”  Sometimes  there  are  songs  that  start  off  bland  and only in the chorus become very catchy. The reason we know this  is probably because we hear songs over and over again, at least if we  are  music  radio  listeners,  but  when  it  comes  to  other  content,  we  don’t have the luxury to think that maybe on the fifth listen, they will  get  it.  There  will  probably  only  ever  be  one  listen  per  listener.  So  regardless  of  how  artistic  you  want  your  expression  to  be,  if  your  message  is  more  important,  then  you  must  think  of  the  best  way  to  communicate it.    I  personally  never  like  to  start  or  finish  with  my  own  voice‐over.  I  just feel that surely there must be better audio to describe what I am  covering.  Surely  I  can’t  be  the  most  interesting  person  recorded.  Surely, out of all the people, I can’t be the factor that makes my work  stand  out.  If  I  was,  I’d  have  to  rethink  really  hard  if  my  story  and  angle are good enough.    The  beginning  of  your  piece  hooks  your  listeners  and  makes  them  want  more,  and  then  in  the  end,  the  final  thoughts,  hopefully,  leave  them  thinking  about  your  point.  Or  at  the  very  least  something.  Whatever  you  end  up  including  in  the  middle  of  these  two  things,  think of them as factors that can boost your chances to be heard and  remembered.    I  was  talking  about  the  style  and  flair  that  the  script  gives  to  your  audio,  and  while  I  am  not  taking  that  back,  I  must  add  that  editing  and compiling your work obviously deals with the same matter. I was  also saying that when recording, do record a lot of audio that isn’t an 

[  49  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

interview,  but  just  something  happening.  At  this  point,  you  start  drawing from that audio archive you’ve created on locations. Which  atmospheric  sounds  are  clear  signals  of  the  space,  and  which  ones  signal  the  mood?  Some  other  sounds  are  great  for  transitions  between places and moods; from interview to another when they are  in different places. I personally think cars work very well for that, but  you’ll  find  that  many  of  these  things  don’t  have  to  be  made  too  obvious.  They  are  small  signs  maybe  on  the  background  communicating  almost  subconsciously    the  message.  Transition  can  be  made,  for  instance,  by  cross‐fading  the  relevant  background  noises  with  long  enough  mix,  so  the  change  has  just  happened.  Use  other audio over the fades and think carefully if you want to use your  audio in a way that it’s bang! here, and now the next thing. Your mix  of atmospheric tracks shouldn’t look like a queue of audio items but  rather  a  number  of  tracks  fading  in  and  out  and  layered  on  top  of  each other. Well, at least possibly so. I can’t tell you exactly how your  work should look like on the screen or sound like from the speakers,  and of course we all like different things, but still, I’d recommend you  to try and make  sound rich features and documentaries. Most people  don’t seem to do so, so this can be your advantage and unique selling  point.     Often  we  feel  tempted  to  undermine  our  listener.  In  general  radio  practitioners  seem  to  every  time  either  under  or  overestimate  the  audiences’ attention span, brain capacity and dedication to listening.  We  can’t  take  anything  for  granted,  but  patronising  won’t  win  you  any  sympathy  either.  Be  clear,  but  don’t  make  your  point  like  the  listener  is  stupid.  Contents  like  the  ones  we’ve  been  dealing  with 

[  50  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

here, are probably listened to in a different way and in all probability  with more attention. If not, they probably aren’t listened to at all, or  at  least  not  in  a  way  that  the  message  demands  in  order  to  be  communicated  in  any  meaningful  way.  So  if  we  assume  that  people  either give you their attention to an extent which is enough, or then  they don’t matter much – at least as far as your documentary goes –  you don’t have to assume that they can’t comprehend anything. They  can.     Actually, even if we assume almost anything, or you could prove my  thinking  faulty,  I  still  think  that  people  aren’t  stupid  and  therefore  shouldn’t be treated as such.    You  don’t  have  to  use  a  formula  where  you  talk,  place  an  interview  clip,  then  talk  more,  another  interview  and  so  forth.  Make  the  clips  from different interviews talk amongst and to each other. Make them  support  each  other,  fill  in  gaps  or  even  argue.  You  don’t  have  to  always  introduce  them.  Be  creative  and  try  it  out.  It  may  not  immediately click, but with a few trials and errors you might just get  somewhere.     Sometimes this type of juxtaposing can tell so much more about the  situation  than  you  ever could verbally. How people approach things  from different angles and have different priorities.     If  you  want  to  use  the  different  interviews  to  support  and  complement  each  other,  try  to  find  a  seamless  way  to  tell  the  story 

