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The Tenth Indian Summer in Levoca Festival 2017

First Concert
Friday 8th September
Congress Hall, Levoa, 19.00

Slovak Sinfonietta ilina, conductor Theodore


Kuchar (USA)
Kateina Englichov (Czechia) (harp)
Carlo Jans (Luxembourg) (flute)
Jn Levoslav Bella (1843-1936): Festival Overture in E flat
Born in Liptovsk Mikul, Bella studied at the Gymnasium in Levoa, where he began to study
composition, organ and conducting. Its therefore only appropriate that our tenth Levoa Festival
starts with his Festival Overture, which was written in 1872/3. A contemporary of Antonn Dvoak,
and active as a teacher and conductor, Bella was also concerned to write music reflecting his
homeland, and also wrote the first Slovak opera, Wieland the Smith, to a libretto by Richard
Wagner alas, a bit beyond the Festivals scope.

Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791): Concerto for Flute and Harp K. 299
I. Allegro II. Andantino III. Rondeau: Allegro
Its a tribute to Mozarts supreme musicianship that, although he disliked both the flute and the
harp as instruments, he wrote for them a concerto of charm and brilliance. In 1778 Mozart was in
Paris, giving composition lessons to harpist daughter of the Duke of Gunes, himself a flautist, and
the concerto was a result. The central Andantino movement showcases the melodic potential of the
solo instruments, accompanied only by the strings; whilst the outer movements give plenty of
playful interchange between soloists and orchestra.

==Interval==

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827): Symphony no. 3 op. 55 (Eroica)


I. Allegro con brio II. Marcia funebre: Adagio assai III. Scherzo: Allegro vivace
IV. Finale: Allegro molto
Beethovens own favourite amongst his symphonies, his Third, Heroic, Symphony, written
between 1802 and 1804, was at first intended as a tribute to Napoleon. Despite his later disillusion
with the Emperor, and the change of the symphonys dedication to the memory of a great Man,
Beethoven told his publisher the real title of the symphony is Bonaparte. Unusually the
symphony seems to have been written back to front, starting with the last movement, a set of
variations on a theme already used by Beethoven in his ballet, The Creatures of Prometheus.
This theme also seems to underlie the other movements. The stormy first movement is punctuated
by outbreaks of savage discord and has a deliberate false move by the horn just before the
recapitulation. The extended funeral march of the second movement is one of the earliest full-
blooded examples of the romantic heroic style for orchestra, its effect heightened by its dramatic
decline into silence. The scherzo and trio was compared by Berlioz to the funeral games at the
death of a hero. Early audiences in Venna were mystified by the symphony, not least by its
unusual length. But when it was premiered in Leipzig in 1807 the organizing committee was
besieged with requests for its repetition. Since that time this rich and powerful work has
maintained its reputation as one of the supreme works in the classical repertoire.
The Slovak Sinfonietta of ilina (The Slovak State Chamber Orchestra ilina) is one of the best known professional
orchestras in Eastern Europe and holds a very important position in the Slovak musical life. It was founded in 1974 as
the only "Classical period" chamber orchestra in Slovakia. Since then the orchestra has attained a prominent position
in both the Slovak and Czech Republics, as well as it has achieved a considerable international reputation. Its 34
members are graduates of the major Czech and Slovak music academies and many of them are winners of
international competitions and active both as soloists and chamber musicians. The quality of the players together with
the experience and musicianship of the founding music director and conductor Eduard Fischer (1930-1993) brought
about the quick artistic growth of the orchestra. Following chief conductors were Jan Valta, Leo Svrovsk and Oliver
von Dohnnyi. The Sinfonietta returns to Levoa under the baton of its Principal Conductor, Theodore Kuchar. Mr.
Kuchar has served as artistic director and principal conductor of two of Europes leading orchestras, the Janek
Philharmonic Orchestra (formerly the Czech Radio Orchestra) (20052014) and the National Symphony Orchestra of
Ukraine (19942004). In the 201112 season he began his tenure as the artistic director and principal conductor of the
Orquesta Sinfnica de Venezuela. From 2002 he has served as music director and conductor of the Fresno
Philharmonic Orchestra, and of the Reno Chamber Orchestra in the United States from 2003. An avid chamber
musician, he served as the artistic director of the Australian Festival of Chamber Music from 1990 to 2006. Since 2005
he has been the artistic director of the Nevada Chamber Music Festival.

One of the most sought after Czech harpists of her generation, Katerina Englichov performs worldwide. She has
collaborated with artists such as Mstislav Rostropovitch, Josef Suk, Gerard Causee, Cynthia Phelps, Michel Lethiec,
Eugenia Zukerman, Robert Stallman, Jitka Hosprov, Carlo Jans, Michael Kofler, and with many ensembles, including
the Prazak Quartet, the Haas Quartet and the Wihan Quartet. Ms. Englichova cooperates on regular basis with the
Bohemia-Luxembourg Trio and in duo with the Czech oboist Vilem Veverka. She has performed at numerous
international festivals such as Tanglewood and the Tucson Music Festival in the USA, Music by the Red Sea in Israel,
Pacific Music Festival in Japan, Rencontres Musicales dEvian and Festival dIle de France, and in the Czech Republic
at Prague Spring, Prague Autumn, Festival B. Martinu and many others.

