A PERMANENT

CULTURE OF
GIVING
We invite you to join other generous music lovers in supporting
the Greensboro Symphony by making a leadership gift to the
Endowment, allowing our Symphony to:

Attract the very finest Bring vibrancy
guest artists and and quality of life
musicians to the Triad to our citizens

Provide outstanding Create increased music
musical offerings of a education opportunities
diverse nature for young audiences

TRUSTEES:
Lisa Bullock, Chairman; Sally B. Cone; Robert Harris, Jr.; A. Robinson Hassell; Ann Elizabeth Kroupa; Lee Lloyd; Lewis R. Ritchie; William Rogers, Ph.D.; Jonathan Smith
HISTORY

A STORIED
TRADITION
The seeds of the Greensboro Symphony Endowment Fund (GSEF) were planted in 1985 by Sympho-
ny Guild President, Rachel Hull Galyon. Under her leadership, the Guild raised an additional $50,000
during the 1985-1986 season to contribute toward endowing the $250,000 Concertmaster’s Chair,
completed in 1995, marking the official launch of the GSEF. The leadership torch was passed to Guild
member Caroline M. Lee, who devoted more than twenty years to the development and growth of
the fund.

In 1995, Guild member Kay Edwards and GSO Board Member Maurice Jennings launched a success-
ful campaign to surpass the GSEF’s $1 million milestone. During the 2001-2002 season, the fund
surpassed $2.5 million with a special initiative spearheaded by Caroline Lee. In 2001, Barbara Cone
led a secret campaign undertaken by Endowment donors to establish the Associate Concertmaster’s
Chair in honor of Caroline M. Lee. Since 2006, Cathy and Garson Rice have served as co-chairs of the
Endowment Committee. The Fund itself recently surpassed $4.5 million in 2014 and provides an
annual gift to the Symphony to help support its operating budget.

$5

GROWTH OF THE ENDOWMENT
$4

$3
MILLIONS

$2

$1

’85 ’95 ’97 ’99 ’01 ’03 ’05 ’07 ’09 ’11 ’13
YEAR

ABOUT THE GREENSBORO SYMPHONY
Since 1958, the Greensboro Symphony has been entertaining and educating our families with incredible
music. In addition to its diverse Masterworks, POPS and Chamber series, the Symphony also supports
award-winning education programs which reach more than 50,000 students in pre-kindergarten through
high school in Guilford, Rockingham, Randolph and Alamance counties.
GIVING

CREATE A
LEGACY
By investing in the Greensboro Symphony’s Endowment Fund, you leave a lasting, personal legacy,
ensuring that future generations may experience the same joy and wonder of orchestral music as
you. Investing in the Endowment allows you to enhance our mission of world-class music and music
education programs in an enduring way. There are two primary ways to give:

GIVING TODAY

Endowed Chairs: Endowing a Chair permanently ties your name to a specific seat and instrument
within the orchestra. Gifts can range from $40,000 - $500,000 depending on the type of Chair and
are recognized in perpetuity. Chairs can be upgraded over time.

Named Funds: Ranging from $10,000 - $39,999, these funds serve as an excellent entry to Endow-
ment giving. Named Funds can later be upgraded to Endowed Chairs.

PLANNED GIVING
The Heritage Society (Bequests): One of the simplest ways to give. When the Greensboro Sympho-
ny is listed as a beneficiary from your estate, your estate avoids costly taxes by receiving a charitable
estate tax deduction when the gift is made. Anyone in any tax bracket can leave bequests.

Charitable Remainder Trusts: Throughout your trust’s term, you receive payouts annually and
avoid capital gains tax. The remainder of the trust is given to us at the end of the term. Charitable
remainder trusts are beneficial for donors who have valuable, appreciated assets and want to turn
them into income on which to live.

Life Insurance Policies: If a life insurance policy is no longer needed for your family, you can name
the Greensboro Symphony as a beneficiary. The premium becomes an annual gift to us and is eligible
for an income tax deduction.

No matter how you decide to make a donation, consult with a professional beforehand about how you can
meet both your financial and your philanthropic goals.
FAQ

WHAT IS THE
SYMPHONY
ENDOWMENT?
The Endowment is a permanent fund How is the fund invested? May my named fund or Endowed Chair be
invested by trustees that provides annu- Funds contributed to the Endowment given in honor or as a memorial?
al support to the Symphony. are jointly managed by the Community Absolutely. Your Endowed Chair may
Foundation of Greater Greensboro and honor your family name or the name of
What is the purpose of the Endowment? other outside investment managers, a special person whom you wish to hon-
The Endowment provides an annual both governed by boards independent of or permanently. The concert playbill,
distribution that supports the continua- the Symphony. the Endowment brochure and the rec-
tion and development of the Symphony
ognition column at the Steven Tanger
and its programs. How is my contribution recognized? Center always list, with gratitude and
Every concert playbill lists the names of pride, our generous patrons.
What are the benefits of giving? all generous Endowment contributors.
When giving to the Endowment, you Patrons of Named Funds and Endowed What is the Heritage Society?
personally become a partner and per- Chairs are permanently recognized in The Heritage Society includes those who
manent supporter of the education and the playbill and will be permanently have provided bequests in their wills to
entertainment at which the Symphony displayed in the Steven Tanger Center the Greensboro Symphony Endowment
excels. Federal and state tax laws offer for the Performing Arts. Fund.
advantages to those who give.
How do I complete my gift? How do I find out more information?
What are the levels of Major Gifts? You may give either the full amount Contact Lisa Crawford, President &
Endowment levels begin at the $10,000 immediately or pay in installments over CEO at 336-335-5456 x222 for more
level with Named Funds. Endowed five years. When one-third is given, you information on ways to make a last-
Chairs vary from $40,000 Section may choose your Chair and enjoy the ing difference through the Greensboro
Chairs up to $500,000 podiums. privileges and recognition that accom- Symphony Endowment Fund.
How does the fund compare with similarly panies your generous gift.
sized symphony orchestras?
See chart below