[  51  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

through  a  few  different  characters  instead  of  all  of  them  saying  the  same thing one after another.    You can consider the order of the interviews based on how you want  to  tell  the  story,  but  also  how  interesting  they  are.  Sometimes  someone  we  don’t  know  says  something  incredibly  interesting  and  other  times  the  President  of  the  Nation  says  something  rather  dull,  but is such an important figure, that it’s interesting anyway. It may be  worth placing bits and pieces of the interesting people strategically in  the beginning and the end for the reasons I’ve mentioned already – to  attract  attention  and  hook  the  listener  and  to  leave  something  to  think about and remember, but you can also try to evenly distribute  them so that there isn’t a long dry phase somewhere in the middle.    I had dedicated an entire segment reminding you how important it is  to be familiar with the necessary technology in order to achieve good  results.  Just  before  reaching  the  very  end  of  your  production  task,  make  sure  that  you  listen  to  it  back  and  forth  a  good  few  times  to  identify  the  potential  problems.  Then  fix  them.  Make  sure  that  the  audio  levels  are  not  jumping  from  high  to  low  very  quickly  and  dramatically.  Use  some  compression  and  mix  until  you  are  happy  with it. And don’t go too easy on yourself; it’d be a shame to fall short  on the last leg of your production mission.    The way your final piece will be, depends on you and how have you  managed  to  work  it.  I  can’t  really  tell  you  the  way  to  do  it,  because,  well,  it  depends,  but  I  have  tried  to  give  you  some  ideas  of  what  to  consider. That, of course, goes for all the segments of this e‐book.  

[  52  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

  But  now,  at  this  point,  our  documentary  is  done.  How  nice.  We’ve  done  a  good  job,  but  no  one,  maybe  outside  of  our  group  of  friends  and  family,  has  heard  it.  The  last  chapter  deals  with  how  to  get  it  placed  and  what  other  options  there  are,  and  should  we  actually  completely rethink why we do this type of things at all.    

[  53  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

4.  … and finally 

 
This last chapter deals with how to get your work heard and what kind  of  practicalities  might  need  some  considering,  and  why    keep  on  thinking  about  something  that  is  increasingly  not  in  radio  anymore.  Could  there  be  a  renaissance,  redefinition  or  redundancy  in  the  horizon?  

[  54  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Know your placement   
…finding a home for your baby.    The  media  industry  is  not  much  fun  when  you  approach  it  as  an  outsider. At the very least, it can be incredibly tough to penetrate it in  any other way but to get a job instead of becoming a service provider  or an independent content producer. I am sure it can be done; all I am  saying is that it can be tough. It certainly has had its ups and downs  with me. But regardless of the assumed excellence and insightfulness  of your production, you now need to place it somewhere. Unless, you  had  had  an  arrangement  before  getting  to  this  point,  or,  like  said,  you’re nine to fiving for a station or a production company.     Unless your idea of placing your work is on CD on your bookshelves  or as a file in a forgotten folder in the depths of you computer, there’s  a need for some decisive action.     Now  having  a  final  product,  I  am  sure  you’ve  thought  hard  about  where  its  style  would  work,  or  alternatively  produced  it  in  a  style  that  fits  into  the  flow  of  your  targeted  station.  It’s  important  to  familiarise  yourself  with  stations  where  things  like  these  can  find  themselves  in,  and  work  with  the  knowledge  gathered  from  that  exercise. What topics get commissioned and in what kind of style? Is  it more hard journalistic exposé, human interest story with a strong  emotional  aspect  or  reflective  journey‐like  content?  Every  single  bit  of  information  you  can  find  out  may  be  very  useful  when  you  approach the station.     [  55  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