Carlo Jans began his first flute lessons at the age of seven. Since 1984, he has taught flute and chamber music at the
Conservatory of Luxembourg. In 1999, he was awarded a professorship for flute and conducting and took over
leadership of the Conservatory orchestras. From 1997 on, he has been guest professor at the Academy of Music in Riga,
Latvia and he is often invited for masterclasses in the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland,
France, and the United States of America. His discography (over 34 CDs) for labels like Hnssler Classics, Pavane
Records, Calliope, Arco Diva and Bella Musica, have earned him outstanding reviews in the international press and the
award of the "Grand Prix du Disque" for his recording of the chamber music of Manuel Rosenthal.

At this years Festival, Katerina and Carlo also join with the Zemlinsky Quartet in a performance of
Ravels Introduction and Allegro on Saturday 9th September at 19.00, and give a duo recital on
Sunday 10th September at 15.00.

The 2017 Indian Summer in Levoa Festival is realised with the support of our patrons and of the
following organisations:

Z verejnch zdrojov podporil Fond na podporu umenia


Supported using public funding by Slovak Arts Council

Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Ministry of Culture of the Grand Duchy of


The Town of Levoa Luxembourg in Austria Luxembourg
Levoa Cultural Centre

Hotel U Leva Hotel Arkada


The Tenth Indian Summer in Levoca Festival 2017
Second Concert
Saturday 9th September
Dardanely, Markusove, 15.00

Milan Paa (violin)


Kateina Paov (piano) (Slovakia)

Eugen Sucho (1908-1993): Sonatina for violin and piano op. 11


I. Allegretto con agitazione II. Largo, sostenuto III. Allegro assai
The Festival has been delighted to offer many works of the Slovak composer Eugen Sucho over
the years; his engaging and distinctive style deserves a far wider hearing. His Violin Sonatina of
1937 follows a lyrical first movement with an impassioned central moment, which after a piano
introduction is for violin alone; the final movement, with its strong rhythmic impulse, leads to a
virtuosic closing passage.

Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937): Four song transcriptions


Czasem, gdy dugo, na p sennie marz (Sometimes as I sleep), op.2 no.4 - Syszaem
ciebie (I heard you), op.2 no.5 - Kak tolko vostok pobeleet (When the east turns white),
op.32 no.1 (transcribed by Milan Paa)
Roxanas aria from the opera King Roger (transcribed by Pawe Kochaski)
Many of the lyrical lines of Szymanowskis songs are ideally suited to violin transcription. We hear
two songs from the early op. 2 songs (written between 1900 and 1902), and one from the op. 35
songs to words by the Russian poet Dmitry Davydov, written in 1915. The set concludes with
Roxanas haunting song from Act 2 of Szymanowskis 1926 opera King Roger.

Edward Elgar (1770-1827): Sonata for violin and piano, op.82


I. Allegro Risoluto. II. Romance. Andante III. Allegro, non troppo
The Violin Sonata was amongst the works written by Elgar near the end of the First World War at
his cottage in Sussex in the south of England. Begun in August 1918, it reflects the change in
temperament which Elgar experienced because of the war and is notable for moments of anger and
of resignation. He wrote of the sonata to a friend It is full of golden sounds and I like it, but you
must not expect anything violently chromatic or cubist. The violinist Billy Reed was staying with
Elgar while he wrote it, and remembered : We used to play up to the blank page and then he
would say And then what?and we would go out to explore the wood or fish in the River Arun.
A group of ancient trees near the cottage which had been struck by lightning were amongst the
inspirations for the second movement of the sonata.

Elgar described the sonata as follows in a letter to his companion Alice Stuart-Wortley: The first
movement is bold and vigorous, then a fantastic, curious movement with a very expressive middle
section; a melody for the violin they say it is as good or better than anything I have done in the
expressive way the last movement is very broad and soothing, like the last movement of the
second symphony.
A violinist who is also a virtuoso of the viola, the Slovak virtuoso Milan Paa has premiered many new
and in recent years he has performed for audiences at many events showcasing new music, of which the
most important included the ISCM World New Music Days 2013, the 28th Music Biennale Zagreb (2015),
Arcus Temporum (Pannonhalma, Hungary), the Melos-Ethos International Festival of Contemporary Music
(Bratislava, Slovakia) and the Hradec Krlov Music Forum (Czech Republic, 2013), where he played the
Violin Concerto by the Finnish composer, Esa-Pekka Salonen. In April 2017, he performed at the 29th
Music Biennale Zagreb, this time in Harrison Birtwistles Concerto for Violin and Orchestra under the baton
of Pierre-Andr Valade. A very busy concert artist, Milan Paa commands a broad repertoire. His career as a
soloist has led him to cooperation with conductors such as Theodor Guschlbauer, Howard Arman,
Alexander Cernusenko, Leo Svrovsk, Andreas Sebastian Weiser, Peter Gribanov, Jakub Hra, Ondrej
Lenrd and Marin Lejava.

With pianist Ladislav Fanzowitz, Milan is committed to recording the complete sonatas for violin and piano
by major composers, with works by Johannes Brahms, Ludwig van Beethoven, Eugen Sucho and Edvard
Grieg having been published so far. Their most recent recording (2017) features Dmitri Shostakovichs
Sonata for Violin and Piano, Op. 134, and Sonata for Viola and Piano, Op. 147. A result of the cooperation of
many years between Milan Paa and the conductor and composer Marin Lejava is their critically acclaimed
recording of violin concertos by Alban Berg and Karol Szymanowski with the Slovak Radio Symphony
Orchestra.