Annual Budget ($ millions)
Endowment Size ($ millions)
5.67
4.52 4.02
1.81 1.99 1.85 1.88 1.78 1.73 1.57

Greensboro Symphony Orchestra A Orchestra B Orchestra C Orchestra D
INVEST IN A
LIFETIME OF
MUSIC
A guide to available chairs
CHAIRS BY SECTION CHAIRS BY NAME
Unavailable Available
MAESTRO’S PODIUM $���,��� Richard Kelly Bowles, Jr. Jimmie Irene Johnson Frederick Kent Wilkins
Endowed by bequest Memorial Chair Memorial Chair Memorial Chair
by Louise H. and R. Kelly Bowles by Dr. Harry W. Johnson and Family by Kaye Andrews Wilkins and Children
MAESTRO’S PODIUM EMERITUS
CHAIR $���,���
Family Foundation Mary Ellen and Elizabeth Betty F. and Robert P.
Milton J. Jackson Memorial Chair Brough-Webber Chair Anne Kavanagh Chair Williams Chair
by Lenora W. Jackson by Elizabeth Brough Webber by Ellen C. and B. John Kavanagh Thomas E. and Elaine R.
and William R. Webber Preston Wylie Keith and Martha Wright Chair
YOUTH ORCHESTRA
CONDUCTOR’S CHAIR $���,��� Lillian Daley Brown Memorial Chair Elizabeth Allred Keith Chair
NAMED FUNDS: $��,���- $��,���
� CHAIR AVAILABLE by the Massey Trust through by Dr. Preston Keith and Marty Keith
Nancy C. and Alex S. Brown, Jr. Anonymous
CONCERTMASTER’S Janie C. and E. Kemp Reece Chair Mr. and Mrs. Thaddeus A. Adams, III
CHAIR $���,��� Willie and Lisa Bullock Chair Walter W. King, Jr. Memorial Chair Dorothy B. and T. Clyde Collins
Greensboro Symphony Guild by Willie and Lisa Bullock by Elizabeth Yates King Marion Stedman Covington
Mr. Lenoir Chambers Joyce C. Kiser Memorial Chair Amelia Tatum Daniel Memorial
THE DISTINGUISHED GUEST
ARTIST PIANO CHAIR $���,��� Memorial Chair by Mose Kiser, Jr. and Family by Samuel Cameron Tatum
In honor of Linda M. Jones by Mr. Lenoir Chambers Wright Warren Moore and Anne Moore Diaz
Kroupa Family Chair
John E. and Martha S. Memorial by Jean Paul Moore
THE YOUTH PHILHARMONIC by Bob and Ann Kroupa
Chandler Chair George W. and Anna B. Dickieson
CHAIR $���,��� Barbara B. and Robert E.
In honor of Dr. Jean B. Brooks. Barbara S. and Herman Kay Bryan Edwards by KPB Corporation
Lavietes Chair Ronda Ellen and Kenneth Kornfeld
Cone, Jr. Chair
ASSOCIATE CONCERTMASTER’S by Donna M. and Herman Cone III C. Scott Lee Chair Mrs. E. Pierpoint Gill
CHAIR $���,��� by Caroline M. and N. Clayton Lee
Elaine Wolf Cone Memorial Chair Herbert and Mary Frances Hazelman
In Honor of Caroline M. Lee
by Barbara S. and Herman Cone, Jr. Alice Mae and William M. Lineberry Michel Family Foundation
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER’S Memorial Chair In honor of Sally Millikin by Steve Millikin
CHAIR $���,��� Richard and Danahy Family Chair by Helen H. and Albert S. Lineberry, Sr.
by Mary C. Richard Danahy and Dr. E. Phillip Morgan Memorial
Beverly Cooper Moore and by Inga Borgstorm Morgan,
Patrick Danahy R. Bradford Lloyd Chair
Irene Mitchell Moore Chair Kent and Carolyn Morgan
by Mary Ruth and Robert B. Lloyd, Jr.
George W. Dickieson Chair Carolyn and Harold O’Tuel
PREMIUM PRINCIPAL CHAIR The Michael and Anna Lodico Chair
$���,���
GSO Conductor 1951-1963 Doris R. Preyer,
by Anna B. Dickieson by Flo and Bill Snider
Fraser Family Chair Trustee William Y. Preyer, Jr. CLU
by Susan and Bill Fraser Lucy and Clark Dixon Joy C. Morrison Chair Lynn R. and Karl E. Prickett Fund
Memorial Chair by William H. Morrison, Jr. Mr. And Mrs. J. W. Werner, Jr.
Eleanor Downes Mewborn Chair
In Memory of Carolyn Riddle Downes by Jack C. Dixon Carole Swope Monroe Chair
HERITAGE SOCIETY
Marie C. and Ed Faulkner Chair by Edwin Brent Monroe
PRINCIPAL CHAIRS · $��,��� The Heritage Society is composed of those
by Marie C. and Ed Faulkner Alice Wilson Pearce Chair who provided bequests in their wills to the
Kathleen Price Bryan
Memorial Chair Dorothy G. Frank Chair by Woody Pearce Greensboro Symphony Endowment Fund. Gifts
by Stanley M. Frank may be in honor or as a memorial.
by Kay Bryan Edwards and Family Ethel Clay Price Memorial Chair
by Kathleen Price Bryan Family Fund Anonymous Bequests
Peter B. Bush Memorial Chair Hughlene Bostian Frank and
William Allen Frank Chair Nan and John Bayersdorfer
Violin Percussion Flute Clarinet Bassoon Horn Timpani Viola Cello Tuba Bass Conductor by Mary Ann Bush and Children Lynn R. Prickett Memorial Chair
Anne Rendleman Daniel
Irene Mitchell Moore and James Autha Freeze by the Lynn R. and Karl E. Prickett Fund
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Guirlinger
Beverly Cooper Moore Chair Memorial Chair Royce O. Reynolds Chair
by J. Thurman and Peg Freeze Claire Kelleher
by Jane W. Reynolds
ASSOCIATE AND ASSISTANT Pearl E. and Robert A. Kraay
PRINCIPAL CHAIRS · $��,��� Greensboro Opera Company Chair Dr. William R. and Beverley C. E. Joseph LeBauer
Kay Bryan Edwards Chair by Peggy and Phil Johnson Rogers Chair Sam and Joan LeBauer