If  you  haven’t  had  an  arrangement  to  have  your  piece  placed  anywhere,  it  might  be  a  good  idea  to  email  the  person  who  is  in  charge; programme controller or some such (don’t mistake the vague  sound  of  that  with  it  not  mattering;  it  might  just  depend  on  the  station’s organisational structure who is that right person – but you  need  to  find  it  out),  and  demonstrate  to  them  why  your  feature  or  documentary  would  specifically  work  on  their  station.  It’s  generally  better to email than to call as many people can find phone calls from  people they don’t know a bit irritating, but once you have created a  contact, if there’s a delay with their response, you can call to remind.  I do advise you to remember that sometimes it is a thin line between   reminding  and  pestering,  and  many  of  the  people  you  must  get  through  to,  have  many  meetings  so  don’t  try  to  prolong  the  conversations  if  they  sound  hurried.  That’s  not  to  say  that  you  couldn’t say what you called to say.      Another  very  practical  reason  why  it  is  better  to  email  is  that  then  there’s  a  digital  paper  trail,  and  whatever  arrangement  you  end  up  with,  the  information  can  be  traced  back,  which  erases  many  potential  misunderstandings  and  also  the  occasional  people  who  don’t agree with fair play.     There are of course other reasons why you may have produced your  material,  than  to  just  get  it  sold  once  and  then  move  on  to  the  next  one to do exactly the same thing. Maybe you did it as a showcase that  you hope will get you hired. It’s not a bad plan either, especially if you  are a student.   

[  56  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

And  as  a  student  you  can’t  expect  to  automatically  be  able  to  sell  everything  that  you  do.  Strictly  legally  speaking  actually,  you  might  not  even  have  a  right  to  if  it’s  part  of  your  studies,  but  I  am  getting  into the copyright matters in a moment.     I  always  recommend  students  to  blog.  You  have  your  Facebook  and  Twitter,  but  realistically  as a media student, you should have  a blog  as  well.  I  am  not  the  one  who  decides  that,  but  I  really  struggle  to  come up with any reasons why you wouldn’t. Your blog can be your  showcase  of  your  writing,  videos,  photographs  and  of  course  also  audio. You can be a podcaster or just occasionally upload some audio  you’ve worked with for people to hear and for you to learn the way  the technology works. There are all the chances in the world that you  need  to  know  the  basics  of  updating  a  blog  of  some  kind  when  you  are  hired  and  it’s  something  nice  to  pull  out  of  the  bag  in  a  job  interview. It demonstrates taking initiative, creativity and passion for  production.  I’d  see  it  as  a  massive  plus  on  the  corner  of  your  application,  and  although  not  everyone  in  the  industry  feels  as  strongly  about  this  as  I  do,  I  can’t  see  how  it  would  reduce  your  chances.  Maybe  with  an  exception  of  you  having  uploaded  photos  from  the  weekend  night  out  where  you  passed  out  half  naked  and  your friends draw a Hitler moustache on you with a marker pen, but  isn’t that what Facebook is for?    As always, you can find many services that you can use online, but I  wanted to provide you with a very short list of a few web services I  like,  and  find  convenient  specifically  when  it  comes  to  blogging  and  placing audio online. A word of warning though; in the Internet these 

[  57  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

things keep on changing and what is good today, may be overdone by  someone else tomorrow. So there will be a moment in time when this  list becomes outdated.     • Wordpress  Wordpress is one of the free ways of blogging. You can make your  blog really rather professional looking by tweaking it for a while.     • Blogger  Blogger  is  one  of  Google’s  services  and  one  of  the  older  blogging  platforms.  It  is  increasingly  flexible  and  has  an  added  social  networking aspect by allowing you to follow other blogs and them  to follow you.    • Posterous  This  is  probably  the  easiest  and  by  far  the  most  convenient  blogging  service  that  I  have  tried.  With  a  Posterous  blog  everything  can  be  done  by  sending  an  email.  That  includes  attaching pictures, PDF’s, audio or video to the email and the blog  then presents them in a nice stylish manner. There are things you  can’t do with it, but the ones you can are incredibly effortless.    • PodBean  While  Podbean  also  gives  you  a  blog,  it  is  actually  more  of  a  podcasting  service.  By  opening  this  account  you  can  upload  100MB  of  audio  for  free  and  get  automatically  created  feeds  for  your audio to be subscribed to via iTunes or RSS. Even if you’d use  other services for blogging, this could work as your audio base. 

