HOMILETICS

Intro: Two parts of this subject: a. Theory b. Practicum Two important divisions in the theory: a. The preparation of the sermon b. The delivery of the sermon

A. THE PREPARATION OF THE SERMON
HOMILETICS DEFINED: The word homiletics is derived from the Greek word homilia and signifies either a mutual talk and conversation or a set discourse. The preachers in the early church were in the habit of calling their public discourse talks . Thus making it proper to speak of what is in the present day in some quarters called a Gospel Talk . From the word homilia has come the English word Homiletics , which has reference to that science or art or indeed both which deals with the structure of Christian discourse, embracing all that pertains to the preparation and delivery of sermons and Bible addresses. It shows how to prepare a sermon or Gospel address and how to deliver it effectively. Homiletics then is the art and science of preaching. Why is preaching important? 1. Because preaching is ordained of God as a means of spreading or making known the Gospel. Matt. 28: 18- 20; Mark 16: 15, 16; Rom. 1: 16 2. Preaching is bearing witness of the facts of the Gospel. Acts 1: 8; Luke 24: 45- 48 3. Faith cometh by hearing and hearing by the Word of God. Rom. 10: 14- 15, 17 4. The preaching of God s Word brings repentance and salvation in the hearts of men. Example: 1. The people of Nineveh repented at the preaching of Jonah. Jonah 3: 1- 10 2. Three thousand souls repented and were saved by the preaching of Peter on the day of Pentecost. Acts 2: 37- 40 5. Because when we preach, we feed the souls of men with the Words of God. Matt. 4: 4 6. Preaching the Word of God brought healing to the sick. Ps. 107: 20 7. Preaching God s Word brings deliverance to the captives. Luke 4: 18 What is the purpose of Preaching? 1. To declare the will and love of God to all mankind. Matt. 7: 21, John 3: 16 2. To proclaim the Gospel of Christ for the salvation of men. Matt. 28: 19, 20; Mark 16: 15, 16; Rom 1: 16; Eph. 2: 8 3. To warn the people of the coming judgment of God because of sin. Rom. 1: 17; Luke 13: 3 4. To edify and strengthen the faith of the people of God. Eph. 4: 12- 13 5. To rebuke, reprove, correct and exhort. 2Tim. 3: 16 6. To reach, guide, comfort and instruct. 7. To inspire, encourage, and indoctrinate. 8. To feed the flock of God. Matt. 4: 4; John 21: 15- 21 9. To call people to worship, honor and serve God.

THE PREACHER
A. THE PERSONALITY OF THE PREACHER Page | 1

Personality is defined as the sum total of traits necessary to describe what is to be in a person. It is the expression of our inner selves, the way in which we show ourselves o the world. In order to express ourselves, it is necessary to know ourselves, and next; to know clearly what it is we wish to express, and finally how express it. It has been said that truth and personality of the preacher has very much to do with the effectiveness of his message. It has been said that truth and personality are the fundamentals to all preaching. His life must correspond to his message. Therefore, the experience of truth must be in the preacher himself before he can proclaim it with convicting force in and through the sermon. B. MARKS OF A GOOD CHRISTIAN PERSONALITY: 1. He is clean in person. 2Cor. 5: 17 2. He is well groomed (hair). Ezek. 44: 20 3. He is a man of his word and action. Matt. 5: 37; James 5: 12 4. He is a man of good Christian conduct. 1Tim. 4: 12; Phil 4: 8 5. He is understanding and cooperative with others. 2Cor. 1: 24 6. He is a man of prayer. 1Thess. 5: 15 7. He loves people despite of their shortcomings. Matt. 22: 39 8. He does all things without murmuring and disputing. Phil. 2: 14 9. He never repays evil for evil. Rom. 12: 21 10. He rejoices in the Lord always. Phil. 4: 4 11. In everything he gives thanks. 1Thess. 5: 18 12. He loves the brethren and those of the household of faith. 1John 3: 14; Gal. 6: 10 13. He is ever forgiving of others mistakes and shortcomings. Col. 3: 13; Matt. 6: 14 14. He serves God above all things. Matt. 6: 33 15. He is considerate of others. Rom. 15: 1- 3 16. He is not proud in heart despite of the great achievements he made. Prov. 16: 19 17. He is humble and is willing enough to accept his limitations, faults, shortcomings. James. 4: 6- 10 18. He never compromises to the world and its evil fashions. Rom. 12: 2 19. He respects and honors those who are over him in the Lord. 1Thess. 5: 12, 13 20. He is faithful to God and the church. 21. He exercises self-discipline. 22. He is honest to himself and to others. OTHER IMPORTANT SUGGESTIONS: 1. One must carefully consider the spiritual needs of the people to whom one is ministering. 2. There should be a careful consideration of the cycle of truth preached. 3. There should be a careful consideration of one s ability to deal with the text and the subject derived from it. 4. The constant reading of the Word of God is primary. 5. The use of a notebook should be cultivated. 6. The reading of good books provides rich sermon material. 7. The guidance of the Holy Spirit is paramount.

THE SERMON
A. THE MEANING OF A SERMON The word sermon has its origin in Latin, which means a stab , or a thrust . This indicates the purpose of it, to pierce the hearer with the Sword of the Spirit which is the Word of God. Eph. 6: 17 A sermon is an oral address to the popular mind upon Scriptural truth contained in elaborately treated and with a view to persuasion. A sermon is a form of discourse on Scripture truth, designed to save or edify the hearers. A sermon is a prepared message and presented for the purpose of persuading men to believe and to act upon the truth as revealed by the preacher. Page | 2

PROPHETIC This kind of sermon is sometimes called social or social-prophetic. to show causes. THE IMPORTANCE OF HAVING A TEXT. 2. Paul is an example to this fact. There is an announcement of the Good News and an invitation to receive it.: the 22 Tenets.) 3. 3. PARTS OF THE SERMON 1. counsel. comfort. MEANING OF A TEXT The text is the portion of the Scripture selected to be considered as the basis or the foundation on which the sermon is built. THERAPEUTIC This classification includes what are sometimes called devotional and psychological sermons. Text is a single verse. the attention and interest of the audience has been awakened and secured in the text. 2: 1-5. Page | 3 . It prepares the hearers for the discussion. He preached and taught nothing but the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ. or more verses. ~ Van Cleave The corner stone is to a building. Conclusion the last part of the sermon which contains a summary of the body and the application of the truth presented to the congregation. The preacher seeks to exhort. There are seven reasons why a text is important: 1. 5. Body that part of the sermon which presents or discussed the truth contained in the text and the theme. The goal of this kind of preaching is to win people to Christ. Introduction is that part of the sermon which leads up to the discussion and thus prepares the audience for the body of the sermon. and to motivate Christians to work to remove the evil. encourage and inspire his people. A text less preacher is a great loser in the matter of effective preaching. but to expose it. Theme is that part of the sermon which defines the subject which the preacher seeks to expound from the text. The emphasis is on learning and understanding. 4. (Ex. the development of insight. The desired learning may be directed towards the correction of ignorance or misinformation. 2. or even part of a verse. APOLOGETIC This kind of preaching faces the problem of the Christian world view in dialogue with secularism. 1Cor. or a whole passage from the Bible to be ordered. This means when the preacher announces his text. DIDACTIC This is sometimes called Doctrinal Preaching. Acts 20: 24 3. problems and evils from a Christian perspective. Topic/Subject is the substance or the Biblical truth that the preacher seeks to expound. or the acquisition of skill. The emphasis is on dealing with the problems of Christian living. The emphasis is on dealing with social issues. THE BASIC PURPOSE OF SERMONS 1. to seek solutions. This is how important a text is. or a whole passage or chapter or the Bible consisting of many verses. the sharpening of critical faculties. so is a text to a sermon.B. It gains the confidence of the audience. To be able to secure this state of mind in the audience is of great advantage to the preacher. The confidence is that he is to proclaim to the people the Word of God and not his own opinions. 2. B. 6. communism. 5. atheism and other non-Christian viewpoints. KERYGMATIC Sometimes called proclamation or evangelistic preaching. It awakens the interest of the audience. leading to maturity in the Christian life. tithing/giving. 4. The text may consist of a single verse of the Holy Scripture or even a part of a verse. THE TEXT OF THE SERMON A. The preacher is not only to denounce social evil. It seeks to defend the Christian faith and the Christian position at points where attacked by its opponents.