GIVING OPTIONS by Joseph M. Bryan, Jr.
Jeanne Maxwell Hassell Chair
by Charles M. Hassell
Lynn Carroll Haley Chair
by Michael W. Haley
Joan T. and William L.
David Vincent Sherman Chair
by Ann, Beth and Becky Sherman
Sidney J. Stern, Jr. Memorial Chair
Caroline M. and N. Clayton Lee
Susan and Dale Miller
Roy E. and Christine P. Rizzo
Carolyn J. Maness Chair Hemphill Chair by Katherine G. Stern Kitty and George Robison
by John R. Maness Sally London Hobbs Ellen and Gary Taft Chair Connie and Robin Saul
$275,000 $80,000 - $100,000 $60,000 $40,000 $10,000 - $39,999 Garson L. Rice, Jr. Chair Memorial Chair Florence G. Young
by Johnnye and J. T. Hunter Richard W. and Carlotta M.
Youth Orchestra Principal Chairs (11) Associate & Assistant Section Chairs (8) Named Funds (unlimited) by Catherine G. Rice and Children Treleaven Memorial Chair
Conductor’s Chair (1) Principal Chairs (2) Rachel Smothers Hull and by Carl W. and Lina Z. Treleaven
SECTION CHAIRS · $��,���
Worth Brantley Hull Chair
Austin Family Chair
by Patricia Austin Sevier Linda B. and Maurice
Jennings Chair
CHAIRS BY SECTION CHAIRS BY NAME
Unavailable Available
MAESTRO’S PODIUM $���,��� Richard Kelly Bowles, Jr. Jimmie Irene Johnson Frederick Kent Wilkins
Endowed by bequest Memorial Chair Memorial Chair Memorial Chair
by Louise H. and R. Kelly Bowles by Dr. Harry W. Johnson and Family by Kaye Andrews Wilkins and Children
MAESTRO’S PODIUM EMERITUS
CHAIR $���,���
Family Foundation Mary Ellen and Elizabeth Betty F. and Robert P.
Milton J. Jackson Memorial Chair Brough-Webber Chair Anne Kavanagh Chair Williams Chair
by Lenora W. Jackson by Elizabeth Brough Webber by Ellen C. and B. John Kavanagh Thomas E. and Elaine R.
and William R. Webber Preston Wylie Keith and Martha Wright Chair
YOUTH ORCHESTRA
CONDUCTOR’S CHAIR $���,��� Lillian Daley Brown Memorial Chair Elizabeth Allred Keith Chair
NAMED FUNDS: $��,���- $��,���
� CHAIR AVAILABLE by the Massey Trust through by Dr. Preston Keith and Marty Keith
Nancy C. and Alex S. Brown, Jr. Anonymous
CONCERTMASTER’S Janie C. and E. Kemp Reece Chair Mr. and Mrs. Thaddeus A. Adams, III
CHAIR $���,��� Willie and Lisa Bullock Chair Walter W. King, Jr. Memorial Chair Dorothy B. and T. Clyde Collins
Greensboro Symphony Guild by Willie and Lisa Bullock by Elizabeth Yates King Marion Stedman Covington
Mr. Lenoir Chambers Joyce C. Kiser Memorial Chair Amelia Tatum Daniel Memorial
THE DISTINGUISHED GUEST
ARTIST PIANO CHAIR $���,��� Memorial Chair by Mose Kiser, Jr. and Family by Samuel Cameron Tatum
In honor of Linda M. Jones by Mr. Lenoir Chambers Wright Warren Moore and Anne Moore Diaz
Kroupa Family Chair
John E. and Martha S. Memorial by Jean Paul Moore
THE YOUTH PHILHARMONIC by Bob and Ann Kroupa
Chandler Chair George W. and Anna B. Dickieson
CHAIR $���,��� Barbara B. and Robert E.
In honor of Dr. Jean B. Brooks. Barbara S. and Herman Kay Bryan Edwards by KPB Corporation
Lavietes Chair Ronda Ellen and Kenneth Kornfeld
Cone, Jr. Chair
ASSOCIATE CONCERTMASTER’S by Donna M. and Herman Cone III C. Scott Lee Chair Mrs. E. Pierpoint Gill
CHAIR $���,��� by Caroline M. and N. Clayton Lee
Elaine Wolf Cone Memorial Chair Herbert and Mary Frances Hazelman
In Honor of Caroline M. Lee
by Barbara S. and Herman Cone, Jr. Alice Mae and William M. Lineberry Michel Family Foundation
ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER’S Memorial Chair In honor of Sally Millikin by Steve Millikin
CHAIR $���,��� Richard and Danahy Family Chair by Helen H. and Albert S. Lineberry, Sr.
by Mary C. Richard Danahy and Dr. E. Phillip Morgan Memorial
Beverly Cooper Moore and by Inga Borgstorm Morgan,
Patrick Danahy R. Bradford Lloyd Chair
Irene Mitchell Moore Chair Kent and Carolyn Morgan
by Mary Ruth and Robert B. Lloyd, Jr.
George W. Dickieson Chair Carolyn and Harold O’Tuel
PREMIUM PRINCIPAL CHAIR The Michael and Anna Lodico Chair
$���,���
GSO Conductor 1951-1963 Doris R. Preyer,
by Anna B. Dickieson by Flo and Bill Snider
Fraser Family Chair Trustee William Y. Preyer, Jr. CLU
by Susan and Bill Fraser Lucy and Clark Dixon Joy C. Morrison Chair Lynn R. and Karl E. Prickett Fund
Memorial Chair by William H. Morrison, Jr. Mr. And Mrs. J. W. Werner, Jr.
Eleanor Downes Mewborn Chair
In Memory of Carolyn Riddle Downes by Jack C. Dixon Carole Swope Monroe Chair
HERITAGE SOCIETY
Marie C. and Ed Faulkner Chair by Edwin Brent Monroe
PRINCIPAL CHAIRS · $��,��� The Heritage Society is composed of those
by Marie C. and Ed Faulkner Alice Wilson Pearce Chair who provided bequests in their wills to the
Kathleen Price Bryan
Memorial Chair Dorothy G. Frank Chair by Woody Pearce Greensboro Symphony Endowment Fund. Gifts
by Stanley M. Frank may be in honor or as a memorial.
by Kay Bryan Edwards and Family Ethel Clay Price Memorial Chair
by Kathleen Price Bryan Family Fund Anonymous Bequests
Peter B. Bush Memorial Chair Hughlene Bostian Frank and
William Allen Frank Chair Nan and John Bayersdorfer
Violin Percussion Flute Clarinet Bassoon Horn Timpani Viola Cello Tuba Bass Conductor by Mary Ann Bush and Children Lynn R. Prickett Memorial Chair
Anne Rendleman Daniel
Irene Mitchell Moore and James Autha Freeze by the Lynn R. and Karl E. Prickett Fund
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Guirlinger
Beverly Cooper Moore Chair Memorial Chair Royce O. Reynolds Chair
by J. Thurman and Peg Freeze Claire Kelleher
by Jane W. Reynolds
ASSOCIATE AND ASSISTANT Pearl E. and Robert A. Kraay
PRINCIPAL CHAIRS · $��,��� Greensboro Opera Company Chair Dr. William R. and Beverley C. E. Joseph LeBauer
Kay Bryan Edwards Chair by Peggy and Phil Johnson Rogers Chair Sam and Joan LeBauer