After graduating at Gymnzium Varavsk in ilina, Katarna Paov continued her studies at
Konzervatrium in ilina, where she studied piano with Mgr. art. udmila Fraov and conducting with
doc. tefan Sedlick. Since 2013 Katarna has been studying piano at Janek Academy of Performing Arts
in Brno, Czech Republic in the class of Ivan Gajan. She took masterclasses with pianists including Eugen
Indji, Alexandar Serdar and Jonathan Powell. In 2010 - 2013 Katarna took part in student ensemble for
contemporary music Veni Academy, which, headed by Marin Lejava, participated in several festivals like
Melos tos (2011) and ISCM World New Music Days (2013). In 2013, the ensemble recorded a double-CD
titled Rolling Tones/In zarter Bewegung, which received the Radio_Head Award in the Classical Music
category. Besides accompanying her colleagues in recitals at Janek Academy, Katarna also works with
her husband, Milan Paa, with whom she has performed e.g. at festival Konvergencie in 2016. Alongside
the music of 18th and 19th century, Katarna devotes herself mainly to 20th and 21st century music. She has
performed works of such composers as Samuil Feinberg, Nikolai Roslavets, Toru Takemitsu, and Pascal
Manolios. She has also given the first performances of several works of Slovak and Czech composers.
Recently, she has premiered Yevgeniy Irai's Concerto Mosso no.2 for piano and string quintet under the
baton of Marin Lejava.

The 2017 Indian Summer in Levoa Festival is realised with the support of our patrons and of the
following organisations:

Z verejnch zdrojov podporil Fond na podporu umenia


Supported using public funding by Slovak Arts Council

Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Ministry of Culture of the Grand Duchy of


The Town of Levoa Luxembourg in Austria Luxembourg
Levoa Cultural Centre

Hotel U Leva Hotel Arkada


The Tenth Indian Summer in Levoca Festival 2017
Third Concert
Saturday 9th September
Theatre, Levoa, 19.00

Zemlinsky Quartet (Czechia)


Frantiek Souek, Petr Stek violin, Petr Holman viola,
Vladimr Fortin violoncello
Kateina Englichov (Czechia) (harp)
Carlo Jans (Luxembourg) (flute)
Jan Mach (Czechia) (clarinet)
Robert Schumann (1810-1856): String Quartet no. 2 in F major, op. 41/2
I. Allegro vivace II. Andante quasi Variazioni III. Scherzo. Presto - Trio. L'istesso
tempo IV. Allegro molto vivace
Although published as no. 2, the F major quartet was in fact the earliest of the three quartets
Schumann published in 1842 (we will hear no. 1 tomorrow). The quartets, which were dedicated to
Mendelssohn, followed a period when Schumann had been studying counterpoint. Op. 41/2 conforms
closely to Schumanns description of a string quartet as beautiful and intricately woven conversation
among four people. After the leisurely chat of the first movement, the second movement, a set of
variations, is the emotional heart of the quartet. The spirit of the playful scherzo and trio is continued
in the final rondo movement.

Maurice Ravel (1875-1937): Introduction and Allegro for harp, flute, clarinet and string
quartet.
Ravels Introduction and Allegro, commissioned by the rard company in 1905 to display their pedal
harp, is in effect a miniature harp concerto. A brief slow introduction is followed by the Allegro, in
sonata form, with a harp cadenza leading to the final section.

==Interval==

Alexander Zemlinsky (1871-1942): String Quartet no. 2, op. 15


I. Sehr mig - Heftig und leidenschaftlich - Andante mosso - Etwas rascher -
II. Adagio III. Schnell IV. Andante Molto allegro V. Langsam.
Zemlinskys Second Quartet, commenced in 1913, in part reflects his turbulent relationship with
Arnold Schoenberg, whose wife, Zemlinskys sister Mathilde, had an affair with the artist Richard
Gerstl which ended with Gerstls suicide in 1908. The story is also reflected in Schoenbergs music
drama Die glckliche Hand. In the quartets uncertainty of home key, the key of D represents
Zemlinsky and the key of F sharp represents Schoenberg. But we do not need to be able to decipher
Zemlinskys coded references to the saga in key-changes and phrase-lengths to feel the passion and
tension underlying the work, which were enhanced by the unfolding events leading to the World War.

The quartets five sections are played without a break. The opening motto of three rising notes
underpins the entire work, (and is recalled in the calm ending of the last section). The dramatic first
movement alternates passages of conflict and peaceful reflection. The adagio second section, beginning
with a melody on the viola, becomes a set of variations featuring the motto theme. The scherzo-like
third section becomes ever more furious before plunging into the fourth section, which at first treats
the motto with the greatest expression before developing into a restless faster section. At last in the
final section the music develops a tranquil resignation.
Since its founding in 1994, the Zemlinsky Quartet (Frantiek Souek, Petr Stek violin, Petr Holman viola,
Vladimr Fortin cello) has become a much lauded example of the Czech string quartet tradition. The quartet has won
the 1st Grand Prize in the Bordeaux String Quartet Competition (2010) and has enjoyed a string of top competition
prizes that include Banff, Prague Spring and London, where it was also awarded the Audience Prize. They have also been
the recipient of the Alexander Zemlinsky Advancement Award. So far, the Zemlinsky Quartet has toured extensively in
four continents. The repertoire of the ensemble contains over 180 works by leading composers, including contemporary
music. Since early 2007, the Zemlinsky Quartet has recorded exclusively for the French record label Praga Digitals,
having released seven titles including Diapason dOr award winning 4-CD set of early string quartets by A. Dvok.
Having studied with Walter Levin (LaSalle Quartet) and Josef Kluso (Prak Quartet), the group currently teaches as
assistant quartet-in-residence at Musikakademie Basel in Switzerland and gives numerous master classes to students of
all ages. Frantiek Souek also teaches both solo violin and chamber music in the Prague Conservatory since 2009. The
Quartet makes a welcome return to the Levoa Festival and will give a further concert on Sunday 10th
September to include Schumann, Janek and the Brahms Clarinet Quintet with Jan Mach.