[  58  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

  • Soundcloud  Created  more  for  the  purposes  of  musicians,  Soundcloud  allows  you to upload and store audio for free. It gives you, in my opinion,  very  stylish  audio  players  that  you  can  easily  embed  into  your  blog  or  elsewhere  online.  You  can  decide  whether  your  audio  is  downloadable  or  not,  and  the  drop  box  enables  you  to  easily  receive and give files to others.    • PRX  PRX,  or  the  Public  Radio  Exchange  is  a  website  for  the  American  Public  Radio  system.  This  is  a  place  where  you  can  upload  your  material and even sell it to the stations for some money. While the  money isn’t necessarily going to blow your mind, it might be a nice  thing  to  have  in  your  CV.  You  can  listen  to  other  people’s  work  here as well, get ideas, give feedback to others just as they can give  it to your work and generally get good ideas for your future work.     Finally, whether you are uploading your audio on your personal blog  or on someone else’s website, working for a station or a production  company  or  trying  to  sell  your  content  independently,  it  is  good  to  have an idea of copyright matters. They can be tricky on a good day.     You own the full copyright to your work as soon as you have done it.  You  don’t  need  the  ©  symbol  or  a  detailed  explanation  on  how  you  are going to let the blood thirsty dogs after anyone who even thinks  about using your work; what you have done, you own the rights for.  Copyright is your incentive for your creativity.  

[  59  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

  Or so they say.    Here’s the fine print; for the sake of clarity I wrote it on the same font  size as the rest of the text. If you have done your work at a university  or with university’s equipment, depending on their policies, but quite  likely, they would own the copyright to your work. In theory you are  not  able  to  sell  that  or  arguably,  if  indeed  they  do  own  the  rights,  legally  put  it  online  to  your  blog.  I  am  sure  that  the  latter  should  never be a problem and even the former generally shouldn’t land you  in  trouble.  The  truth  is  that  if  you  as  a  student  manage  to  sell  your  work while studying, you are also positive PR for the department and  that may even end up recruiting a few new students; that’s where the  money  is  for  them.  And  where  it  definitely  isn’t,  is  to  make  a  few  bucks  out  of  selling  student  work  for  which  they  claim  ownership.  Even if they did own the rights, they wouldn’t probably use them.     Another  option  is  that  you  work  for  a  radio  station  or  a  production  company.  It  is  then  also,  in  all  probability  somewhere  in  your  contract that the work you have produced is owned by them. Which  means that, again, at least in theory, you cannot even place it online  for  free  for  others.  In  practice,  I  am  sure  you  can,  but  legally,  you  could  be  sued.  Definitely  they  wouldn’t  be  happy  if  you  tried  to  sell  the work they paid you to do to someone else.     It can also so happen, that you are an independent producer who has  taken a risk and without any advance payments produced something  out of your own concept with your own equipment on your own time, 