GIVING OPTIONS by Joseph M. Bryan, Jr.
Jeanne Maxwell Hassell Chair
by Charles M. Hassell
Lynn Carroll Haley Chair
by Michael W. Haley
Joan T. and William L.
David Vincent Sherman Chair
by Ann, Beth and Becky Sherman
Sidney J. Stern, Jr. Memorial Chair
Caroline M. and N. Clayton Lee
Susan and Dale Miller
Roy E. and Christine P. Rizzo
Carolyn J. Maness Chair Hemphill Chair by Katherine G. Stern Kitty and George Robison
by John R. Maness Sally London Hobbs Ellen and Gary Taft Chair Connie and Robin Saul
$275,000 $80,000 - $100,000 $60,000 $40,000 $10,000 - $39,999 Garson L. Rice, Jr. Chair Memorial Chair Florence G. Young
by Johnnye and J. T. Hunter Richard W. and Carlotta M.
Youth Orchestra Principal Chairs (11) Associate & Assistant Section Chairs (8) Named Funds (unlimited) by Catherine G. Rice and Children Treleaven Memorial Chair
Conductor’s Chair (1) Principal Chairs (2) Rachel Smothers Hull and by Carl W. and Lina Z. Treleaven
SECTION CHAIRS · $��,���
Worth Brantley Hull Chair
Austin Family Chair
by Patricia Austin Sevier Linda B. and Maurice
Jennings Chair
Five
Endowed
MARY CAROL & PAT DANAHY
Few would argue the tremendous impact of
Mary Carol and Pat Danahy on Greensboro.
HUGHLENE & BILL FRANK
Testimonies to the power of educational outreach, Hughlene and
Bill Frank’s lives were transformed by early musical experiences.
Chairs
A R
s past President of the Greens- are made by families rather than business fac- aised in a small town of 1,500, because it was our introduction to the cultur-
boro Partnership and former CEO tors, because there is something special about Hughlene played in her high al life of Greensboro,” says Hughlene. “It was,
of Cone Mills, Pat has been a local the community itself,” he says. school band and studied piano and still is, an organization that reached out
leader for decades, and both he The Danahy’s believe that the Endowment under a Julliard graduate. How- into the community and functioned as the
and Mary Carol have served as trustees, board provides not only sustainable funding, but a ever, she remembers her true interest in foundation of what Greensboro stands for as
members and volunteers for colleges, arts sense of community for those participating. music awakening following an outreach per- a city.”
organizations and institutes across the city. “We spent many evenings with five or six oth- formance by the North Carolina Symphony. After developing a network of friends cen-
With his support role in economic devel- er couples who contributed to the Fund—it “While Bill grew to love music through his tered around the Symphony Guild and the
opment, Pat regularly witnesses the Sympho- was a very close-knit group,” says Mary Car- parents, that particular performance was Endowment, the Franks wanted to make a
ny’s unique value. “It adds a cultural aspect ol. “Some of our most interesting and enjoy- instrumental in introducing me to classical difference in a meaningful way. “It was a circle
that is irreplaceable,” says Pat. “The arts are able musical experiences have resulted from symphonic music,” she says. “The Greensboro of friends helping a very worthy cause that
an important element when businesses look Symphony Endowment events,” agree Pat Symphony does the same in the surrounding makes a tremendous difference in our com- Five Endowed Chairs who have helped ensure the continued
to attract the work force they need, and they and Mary Carol, citing a recent event where areas. It brings awareness—exactly what that munity,” she says. “Once you have contribut- success of the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra.
make a statement about our community’s Chairs sat onstage during a rehearsal. “Once concert did for me in my small town.” ed to the Endowment Fund, your excitement
values.” Pat also indicates that cultural ame- you invest in an Endowment, you become The GSO made a similarly strong impres- about what is happening at the Symphony
nities impact not only recruitment, but larger committed to and involved in that organiza- sion when the Franks married and began just continues to grow. And you never know
business decisions. “Many decisions about tion,” they say. “And being involved is much their lives here in 1970. “It stands out for us who you are touching.”
expanding or keeping a corporation in a city more rewarding than just writing a check.”
CATHY & GARSON L. RICE, JR. ANN & ROBERT KROUPA SUSAN & BILL FRASER
For Garson Rice, the presence of a vibrant arts community in “We believe music is unique in its ability to unite an entire community,” Susan and Bill Fraser are shining examples of support
Greensboro means “the difference between existing and living.” say longtime Symphony supporters Ann and Bob Kroupa. for the Greensboro Symphony.