One of the most sought after Czech harpists of her generation, Katerina Englichov performs worldwide She has
collaborated with artists such as Mstislav Rostropovitch, Josef Suk, Gerard Causee, Cynthia Phelps, Michel Lethiec,
Eugenia Zukerman, Robert Stallman, Jitka Hosprov, Carlo Jans, Michael Kofler, and with many ensembles, including
the Prazak Quartet, the Haas Quartet and the Wihan Quartet. She has performed at numerous international festivals
such as Tanglewood and the Tucson Music Festival in the USA, Music by the Red Sea in Israel, Pacific Music Festival in
Japan, and in the Czech Republic at Prague Spring, Prague Autumn, Festival B. Martinu and many others.

Since 1984 Carlo Jans has taught flute and chamber music at the Conservatory of Luxembourg. In 1999, he was
awarded a professorship for flute and conducting and took over leadership of the Conservatory orchestras. From 1997
on, he has been guest professor at the Academy of Music in Riga, Latvia and he is often invited for masterclasses in the
Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland, France and the US. His discography (over 34 CDs) for
labels like Hnssler Classics, Pavane Records, and Bella Musica, have earned him outstanding reviews in the
international press and awards such as the "Grand Prix du Disque" for his recording of music of Manuel Rosenthal.

Carlo and Katerina give a duo recital at the Festival on Sunday 10th September at 15.00 in the Levoa
Town Gallery.

Jan Mach completed his studies at the Brno Conservatoire in the classes of Lubomr Barton, and graduated at the
Academy of Performing Arts in Prague as Ph.D. with Vlastimil Mares and Jiri Hlavac. He took part in master courses
at Semmerig, Austria in 2000 and the French-Czech academy in Telc, Czech Republic led by Michel Raison in the
same year. He attended a five month fellowship in Karlsruhe, Germany with Wolfgang Meyer in 2000/2001. He took
part in summer courses at Aix-en-Provence, France led by Ensemble InterConterporain and became a member of the
festival orchestra at Aix-en-Provence. He is a member of Prague Symphony Orchestra and plays bass clarinet with
Prague Clarinet Quartet. Last year he became teacher at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague (AMU).

The 2017 Indian Summer in Levoa Festival is realised with the support of our patrons and of the
following organisations:

Z verejnch zdrojov podporil Fond na podporu umenia


Supported using public funding by Slovak Arts Council

Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Ministry of Culture of the Grand Duchy of


The Town of Levoa Luxembourg in Austria Luxembourg
Levoa Cultural Centre

Hotel U Leva Hotel Arkada


The Tenth Indian Summer in Levoca Festival 2017
Fourth Concert
Sunday 10th September
Town Gallery, Levoa, 15.00

Kateina Englichov (Czechia) (harp)


Carlo Jans (Luxembourg) (flute)

Michel Blavet (1700-1768): Variations on a theme of Corelli


Georg Philip Telemann (1681 - 1767): Fantasy in B flat major no. 4
Alphons Hasselmans (1845-1912): Le source, for harp solo
Frantiek Benda (1709-1786): Sonata in F - Claude Debussy (1862-1918): Syrinx for flute solo
Jan Frank Fischer (1921-2006): Study no. IV for harp
Bernard Andrs (b. 1941): Narthex - Eugene Bozza (1905-1991): Image for flute solo
Jan Trneek (1858-1914): Fantasie on 'Vltava' for harp
Astor Piazzola (1921-1992): Caf 1930 - Cabaret
Kateina and Carlo present a virtuoso recital of music for their instruments, both solo and duo, from the 18th
to the 20th centuries.
One of the most sought after Czech harpists of her generation, Katerina Englichov performs worldwide
She has collaborated with artists such as Mstislav Rostropovitch, Josef Suk, Gerard Causee, Cynthia Phelps,
Michel Lethiec, Eugenia Zukerman, Robert Stallman, Jitka Hosprov, Carlo Jans, Michael Kofler, and with
many ensembles, including the Prazak Quartet, the Haas Quartet and the Wihan Quartet. She has
performed at numerous international festivals such as Tanglewood and the Tucson Music Festival in the
USA, Music by the Red Sea in Israel, Pacific Music Festival in Japan, and in the Czech Republic at Prague
Spring, Prague Autumn, Festival B. Martinu and many others.

Since 1984 Carlo Jans has taught flute and chamber music at the Conservatory of Luxembourg. In 1999,
he was awarded a professorship for flute and conducting and took over leadership of the Conservatory
orchestras. From 1997 on, he has been guest professor at the Academy of Music in Riga, Latvia and he is
often invited for masterclasses in the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, the Czech Republic, Poland, France
and the US. His discography (over 34 CDs) for labels like Hnssler Classics, Pavane Records, and Bella
Musica, have earned him outstanding reviews in the international press and awards such as the "Grand Prix
du Disque" for his recording of music of Manuel Rosenthal.