To be Biblical in our preaching will always bring us to safety. Rom. we must read to listen what God wants to tell you. It gives the preacher authority and boldness in the proclamation of his message. It will keep the preacher Biblical. C. and not the mere words of man. Select a simple text that you are familiar with. In other words. It helps confine the preacher to stick to his subject. The people listening are made to realize that it is the truth of God s Word to which they are listening. 6. and if the preacher has the idea that a sermon is a message inspired by God to look the needs of man. Look for an appropriate text of a message that you have already in mind to preach. 13: 8 b. The love of God John 3: 16 3. Know what kind of people you are to preach. emotional. Choose a simple text that corresponds with your subject you are going to preach. It will keep the preacher s mind from wandering. if there is a daily walk and fellowship with God. to the Jews first. 2Pet. 4. Philip Brooks well said: the ease and facility with which a test is chosen depends upon to things: 1) The preacher s own mind. Many times it is when we are reading and studying the Word of God that we are given a particular text to base our message. It is very important for you to know and master the subject matter in which you are going to preach. Therefore be always sensitive to the direction and leading of the Holy Spirit as you read the Holy Word. The text itself should remind the preacher what he ought to preach not what he wants to preach. Example: If you are going to preach in the following themes. 3. It gives authority to the message. In choosing your text. Example: If you are going to preach on The Judgment of God in Noah s Day . 2) and the idea of the sermon. It is the Word of God that the preacher preaches and not his own words. physical. the anointing and authority of the Holy Spirit and not man. With a thus saith the Lord as the basis of his sermon he may speak with authority of heaven for after all. it is very important for the preacher to be able to know the following principles on how to select an appropriate text for his sermon. Chose a text and subject that you are able to deal with. The text will help us keep ourselves from wandering and jumping from one thought to the other. It is God speaking to the people through the text. The proper selection of a text is often a difficult task for the preacher. 7. then it would not be hard for the preacher to look for a text where he could base his message. The heavenly invitation Matt. 1: 16 5. and spiritual.4. The unchangeable Christ Heb. or you need to be able to relate the why s and how s of the flood and its applications. 1: 21. for it is the power of God unto salvation to everyone that believe. and also to the Greeks. It is a must that we should depend and seek for the guidance and direction of the Holy Spirit because He is the author of the Written Word. 1. Read and study God s Word. However. If the mind and soul of the preacher are being continually soaking in the Word of God. 11: 28 2. For I am not ashamed of the Gospel of Christ. Make your preaching relevant to the needs of the people social. moral. Page | 4 . use the corresponding text. it is not right to read the Holy Word with the only purpose of looking a text for a message. if you always have a message in mind to preach. you need to read and master the historical events that had happened before. Example: 1. then it will be a comparatively easy matter to find a text from which to proclaim God s message to a hungry world. It is The Word of God says that carries the weight on the sermon. Because of this. 2. during and after the flood of Noah. mental. Let the people s needs determine what shall be the nature of the message and text. 5. it is God not man who speaks from the text. There are six (6) principles on how to select a text of a sermon: Pray for the direction of the Holy Spirit. THE SELECTION OF THE TEXT. consider the spiritual needs of the people with whom you are going to minister. what you need is a text that will go with the message. With such an authoritative message. no preacher need to timid about proclaiming he will of God. a. The great Apostle Paul said.

in Time until. as. through. 107:22. Interpret the Text in the light of the Context.30 Subject: The Heavenly Invitation D. Example: In Malachi 3: 10. to. in. as a result. In order to get the full meaning of the text. so that. in. Another is what Christ said in John 14: 2. therefore.17. There are four languages used in the Word of God: a. which. which. Occasion: Christmas Text: Matt. against. 3. what you need is to look up in your Bible a verse which deals on Thanksgiving.28: 10. 13). Your supporting verses would be: Ps. with. Occasion: Evangelistic Text: Matt. so then. to 4. HOW TO INTERPRET A TEXT There are certain guiding principles that must be observed in the correct interpretation of the text. (Isa. The Text must be interpreted in Harmony with the Language used in the Word of God. as. the Bible is the interpreter of itself. Interpret the text in harmony with the Teaching of Whole Bible. to. Col. since. through. from. as Reason for. 11: 28. We would use the Holy Scripture to interpret itself. with. because. according to. the verse deals about giving our tithes and offerings. Therefore. concerning. It cannot be figurative or symbolical. when. so. Find the Grammatical Keys: LITTLE WORDS AS THE GRAMMATICAL KEYS MEANING Cause for. out of. When He said. The meaning is never changed. It is our love offering to God. out of Place where. 2. The Bible does not contradict itself. wherever. 3 about mansions and His second coming. 5: 18 and in order to build up your sermon. just. 4: 14. 50: 14. The book of revelation speaks of the same mansions which is the Holy City.Suppose you are going to preach on Thanksgiving . line upon line. 1:18-15 Subject: The birth of Jesus Christ 2. The offering is anything we give voluntarily above the tithes. thus. through. Here a little and there a little. to. till Manner just as. since. These words are literal in their meaning. that Result that. This is literal. I will come again . Eph. whenever. 100:4-5. until. Observe the following rules for interpretation: 1. towards Means by. 21: 2). It speaks of the 10% of one s gain of profit called tithes. unto. Literal Literal language based on the actual words in their ordinary meaning. concerning. into. or may be the whole chapter or the whole book in order to understand the content of the book that has been considered and studied. This speaks of the literal second coming of Christ. Select a text and a subject that is appropriate for an occasion. 1:12 6. The promise of Christ to return back for His second coming is also recorded in the book of 1Thess. 105:1. from. you need to study the verse before and after the text. precept upon precept. you may use supporting verses and example of illustration to bring more light and meat to the message. because. then Purpose in order that. of. the New Jerusalem that is coming down from heaven as revealed to John in the book of Revelation (Rev. Page | 5 . The word of the object described in the text is to be taken as it is. from. till. A very good text for the subject of Thanksgiving is 1Thess. 5:20. You should consider the occasion in choosing a text and a subject for a sermon: Example: 1. upon. with.

It is figurative.b. Figurative Figurative language is a truth represented by means of a figure symbol. Consult parallel passages. Amplified Version of the Bible v.10 4. THE MEANING OF A THEME The theme is the preacher s own statement of the purpose of the sermon. Different Bible Commentaries: i. Etc. 2: 19. yet it must be admitted that a wisely chosen theme has much to do with the sermon interest to its hearers. It is never literal. It is a picture phrase that makes the truth vivid and memorable. Etc. It is usually an allegory. Example: The Bread and Wine are the two elements used in the celebration or the Holy Eucharist or the Lord s Supper. Consult different Bible Translations and Commentaries to give some light in the interpretation of the text. Consult the Original Languages as a help to Interpretation. A Scripture is best interpreted by another Scripture. 13: 3. The wise choice and proper wording of the theme of a sermon are of no small importance. 22). Example: 1. The Parable of the Sower Matt. especially an object to represent something abstract. and in three days I will raise it up (Jn. The Matthew Henry s Commentary ii. Symbolical Symbolical language is something that stands for or represents another thing. but do not either reject their explanations without good reason and careful study. 13: 24. Page | 6 . It is an earthly story with a heavenly meaning. The theme is that part of the sermon which defines the main truth or subject which the preacher seeks to expound from his text. Both are literal bread and wine but the Bread symbolizes the Body of Christ. The Parable of the Tares Matt. 5. Different Bible Translations: i. (Note: Do not be a slave follower of commentaries. and the Wine symbolizes the Blood of Jesus Christ that was shed for the redemption of mankind. The choice of a worthy theme is a very important step toward successful sermon construction. New International Version vi. 15: 11. The King James Version ii. Good News Bible vii.23 2. Jesus spoke of His death and resurrection of the third day. Here. A. Greek and Hebrew qualify the minister to interpret his text correctly. The attractiveness of the title of a book is sometimes the greatest factor in its sale. The Parable of the Lost Coin Lk. The Great Text of the Bible v. Clark s Commentary iii.32 4. Example: Our Savior spoke in a figurative language when He said to the Jews. Destroy this temple. or likeness. b. a. Parable A parable is a short. ) 6. d. American Standard Version iii. Pulpit Commentary iv. 21. simple story from which a moral lesson may be drawn. The New English Bible iv. The important thing is to select the proper theme for the occasion. THE THEME OF A SERMON A sermon needs a theme for the same reason that a book needs a title.30 3. 15: 8. c. While this should not be so in the case of a sermon. The Prodigal Son Lk.