T M B
hough originally spoken by his munities, they look at workforce and proper- usic is the universal language community,” says Ann. “We need to stress eginning as subscribers, Bill joined the Symphony’s distinctive role in that fabric.
father, Cathy and Garson Rice have ty values and tax packages—but I think they and can help create a city-wide that it is the customer, the audience, who you the Endowment’s Board of Trust- “How many cities Greensboro’s size have a
held to these words, serving as irre- also look at quality of life,” Garson says. “It dialogue,” says Ann. Bob refer- work for—but we all do it together, excellent ees in 1995 and quickly became Symphony Orchestra of our stature? I would
placeable leaders for the Greens- keeps the community alive and vibrant.” ences the Symphony’s educa- each in our own part. That is what the Sym- Chairman in 1996. The Frasers think that we are pretty unusual. It sets a tone
boro Symphony for more than a decade. Given as a surprise by his family, the Gar- tion programs as an excellent example. “To phony represents.” voluntarily increase their annual contribu- in our community—we have a fabulous arts
Helping Dmitry Sitkovetsky establish the son L. Rice, Jr. Chair was an Endowment gift watch children from all backgrounds come In addition to subscribing to all three tion to the Symphony on a regular basis, and presence here,” says Bill. From the Fraser’s
Rice Toyota Sitkovetsky and Friends Cham- of incredible meaning, both to Garson and to off the buses for performances—it is exciting concert series, the Kroupas gave to the just recently augmented their Endowment perspective, arts organizations in Greensboro
ber Series in 2004, Garson has served on the the Symphony. For Garson, it was a lasting to think they will all experience this event Endowment because they realized the civic gift—for the third time. “We like the idea of give both its residents and visitors a sense
Symphony’s Board of Directors for nine years, expression of his commitment to the arts, together.” significance of the Symphony and wanted to Endowments because they keep giving and that value is placed on the community, par-
and both Cathy and Garson act as Co-Chairs given lovingly by his wife and children. For Just like the children, the Kroupas believe help preserve it for future generations. “We giving over time,” says Bill. “It is crucial for ticularly when large organizations such as the
of the GSO Endowment Committee. “The arts the Symphony, it was a way to honor one of that the Greensboro community as a whole think it is wonderful to give to the Endow- any organization to have an Endowment as a Symphony can thrive. “The Symphony creates
add a special element to a community,” says its most ardent supporters—and an assur- can also learn from the orchestra. “The Sym- ment and see what it does for the Symphony base funding mechanism.” another reason to come to Greensboro, to
Garson. “They take you out of the humdrum, ance of future sustainability. “You are putting phony embodies in its very operating struc- and for Greensboro—it is our legacy, but we The Frasers recognize Greensboro as a city live in Greensboro, to work in Greensboro—a
every day existence.” back into the woodpile from which you have ture both leadership and teamwork. Each can also enjoy it now,” says Ann. “We are in that fervently supports the arts, and highlight very important reason,” says Bill.
Cathy and Garson firmly believe in the drawn for so many years and helping ensure musician needs to excel at his or her instru- the middle of a Greensboro Renaissance mov-
impact of the arts on Greensboro. “I think that future generations have that fuel for life,” ment, but cannot overshadow his or her ing into our future. We consider the Sympho-
that when large corporations come to com- Garson says. colleagues. It is the same in business or our ny an especially important part.”
CATHY & GARSON L. RICE, JR. ANN & ROBERT KROUPA SUSAN & BILL FRASER
For Garson Rice, the presence of a vibrant arts community in “We believe music is unique in its ability to unite an entire community,” Susan and Bill Fraser are shining examples of support
Greensboro means “the difference between existing and living.” say longtime Symphony supporters Ann and Bob Kroupa. for the Greensboro Symphony.