The 2017 Indian Summer in Levoa Festival is realised with the support of our patrons and of the following:

Z verejnch zdrojov podporil Fond na podporu umenia / Supported using public funding by Slovak Arts Council

Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Ministry of Culture of the Grand Duchy of


The Town of Levoa Luxembourg in Austria Luxembourg
Levoa Cultural Centre

Hotel U Leva Hotel Arkada


The Tenth Indian Summer in Levoca Festival 2017
Fifth Concert
Sunday 10th September
Theatre, Levoa, 19.00

Zemlinsky Quartet (Czechia)


Frantiek Souek, Petr Stek violin, Petr Holman viola, Vladimr Fortin violoncello
Jan Mach (Czechia) (clarinet)
Robert Schumann (1810-1856): String Quartet no. 1 in A minor, op. 41/1
I. Introduzione: Andante espressivo - Allegro II. Scherzo: Presto - Intermezzo
III. Adagio IV. Presto
The conversation of Schumanns A minor quartet, written in his year of chamber music of 1840 is
of a more serious character than the affable chat of the F major quartet. Each instrument introduces
itself in turn before launching into a lyrical first movement much of which is in fact in a different key
(F major) to the quartets home of A minor. The following scherzo seems to tell a fairy story
adventure from the forest. The serene adagio which follows prepares us for the energetic and exciting
final movement.

Leo Janek (1854-1928): Mld for wind sextet, arranged for string quartet by
Krytof Maatka (b. 1972)
I. Allegro II. Andante sostenuto III. Vivace IV. Allegro animato
Mld (Youth) was written by Janek for wind sextet in 1924 as a memoir of the composers early
life in Brno. All the movements reflect Moravian folk melodies the third movement is based on the
composers March of the Blue Boys, originally written for piccolo, bells and tambourine. This
charming arrangement of the sextet by the Czech composer Krytof Maatka was premiered by the
Zemlinsky Quartet in March 2016: this is its first performance in Slovakia. Maatka has noted that
his version is a creative adaptation arising from the intuition of an additional potential of the
spirit of the original.

==Interval==

Johannes Brahms (1833-1897): Clarinet Quintet in B minor, op. 115


I. Allegro II. Adagio- pi lento III. Andantino - Presto non assai ma con sentimento
IV. Con moto
Brahms had more or less retired from composition he had said in 1890 I have worked enough;
now let the young folks take over when he heard the clarinettist Richard Mhlfeld play in 1891.
Mhlfelds virtuosity inspired an Indian Summer of Brahmss own, resulting in the Quintet we hear
tonight, the Clarinet Trio, and two clarinet sonatas. These ripe and lyrical masterpieces form a coda
to the composers career, utilizing the clarinets various registers, including its deepest chalumeau
notes, to convey a mellow and autumnal atmosphere.

Nearly all the musical themes of the quintet are related to those exposed in the first movement. The
second movement is intensely wistful, and seems to hark back to the Hungarian melodic lines which
the young Brahms first experienced in his partnership with the violinist Remeny. The athletic
scherzo of the third movement is preceded by a folk-music like andantino. The last movement is in
effect a theme with five variations, dying away to a cadence which seems truly final.
The Tenth Indian Summer in Levoca Festival 2017
Sixth Concert
Monday 11th September
Congress Hall, Levoa, 15.00

Jonathan Powell (UK/ Poland) (piano)

Ludwig van Beethoven (1770-1827): Piano Sonata no. 30 in E major, op. 109
I. Vivace, ma non troppo II. Prestissimo III. Andante molto cantabile ed espressivo
Karlheinz Stockhausen (1928-2007): Klavierstuck IX
Franz Liszt (1811-1886): Piano Sonata in B minor, S. 178
Karol Szymanowski (1882-1937): Two Mazurkas, op. 62
Igor Stravinsky (1882-1971): The shrove-tide fair, from Three Movements from
Petrushka