One of the best ways to determine the subject of a passage and thus to discover the subject of the sermon to be constructed is: 1) to read the portion of Scripture several times. One of the tests of a sermon is that which happens to the man in the pew as a result of having heard that sermon. How to Determine the Subject of the Sermon? The first step in ma constructing a biblical Sermon is to determine the subject of the sermon. 4) as the subject is normally one-word. The passage for preaching should have as its subject. 2) each sermon has but one theme based on one subject. If in a form of a question the divisions are answers to the question. C. while 2) asking oneself this question: What is the one main center of attention for this whole passage? Such a center of attention may be a) a duty to perform. the matter of concern and importance which is relevant to the preaching purpose. therefore should state exactly what the preacher intends to discuss. Normally the subjects are given in terms of a single word or at most a short phrase. The subject of the message should ideally be considered as the subject for the sermon. or d) an occupation. Logical Theme consist of subject and a predicate. Rhetorical Theme a subject with its modifiers such as adjectives or prepositional phrases to make them sufficiently specific for theme. A Theme is sometimes called a proposition or statement . It should capture the concern of the preacher in such a way he feels that his listeners have a need for that subject. b) a precept or maxim to explore. TWO KINDS OF THEME: 1. The theme. or calling to pursue. 2. The theme of a sermon will be: 1) the particular aspect of the subject just discovered which is to be developed within this particular message. 3) it is the function of the theme to divide the subject and to suggest relationships. Example: The Blessings of God s People The Perils of Life s Journey (modifier) (subject) 2. the theme will always be in the form of a phrase. How to Determine the Theme of a Sermon? The selection of a theme is important in the formation of a sermon. THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN A SUBJECT AND A THEME 1. c) a problem to solve. Example: Faith in Christ is the only means of Salvation Why is faith in Christ necessary to Salvation? Page | 7 . profession. Here are a few examples of subjects which might serve a foundation for message: Affliction Atonement Brotherhood Christ Courage Discipleship Faith Fear Fellowship Forgiveness Grace Heaven Hell Holiness Holy Spirit Judgment Justification Love Missions Obedience Patience Peace Praise Prayer Sacrifice Self-control Stewardship Thanksgiving The Church Work Workshop Youth Zeal When the preacher has determined the subject of the preaching portion which in turn the subject of his sermon. B. It suggests divisions which are proofs of the theme. he will be wise at that point to gather information related to that subject. This subject represents a broad area out of which number of themes may be selected for sermon.It is a concise statement of the principal truth which the preacher sees in his text and which he proposes to expand in his sermon. without any involve clauses or explanatory terms.

on birth of Jesus Christ. you should preach on the Resurrection of Christ. It is very important that you should know what kind of occasion you are to preach. illustrations. the Theme ought to be specific. not rumbling here and there. You should have a definite aim in the treatment of your theme. but your message is more forceful if you preach something you know and experienced. Example: Occasion: Evangelistic Text: Mat. on the death of Jesus Christ. If it is Easter. Comprehensive means complete. intelligent. but even in such cases. It is not wise for you to choose a trivial theme that is difficult to understand. It is not only important for you to preach something that you know. energy) 4. You should know your theme thoroughly. This does not mean that you must know absolutely everything connected with the subject. (specific definite. if your Christian life is a failure. you need first to know you are saved. masterly grasp of the subject. Don t choose a theme that you yourself don t understand and have not experienced. place and occasion. nothing more or less. otherwise its elaboration could hardly be called a sermon. 2. We should not get out of the Bible. He is like the hunter who fired his gun in the thick forest. 2. It should be comprehensive. The proper theme is dynamic. definite. 10: 13 Subject: Temptation Theme: How to Overcome Temptations Aim: To show the people of Satan s plan to destroy their faith using temptations and that God had provided a way of overcoming everyone of it. Choose a simple theme. 4. You must have aim to hit something. have an aim and don t get out of it. let the arguments. The Word of God should be the bases of our sermon if it is to be effective. Finally. and analogies are such that the congregation may reasonably be expected to understand.D. and try to hit it. Choose a theme that is within your reach. You cannot preach How to have a victorious life . The theme therefore must have force and life in itself. Example: Text: 1Cor. You should remember that your hearers do not live the same kind of atmosphere you live through the week. or within the level of your ability to expound or discuss. To preach about salvation.30 Subject: Heavenly Invitation Theme: Christ s Invitation to Spiritual Rest Page | 8 . who instead of hitting the wild pig. full of understanding. The time which does preposition to fit the occasion. However. 3. The good proposition is Biblical. GENERAL RULES AND SUGGESTIONS: 1. 11: 29. In order not to get lost in your preaching. A sermon that has no definite aim is like a man who lost in the journey because he doesn t know where to go. Don t go around the bush and lost yourself in the middle of the sermon. (Dynamic power. 5. People are not intensely interested in the general subject Faith but many are interested in Faith that overcomes the Word . You must have a mark. Be sure your theme is one your hearers can readily understand. It should be dynamic. You must not preach over the people s head. and have experienced salvation or a forgiven life. 3. Let your theme be suitable to time. or Faith that obtains Salvation . There are times when you will find it necessary to deal with a theme which may be new and strange to the hearers. particular) E. it starts the hearer s mind thinking in a certain direction. THE QUALITIES OF A GOOD THEME 1. if Holy Week. it does mean that you must have a clear. It should be Biblical. The theme should express the whole aim of the sermon. he drove them away and got nothing. if Christmas.

An opening like. And that Christ is inviting anyone who needs rest to go to Him to unload his heavy burden and find spiritual rest. To make a translation between the subject and the body of the sermon. The introduction should prepare for the sermonic journey. 6.Aim: To show to the people that Christ is concern to every man who is carrying a heavy burden in life. It is short. Page | 9 . It should cause the hearers to listen more of what you have to say. A firm rule is never apologize . 3. To establish contact between the preacher and the hearers. 5. but the rule is that the introduction should be as short as possible. To serve as a background of the sermon. 5. It tells the audience how the preacher is going to treat his subjects. It is specific. The translation usually comes at the end of the introduction. In a twenty-five minutes message the introduction should ordinarily be no longer than two minutes. One should never make any kind of apology in the introduction. The length of the introduction will depend on how much the listener know. The purpose of an introduction to a sermon is to lead the audience into a deeper understanding of the subject matter to be discussed. To prepare the audience for an understanding of the theme you are to discuss. 4. An obscure introduction will invariably give the impression that the whole sermon is to be obscure or over the heads of the people. or I m not prepared will loss an audience for sure. THE MEANING OF INTRODUCTION It is that part of the sermon which leads us to the discussion and thus prepares the audience for the body of the sermon. how the audience feels toward the message or the speaker. and the complexity of the idea to be presented. It is very important that the introduction should be clearly understood by the listeners. If you are to impress the minds and hearts of your hearers with the message you are going to preach. It is unapologetic. To awaken the hearer s interest in the subject that has been chosen. and perhaps states the points which the discussion is divided. THE PURPOSE OF AN INTRODUCTION 1. 4. A good introduction creates and establishes good relationship between the preacher and the hearers. It is interesting. 2. 2. It is simply an approach to the theme which briefly lays the foundation in such a way as to prepare the listener for the sermon and arouse their interest. I m only a layman . Begin in a low and then shift to higher voice in the sermon. The preacher should begin the sermon in a friendly conversational voice. C. 3. It is the bridge made of words that connects the theme and the body of the sermon. The function of the introduction is to attract the attention and arouse the interest of the listeners. It would look unfinished without it. It should serve as a background by giving information. Note: the transition from the introduction to the body of the sermon should be a natural one. THE QUALITIES OF A GOOD INTRODUCTION 1. A good introduction will contain a clear and specific statement of the theme of the sermon and its purpose. B. I m not a good speaker . abrupt or strained. THE INTRODUCTION OF THE SERMON A. you must get them interested in what you are to say at all costs. It is modest. It is clear. It must not be forced. clarification or definition of terms used in the subject and its previous experience with the ideas and concept the preacher proposes to discuss. The introduction is like a perch or ladder to a house.