[  60  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

and when you wish to sell it to some broadcaster, instead of one‐time  only  rights,  they  want  the  full  copyright  of  your  work.  That  means  that they pay you once a bit and then own this work for so long that it  could as well be forever. In practice it means that they’ll play it once  and  then  it  goes  into  an  archive  in  all  likelihood  never  to  be  played  again  anywhere.  Legally,  they  will  decide  what  happens  to  it.  You  could  renegotiate  this  clause,  I  guess,  as  I  doubt  it’s  a  deal  breaker  since  often  especially  in  radio,  the  stations  and  broadcasters  aren’t  banking  on  further  income  from  your  work.  For  some  reason  the  contracts are not drawn with that in mind.     Basically what that means is that it’s important that you know what  kind of contracts are involved and what are the policies. Just because  I  have  said  many  times  in  the  previous  paragraphs  that  in  all  probability  a  non‐commercial  usage  of  your  production  would  not  create problems, doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t know what you are  dealing with. And I can’t promise to you that there definitely won’t be  trouble.  One  thing  that  you  can  learn  more  about  is  the  idea  of  Creative  Commons.  Creative  Commons  licences  are  part  of  copyrights,  only  with  them  you  can  release  some  rights  so  that  people can use your content just like you can use the content that has  been  licensed  in  this  same  way.  I  personally  wouldn’t  mind  seeing  these  licences  used  more  by  universities  and  even  radio  stations,  which  could  release  some  rights  after  the  first  broadcasting  of  the  content, but that is not a very common practice at this point in time.     But whatever is the case with your legal rights to your production, I’d  encourage  you  to  upload  it  online  to  your  blog.  It’s  your  demo  tape 

[  61  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

and  a  proof  of  the  standard  of  your  production  work.  No  corporate  lawyer  will  realistically  bother  you  for  having  it  there,  because  no  one is losing revenue in the process. At this point, that is what it all  comes  down  to.  Everyone  needs  to  pay  the  bills  and  how  does  this  kind of audio content support that?    In the next segment, we look into how important all of this really is –  I mean who even cares about the radio documentaries anyway?                                         

[  62  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Re‐thinking everything
…after the basics, where to next?    We have now spent a considerable time pondering different aspects  of  documentary  and  feature  production.  Disproportionate  amount  really  when  you  consider  how  few  and  far  in  between  they  are  in  many radios, you might think. And maybe you’d be right. Maybe.     I  was  reading  a  radio  production  book  aimed  at  students  much  like  what I have had in mind when I’ve been writing this. That book said –  and  its  author  was  a  very  respectable  academic  with  strong  media  industry  qualifications  –  that  documentaries  are  a  bit  like  features,  which  had  been  explored  to  some  extent  earlier,  but  that  they  are  basically so rare in radio that they were hardly worth getting into.     So what kicks do I get  from wasting your time talking about a dead  craft?    I  always  tell  my  students  that  studying  radio  is  really  about  two  different things: what radio is in the real world industry and how it is  produced,  which  I  believe  include  where  it  comes  from,  but  also,  where  it  might  be  going.  What  is  its  potential?  Is  it  fundamental  characteristics of radio that nearly everything but popular music and  bad jokes are out of bounds? Is radio living up to its true potential?    Needless  to  say  that  since  nothing  is  perfect,  everything  can  be  improved. Being a student, especially in a university, you may end up,  I hope, working in a position where you can contribute to the positive  [  63  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

change.  Whatever  you  conceive  the  positive  to  be.  I  have  said  it  before but it’s worth repeating; I am not judging music, or any other  kind of radio here. I really like music radio especially when it is done  well, and I have certainly worked a lot for stations like that. So when I  say  positive  change,  I  don’t  mean  change  the  whole  style  of  the  station, even if you were in a position to do so; just improve it.      It’s  of  course  also  noteworthy  that  I  have  called  these  kind  of  documentaries and features by the name of content based audio. Not  radio, but audio, because since the internet connections have become  common and fast enough, the online environment is as good place as  any  for  what  was  previously  considered  to  be  exclusively  radio  content. And when online, but also on‐air, we can also reconsider the  political economy of this kind of content. In other words who will pay  you  for  doing  these,  will  determine  why  you  might  find  yourself  producing them.    Let’s start from the traditional radio. Over the air FM, AM, Digital and  so on.    I guess there can be many reasons why you don’t get that much pre‐ packaged content on popular radio. The stations may be understaffed  and employees under constant deadlines, they may have realised that  you can do without these by just playing music; they are not the most  cost‐effective way to fill the hour clock,  or maybe no one just came  up  with  a  good  enough  way  of  using  these  methods  for  something  suitable.  We  think  of  longish  and  arguably  boring  pieces  about  politics  or  so,  but  who  says  that  they  couldn’t  be  short  few  minutes 