Jonathan Powell gives us in one concert a conspectus of piano styles from romanticism to
modernism, contrasting the two eras in his opening items.
An entry made in one of Beethovens conversation books during April 1820 refers to a small new
piece, which was later identified as the opening material of the first movement of the op. 109
Sonata in E flat. A flowing theme, interrupted by improvisatory recitatives, is the kernel of the first
movement. The second, brief, movement is in sonata form, and the work concludes with a
remarkable set of variations.
Karlheinz Stockhausens Klavierstuck IX (1962) is one of a sequence of nineteen pieces for solo
piano (sometimes augmented by tape, or by whistling) which he wrote between 1952 and 2003,
and which he called my drawings. It contrasts a repeated chord with a slowly rising chromatic
scale. The rhythms of the piece are determined by the mathematical Fibonacci series, where each
number is the sum of the two previous numbers (1,2,3,5,8..).
The only Piano Sonata of Franz Liszt, which he completed in 1853, stands at the apex of high
romanticism in music. Its single-movement structure, combining and condensing the traditional
elements of a four-movement work into a version of classical sonata form, was groundbreaking for
its time. The opening theme a leap upwards, followed by a descending motif is inverted in the
second theme with a leap downwards. The elements of these themes infuse all the other themes of
the work. Both Faustian and autobiographical programmes (themselves neither necessarily
contradictory nor disconnected) have been proposed for the work. Others have suggested religious
sources of inspiration related to the Bible (in its entirety!), the Fall of Man, and Miltons Paradise
Lost. Others have maintained that the work, unusually for Liszt, has no extra-musical allusions.
The Two Mazurkas op. 62 of Karol Szymanowski, written in 1933/4, were his last
compositions. Of the first, he wrote I have written a very pleasant and cheerful mazurka, and I
enjoy playing it very much. Its funny but as I get old the music I write gets more and more
cheerful!! The second was written in England, and premiered in London by the composer at a
private concert. These very free versions of the mazurka style are a very late blossoming of the
romantic tradition.
Igor Stravinsky arranged three movements of his ballet Petrushka for the pianist Arthur
Rubinstein in 1921. The Shrove Tuesday Fair is based on the start of the fourth scene, with
the entries of the nurses, the dancing bear, gypsies and masqueraders, and with a coda written by
Stravinsky for this version.
Jonathan Powell is a pianist and composer. He studied the piano with Denis Matthews and
Sulamita Aronovsky. After concentrating on composition during the 1990s, he then established an
international career as a soloist. He has a particular interest in contemporary music and
composers of the early 20th century: in particular the music of Scriabin and other Russian
modernists, as well as Ives, Szymanowski, Busoni, and others. Over the last decade, concerts have
taken him on a tour across the US, to the Musica Sacra Festival in Maastricht, the contemporary
series hosted by the Fundacin BBVA in Bilbao, the Musica Nova Festival in Helsinki, the Festival
Radio France Montpellier, Borealis Festival in Bergen, the Huddersfield Festival of Contemporary
Music, recital broadcasts for Radio Netherlands and Radio Deutschland Kultur, the Raritten der
Klaviermusik am Schloss vor Husum, Vredenburg Muziekcentrum in Utrecht, De Toonzaal in S
Hertogenbosch, and in the Jewish Museum and Altes Rathaus, Vienna. His recent concerto
appearances include Brahms 2nd (with the Slovak Philarmonic), Liszts Maldiction (with the
Kiev Soloists), Finnissys 2nd Concerto (at the Moscow Conservatoire) and Srensens 2nd (with
the Prague Philarmonia under Marian Lejava). During 2013 he made international tours featuring
Messiaens Vingt regards sur lenfant Jsus and Albeniz Iberia respectively, while in late 2014 he
made an eight-concert tour of the US taking in Seattle, Denver, NY and Chicago. During 2015 he
gave numerous performances of Beethovens Hammerklavier sonata and Regers Bach Variations.
Current activities include performances of Stockhausens Klavierstcke and Sorabjis Opus
clavicembalisticum. During 2018 he will perform Shostakovich's 24 Preludes and Fugues op.87.

His CD releases encompass the works of Alexander Krein, Felix Blumenfeld, Alexander
Goldenweiser, Konstantin Eiges, Georgiy Conus, Leonid Sabaneyev, Egon Kornauth, Janis Medi,
Kaikhosru Sorabji, Joseph Marx, Isay Dobrowen, Alexander Scriabin, Jean Sibelius and others.

Masterclasses and lecture-recitals have taken Powell to the Janek Academy (Brno), Oxford
University, the Guildhall School and Music and Drama (London), Cornish College of Arts (Seattle),
and Det Jyske Musikkonservatorium (Esbjerg and Odense, Denmark), among others.

Jonathan is a regular performer at the Indian Summer in Levoa Festival. He lives in southern
Poland.

The 2017 Indian Summer in Levoa Festival is realised with the support of our patrons and of the
following organisations:

Z verejnch zdrojov podporil Fond na podporu umenia


Supported using public funding by Slovak Arts Council

Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Ministry of Culture of the Grand Duchy of


The Town of Levoa Luxembourg in Austria Luxembourg
Levoa Cultural Centre

Hotel U Leva Hotel Arkada


Since its founding in 1994, the Zemlinsky Quartet (Frantiek Souek, Petr Stek violin, Petr
Holman viola, Vladimr Fortin cello) has become a much lauded example of the Czech string
quartet tradition. The quartet has won the 1st Grand Prize in the Bordeaux String Quartet
Competition (2010) and has enjoyed a string of top competition prizes that include Banff, Prague
Spring and London, where it was also awarded the Audience Prize. They have also been the recipient
of the Alexander Zemlinsky Advancement Award. So far, the Zemlinsky Quartet has toured
extensively in four continents. The repertoire of the ensemble contains over 180 works by leading
composers, including contemporary music. Since early 2007, the Zemlinsky Quartet has recorded
exclusively for the French record label Praga Digitals, having released seven titles including
Diapason dOr award winning 4-CD set of early string quartets by A. Dvok. Having studied with
Walter Levin (LaSalle Quartet) and Josef Kluso (Prak Quartet), the group currently teaches as
assistant quartet-in-residence at Musikakademie Basel in Switzerland and gives numerous master
classes to students of all ages. Frantiek Souek also teaches both solo violin and chamber music in
the Prague Conservatory since 2009.

Jan Mach completed his studies at the Brno Conservatoire in the classes of Lubomr Barton, and
graduated at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague as Ph.D. with Vlastimil Mares and Jiri
Hlavac. He took part in master courses at Semmerig, Austria in 2000 and the French-Czech
academy in Telc, Czech Republic led by Michel Raison in the same year. He attended a five month
fellowship in Karlsruhe, Germany with Wolfgang Meyer in 2000/2001. He took part in summer
courses at Aix-en-Provence, France led by Ensemble InterConterporain and became a member of
the festival orchestra at Aix-en-Provence. He is a member of Prague Symphony Orchestra and
plays bass clarinet with Prague Clarinet Quartet. Last year he became teacher at the Academy of
Performing Arts in Prague (AMU).