body of the sermon. judgment and salvation. S State the contract (why should they listen?/ Benefits it they listen) 6.7. To exhort the people to accept God s warning and be safe. 4. 5. Introduction: the weather bureau warns the people when a storm is coming so they can prepare. 5. T Transition. Page | 10 . Organized sermon increases the effectiveness of the sermon. Referring to the occasion. 3. 4. R Raise and emphasize need/s 4. and the occasion. Giving an example. that by God s divine love and mercy He warns the people of the coming judgment. E Encourage from the Scripture (the promise that the Scripture will answer the need raised) 5. 4 out of 5 mothers cradle their infants in their left arm . Stating a startling fact. It is easier to remember the sermon thought of they are arranged so that logically related thoughts follow one another. Songs. It has unity. Each division related to the theme. QUALITIES OF GOOD SERMON ORGANIZATION 1. illustration or story. Emphasizing the importance of the subject. F. An alien visits you and asks you what s the most important in this earth . Pointing to an historical event. It should go with the text. God has given the whole world a warning about sin. 3. 6: 7 Theme: God s Warning about the Flood Aim: To show to the people that God rewards every man according to their works and their dealings with God. 1. 2. THE ORGANIZATION OF A SERMON A. The organized sermon can be easily understood. Telling a joke. REASONS FOR ORGANIZATION IN THE SERMON 1. E. 7. A Attention technique 2. USE THE ACCRONYM A R R E S T 1. Asking a question. HELPFUL SUGGESTIONS ON GIVING AN INTRODUCTION. 3. By means of the greatest storm ever experienced. D. The preacher will find that organized discourse is easier to deliver. 8. It facilitates the preacher s delivery. 2. The organized sermon is more pleasing to the hearers. Unity is when one theme prevails throughout all the divisions. B. Example Text: Gen. Presenting a quotation. It should have UNITY. The organized sermon is easier to remember. R Relevance of the Attention Technique to the audience. that destruction by the wrath of God is coming to the wicked or people who do not listen to God. Using a gimmick. 6. 9. subject. 10.

but unimpassioned voice and then gradually increasing the emphasis and gestures as the sermon progresses so that the most intense point is at the appeal.15 Theme: Jesus Came 3 Jesus came preaching repentance His message 2 Jesus came preaching His mission 1 Jesus came His advent 4.15 Theme: The Christian Attitude towards Attainment I. His attitude towards present attainment Earnest reaching farther III. Divisions are equal in importance and receive the same amount of treatment. Example: Text: Rom. It is also achieved in the delivery by starting a deliberate. 14 II. I. It should have SYMMETRY. When should we approach the throne of Grace? when in the time of need 2. It should be PROGRESSIVE. 4: 16 Theme: Approaching the Throne of Grace I. Example: Text: Phil. How we approach the throne of Grace? with boldness. It means the final highest point of development. 1: 14. His attitude towards past attainment Humble forgetfulness II. 16 III. It should have CLIMAX. Symmetry or proportion is necessary to all unless of art. The word climax comes from the Greek word which means ladder .16 Theme: Paul s state of mind regarding on the preaching of the Gospel of Christ. Example: Text: Mark 1: 14. 15 3.Example: Text: Heb. I am a Debtor to preach v. It should have COHERENCE. Why we approach the throne of Grace? to obtain mercy and receive help III. This quality assures that the hearer s attention will be carried along to the goal. The parts should adhere one to another. I am not ashamed to preach v. His attitude towards future attainment Confident expectation of perfection Page | 11 . 5. II. The arrangements of the divisions are designed so that each rises a little nearer to the goal. Climax is achieved in the construction by the arrangement of the points so that the goal is reached at the end of the sermon which is worthy of a sermon. I am ready to preach v. 3: 13.

Main-point Two. There are number of ways to phrase positions to ensure that they wed principle and application. E Explain the principle. Main-point Three. Two of the most basic are consequential and conditional statements.Each main point is a division of the thought presented in the proposition. or strongly advising a course of action to somebody) mode. . Consequential form states something should be done as a consequence of a truth. I. In the most formal wording of main points. Conditional form identifies a condition that warrants a response. The S-A-V-E a point pattern in the outline of the sermon. we must all acknowledge our sin. The word because or since is used or implied. you must present Christ to sinners. . THE MAIN POINTS AND SUBPOINTS IN THE SERMON 1. The words if is typically used. Main-point One.C. Explain the proposition. then the outline is principle consistent . Each main point then answers: What should be done about the truth? If the anchor clause is the application clause. Example: . then the outline is application consistent and the main points answer: Why should this be done? Page | 12 . The main-point clause that is repeated is called the anchor clause . Because Jesus promises will be with you . a. Explain in terms of the text Explain in terms of the audience Alternative Format Illustrate the principle Apply the principle III. II. If the anchor clause is the truth-principle clause. encouraging. V Validate (confirm or establish the truthfulness of your proposition). b. S-A-V-E D. The main points or central proposition of the sermon (CPS). 28: 18. Example: If God accepts only true worship. (Mat. You must truthfully worship Him. S State the principle A Anchor to the text.Truth of God/Jesus nature or works Because Jesus died for the ungodly. one clause (principle or application) of the proposition is picked up by the main points and is repeated throughout the outline.It is the universal truth in a hortatory (urging.20) .Truth of man s condition Since all have fallen short of the glory of God. you must be bold in sharing the gospel.

you much preach Christ at every opportunity. Because Jesus is the only hope of salvation. Since Jesus alone purchased salvation. I. you must preach Christ at every opportunity. you must preach Christ at every opportunity. III. you must present Christ when it is difficult. Thus. Sub-points: 1. Example: CPS: Because Jesus is the only hope of salvation. 3. II. Interrogatives are sub-points worded in as questions. and then ask an analytical question about it that prompts the sub points. What helps us face these difficulties? Page | 13 . you must preach Christ at every opportunity. you must preach Christ in difficult situations. you must preach Christ to difficult people. Because Jesus is the only hope of salvation. Example: CPS: Because Jesus is the only hope of salvation. that introduce the biblical material that will TYPES OF SUB POINTS a. Since Jesus alone bestows salvation. 2. III. When should this apply in our lives? Preachers state the main point. The Sub points. you must preach Christ despite our difficulties. In circumstantial difficulties. Because Jesus is the only hope of salvation. The magnetic clauses draw the explanatory elements of the main points to themselves because they contain the key word changes that attract the attention of listeners ears. Since Jesus alone possesses salvation. sub points support or develop the magnetic clauses since they contain the developmental features of the outline. Magnet Clause Anchor Clause The clauses in the main points that do not remain consistent are the magnetic clauses . II. ANALYTICAL QUESTION RESPONSE. When. b. In spiritual difficulties. Why. How much. What. Etc. Anchor Clause Application Consistent Outline Magnet Clause CPS: Since Jesus alone provides salvation. INTERROGATIVES. I. functions as sub-points by introducing an answer that develops (or supports) the main point. you must present Christ when it is difficult. 2. you must preach Christ at every opportunity. How. Sub points are thought pegs support the main point. What types of difficulty may we face? 2. Each question. Each sub points introduce discussion about the answer it supplies in the standard SAVE a point pattern . Supports or develop the main point by answering an overarching question: How do we know this is true? Or.Example: Principle Consistent Outline CPS: Because Jesus is the only hope of salvation. Analytical question: in what types of difficulties must we present Christ? Sub points: 1. Who. In relational difficulties.