T M B
hough originally spoken by his munities, they look at workforce and proper- usic is the universal language community,” says Ann. “We need to stress eginning as subscribers, Bill joined the Symphony’s distinctive role in that fabric.
father, Cathy and Garson Rice have ty values and tax packages—but I think they and can help create a city-wide that it is the customer, the audience, who you the Endowment’s Board of Trust- “How many cities Greensboro’s size have a
held to these words, serving as irre- also look at quality of life,” Garson says. “It dialogue,” says Ann. Bob refer- work for—but we all do it together, excellent ees in 1995 and quickly became Symphony Orchestra of our stature? I would
placeable leaders for the Greens- keeps the community alive and vibrant.” ences the Symphony’s educa- each in our own part. That is what the Sym- Chairman in 1996. The Frasers think that we are pretty unusual. It sets a tone
boro Symphony for more than a decade. Given as a surprise by his family, the Gar- tion programs as an excellent example. “To phony represents.” voluntarily increase their annual contribu- in our community—we have a fabulous arts
Helping Dmitry Sitkovetsky establish the son L. Rice, Jr. Chair was an Endowment gift watch children from all backgrounds come In addition to subscribing to all three tion to the Symphony on a regular basis, and presence here,” says Bill. From the Fraser’s
Rice Toyota Sitkovetsky and Friends Cham- of incredible meaning, both to Garson and to off the buses for performances—it is exciting concert series, the Kroupas gave to the just recently augmented their Endowment perspective, arts organizations in Greensboro
ber Series in 2004, Garson has served on the the Symphony. For Garson, it was a lasting to think they will all experience this event Endowment because they realized the civic gift—for the third time. “We like the idea of give both its residents and visitors a sense
Symphony’s Board of Directors for nine years, expression of his commitment to the arts, together.” significance of the Symphony and wanted to Endowments because they keep giving and that value is placed on the community, par-
and both Cathy and Garson act as Co-Chairs given lovingly by his wife and children. For Just like the children, the Kroupas believe help preserve it for future generations. “We giving over time,” says Bill. “It is crucial for ticularly when large organizations such as the
of the GSO Endowment Committee. “The arts the Symphony, it was a way to honor one of that the Greensboro community as a whole think it is wonderful to give to the Endow- any organization to have an Endowment as a Symphony can thrive. “The Symphony creates
add a special element to a community,” says its most ardent supporters—and an assur- can also learn from the orchestra. “The Sym- ment and see what it does for the Symphony base funding mechanism.” another reason to come to Greensboro, to
Garson. “They take you out of the humdrum, ance of future sustainability. “You are putting phony embodies in its very operating struc- and for Greensboro—it is our legacy, but we The Frasers recognize Greensboro as a city live in Greensboro, to work in Greensboro—a
every day existence.” back into the woodpile from which you have ture both leadership and teamwork. Each can also enjoy it now,” says Ann. “We are in that fervently supports the arts, and highlight very important reason,” says Bill.
Cathy and Garson firmly believe in the drawn for so many years and helping ensure musician needs to excel at his or her instru- the middle of a Greensboro Renaissance mov-
impact of the arts on Greensboro. “I think that future generations have that fuel for life,” ment, but cannot overshadow his or her ing into our future. We consider the Sympho-
that when large corporations come to com- Garson says. colleagues. It is the same in business or our ny an especially important part.”
CATHY & GARSON L. RICE, JR. ANN & ROBERT KROUPA SUSAN & BILL FRASER
For Garson Rice, the presence of a vibrant arts community in “We believe music is unique in its ability to unite an entire community,” Susan and Bill Fraser are shining examples of support
Greensboro means “the difference between existing and living.” say longtime Symphony supporters Ann and Bob Kroupa. for the Greensboro Symphony.