[  64  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

things  about  pop  singers,  festivals  or  films.  And  maybe  it  is  exactly  the occasional film review that might be one of the surviving ways of  utilising  the  skills  we’ve  been  talking  about.  Of  course,  there’s  also  many  talk  radios  that  use  features  as  they  are,  and  even  documentaries  as  part  of  their  standard  broadcast.  Sometimes  they  sound  great,  but  more  often,  you  feel  that  a  little  bit  more  money  invested  could’ve  afforded  enough  time  and  effort  to  have  made  it  great.  I’d  venture  a  guess  –  some  would  say  an  educated  guess,  but  who  knows  –  that  it’s  exactly  the  shortage  of  that  money  and  resources  that  the  lack  of  such  content  can  be  attributed  to.  Rather  than, say, it’s inherently useless.     I’ve always felt that the advertising industry could use the methods of  documentary making into their advantage much more than what they  do. The adverts are a different craft where an idea or a feel or some  information  is  crammed  into  thirty  seconds  in  order  to  convince  people to pay money to someone. But there are places in radio where  even  a  little  longer  bit  of  audio  could  actually  communicate  a  lot  more. The only problem with on‐air radio would become the price of  this – it would exclude most businesses instantly.     In  an  online  environment,  I  am  much  more  comfortable  saying  that  why  wouldn’t  you  use  pre‐packaged  audio  as  a  part  of  your  promotion? I say that because the online environment is much more  inclusive to businesses, organisations and individuals of any calibre.      You  can  be  a  poet  or  brick  layer,  a  hair  dresser  or  a  troubadour,  a  gangsta rapper or philosopher, a politician or photographer. And you 

[  65  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

don’t have to be just a person who represents his or her own self, but  you  can  also  do  this  for  a  shop,  record  label,  club,  sports  team  or  a  university.  Take  control  of  your  communication  online.  You  can  use  these  techniques  for  making  engaging  audio  newsletters  for  organisations, actually interesting yearly reviews for businesses in an  audio format or just build hype around a forthcoming Rap album.    Podcasting, which always is pre‐recorded, for instance can be used to  keep  people  up  to  date  with  what  anyone  or  any  organisation  is  doing.     And why wouldn’t an NGO want to have a documentary made out of  the  work  they  do,  interviewing  people  from  the  communities  they  help,  employees  and  volunteers  or  other  relevant  people  with  some  lovely colourful audio to support the all around feel of their work? I  think  it’d  sound  like  exactly  the  kind  of  thing  that  their  funders,  internationally  or  locally  would  love  to  receive  and  feel  that  their  money  is  going  to  a  worthy  cause.  Maybe  the  documentary  could  even  convince  a  few  new  funders  to  part  with  their  money  for  the  cause.  And  the  reason  why  audio  can  be  nice  to  use  for  this  kind  of  thing is also that it’s a lot cheaper to do a professional quality audio  content than its equivalent in video.     In the Internet your small or big features and documentaries have a  whole different function and political economy; in all probability you  are not trying to sell them, but avail them for free while trying to sell,  or  communicate  something  else.  Thinking  purely  financially,  then,  there might just be a way for you to find some income from all this. 

[  66  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Because you are the one who knows how to do these things unlike all  those politicians, musicians and other potential users of such content  in the Internet.     The  additional  thing  that  is  enabled  by  the  Internet  technologies  is  for  you  to  access  international  radio  stations.  You  might  be  doing  documentaries  in  South  Africa,  but  no  South  African  broadcaster  would  show  any  interest  in  them.  Then  you  can  Google  the  international  broadcasters  from  any  country  that  could  have  someone  suitable  broadcasting  in  the  language  you’ve  made  your  piece in and you could try to approach them. They will probably even  pay better, or at least there’s a chance for it, if they want to buy some  content  from  you.  All  of  the  sudden  this  broadens  your  potential  market into nearly a global one. This way you might be able to even  as  a  freelancer  keep  yourself  busy  and  the  bills  paid.  With  a  bit  of  luck,  but  mainly  good  products,  punctuality  and  firm  but  polite  manners you can be able to build relationships overseas that can be  incredibly useful for your career, and trading can become ongoing.    There  are  ways  of  using  these  skills  creatively.  Creativity  exactly  is  the key word when it comes to figuring out some new ideas that can  change  things.  It  is  not,  however  something  that  everyone  needs  to  do. There’s still some need for this material in the traditional radio as  well.  And  knowing  how  to  do  this;  being  able  to  visualise  the  production  process  and  understanding  the  practices,  will  only  help  you in nearly everything that you do in media. There is a lot involved  here; being able to identify the relevant information and being able to  critically  engage  with  it,  thinking  about  angles  and  putting  things 