As a result. 23: 17. An example to this is very clearly stated in Ephesians 5: 22. and of all uncleanness. throw light upon. 4. They give ornamentation. therefore I say unto you. Wherefore. illustrations are the windows of the sermon . In the midst of busyness. to make intelligible. to illuminate. Is not the life more than meat. what ye shall eat.Interrogative sub-points greatly aid communication because they force preachers to ask questions listeners would ask if they were analyzing the sermons. For the husband is the head of the wife. They explain. It is used also to explain the subject. Christ gave them these words. which indeed appear beautiful outward but are within full of dead men s bones. shall take he not much more clothe you. A. In the face of fear.25. or what ye shall drink. In the storm of anger. This is especially true of illustrations from analogy. and He is the Savior of the Body. therefore. They prove. It gives the variation of presentation and prevents our audience from getting bored to listen to us. you must present Christ when it is difficult. They throw light upon the subject matter.25. Christ illustrates the hypocrisy of the Pharisee by likening them unto white sepulchers . and the body than raiment? Consider the lilies of the fields. submit yourself unto your own husbands as unto the Lord. take no thought saying what shall we eat. To illustrate has a wider meaning than to throw light. Husbands love your wives. when the Apostle Paul was explaining the relationship between husband and wife which should pattern after the relationship of Christ and the church. to give luster to. These statements may be declarative sentences or sentence fragments that make sense on the basis of transitions and previous discussion. 3. as the Church is subject unto Christ. Bullet statements encapsulate divisions in the explanation of main points in short. Let us take of what the Apostle Paul is saying: Wives. Matt. the preacher thinks as parishioners do and produces as much more listener-friendly discussion. o ye of little faith? Therefore. (the subject or point). 3. that even Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. nor yet for your body what ye shall put on. crisp statements. 2. if God so clothe the grass of the fields which today is withered and tomorrow is cast into the oven.28. and yet I say unto you. but within are full of hypocrisy and iniquity. THE PURPOSE OF ILLUSTRATION 1. 2. It encourages our listeners to pay more attention to the preaching. or what shall we drink? Or what shall we be clothed? (For after these things do the gentiles seek) For Page | 14 . Illustrations give beauty to our preaching. To illustrate means to light up. even as Christ is the head of the Church. Example: CPS: because Jesus is the only hope of salvation. so let the wives be to their own husbands in everything. THE ILLUSTRATION It is said that. they toil not neither do they spin. Illustrations make it possible for abstract truth to be vivid and clear. which that they outwardly appear righteous unto men. Illustrations may be used for the purpose of proof. Sub-points: 1. BULLET STATEMENTS. We use illustration in order that we may make the style of our message more interesting not merely ornamental. c. A preacher who neglects to illustrate will invariably be dry and hard to understand. Eph. 5: 22. take no thought for your life. how they grow. even as Christ also loves the Church and gave Himself for it. When Christ sensed His disciples that they begin to worry about their needs (food and clothing).

b. Take therefore no thought for the morrow.29 e. In using illustrations. Matt. 6: 25. c. But seek ye first the kingdom of God and His righteousness and all these things shall be added unto you.34. 25: 14. 12: 6.12 c. Matt.7). Metaphor is a picture phrase that makes the truth vivid and memorable. sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof. Luke 18: 1. for the morrow shall take thought for the things itself. Stories are more effective when they are true to life. Eph. By the use of testimonies. God s love and discipline towards the Christian is liken unto a Father s love and discipline towards his children. Christ said. Mark 13: 28. Christ as the Way . Be very careful when you use this type of illustration. Here s the illustration.7 b. 5: 14. The Word as the Bread of Life. (2 Sam. 4.11. The relationship of Christ and the Church is likened unto the relationship between husband and wife. Use metaphor to illustrate relationships.16 e. Example: a. Ye are the Branches . The Christians as Light of the world . 13 b. By the use of Metaphor. They can bring conviction. but to be used as an illustration or application in the sermon. Jn. The believers as branches show their connection with Christ. The parable of the Sower. Heb.25 5. 5: 23.8 2. 12: 1. The parable of the Unjust Judge. Matt. When King David committed the sin of adultery to Bathsheba. 5: 13 d. Christ used parable to illustrate his points. Illustrations should not too long. The Bible is a very good source of a true story that can be used as an illustration. 15: 1. Jn. Stories should not be told merely to entertain. The Bible as the Road Map to heaven. and presented to him an illustration case about the King s sin and how it should be judged. one must be very sure that the illustrations really illustrates.13 c. By the use of Parable. Example: Page | 15 . The Christians as Salt of the earth . The course of human life is like an ocean voyage. Analogy shows two different things having similarity or resemblance in some respects. the Lord sent the prophet Nathan to King David. An illustration may be used to arouse the conscience and clinch the truth. The parable of the Fig Tree. Prov. Example: a. Most of us can remember stories we heard in sermons long after we have forgotten the text or the theme. Matt. B. 6. it should be brief to the point. and murder Uriah. Illustrations also serve to make truth interesting and impressive and easier to remember. Matt. A preacher may invent his stories or take them from fiction. 3: 11.30 d. Use of testimonies that are relevant to the subject matter you are dealing with. the husband of Bathsheba. 14: 6 f. g. The parable of the Ten Virgins. TYPES OF ILLUSTRATIONS: 1. The parable of the Talents. Matt. By the use of Story. 3. 25: 1. 5. Example: a. By the use of Analogy. I am the vine.your heavenly Father knoweth that ye have need of all things.

Anecdote. 7. C. letters. 4. who will not give-in to the bargain of Satan. 6: 1. 2. Application: if every Christian is like the little girl.25 4. Bible Stories 1. He knocks at the door of the ant s house but no response and finally the locust died of hunger. The Story of the Turtle and the Wild Duck. Illustration of true happenings are accurate than invented ones. but obey and act according to the Word of God. I then asked for bargain and convince the little girl to give me the bigger 10. The Flood of Noah Gen. while the smaller cost 10. If it claims attention to itself for its own. Sir. conversations and books. The rich man and Lazarus Luke 16: 19.a. The Race between the Turtle and the Rabbit. Commit your illustration to memory. no less. 3.00. Keep illustration short. Illustration in the sense of stories or anecdotes should not be long. This is a story or happening gleaned from newspapers. A house of many windows is not good to see. She said.00. the devil will find no way to even defeat the Christian. We do not simply illustrate. the grasshopper did not mind but kept on jumping. and the ordinary man or woman in the pew is frustrated by Page | 16 . Illustrations should only be used when clarifying or supporting some definite point that is being made. I asked the little girl how much will the bolo cost. The ideas of the sermon are the walls. 6.00. 3. It is true incidents in one s own experience reports from friends or the reported experience of another as illustration. that s the price. Don t use too many illustrations Illustrations are like windows that lit the light. The conversion of the Ethiopian Eunuch Acts 8: 26. Example: One day I went to the market to buy a bolo for the school.00. the bigger ones cost 12. 1. I approached a young girl about 9 yrs old who was assigned by her father to watch over the merchandize. 6-7 3. Fiction and Fable Stories 1. or else they will destruct the progress of the message. c. 2. rainy days is coming and it would be hard for you to go out and get your food. The ant said to his friend grasshopper. It is the thought that is important. Make sure the illustration is accurate facts and figures and details should be checked. Make sure the illustration fits exactly use illustration that should fit your point or the message you are preaching. the All-illustrations kind of sermon is not helpful. and the smaller 8. The Fall of Jericho Jos.31 2. 5. no more. The Ant and the Grasshopper One day the grasshopper met his friend ant who was busy preparing and gathering food stuff because he knows that rainy days is fast approaching. Don t let illustration steal the show from the central of the sermon. so is a sermon with too many illustrations. until one day the rain came and the grasshopper could no longer go out and get his food.40 b. Make illustration practical and realistic. So prepare and get ready now. friend you better prepare. magazines. But the little girl intensely said. RULES TO BE FOLLOWED IN THE USE OF ILLUSTRATION. And she did not accept my bargain. But while the ant is busy preparing. we illustrate something. He managed to go the ant. Sometimes preachers tell stories of great Christian heroes or people who are famous. An illustration is valuable only to the degree in which it centers attention on the point being made not on it. A good illustration demands eye contact and total involvement. his Father. an illustration disrupts rather than assist the communication of thought. To read the illustration is to destroy it.