T M B
hough originally spoken by his munities, they look at workforce and proper- usic is the universal language community,” says Ann. “We need to stress eginning as subscribers, Bill joined the Symphony’s distinctive role in that fabric.
father, Cathy and Garson Rice have ty values and tax packages—but I think they and can help create a city-wide that it is the customer, the audience, who you the Endowment’s Board of Trust- “How many cities Greensboro’s size have a
held to these words, serving as irre- also look at quality of life,” Garson says. “It dialogue,” says Ann. Bob refer- work for—but we all do it together, excellent ees in 1995 and quickly became Symphony Orchestra of our stature? I would
placeable leaders for the Greens- keeps the community alive and vibrant.” ences the Symphony’s educa- each in our own part. That is what the Sym- Chairman in 1996. The Frasers think that we are pretty unusual. It sets a tone
boro Symphony for more than a decade. Given as a surprise by his family, the Gar- tion programs as an excellent example. “To phony represents.” voluntarily increase their annual contribu- in our community—we have a fabulous arts
Helping Dmitry Sitkovetsky establish the son L. Rice, Jr. Chair was an Endowment gift watch children from all backgrounds come In addition to subscribing to all three tion to the Symphony on a regular basis, and presence here,” says Bill. From the Fraser’s
Rice Toyota Sitkovetsky and Friends Cham- of incredible meaning, both to Garson and to off the buses for performances—it is exciting concert series, the Kroupas gave to the just recently augmented their Endowment perspective, arts organizations in Greensboro
ber Series in 2004, Garson has served on the the Symphony. For Garson, it was a lasting to think they will all experience this event Endowment because they realized the civic gift—for the third time. “We like the idea of give both its residents and visitors a sense
Symphony’s Board of Directors for nine years, expression of his commitment to the arts, together.” significance of the Symphony and wanted to Endowments because they keep giving and that value is placed on the community, par-
and both Cathy and Garson act as Co-Chairs given lovingly by his wife and children. For Just like the children, the Kroupas believe help preserve it for future generations. “We giving over time,” says Bill. “It is crucial for ticularly when large organizations such as the
of the GSO Endowment Committee. “The arts the Symphony, it was a way to honor one of that the Greensboro community as a whole think it is wonderful to give to the Endow- any organization to have an Endowment as a Symphony can thrive. “The Symphony creates
add a special element to a community,” says its most ardent supporters—and an assur- can also learn from the orchestra. “The Sym- ment and see what it does for the Symphony base funding mechanism.” another reason to come to Greensboro, to
Garson. “They take you out of the humdrum, ance of future sustainability. “You are putting phony embodies in its very operating struc- and for Greensboro—it is our legacy, but we The Frasers recognize Greensboro as a city live in Greensboro, to work in Greensboro—a
every day existence.” back into the woodpile from which you have ture both leadership and teamwork. Each can also enjoy it now,” says Ann. “We are in that fervently supports the arts, and highlight very important reason,” says Bill.
Cathy and Garson firmly believe in the drawn for so many years and helping ensure musician needs to excel at his or her instru- the middle of a Greensboro Renaissance mov-
impact of the arts on Greensboro. “I think that future generations have that fuel for life,” ment, but cannot overshadow his or her ing into our future. We consider the Sympho-
that when large corporations come to com- Garson says. colleagues. It is the same in business or our ny an especially important part.”
Five
Endowed
MARY CAROL & PAT DANAHY
Few would argue the tremendous impact of
Mary Carol and Pat Danahy on Greensboro.
HUGHLENE & BILL FRANK
Testimonies to the power of educational outreach, Hughlene and
Bill Frank’s lives were transformed by early musical experiences.
Chairs
A R
s past President of the Greens- are made by families rather than business fac- aised in a small town of 1,500, because it was our introduction to the cultur-
boro Partnership and former CEO tors, because there is something special about Hughlene played in her high al life of Greensboro,” says Hughlene. “It was,
of Cone Mills, Pat has been a local the community itself,” he says. school band and studied piano and still is, an organization that reached out
leader for decades, and both he The Danahy’s believe that the Endowment under a Julliard graduate. How- into the community and functioned as the
and Mary Carol have served as trustees, board provides not only sustainable funding, but a ever, she remembers her true interest in foundation of what Greensboro stands for as
members and volunteers for colleges, arts sense of community for those participating. music awakening following an outreach per- a city.”
organizations and institutes across the city. “We spent many evenings with five or six oth- formance by the North Carolina Symphony. After developing a network of friends cen-