[  67  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

together so that it makes sense. Most of all, I hope this teaches you to  not  be  afraid  to  work  hard  in  order  to  be  able  to  get  better  end  results. You can get a nice interview arranged with a bit of fluke, but  other than that it doesn’t happen without some dedication and effort.                                                 

[  68  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

Last words 
  My disclaimer for this e‐book has been that these are just ideas – not  the truth. I don’t particularly believe in the truth, even though I know  some things are true. Without questioning these ideas don’t probably  have much value as they need to be applied so that they match with  what you are trying to achieve. I wish that you have gained a sense of  how to approach working with content based audio and some ideas  how to think about it rather than just a checklist of things to do. You  know, the whole difference between giving one a fish or a fishing rod.  I also hope that you will think about radio, or any media not just as  what it is but what it could be.     When  it  comes  to  documentaries,  features  and  such  there  is  not  really a right or wrong way to do it – at least not any universal ones.  This  e‐book  has  been  about  sharing  ideas  and  introducing  considerations  for  you  to  find  how  you  would  be  able  to  best  do  it.  But  reading  this  text  is  not  about  doing;  it’s  only  helping  you  to  get  started.    So go out – to the real world – and do it. Keep an open mind and try  something out. Record beautiful and interesting audio, talk to people,  find out, learn, experience, grow and share. You can’t do it in theory  only, so go and create something in practice.   

   
[  69  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

About me. 
  Sometimes  people  say  about  the  author,  but  in  the  spirit  of  Michel  Foucault, I am not really the author of  this  text.  I  wrote  it,  yes,  but  I  can  hardly claim that these ideas originate  from  me  –  most  of  them  I’ve  learned  either  from  other  people  or  from  my  experiences.  All  the  ideas  here  are  building  on  the  tradition  of  broadcasting  and  I  am,  and  have  been  one  small  link  in  that  continuum.  I’ve  seen, heard and been told, it has filtered through my own experiences  and  practices,  I’ve  thought  and  theorised  based  on  the  thoughts  of  others’,  I  have  interpreted,  summarised  and  structured  an  idea  around  a  bank  of  knowledge.  I  am  not  the  banker  –  I  only  have  an  account.    I’ve been involved with radio for over a decade. After having done my  first  broadcasts  on  what  could  only  be  described  as  a  community  station, although it officially isn’t one, I hosted and produced a daily  evening show on hit radio station in my home country, Finland.     In  England  I  worked  as  technical  operator  and  a  member  of  the  promotional  team  for  a  rock  station  as  it  was  being  launched  This  I  did while studying my BA and Honours Degrees at the University of  Central England (now known as Birmingham City University).   [  70  ] 

Thinking and doing: content based audio | Mikko Kapanen

  I’ve  worked  and  volunteered  for  a  few  years  for  one  of  the  Africa’s  oldest community stations.    I’ve  co‐ran  an  audio  production  company  that  produced  documentaries and other content for SAfm amongst others.    I produced labour news for SABC’s Channel Africa and several other  African Public Broadcasters.    At the University of Cape Town I have taught radio students as well  studied for my Masters Degree.      I’m a blogger and a keen photographer.     There  is  also  one  person  who  calls  me  a  husband  and  another  who  calls  me  isi  –  that’s  dad  in  Finnish.  It  is  to  these  two  people  that  I  extend my thanks.     Mikko Kapanen, 2010. 

[  71  ]