The 2017 Indian Summer in Levoa Festival is realised with the support of our patrons and of the
following organisations:

Z verejnch zdrojov podporil Fond na podporu umenia


Supported using public funding by Slovak Arts Council

Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Ministry of Culture of the Grand Duchy of


The Town of Levoa Luxembourg in Austria Luxembourg
Levoa Cultural Centre

Hotel U Leva Hotel Arkada


The Tenth Indian Summer in Levoca Festival 2017
Seventh Concert
Monday 11th September
Congress Hall, Levoa, 19.00

Vienna Piano Trio (Austria)

David McCarroll (violin)


Matthias Gredler (cello)
Stefan Mendl (piano)

Franz Schubert (1797-1828): Sonata Movement B-flat major D.28


This early work for piano trio was written in 1812; it was the first work for piano and strings by the
15-year old composer. Like many of his works, it was abandoned without other movements being
added. The composers inexperience shows, to some extent, in the super-abundance of thematic
material, but the work is a great augury of things to come.

Robert Schumann (1810-1856): Phantasiestcke op. 88


I. Romanze: Nicht schnell, mit innigen Ausdruck II. Humoreske: Lebhaft
III. Duett: Langsam und mit Ausdruck IV. Finale: Im Marsch-Tempo
Schumanns four Fantasy Pieces for piano trio were written in December 1842, five years before the
official first trio (which we will hear in tomorrows concert), but only published in 1850. They are
amongst his earliest works for chamber ensemble and have a feeling almost of an 18th-century
divertimento. The four song-like movements were perhaps not sufficiently intricate or robust for the
composer to consider them a contribution to the formal classical trio tradition; Schumann wrote to
friend of their completely gentle nature. Nonetheless, the fact that the last movement is formally
titled Finale leaves no doubt that these charming pieces were conceived as a unit and should be
heard as such.

==Interval==

Maurice Ravel (1875-1937): Piano Trio (1914)


I. Modr II. Pantoum (Assez vif) III. Passacaille (Trs large) IV. Final (Anim)

When Ravel finally plucked up courage to start work on his Piano Trio in 1914, he wrote to a friend
My trio is finished; I only need the themes for it. It was Ravels first chamber work in 10 years
since the Introduction and Allegro (which we heard on Saturday). At the time, staying in St. Jean-
de-Luz in Basque country, he was thinking of Basque rhythms and melodies which he had known
since his childhood, (he was born near Biarritz, not far from the Spanish border), and these can
clearly be heard in the Trio. At first progress on the work was variable; but after the outbreak of war
later in the year Ravel was determined to complete it in order to volunteer for the French army (he
eventually became a truck driver in an artillery regiment; in August he wrote I am working on the
Trio with the sureness and lucidity of a madman. The result was one of his greatest works,
luminous, vital and with a wonderful array of textures that underpin its lyricism.
Celebrated for its finesse, infectious exuberance, tonal allure, and its irresistible panache, the
Vienna Piano Trio has long been hailed as one of the worlds leading ensembles of piano, violin
and cello (The Washington Post). As of September 2015, that reputation is being kept alive with
David McCarroll as its new violinist who has a rich relationship with the chamber music repertoire.
Formed in 1988 and winning numerous prizes at international competitions, the Vienna Piano Trio
today performs in the major concert halls worldwide. In North America, the group has appeared,
among others, in New York City (Lincoln Center, Weil Recital Hall, Frick Collection) Washington
(Kennedy Center, National Gallery, Library of Congress), in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Cleveland,
Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Seattle, Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec City, and
Mexico City.) In Europe the ensemble frequently plays at the major Chamber-Music venues like
Wigmore-Hall-London, Concertgebouw-Amsterdam, Mozartsaal-Wien, Konzerthaus-Berlin, Cit
de la Musique-Paris, Palau de la Musica Catalana-Barcelona to name a few. Tours to South America
have led them to Chile, Brazil, Columbia, Mexico and Argentina (Teatro Colon-Buenos Aires). In the
Far East they have toured Japan and China several times. The trio won many awards for its
recordings (including the Echo Klassik) for Naxos, Nimbus, and since 2003 for MDG.

Festival engagements have included the Grafenegg-Festival (Beethovens Triple-concerto in 2016),


Schubertiade Schwarzenberg, Wiener Festwochen, Salzburg Mozartwoche, Rheingau-and
Schleswig-Holstein Festivals, Festival of Flanders, Aix-en-Provence, Prades-Casals, Kuhmo,
Princeton Summer, Caramoor, and the festivals in Ottawa, Toronto, at Lanaudiere, Domaine Forget,
Orford, Quebec City. Following its concert series at the Musikverein, the trio became ensemble-in-
residence at Viennas Konzerthaus in 2006. Starting with the 2015/16 season, the ensemble is now
also in residence at the Turner Sims Hall in Southampton, England. The Levoa Festival welcomes
the Trio for its fourth appearance in Levoa, with concerts on 11th and 12th September.

David McCarroll plays a violin by A.&G. Gagliano from 1761. Matthias Gredler plays on a Violoncello
by J.B. Guadagnini from 1752.