It is the moment in which the issue can be seen at its clearest. This will most often be true with sermons of the teaching type which call for no immediate decision at the close. Note: Sometimes this type of conclusion of the sermon takes the form of poem or the verse of some well-known hymn or the sermon maybe finished the use of the striking sentence. impelling impression that will aid in achieving the purpose of the sermon. 3. To persuade the listener to apply the truth and to bring him face to face with God in the altar for prayer. This makes a splendid conclusion for a teaching sermon. felt at its sharpest and carried back into life where. because there will be no learning without repetition. Sometimes. A. because there will be no learning without repetition. 1. The Appeal Type of Conclusion. nor altar call given. The conclusion is the moment in which the listeners can at the nearest see the idea whole and all at one time. actions or obedience such as altar call. To bring the message to a climax and give a final view of the theme or central idea. By all means the summary should be brief. This consists simply of making a direct appeal for immediate decision. but are extremely vital to the success of the sermon. if anywhere it must be resolved.comparing himself or herself to this great saints. This type of conclusion is usually used in an evangelistic meeting where the preacher after preaching an evangelistic sermon makes an appeal to decide to accept Christ as Lord and Savior. nor altar call given. THREE TYPES OF CONCLUSION: 1. This consists briefly of repeating the salient points of a sermon in order to aid the hearer in remembering the sermon. Stories from lives of men and women more liked by the average Christian might be of more help. This is done mostly in an evangelistic service by asking the people to make decision to receive Christ as Lord and Savior and to make a public confession before men. One should avoid concluding the sermon with a whole list of lessons. THE PURPOSE OF CONCLUSION. this violates unity and is not effective. The summary conclusion is also called recapitulation. This is to terminate the sermon where no immediate decision is sought. THE CONCLUSION OF THE SERMON THE CONCLUSION is the part of the sermon which contains a summary of the body and the application of the truths presented upon the life of the congregation. This consists briefly of repeating the salient points of a sermon in order to aid the hearer in remembering the sermon. but suggest a final lesson for departing auditors to contemplate. However. 3. at the end of the Page | 17 . The Summary Conclusion. 2. This makes a splendid conclusion for a teaching sermon. action or obedience such as the altar call. The conclusion puts the central idea in respective and draws the whole sermon together to make a unifold. The word introduction and conclusion of a sermon are small parts. The Lesson Conclusion. because they are small parts. B. This consists simply of making a direct appeal for immediate decisions. By all means the summary should be brief. This type is used to terminate the sermon where no immediate decision is sought. Such an appeal is given whether to stand or to lay up their hands and or to come to the altar for prayer. This type of conclusion consists of stating the lesson which the sermon teaches. 2. many preachers overlook their importance. To summarize the sermon.

weak. When one desires to present general evangelistic truth to an audience of unsaved persons who are not too familiar with the Bible. THE CHARACTERISTICS OF A GOOD CONCLUSION: 1. 3. intense and gripping. It gives unlimited rein to the preacher s incentive genius and opens a wide door to rhetorical eloquence. for reconciliation. When one desires to treat a subject in a very general way such as presenting a doctrine to an audience to which it is entirely unfamiliar. The method permits full liberty of composition and a full treatment of any subject. The meaning of Prayer. The preacher should definitely have in mind what he wants people to do as a result of his sermon. The conclusion should be relevant to the subject. I. 4. It should be as long as it needs to be and as short as it can possibly be. THE APPLICATORY CONCLUSION. TOPICAL SERMONS ARE RECOMMENDED IN THE FOLLOWING CONDITIONS: 1. fresh.sermon. uncertain or apologetic. It is definite. decision or hope. The conclusion should be alive. C. It is personal. By simply noting the aspects. By Aspect. What is Prayer? Page | 18 . THE THREE KINDS OF SERMON I. The sermon needs to be specific in applying the thought of the sermon and avoid vagueness that sometimes hangs over preaching. 2. let the host pastor do the challenge. The conclusion should be short. The sermon conclusion should not be negative. Note: If one is invited to a church. 2. It is real. A. 5. Be natural. the divisions are invented by the preacher in accordance with the rhetorical possibilities of the subject and the preacher s knowledge of the subject as it is treated in the whole Bible. It is brief. an appeal is given to come to the altar. for deeper consolation. It should have continuity with the idea developed in the body. 4. When treating social and moral problems not existing in Bible times or not treated by Bible writers. The preacher should only speak as he really feels. It is appropriating. especially for those who are sick and is in need for prayer. It is arresting. 3. Convey your message in a natural manner and voice. CLASSIFICATION OF A TOPICAL SERMON: 1. 6. It should aim to touch the conscience and motivate behavioral change. THE TOPICAL SERMON The Topical Sermon takes from the text only a topic or subject. When the subject is not adequately treated by any one passage of Scripture. or by asking questions which will bring out the aspects. (The acronym T-A-P-O-S) T Tie-up to the introduction A Artistic summary of Major Points P Picture with inspirational story O Order action S Significant last sentence D. and for other personal needs of the Christian are presented to the Lord into His throne of Grace. The conclusion should be unmistakably personal in its aim. Example: a) PRAYER (aspects noted) b) PRAYER (aspects asked) I. By aspect we mean points of view or ways of looking at a subject. for a heavy burden to be unload. Avoid the pulpit tone. 7. it should point toward some positive determination. It is positive. B.

or even a part of a verse as a text. Illustrations. ADVANTAGE OF THE TEXTUAL SERMON. 1. 5. 3. and Application. Bible study III. II. The main divisions of the sermon are only the ones stated or clearly inferred by the passage of Scripture upon which the sermon is based. Example: HUSBANDRY OF THE CHRISTIAN LIFE I. IV. 2. This method is best for controversial themes or where the theme is a statement of facts. III. Prove it quote Scriptures. A. Example: THE DISCIPLINARY VALUE OF DELAY I. 4. THE MESSIAH I. III. The going working for God II. As seen in the case of Moses.2. A topical sermon may be constructed by analogy. As seen in the case of Elijah. Proofs from Old Testament prophecy. II. III. The actual words of scripture are brought before the people. which are: Explanation. 4. A topical sermon may be constructed in addition by advancing illustrations of the theme taken from the Bible incidents and biographies or even by illustration from church history. 3. IV. Example: CHRIST. A topical sermon may be constructed also by stating its proofs. By the Order of Material. Proofs from the power of His Gospel. Apply it urge hearers to adapt it. The necessity of Prayer. TWO METHODS OF MAKING A TEXTUAL SERMON. As seen in the case of Paul. IV. To analyze a text is simply separating its part so as to note and examine them separately. How is Prayer done? IV. THE TEXTUAL SERMON It consists of selecting verses. II. Why is Prayer needed? III. Argument. B. The number of divisions is determined by the material in the text. The results of Prayer. The reaping blessing. Proofs from Christ s claims. life eternal II. By Analysis. III. The method used in Prayer. A topical sermon may be developed from the order of the kinds of material used in the sermon. 1. Proofs from Christ s own works. What is the result of Prayer? By Proofs. It permits great variety in construction and selection. Example: CHRISTIAN TITHING I. The cultivating prayer. II. some familiar object or process may be adopted and treated part or step by step where such an analogy can be given spiritual significance. The word Analysis means taking apart . It will be remembered longer. a verse. Illustrate it give examples of benefitted tithe-givers. By Analogy. Explain it what it means? II. By Illustrations. Page | 19 .