With his support role in economic devel- er couples who contributed to the Fund—it “While Bill grew to love music through his tered around the Symphony Guild and the
opment, Pat regularly witnesses the Sympho- was a very close-knit group,” says Mary Car- parents, that particular performance was Endowment, the Franks wanted to make a
ny’s unique value. “It adds a cultural aspect ol. “Some of our most interesting and enjoy- instrumental in introducing me to classical difference in a meaningful way. “It was a circle
that is irreplaceable,” says Pat. “The arts are able musical experiences have resulted from symphonic music,” she says. “The Greensboro of friends helping a very worthy cause that
an important element when businesses look Symphony Endowment events,” agree Pat Symphony does the same in the surrounding makes a tremendous difference in our com- Five Endowed Chairs who have helped ensure the continued
to attract the work force they need, and they and Mary Carol, citing a recent event where areas. It brings awareness—exactly what that munity,” she says. “Once you have contribut- success of the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra.
make a statement about our community’s Chairs sat onstage during a rehearsal. “Once concert did for me in my small town.” ed to the Endowment Fund, your excitement
values.” Pat also indicates that cultural ame- you invest in an Endowment, you become The GSO made a similarly strong impres- about what is happening at the Symphony
nities impact not only recruitment, but larger committed to and involved in that organiza- sion when the Franks married and began just continues to grow. And you never know
business decisions. “Many decisions about tion,” they say. “And being involved is much their lives here in 1970. “It stands out for us who you are touching.”
expanding or keeping a corporation in a city more rewarding than just writing a check.”
Five
Endowed
MARY CAROL & PAT DANAHY
Few would argue the tremendous impact of
Mary Carol and Pat Danahy on Greensboro.
HUGHLENE & BILL FRANK
Testimonies to the power of educational outreach, Hughlene and
Bill Frank’s lives were transformed by early musical experiences.
Chairs
A R
s past President of the Greens- are made by families rather than business fac- aised in a small town of 1,500, because it was our introduction to the cultur-
boro Partnership and former CEO tors, because there is something special about Hughlene played in her high al life of Greensboro,” says Hughlene. “It was,
of Cone Mills, Pat has been a local the community itself,” he says. school band and studied piano and still is, an organization that reached out
leader for decades, and both he The Danahy’s believe that the Endowment under a Julliard graduate. How- into the community and functioned as the
and Mary Carol have served as trustees, board provides not only sustainable funding, but a ever, she remembers her true interest in foundation of what Greensboro stands for as
members and volunteers for colleges, arts sense of community for those participating. music awakening following an outreach per- a city.”
organizations and institutes across the city. “We spent many evenings with five or six oth- formance by the North Carolina Symphony. After developing a network of friends cen-
With his support role in economic devel- er couples who contributed to the Fund—it “While Bill grew to love music through his tered around the Symphony Guild and the
opment, Pat regularly witnesses the Sympho- was a very close-knit group,” says Mary Car- parents, that particular performance was Endowment, the Franks wanted to make a
ny’s unique value. “It adds a cultural aspect ol. “Some of our most interesting and enjoy- instrumental in introducing me to classical difference in a meaningful way. “It was a circle
that is irreplaceable,” says Pat. “The arts are able musical experiences have resulted from symphonic music,” she says. “The Greensboro of friends helping a very worthy cause that
an important element when businesses look Symphony Endowment events,” agree Pat Symphony does the same in the surrounding makes a tremendous difference in our com- Five Endowed Chairs who have helped ensure the continued
to attract the work force they need, and they and Mary Carol, citing a recent event where areas. It brings awareness—exactly what that munity,” she says. “Once you have contribut- success of the Greensboro Symphony Orchestra.
make a statement about our community’s Chairs sat onstage during a rehearsal. “Once concert did for me in my small town.” ed to the Endowment Fund, your excitement
values.” Pat also indicates that cultural ame- you invest in an Endowment, you become The GSO made a similarly strong impres- about what is happening at the Symphony
nities impact not only recruitment, but larger committed to and involved in that organiza- sion when the Franks married and began just continues to grow. And you never know
business decisions. “Many decisions about tion,” they say. “And being involved is much their lives here in 1970. “It stands out for us who you are touching.”
expanding or keeping a corporation in a city more rewarding than just writing a check.”