The 2017 Indian Summer in Levoa Festival is realised with the support of our patrons and of the
following organisations:

Z verejnch zdrojov podporil Fond na podporu umenia


Supported using public funding by Slovak Arts Council

Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Ministry of Culture of the Grand Duchy of


The Town of Levoa Luxembourg in Austria Luxembourg
Levoa Cultural Centre

Hotel U Leva Hotel Arkada


The Tenth Indian Summer in Levoca Festival 2017
Eighth Concert
Tuesday 12th September
Congress Hall, Levoa, 19.00

Vienna Piano Trio (Austria)

David McCarroll (violin)


Matthias Gredler (cello)
Stefan Mendl (piano)

Joseph Haydn (1732-1809): Piano Trio no. 20 in B-flat major, Hob.XV/20


I. Allegro II. Andante cantabile III. Finale. Allegro
Haydns 20th piano trio was written in 1794 for his admiring London audiences as a Sonata for the
Pianoforte with accompaniments for the violin and violoncello. The piano is certainly always to the
fore; although the other instruments get brief occasions to shine, they are mainly there to provide
context for the keyboard, which has some concerto-like passages of bravura.

Heinrich von Herzogenberg (1843-1900): Piano Trio in D minor, op.36


I. Allegro II. Andante III. Allegro molto IV. Allegro moderato
Born in Graz, of French aristocratic descent, Herzogenberg gets a passing mention in histories of
19th century music as an associate of Brahms. An influential teacher, amongst those he taught were
the English composers Ethel Smyth and Ralph Vaughan Williams. His second piano trio shows him
to have had a very individual voice, although, like Brahms, clearly more in the classical Viennese
school than in the New German school of Wagner and Liszt. It is a work of melancholy beauty in
the traditional four movements; in the final passages of the last movement, courage is summoned
to arrive at a triumphant ending.
==Interval==

Robert Schumann (1810-1856): Piano Trio no. 1 in D minor op.63


I. Mit Energie und Leidenschaft II. Lebhaft, doch nicht zu rasch III. Langsam, mit
inniger Empfindung IV. Mit Feuer
The earliest, and by common consent the finest, of Schumanns three official piano trios dates from
1847, a year after the success of his wife Claras trio in G minor which may have inspired him to
follow her lead. Clara was enchanted by Roberts work; It has warmed the depths of my soul and
enraptured me from beginning to end. I love it passionately and keep wanting to play it. He started
work on the trio on his 37th birthday (June 6th) and completed his sketches in just 10 days; the key
of D minor was a tribute to Mendelssohns trio in that key. Schumann is sometimes criticized for
being too pianistic in his chamber music, but although the piano here has many virtuosic passages,
the writing for strings also shows great imagination, including chords using all four strings of the
violin and the prominence of the violin and cello in the third (slow) movement. Only the first
movement is actually in the home key. The strongly rhythmic scherzo second movement, with its
contrasting central lyrical section, is in F major; the song-like third movement is in A minor; while
the fiery last movement is in D major.
Celebrated for its finesse, infectious exuberance, tonal allure, and its irresistible panache, the
Vienna Piano Trio has long been hailed as one of the worlds leading ensembles of piano, violin
and cello (The Washington Post). As of September 2015, that reputation is being kept alive with
David McCarroll as its new violinist who has a rich relationship with the chamber music repertoire.
Formed in 1988 and winning numerous prizes at international competitions, the Vienna Piano Trio
today performs in the major concert halls worldwide. In North America, the group has appeared,
among others, in New York City (Lincoln Center, Weil Recital Hall, Frick Collection) Washington
(Kennedy Center, National Gallery, Library of Congress), in Baltimore, Philadelphia, Cleveland,
Chicago, Houston, Los Angeles, Seattle, Vancouver, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec City, and
Mexico City.) In Europe the ensemble frequently plays at the major Chamber-Music venues like
Wigmore-Hall-London, Concertgebouw-Amsterdam, Mozartsaal-Wien, Konzerthaus-Berlin, Cit
de la Musique-Paris, Palau de la Musica Catalana-Barcelona to name a few. Tours to South America
have led them to Chile, Brazil, Columbia, Mexico and Argentina (Teatro Colon-Buenos Aires). In the
Far East they have toured Japan and China several times. The trio won many awards for its
recordings (including the Echo Klassik) for Naxos, Nimbus, and since 2003 for MDG.

Festival engagements have included the Grafenegg-Festival (Beethovens Triple-concerto in 2016),


Schubertiade Schwarzenberg, Wiener Festwochen, Salzburg Mozartwoche, Rheingau-and
Schleswig-Holstein Festivals, Festival of Flanders, Aix-en-Provence, Prades-Casals, Kuhmo,
Princeton Summer, Caramoor, and the festivals in Ottawa, Toronto, at Lanaudiere, Domaine Forget,
Orford, Quebec City. Following its concert series at the Musikverein, the trio became ensemble-in-
residence at Viennas Konzerthaus in 2006. Starting with the 2015/16 season, the ensemble is now
also in residence at the Turner Sims Hall in Southampton, England. The Levoa Festival welcomes
the Trio to its fourth appearance in Levoa, with concerts on 11th and 12th September.

David McCarroll plays a violin by A.&G. Gagliano from 1761. Matthias Gredler plays on a Violoncello
by J.B. Guadagnini from 1752.

The 2017 Indian Summer in Levoa Festival is realised with the support of our patrons and of the
following organisations:

Z verejnch zdrojov podporil Fond na podporu umenia


Supported using public funding by Slovak Arts Council

Embassy of the Grand Duchy of Ministry of Culture of the Grand Duchy of


The Town of Levoa Luxembourg in Austria Luxembourg
Levoa Cultural Centre

Hotel U Leva Hotel Arkada