An example in conduct (conversation) III. Point 2 became point 1 and point 3 became point 2. 4:12 (Related admonition) I. What ideas are expressed? 4. 3. II. To a mature man. . The ideas. The above text has three points: 1.21(minor theme) The instrument of reconciliation The Blood of His cross Page | 20   I. 2. II. or the admonitions of the text are simply taken in the order that they occur in the text. What are the conditions of success? 10. The duty of teaching (doctrine) 2. Sometimes a difficult text will reveal its hidden parts when a series of question is applied such as: 1.a. the arguments. Three Kinds of Synthetic Textual Sermon outline: 1. 2. 1: 1 (Related duties) I. By Synthesis. The duty of reading. Perfect manhood is the aim of the Christian. a. the duties. An example in spirit V. An example in love (charity) IV. Example: THE CHRISTIAN EXAMPLE 1 Tim. What is required? 9. Point 1 became point 3. Who is the speaker? 6. What promises are made? 3. What qualities are displayed? c. or the construction of an outline from points supplied by a text but arranged to suit the purpose of the sermon or the pattern of the sermon composition without thought of the order of the points in the text. then the second the pattern. The duty of exhorting. III. III. the doctrines. 1: 20. What doctrines are taught? 5. Inverted order PERFECT MANHOOD IN CHRIST Eph. and then the third the method of achievement. An example in the word. Who is addressed? 8. 4: 13 (inverted order) I. To the fullness of Christ. b. What lessons are taught? 2. the classification. It has to do with rearrangement of points. the questions. The outline starts with the aim. An example in faith THREE DUTIES OF A YOUNG MINISTER Psa. II. Perfect manhood is achieved by unity with knowledge of Christ. Perfect manhood is patterned in Christ. Why is this said? 7. Attain the unity of faith and knowledge of Christ. In the outline these points were arranged to a homiletically order. The word ynthesis means putting together . Minor Themes RECONCILIATION Col.

Super Imposed Design THE LADDER OF GOD S ABILITY Eph. Whenever the need of the occasion can be met with a consecutive passage containing all the points necessary to the need. 1. No violence is done to the meaning of the text. Eccl. Abundantly above we ask or think VI. Whenever one desires to give a treatment of any passage longer than one or two verses. III. 8. Advantages of Expository Sermon. It will furnish the preacher with enough material for a lifetime of preaching. 4. This means to place out. 5. Exceedingly abundantly above all we ask or think The idea of a ladder is superimposed upon the text to make the sermon more vivid. When preaching on Bible chapters where the material is not too far scattered. 2. or abuse of isolated texts.The scope of reconciliation The things in earth or things in heaven III. When preaching a series or cause sermons. 7. Evangelistic preaching when the sermon is based on a story. Ps. Above all we ask or think V. It is detailed interpretation. 7. An exposition of a Scripture portion is therefore the placing out. When preaching on a book of the Bible. D. God is able to do what we ask II. 5. or incident. It will deliver the preacher from the tendency to a fanciful use. The power of reconciliation Enmity of mind and wicked works The real theme of the above text and its context is the Pre-eminence of Christ but reconciliation is a minor theme which suits the purpose of the sermon. What we think III. 3: 16-17 4. 2 Tim. When preaching on great chapters of the Bible. Four Features which Characterizes an Expository Sermon. Page | 21 . or the displaying of the truth contained in the passage selected. II. C. parable. 138: 2 2. logical application and practical application of a passage of Scripture. All we ask or think IV. THE EXPOSITORY SERMON A. Expository Sermon is Recommended. It will also make for a variety in the ministry of the Word. 3. 1. to display. When treating a narrative. parable or psalm. B. It enables the preacher to deal with current levels. 3. 6. It puts the supreme emphasis on the Word of God itself. 1: 9-10 6. The truth is the same except that they are given a new framework and rearranged to make an ascending scale. The word expository come from the Latin word ex meaning out and pono meaning to place . 3. It makes for a broad knowledge of the Scripture as a whole. It provides an opportunity for speaking on many passages of Scripture which would otherwise be neglected. The Expository Sermon. 3: 20 I. to exhibit.

Man is a sinner v. 5: 1-9 I. while the topical and textual sermons are treatment of the subject. Christ s death v. Access to Grace v. The appropriation of Justification By faith v. Varieties of Expository Sermon. The result of Justification a. Experience to hope 3. 13 III. 2. 8 II. Hope to shamelessness Note: the construction of the outline is synthesis but doctrinal because it aimed to expound on Justification . Victory in tribulation v. Patience to experience 2. 14: 12-21 I. Example: JUSTIFICATION Rom. The divisions of Ethical sermons consist of related rules of behavior or related aspects of one ethical ideal. The need of Justification a. The aim is to discover. 1-2 IV. E. Personal habits are not to be judged by men v. Personal habits are accountable to God v. 12 II. 8 b. Example: PERSONAL HABITS Rom. 1 c. 6 III. Inferential Expository Sermon. Ethical Expository Sermon. one in which the unity of the sermon is based upon released doctrines or related aspects of a single doctrine. Salvation from wrath v. The Scripture passage is chosen first and the subject is derived afterward. 6 b. 3. The expository sermon is a treatment of the passage of Scripture. 17-19 3. Example: A YOUNG MAN S RUIN 2 Kings 5: 20-27 Page | 22 . Personal habits are subordinate to kingdom interests v. 9 d. 3-5 1. explain and enforce rules of right Christian conduct. Doctrinal Expository Sermon The aim is to expound the doctrinal teaching of a text. God s love v. The inferences may be of a Doctrinal or Ethical nature. The text of expository sermon is usually longer than the text of a textual sermon. Man is without strength v. 2. Peace with God v. 2 b. but the sermon is called inferential if the points are derived by inference from a narrative text instead of by direct statement by the author of the book. 3 e. The provision for Justification a. The divisions are derived from inferences drawn from the fact and details of a narrative text. A narrative text is one which tells a story such as history or parable. 4. 1.1. Development of character v. The text of an expository sermon provides the material for all the divisions and subdivisions.

those who have run before us The training for the race Putting off the heavy garments of sin The gait of the race Patient striving The Judge of the race Jesus the Starter and Finisher The reward for the race Sharing with Christ His exaltation I. The success or failures. He was a man of character v. 20. 12: 1-2 The spectators at the race The martyrs of chapter 11. discussed. An Analogical Expository Sermon. 2-4 a. 27 4. An analogy is a relation or likeness between two things or of one thing to another. IV. II. III. Sin receives sure punishment v. Biographical sermons are quite effective because the greatest interest is human interest next to self interest. He prayed with faith c. The divisions of which are the arguments in the proof of a proposition. Sin leads to other sins v. circumstances or effects. He was a devout man c. Sin begins with covetousness v. 1-2 a. V. Page | 23 . He was a generous man d. 5-8 a. Sin cannot be kept secretly v. He was a man of action v. and presented for the hearer to imitate or avoid. He was an influential man II. the good or bad characteristics of both the good and bad traits of a Bible character are discovered. 26 II. He was a man of prayer v. He prayed with yieldedness III.I. Sin s allurement is deceptive vv. but of two or more attributes. consisting in the resemblance not of the things themselves. Example: WHY GOD USED CORNELIUS Acts 10: 1-8 I. Example: THE RACE OF LIFE Heb. 25 III. 5. The Biographical Expository Sermon. It is recommended for young people for they can be made very vivid and dramatic.27 V. Propositional Expository Sermon. The divisions of which are related parts of an analogy. He prayed always b. 26 IV. 6. He was a story man b. He immediately obeyed God.

The fact that the audience is present indicates that they want to hear what you have to say. Salesmanship is the magic ingredient that will make. Christ s Resurrection is a Theological necessity. 2. Faith would be vain c. All righteous dead would have perished III. Holy men would be false witness d.Example: THE RESURRECTION OF CHRIST 1 Cor. Facing the audience you are in the same position as the salesman. we need to have a little self-confidence to be able to stand in the pulpit. a. Page | 24 . The opposite is absurd a. Your job as a platform speaker is to bring the audience to a three-fold decision that: a) the ideas you are submitting are worthy of acceptance. I. unless you state your case logically. Stand up. Peter b. Faithful believers would be deluded sinners e. THE DELIVERY OF THE SERMON i) Gaining Self-confidence ii) The Speaking Voice iii) Deportment and Gesture When you are facing the audience. 1. a. 3. There are many witnesses to the fact. The Twelve c. There be a second Adam imputed through the transgression of the first Adam. Gaining Self-confidence Though we do not rely on the self. or mar. nervous breaths before they rises to speak. Lack of confidence is due to tension. Place your hands at your sides. Preaching would be vain b. To speak properly. you are there to communicate. B. Close your eyes and mouth. It does not mean that your audience will agree with what you have to say. your success as a speaker. steady and deep breathing. Paul by revelation II. c) they will be receptive to listen to speeches you may make in the future. It is not possible for the audience to peer into your mind. b) that they will act in accordance with the ideas you have advanced. you must breathe properly! Relax! Develop the habit of easy. You are facing the audience to sell them your ideas. clearly and convincingly. 15: 3-23 Proposition: That Jesus Christ arose from the dead. Our total confidence in the Holy Spirit to use us while ministering through the Word of God. Five hundred brethren at once d. Some beginners (neophyte preachers) take short. Try this breathing exercise: 1. resulting to a sinking feeling due to lack of air in their lungs and diaphragm.

is produced by the vocal chords in the larynx. n and l sounds. the nasal cavities and the sinuses. raise the arms from the sides until they are level with the shoulders. then sit down! 2. Faith in yourself comes from doing something definite. who believe they can! Being prepared is another very important help thing in order to have self-confidence! It is a bad manner to preach and then not prepare it. deepness and clarity of the voice. Know what you want to say. 5. If the body is tense.4. they carry well. pitch the voice low. and the dictionary definition of the word is given as capable of returning the sounds. Breath is the sustaining medium of the voice and there must always be sufficient supply. resounding. The result of unprepared sermon is usually verbosity and dullness. and if they are used with full resonance and ample breath to support them. The Speaking Voice a. throat and lips must not be rigid. the root of the mouth. showing vibrations in response to a sound. soft voice is one of the great riches of life. to echo . The jaw. Their sonority and richness are convincing. Practice resonance by repeating words. which means to sound again. This reverberation gives the voice its most important quality. It is difficult to speak when the throat is dry. 6. while the mouth and throat remain moist. The task is to speak with increased resonance. Let the words ring like a bell in the nasal cavity. and warmed to the temperature of the body. so avoid as much as possible any mouth breathing. m. Take a breath through the nose while you mentally count to FOUR. Resonance and Modulation Resonance gives the voice dignity. The problem is not to speak with resonance you have spoken with resonance all your life. the teeth. Resonance has to do with the loudness. I can do all things through Him who strengthens me Phil. full of sounds. They can. and as you do so. but the tone reverberates against the bony structure of the chest. A clear. moistened. say it with all the emotional feeling at your command. or tone. so that you can do the same thing again and again and get the same desired result. Self-confidence is the same thing as faith in yourself. Hold the breath and keep the arms raised while you mentally count to FOUR. it cannot work with tonal vibrations. getting a desired result. for without resonance you could not be heard 10 feet away. Exhale the breath through the mouth while you mentally count another FOUR and at the same time lower your arms. Make the accompanying arm action a habit. They suggest dignity and stability. As you read. Page | 25 . 4:13. Practice reading aloud for a few minutes daily. The lower notes of the voice are the most attractive. and knowing HOW you got it. dwelling with prolonged resonance on the ng. The initial human voice. The word resonance is derived from the Latin word resonare. Good resonance is produced by a relaxed body. It is important to inhale through the nose. The air is filtered.

Become conscious of words and that consciousness will help you to correct pronunciation. Try this one: A twister of twist once twisted a twist. It is essential to practice before an audience. You do it in everyday conversations. or fear. If a twist of the three twisted twist did untwist. the man can achieve. The word dictionary comes from the Latin root dictio. And the twist that he twisted was three twisted twist. ponder them well: Whatever the mind can conceive and believe. stiff or ungainly. diphthongs and consonants. A disagreeable attitude dampens enthusiasm. Every phrase uttered should be said slowly and distinctly. and monotonous tone. or defy. Good modulation means that your words are clearly articulated. By using the hands. rigid. threaten. Modulation is the method of preventing our speech from becoming monotonous. they will remain flexible. summon. Look into the mirror as you say these words. varied. and Watch what happens with the lips when speaking them correctly and forcibly. A disagreeable attitude causes the individual to speak in a disagreeable tone of voice. curtails personal initiative. hatred. 3. flat. dismiss. Deportment and Gesture Gesture All effective speaking is supported by some gesture. vast. a good speaker can plead. display grief or joy. With the hands. Tongue twisters are good fun. lectures and speeches which contained excellent material yet failed to interest us because they were delivered in a dull. very. As you speak. ponder. colorful and rich in contrast. change the pace. It is a case of doing what comes naturally . a word. Pronunciation and articulation Making the sound of speech the way in which a sound. diminishes self-control. pass the tongue from time to time over the surface of the lips. The way to learn to talk is to talk. The dictionary is the speaker s best friend.Modulation makes the voice magnetic. falter. Therefore it is actually a word book. tend. deny. pitch and power of your voice. word or language is articulated especially in conforming to an accepted standard. the whole personality. it is possible to express love. demeanor. Pronunciation refers to vowels. It is the way you carry yourself. ferry. Take words such: men. The twist that untwisted would untwist the twist. yonder. And the most important factor in personality is your mental attitude. from which it gains both force and expression. We become what we think about. Words are the tools of the speaker. While you are practicing. Deportment Deportment is defined as bearing. We have all listened to sermons. act the penitent. Practice before a mirror and exaggerate as much as possible when practicing. But deportment means the whole man. Avoid at all cost any action which appears cramped. ask. bend. but in public speaking you need to exaggerate a little and don t forget the pause that refreshes the ear. Make use of the dictionary. b. and manner . Page | 26 . Here are a few words of advice from Napoleon Hill. because by keeping them moist.

and even reflects itself in one s thoughts. or lack of it. smoothing your hair or straightening your tie. and it puts on the finishing touches of destruction by ultimately overthrowing the power of reason. Sincerity. Never walk to the platform rearranging your clothing. All truly great speakers are humble. the platform everyone is watching you. and makes its possessor sullen and intolerant. Arrogance. Insincerity and confidence will no more mix than oil and water. vanity and egotism are traits which are conspicuous by their absence in the character of the speaker with a pleasing deportment. The habits which detract from a speaker s deportment on the platform are many. just be neatly and appropriately attired for the occasion. greed. The insincere person announces this weakness in tone of his voice. Be sincere. if you are to gain audience acceptance. into every deed. Page | 27 . Try to be well dressed as the occasion demands. It is desirable to create a favorable impression even before you commence to speak. Finally. and certainly don t be less presentable. writes itself indelibly into every word one speaks. first of all with yourself. Fist on the list are egotism and vanity. destroys the habit of friendly co-operation. Don t stand out by being over-dressed by comparison with the audience.subdues the imagination. or standing on. While you are walking to. These preparations should have been completed before you are called on to speak. the expression of his face and in his unconvincing gestures.

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